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CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

Vol. 51, No. 30 403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916 November 30, 2022

www.vt-world.com Email: sales@vt-world.com

Hunger Mountain Co-op

Awards Over $15,000 in

Community Grants

page 2

12th Annual Charity Sale,

Lenny’s Shoe & Apparel

$27,248 Raised to

Fight Hunger

page 2

Vermont Philharmonic

Presents Mozart’s

Orchestration of Handel’s

Messiah Dec. 2 and Dec. 4

page 5

THE VERMONT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

presents

A FESTIVE HOLIDAY TRADITION

Holiday

Decorating

pages 12-14 & 24

Green Light Real Estate

Celebrates the Holidays

by Giving

page 23

Anthony Parnther, Conductor

with special guests Jane Lindholm

and Lyric Theatre Singers

BARRE OPERA HOUSE

BARRE DECEMBER 9 7:30pm

TICKETS AT VSO.ORG

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Send a “sweet” holiday message to family & friends!

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®

OF BARRE

The Rotary Clubs of Barre,

Central Vermont, Montpelier

& Northfield Announce...

2022

Our

40th

Year!

SANTA

PROJECT

To purchase new winter

coats, hats, and mittens

for children of need in

central Vermont.

Send your check to:

WORLD Santa Project

403 US Rt. 302, Barre, VT 05641

or call Gary Hass at

479-2582 or 1-800-639-9753

for more information.

Thank You To This Week’s Contributors

Barre Rotary

Cheryl Plude

Betsy Kelty & Sandra Leopold

Gary & Carole Hass

in memory of their parents

Ture Nelson

Louisa Tripp

Nortfield Rotary Club

Central Vermont GenRotary

Cody Chevrolet

Janice Bevins

Carolyn Wells

Vt. State Records & Archives

Montpelier Rotary Club

Lenny’s Shoe & Apparel

Hunger Mountain Co-op Awards Over

$15,000 in Community Grants

Hunger Mountain Co-op has awarded a

record-setting $15,200 to 15 local grant recipients

working on important and innovative

projects addressing food access and local

food systems.

Hunger Mountain Co-op’s purpose is deeply

rooted in the belief that access to good food

helps to create vibrant, healthy communities

and sustainable local food systems. Each year,

the Co-op encourages central Vermont businesses,

organizations, and initiatives aligned

with its mission to apply for grants from the

Hunger Mountain Cooperative Community

Fund. The focus of funding is on smaller proposals

for one-time expenditures, capital infrastructure

needs, food access projects, and

proposals from historically and currently marginalized

groups.

“This year, the grant recipients include BI-

POC farms in the local community. Khelcom

Farm and The Flying Buffalo LLC will be

getting money to help expand farm production,”

shared Claire Wheeler, Co-op member

and Chair of the Community Fund Committee.

“It’s one of the many ways the Co-op

works to address gaps in the food system and

help lift up a really strong and healthy vibrant

local economy.”

This year’s community grant recipients

are Barre Senior Center, Bethany Church,

Enough Ministries, Good Samaritan Haven,

Greater Northfield Seniors, Green Acres Affordable

Housing, Ishtar Collective, Khelcom

Farm, Maquam Bay of Missisquoi Inc., Milk

With Dignity Standards Council, Montpelier

Senior Activity Center, Onion River Food

Shelf, Schoolhouse Farm, The Flying Buffalo

LLC, and Twin Valley Senior Center.

Since its inception, the Co-op’s Community

Fund has awarded over $96,000 through

84 community grants. This level of continued

support would not be possible without partners

like Twin Pines Cooperative Community

Fund, Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund, and

the generosity of the Co-op’s members.

Five decades ago, a small group of central

Vermonters came together to access the food

and products that were not readily available

in our area. Thanks to years of hard work

and collaboration, Hunger Mountain Co-op

has much to celebrate in its 50th year, with

milestones of over $27 million in gross sales,

10,655 member-owners, 387 Vermont vendors,

187 employees, and over $80,00 given

back through donations and sponsorships.

Hunger Mountain Cooperative exists to

create and sustain a vibrant community of

healthy individuals, sustainable local food

systems, and thriving cooperative commerce.

12th Annual Charity Sale, Lenny’s Shoe &

Apparel $27,248 Raised to Fight Hunger

On Saturday, October 22nd, locals shopped

till they dropped, and raised more than

$27,000 to fight hunger in our area

During the 12th annual Charity Sale, Lenny’s

Shoe & Apparel and customers collectively

raised $27,248 for the Vermont Foodbank

and JCEO Plattsburgh Foodshelf.

