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UP Visual Identity Guide 2017

This is a digital copy of the University of the Philippines Visual Identity Guide 2017. This guide serves to define the elements found in official trademarks of the university, such as the seal, university colors, logo type and The Oblation. It also prescribes how these symbols should be used in official communications, websites, social media accounts and other materials of the university's units, offices, organizations, faculty, students and staff.

This is a digital copy of the University of the Philippines Visual Identity Guide 2017. This guide serves to define the elements found in official trademarks of the university, such as the seal, university colors, logo type and The Oblation. It also prescribes how these symbols should be used in official communications, websites, social media accounts and other materials of the university's units, offices, organizations, faculty, students and staff.

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UP VISUAL IDENTITY GUIDEBOOK

OBLATION

As one of the most identifiable, endearing, and enduring symbols of the University of the

Philippines, the Oblation is an image that has historical narrative significance and

demands respect in terms of usage and visibility. The oblation (and the space in which it

is located) “helped define institutional identity for the benefit of ‘outsiders’” (Cañete 57).

History

UP President Rafael Palma commissioned National Artist Guillermo Tolentino to create

the Oblation. Tolentino, who also served as the Dean for the School of Fine Arts, engaged

in further studies in Italy at the time of the rise of Mussolini. Tolentino brings home and

into his sculpting the Oblation with attributed notions of sacrifice as elevated upon a

pedestal. The Oblation is a visualization of two literary works by Dr. Jose P. Rizal, both

indicating the clarion call for the youth to engage in the rigors of change and progress.

The literary sources are from the second stanza of “Mi Ultimo Adios” and “A la Juventud

Filipina.”

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