“During the past year 2 in 5 people in Vermont

have experienced food insecurity – an

increase since 2021,” said John Sayles, CEO

of the Vermont Foodbank. “At this moment,

households are being challenged on all sides

by high prices and shrinking pandemic-era

support programs. Addressing this continuing

crisis takes all of us working together. We

continue to be grateful for partnerships focused

on making sure that all of our neighbors

• • •

have the food they need and want.”

For the month of October, Lenny’s customers

were encouraged to make a $10 donation

to the Vermont Foodbank or JCEO Plattsburgh

Foodshelf in exchange for a custom

canvas tote bag and exclusive access to the

storewide sale. 100% of the donations collected

went directly to the non-profit organizations.

“This has been our biggest Charity Sale in

12 years!” said Mark McCarthy, Co-Owner of

Lenny’s Shoe & Apparel. “We and our customers

are committed to making a difference

in the lives of our neighbors. To date, we have

donated over $222,000 to take action against

food insecurity in our area.”

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page 2 The WORLD November 30, 2022

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Finding a Real Gem and Lifesaver During the Pandemic

By Robert Kershaw

Not too long ago there was a TV sitcom

called the Golden Girls. It was based on the

lives and friendships of three older women

and the mother of one of them who lived

together in their Florida home. Estelle Getty

played Sophia Petrillo, a first generation

immigrant from Italy and mother of Dorothy

Zbornak, played by Bea Arthur. I want

to start this article by using a phrase Sophia

quite often used to tell a story, explain

things or reminisce about her past.

“Picture this!” The year, 2020. The

place, Barre, Vermont. We had just come out of a cold and

wet winter and the promising signs of spring were popping up

daily. I began to realize that places like stores, coffee shops

and restaurants were closing one by one. People were reluctantly

beginning to wear masks in public places. I even saw

people with their masks on, while alone in their car. There

seemed to be an atmosphere of unrest and uncertainty, politically,

locally, nationally and internationally. I started to recognize

similarities to the HIV/AIDS epidemic when people were

blaming segments of the population or culture and forming

assumptions on how the Covid virus started. Of course we

did not shut down everything during the AIDS crisis but there

certainly was a lot of fear of the unknown.

During the summer of 2020 I found out that I might not be

working for some time as many places were closing down –

schools, stores and even church services were shutting down. I

had heard of some people with no income and the government

stimulus was not in place yet. Luckily I had my pension and

SS retirement pay to cover most of the major bills I had each

month, yet I found myself dipping into my savings account

to cover extras like food, gas and heat which later became

another issue during the winter months. I had no heat or hot

water for some time as no service calls were allowed by the oil

companies. Does this sound familiar? Everyone was being affected.

Even the travel industry was affected where all flights

were canceled.

Those two years were rough and by the summer of 2021, I

had no savings and what the government provided was only a

fraction of what my income was before the pandemic. It was

happening to everyone, so it seemed, but it still hurt.

A couple of families near my house were much worse off

than I was. One of them told me about a church called Enough

Ministries run by a young pastor who had a real good handle

on the gift of giving and self care. At this point, I had a bit of

a problem with the self care part. Years ago I worked with the

homeless programs in NYC and HIV/AIDS programs which

opened my eyes to the needs of others who had much less than

me. I decided to check out the ministry as it had sort of a food

shelf thing going on. Knowing a few families who needed

food, I decided to pick up some boxes of the essentials like

milk, sugar etc., and while I did, I picked a couple of apples

for myself. As I did that I bumped into Tom Sperry who is a

volunteer there and a great guy. After confessing to him that I

snuck a few things for myself, he let me know that they make

no judgment on anyone and that if I felt I needed something

then I should take it. That made me feel a bit better but I still

did not like taking things that could go to others.

I began picking up some things I could use that I could not

get at the few places that were open. I had heard the name Dan

floating around, I soon learned he was the coordinator of this

amazing gem in the middle of Barre. I had had some experience

in programs that were designed to help and support the

community, so I wanted to meet him. Dan Molind who is the

Sr. Pastor of Enough Ministries happened to be in the basement

of the church where all the behind the

scenes activities happened. I introduced

myself and he welcomed me with that big

smile of his and that slight southern accent

he has. He told me about the mission statement

and how it started in 2014 on Summer

Street. They quickly outgrew that location

and opened up the program in the basement

of the church. They now have dinners for

anyone who could use a hot meal and some

good company. They open every Tuesday

and Thursday at noon. The food pantry is

open 24/7, first come first serve against the

back wall of the church. But like the name implies, there is

usually enough. It has a huge closet with vegies, bread and

canned goods and a refrigerator/freezer for all the perishables.

It is on the honor system and all are welcome.

To find a gem like this in the middle of Barre at a time

when people really needed help was truly a blessing. Places

like this are needed in the community whatever your political

persuasion might be. I also found other places that had community

support such as The Hedding Church, Salvation Army,

Capstone and other smaller venues in the area. To be truthful I

cannot imagine surviving the pandemic the way I did without

Enough and feel they are a vital part of our larger community.

I also would not have the pleasure of knowing many of the

amazing people who take advantage of their services and have

fostered many friendships through Enough. Getting to know

people in our community is such a privilege and to have a gem

like Enough Ministries is a blessing.

Thank you Pastor Dan for your insight and your foresight.

I’m sure there are many more people in our community like

Dan who are valuable assets – I just haven’t met all of them

yet. A good resource in Barre – no he doesn’t need one to find

out who is doing what in our community, besides the Times

Argus and The World – is JD Green’s podcast where he interviews

some of the most amazing people in our community. So

stop by Enough Ministries and tell them Bob sent you.

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November 30, 2022 The WORLD page 3


.

The Valley Players will present It’s A Wonderful

Life: A Live Radio Play from Dec. 2-11

at the Valley Players Theater, 4254 Main

Street (Rt. 100), Waitsfield. Show days and

times are Fridays and Saturdays at 7 p.m. and

Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m. The show

will be styled as a 1940’s live radio broadcast,

with an ensemble of five actors bringing to

life all the characters from the movie. Sound

effects will be created live on stage and the

show will be punctuated with musical accompaniment

and 1940’s era commercials. The

It’s a Wonderful Life

Vermont Fiddle Orchestra Winter Concert

The Vermont Fiddle Orchestra

directed by Peter

Macfarlane will perform their

Winter Concert on Saturday,

Dec. 10 at 7 p.m. at the Barre

Opera House. Admission is

by donation.

The VFO will be presenting

a concert of traditional

tunes, a lively mix of jigs

from Ireland, Scotland and

Canada; reels from Appalachia,

Quebec and Scotland; a schottische

and more from Sweden; a polka from Shetland;

a hornpipe from who-knows-where;

together with a few Scottish marches, some

waltzes, and a heart-rending slow air. Pulsating

rhythms and rich harmonies will stir feet

Vermont Philharmonic Presents Mozart’s

Orchestration of Handel’s Messiah

Friday, Dec. 2 and Sunday Dec. 4

Hallelujah! As Vermont enters the season

of cold and dark, Handel’s beloved Messiah

brings warmth, light and joy. Conducted by

Lisa Jablow, the Vermont Philharmonic Orchestra

and Chorus will present two uplifting

performances to put everyone in the holiday

spirit, on Friday, December 2nd at 7:30 p.m.

at St. Augustine Church in Montpelier, and

Sunday, December 4th at 2:00 p.m. at the

Barre Opera House.

The Vermont Philharmonic performances

will present the entire first part of Messiah,

with arias and choral numbers that contemplate

the idea of a messiah, foretell the coming,

and hail the arrival. The concert concludes

with the beloved “Hallelujah” chorus

from Part II, and six numbers from Part III

celebrating redemption.

The Messiah performances this year will

use Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s orchestration

of the familiar arias and choruses, adding

flutes, clarinets, French horns, and trombones

to Handel’s orchestra. Audiences will still

hear Handel’s beloved melodies. Mozart adds

just a bit of color while retaining the essence

of Handel’s masterpiece.

Vermont Symphony Orchestra Returns with

Holiday Pops Extravaganza on December 9

Vermont Symphony Orchestra (VSO) continues

its annual tradition of the Holiday Pops

Concert December 9 at 7:30 pm at The Barre

Opera House, with L.A. guest conductor Anthony

Parnther, Vermont Public’s Jane Lindholm,

and the Lyric Theatre singers. What

better way to celebrate December with festive

music, singing holiday favorites, and storytelling

by one of Vermont’s most beloved

radio hosts?

“We’re thrilled to have Rachel Solomon,

Aleah Papes, Billy Ray Poli, and Eric Brooks

bring cheer to the concert with their beautiful

vocal performances and to lead a festive

audience sing-a-long. Much loved radio host

Jane Lindholm also joins us as a narrator, and

with our orchestra in the holiday spirit, this

will be a heartwarming December concert for

the entire family,” says Elise Brunelle, VSO

Executive Director.

As the music director and conductor of the

San Bernardino Symphony Orchestra and the

Southeast Symphony and Chorus in Los Angeles,

Parnther’s diverse conducting engagements

range from traditional concert halls to

Hollywood film studios and live sports arenas

around the world. Vermont is in for a real treat

with Parnther at the podium.

• • •

• • •

• • •

show will also be available to watch online

through the Valley Players website. Tickets

are $18 for evening shows and $14 for

matinees, and are available in advance with

a credit card from www.valleyplayers.com, or

by reservation by calling 802-583-1674. For

reservations, cash or check is preferred. At

this time, proof of Covid-19 vaccination and

masks are not required to attend in person; the

Valley Players will continue to follow recommended

Vermont state guidelines at the time

of the show.

and emotions alike.

The VFO is a community orchestra of fi -

dlers, violists, cellists, bass players, mandolin

players, guitarists, and flute/whistle players

For more information, visit www.vermontfiddleorchestra.o

g.

The outstanding soloists are familiar to

Vermonters. They include Lillian Broderick,

soprano; Carolyn Dickinson, contralto; Neil

Cerutti, tenor; and Erik Kronke, bass. Mary

Jane Austin is the assistant choral director.

Now in its 64th season, the Vermont Philharmonic

has been making beautiful music

since 1959. It is Vermont’s oldest community

orchestra. The Messiah performances are

a Central Vermont favorite holiday tradition.

Tickets ($20/adults, $15/seniors, and $5/

students) are available at the door. Tickets

can be purchased online at vermontphilharmonic.com.

The VSO is partnering with Spauling Highschool

Food Shelves this December and encourages

all concertgoers to bring a non-perishable

item to the concert at the Barre Opera

House on December 9. VSO volunteers will

take the donations to the food shelf; detailed

information on their top priority needs can be

found at Enough Ministries. Tickets are on

sale now at Holiday Pops at the Barre Opera

House tickets. Buy one full price ticket and

receive up to two free tickets for children ages

12 and under. Limit two per order.

This concert is presented with support by

Courtyard Marriott, AARP, and Vermont Public.

In its 88th year, the Vermont Symphony

Orchestra (VSO) is the nation’s oldest stateassisted

symphony orchestra and a non-profit

organization that celebrates instrumental and

choral music as a unifier throughout Vermont.

The VSO has proven that music can build

strong communities and is proud to serve all

of Vermont’s residents through our diverse

musical events and compelling educational

programs. The VSO is a unique shared resource

in Vermont, belonging to all the communities

it serves.

Classifie

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

for the

7pm Dec 21 2022

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403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, VT 05641

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November 30, 2022 The WORLD page 5


.

Tuesdays & Thursdays

Noon-1pm

in Front of the Montpelier Post Office

For current updates on “Support” Events

standwithukrainevt.com

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page 6 The WORLD November 30, 2022

Ainsworth

Public Library

Williamstown

Look for us on Facebook: Ainsworth Public Library

802-433-5887

library@williamstownvt.org

www.ainsworthpubliclibrary.org

2338 VT RTE 14 Williamstown, VT

Phase 4.5 of Library Opening

Please check our website for details regarding what we are

offering for services. www.Ainsworthpubliclibrary.org M

10-6 p.m., W 11-6 p.m. TH 11-3 p.m., appointment or curbside.

Appointments are limited to 6 people in the building at

one time. You can sign up ahead of time by email, phone or

FB messenger or stop at the door. T 2-6 p.m., FRI 2-6 p.m.,

SAT open day 10-2 p.m. Mask required.

Brown Public

Library

Rotary Matters –

Serving Northfield, VT for more

than 90 years

Brown Public Library is expanding! Cara Gauthier with

Rebecca Pearish, the children’s librarian at Brown Public

Library have worked to create a Little Free Library box at Dog

River Park!

A Little Free Library is a “take a book, return a book” free

book exchange. They come in many shapes and sizes, but the

most common version is a small wooden box of books.

Anyone may take a book or bring a book to share. Little Free

Library book exchanges have a unique, personal touch. There

is an understanding that real people are sharing their favorite

books with their community; little libraries have been called

“mini-town squares.”

These boxes encourage (at least) two values: literacy and

community. While there are many all over the world and a few

in our area, including at the playground at Northfield Falls,

there are currently none in downtown Northfield. Rebecca and

Cara approached Northfield Rotary with the idea to change

Events at the Jaquith Public Library

All events are free and held at the library (unless noted

otherwise), 122 School St. RM 2, Marshfield, VT. For info

call: 802-426-3581 or email: jaquithpubliclibrary@gmail.

com or visit our website: www.jaquithpubliclibrary.org.

We are open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 10

a.m. to 1 p.m. and 3 to 6 p.m. ; Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

and 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 1 p.m

Solstice Celebration on December 21st from 4:00pm-

7:00pm

All the Creatures of Marshfield are invited to join together

and celebrate the Winter Solstice: 4pm for jar decorating

(bring one if you can, we will have a few to share. Handles,

tissue paper and glue provided.) At 5pm we will begin singing

each other into the spiral, placing your light on the wheel as

you walk back out from the center. Stay for community supper,

served at 6pm in the Old Schoolhouse Common. (Special

food donations accepted for the meal.) Together we can find

our way through the Dark. Let us share and celebrate the

• • •

• • •

Friends Meeting

Thursday, December 1 6pm join the Friends for their open

meeting. At the library.

Williamstown Tree Lighting

Look for our canopy on Saturday, December 3 at the

Williamstown Tree Lighting Ceremony. We will be giving

away hot coco. Bring a non-perishable item for the

Williamstown Food Shelf if you can. See you at Seaver Field.

Annual Gingerbread House Competition

Join in our Log Cabin gingerbread house contest. Anyone

can join. You can use any materials to create your house. Go

to our website for the entry form or stop in the library. Prizes

include: 1st prize: $30 gift card at Pump and Pantry and

stuffed Gingerbread Toy; 2nd prize; $30 gift card and Stuffed

Gingerbread Toy; 3rd prize: Stuffed Gingerbread toy and

Candy Land Game; 4th and 5th prizes: Gingerbread Coloring

books and Crayons. Everyone that enters gets a prize.

Everything about this event s FREE.

Trustee Meeting

Open Meeting: Friday, December 9 10 a.m. at the Library.

that and establish a Little Free Library at Dog River Park for

the community to enjoy – knowing Rotary strongly supports

literacy and a sense of community.

The Town Manager, Jeff Shultz, and the Dog Riber Park

Committee, worked with Cara and Rebecca discussing placement,

installation and maintenance. Northfield Rotary was

excited to be part of this project funding the purchase of the

kit from https://littlefreelibrary.org/. On Saturday, November

19, the box was installed with the help of Northfield Rotarians.

In addition to a tremendous collection of books, the Brown

Public Library offers public computer access, Wi-Fi, print,

scanning, and fax services, as well as a broad array of children’s

services including two weekly Storytimes on Mondays

and Thursdays at 10 am and a robust Summer Reading

Program. You can also borrow discount passes to several

Vermont Museums including The Echo Leahy Center and the

Billings Farm as well as a State Parks Pass. You can even borrow

snowshoes in both adult and kid sizes or a moisture meter

to make sure your firewood is properly seasoned.

In addition to these physical resources, a library card gives

patrons access to many online resources such as e-books and

audio books through the Green Mountain Library Consortium

as well as “Universal Class” which is an online educational

resource that includes access to over 500 free online courses

from hobbies to job skills to education and test preparation

and more.

Northfield Rotary is grateful to be part of the Little Free

Library project and encourage you to consider volunteering at

the library is not just a way to help the library: it is a great way

to make friends. The dedication and talents of the volunteers

is deeply appreciated, and are vital for the library to provide

its services to the community. If you are willing to share your

love of books, language and culture, and want to work with

the staff and community members, consider becoming a

Library volunteer!

The Brown Public Library is open Monday 10-6, Tuesday

12-8, Wednesday 10-6, Thursday 10-6, Friday 10-5, and

Saturday 10-2. http://www.brownpubliclibrary.org/brown.

html. Follow us on facebook @northfieldvtrotary or visit us at

https://northfieldvtrotary.org. Share community stories

through email at northfieldvtrotary@gmail.com.

returning of the Light.

Great Movies from the Bookmeyer Collection

Second Wednesdays at 7 p.m.

December 14 - Even the costumes are funny in this classic

and witty film adaptation of an oft-adapted classic and witty

book.

Chapters in History Book Group

Second Saturday of the month at 2 p.m.

A free public reading-discussion series co-sponsored by the

Marshfield Historical Society and the Jaquith Library. Books

are available for loan at the library.

December 10: American Nations: A History of the Eleven

Regional Cultures of North America by Colin Woodward.

Monday Book Group

December- No book group

January 23th- Born a Crime: Story of a South African

Childhood by Trevor Noah.

Story Time and Playgroup: For kids Birth to Age 5

Fridays at 10:30 a.m.

Get ready for some fun with Sasha during story and activity

time. This science, art, and nature- based program will

encourage creativity, exploration and time for parents and

caregivers to share child rearing practices and challenges. We

will start with outside programming, eventually moving

inside when it is safe to do so.

• • •

2022 Vermont Maple Conference: Opportunities for All Maple Producers

The 2022 Vermont Maple Conference, Dec. 7-10, will offer

options for both online and in-person learning with informative

and engaging sessions led by maple industry experts and

maple producers.

University of Vermont (UVM) Extension and the Vermont

Maple Sugar Makers’ Association (VMSMA) will host the

hybrid conference, which is co-sponsored by the Vermont

Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets. Daily sessions will

be of interest not only to sugar makers but also to foresters

who work with maple producers and forest landowners looking

to lease to a producer.

For details and to register, go to www.vermontmaple.org/

maple-conferences. Attendees can register for online sessions,

in-person sessions or nab a “golden ticket” and have access to

all four days of the conference. All sessions will be recorded

for registrants’ future enjoyment and learning.

The conference kicks off on Wednesday, December 7 at 9

a.m. with the first of eight online sessions over a three day

period. Attendees also can register for a day of in-person sessions

at Vermont Technical College in Randolph Center.

This is the first time since January 2020 that the Vermont

Maple Conference has offered an in-person option. The day

will include a panel of industry experts moderated by UVM

Extension Maple Specialist Mark Isselhardt; a plenary session

by Joël Boutin (Maple Consultant and Teacher at the CFA of

St-Anselme, QC); hydrometer testing; a tour of the State of

Vermont Metrology Lab; a research update with Dr. Timothy

Perkins, Director of the UVM Proctor Maple Research Center

and a tradeshow. In addition, the day will include nine interactive

sessions after lunch that will focus on areas such as maple

business management, maple industry regulations, sugarbush

continued on next page


.

.

Three of Northfield’s eleven cemeteries: Clockwise from upper left - Richardson Cemetery (1800-

1846), Robinson Cemetery (1802-1906), Stanton Richardson’s gravestone, Loomis Cemetery (circa

1814-1906).

Northfield Cemeteries - Part

By Linda deNeergaard and Mary Comiskey

with technical support from Karen

Halsted

Death is not the end of life. We all move

on to whatever comes next. The treasures

that we leave behind are left to those who

survive us. Unless the departed has left specific

directives, the survivors will decide how

to handle the burial and other details. Many

of the funeral customs were impossible to

replicate. If a death occurred in generations

past, the family probably buried the remains

somewhere on their land. It became obvious

that a common burial place would be a practical

solution. Neighbors stepped forward to

donate land for a cemetery. Neighborhood

cemeteries soon became common. In Northfield,

Richardson, Robinson, Loomis, Four

Corners, and Aldrich/West Hill cemeteries

were soon established for use. The cemeteries

were and still are laid out in an east-west

fashion. The deceased was placed facing east.

They believed that when that person rose on

the day of judgement, he would be facing God

to be resurrected. Headstones were placed behind

the head of the deceased.

Richardson Cemetery - (1800-1846) Richardson

is probably the oldest remaining cemetery

in Northfield. It began as Stanton Richardson’s

family burial ground. He invited his

neighbors to make use of his land overlooking

the east side of the Dog River when he donated

the property in 1811. It was in use from

1800 to 1823. In time, most of the bodies were

removed and reinterred in Mount Hope and

Elmwood cemeteries to reunite families. Today

there are seven graves remaining in this

smallest graveyard. Amos Brown buried his

young wife, Anna Wakefield Brown (1776-

1815), leaving two young children. The cemetery

is located on the Norwich University’s

soccer fields. It has been lovingly restored by

the generosity of members of the Northfield

Historical Society. Stanton’s original slate

marker (with a gunshot hole in it) is on display

in the Paine House.

Robinson Cemetery - (1802-1906) The Robinson

Cemetery is one of Northfield s oldest

• • •

cemeteries. Amos Robinson, the first settler

of Northfield, donated hilltop land located

near his homestead on Robinson Road in the

southeast corner of town. Many prominent

first settlers are buried there. This includes

members of the Robinson, Averill, and Hedges

families and many others. There are more

than 100 graves in this cemetery. The cemetery

is owned and maintained by the town.

Our first doctor, Nathaniel Robinson (1759-

1813), died during a measles epidemic.

By the 1920’s Barre grey granite replaced

marble. Floral designs and religious symbols

were popular. Epitaphs were fewer, with

noted affiliations or services of the deceased

noted.

Loomis Cemetery - (circa 1814-1906) Loomis

was in use from the early 1800’s until

1906. Eleazer and Dyer Loomis were early

settlers in this area and probably donated their

land. Prominent early settlers, including the

Loomises, the Bucks, and the Hedges, are interred

here. There are 25 legible gravestones

and 61 partial gravestones remaining. It is located

on Onion River Road, off Berlin Pond

Road. This cemetery is managed and owned

by the Town of Northfield. Loomis Cemetery

was restored as part of a Boy Scout Eagle

Project. This included clearing brush and other

maintenance. The workers did not clean or

disturb the fragile gravestones.

Northfield s early gravestones were made

from the abundant slate available in Northfield

Slate was used until the mid to late 1830’s. This

period of gravestone art consisted of willows,

urns, ornate borders, and epitaphs. By the mid

1800’s marble became very popular and replaced

slate here. Simpler designs using flora

and religious symbols occurred. Examples are

angels, praying hands, flowers, etc. Epitaphs

became religious and hopeful.

The remaining eight cemeteries will be

covered in future articles.

Interested in more Northfield History?

Consider supporting the Northfield Historical

Society with a “household membership” of

$25 annually. Visit https://nhsvt.org for more

information!

Volume III of Vermont Almanac Has Been Published

The third edition of Vermont Almanac has

been published and is now being shipped to

readers and delivered to local bookstores.

The book features all new stories about and

by a new cast of Vermont farmers, writers,

loggers, artists, scientists, poets, thinkers, and

doers. In all, more than 70 Vermonters contributed

stories to Volume III.

Vermont Almanac, which is produced by

For the Land Publishing, a Vermont non-profit

organization, tells “stories from and for the

land.” Editors Virginia Barlow, Dave Mance

III, and Patrick White collate this annual look

at the people, places, nature, climate, traditions,

innovations and resilience of rural Vermont

– past, present, and future. With nearly

300 pages of content, organized into monthly

chapters, there’s something (many things,

actually) for anyone with an appreciation for

this place we call home.

Learn how to build an apple ladder from

a popple pole; how to score a whitetail rack;

how to dye fiber with madder roots. Look

back on the year that was and learn why the

brutal mud season of 2022 was so bad; remember

the dry spring and early summer and

learn how farmers coped; remember the white

pine pollen clouds in May and the odd tornadic

weather in July. Visit with the people who

work this land. A mobile mechanic who keeps

farmers working. A cheese maker who lost

everything only to rise again. A berry farm

that harvests 40,000 pounds of fruit annually.

There’s quirk (Joe Citro takes a look back

at a fat men’s club that loomed large in Wells

River in 1903), humor (Bill Torrey takes us to

his childhood deer camp), and gorgeous essays

by some of Vermont’s best writers, including

Megan Mayhew Bergman, Castle Freeman Jr.,

Sydney Lea, Verandah Porche, Brett Ann Stanciu,

Leath Tonino, and many others. Beautiful

art by Adelaide Tyrol, Dianne Shullenberger

and others, as well as stunning photography,

frames the text of the book.

• • •

Vermont Maple Conference continued from previous page

health, marketing and media and maple production

and innovation.

The Vermont Maple Sugar Makers’

Association (VMSMA), founded in 1893, is

one of the oldest agricultural organizations in

the United States and represents over 1,000

members. The VMSMA helps to promote and

protect the branding of pure Vermont maple

products and to serve as the official voice for

Vermont sugar makers. Our members take

great pride in maintaining a prosperous maple

industry and a working landscape that future

generations will enjoy. Vermont sugar makers

produce over 2 million gallons of maple

syrup annually (about one half of the production

in the United States). More information

at www.VermontMaple.org.

Rt. 14, Williamstown • 433-1038

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Due to market conditions all items may not be available.

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November 30, 2022 The WORLD page 7


Lida Mugford

BARRE TOWN – Lida Mugford, 86, a

long-time resident passed away on Saturday,

November 19, 2022, at her home

with her family at her bedside.

Born on January 19, 1936, in Barre,

she was the daughter of Charles and Ethel

(Fuller) Payne. She attended elementary

school in Washington and graduated from

Spaulding High School in Barre.

On October 5, 1957, she married

Wayne Mugford in the First Baptist Church in Barre. Following

their marriage, they made their home in Barre until they

moved to their current residence in Barre Town in 1959.

Lida was a homemaker. She was an active member of

Enough Ministries formally the First Baptist Church, she

served on many boards and committees, was a Sunday School

teacher, and active with the Woman’s Alliance. She volun-

In Loving Memory Of

Gerald R. Bean

Feb. 27, 1931 - Nov. 30, 2000

As time unfolds another year,

Memories keep you ever near.

Silent thoughts of times together,

Hold memories that last forever!

Sadly Missed

By Your Children,

Grandchildren and

Great-Grandchildren

teered with Care Net, and with Redbook – a community service

for area needy. Lida placed all of her love and faith in

her savior Jesus. Always looking for His wisdom, guidance,

and strength.

Following her love for Jesus, was her love for her husband,

her children, her grandchildren and great-grandchildren, her

family and her friends.

In her spare time, Lida loved spending time outdoors in all

seasons – taking in every moment, sledding, gardening, visiting

beaches and mountains, and enjoying the sun and the

rain – you name it, she enjoyed it. When inside, she enjoyed

cooking, baking, decorating, and making her home warm, loving,

peaceful, and welcoming to everyone. Although nothing

surpassed her love and time spent with Jesus, her husband,

family and friends.

Survivors include her husband Wayne Mugford; her children

Todd Mugford, Marna Getz and her husband, Charles,

Craig Mugford and his wife, Sue, and Colleen Carrier and her

husband, Todd; her ten grandchildren; and her twenty-three

great-grandchildren; her sister Marge Couillard; as well as

nine nieces, nine nephews, and many cousins.

In addition to her parents, she was predeceased by her

brother Vern Payne, her sister Mae Braman, and her niece

Marylin Johnson.

The service to honor and celebrate her life was held on

Monday, November 28, 2022, at 10:00 a.m. in the Enough

Ministries Church, 24 Washington Street, Barre. Following

the service, interment took place in Hope Cemetery in Barre.

Family and friends called on Sunday from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.

in the Hooker Whitcomb Funeral Home, 7 Academy Street,

Barre. For a memorial guestbook, please visit www.hookerwhitcomb.com

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to

Care Net, PO Box 513, Barre, VT 05641 or www.carenetcv.org.

DAVID CHENEY from East Montpelier, VT passed away on

November 10, 2022. David was born in June, 1950 to parents

David and Francis Cheney. He married Joyce Ayers in April

of 1969. They have three children Kitty Bolduc and son Cody

of Marshfield; Dan Cheney of East Montpelier, his children

Camille Cheney in Japan, Katrina Cheney East Montpelier,

Liza Day of Williamstown and her sons Evin Badore of Williamstown

and Alex Badore from NY. David owned Cheney

Trucking for many years. Past memberships were Williamstown

Fire Dept., Moose Club, Canadian Club, and Antique

Trucks of America. At his request there will be no services and

burial will be in the spring.

AUSTIN C. CLEAVES passed away on November 17, 2022

at the Barre Gardens Nursing Home. He was born in Springfield,

MA on June 13, 1940, the son of Paul L. Cleaves and

Kate Louise Cleaves. He graduated from West Springfield

High School in 1958 and the University of Vermont in 1962.

He assumed ownership of the Young Farm which was then

owned by long-time East Montpelier resident Lyle P. Young

and Kate Foster Young who was his great aunt. He was married

to Kate Allen of East Montpelier. They later divorced. He

leaves his children, grandson and extended family and friends.

Beside operating the farm, Austin was active in many agriculture

organizations as well as several town boards. A memorial

service was held on Sunday, November 20, 2022 at the

Old Meeting House Church. His remains were interred at his

family’s lot in the Cutler Cemetery. Those wishing to express

online condolences may do so at www.guareandsons.com.

THOMAS JAMES CROMPTON, beloved

husband of Kristine Crompton, passed away unexpectedly

on Thursday, November 10, 2022.

Tom was born in Hartford, CT on July 11, 1961,

the son of Stanley and Beverley Crompton. He

graduated from Avon Old Farms School in Avon,

CT, then earned a BS degree in mathematics

from the University of Hartford. While growing up his passion

was playing hockey. He met his wife, Kristine, when they both

worked at Connecticut Mutual and married in August of 1991

in Litchfield, CT. They then moved to Vermont to work and

raise their family. His love of music spanned many genres, and

he enjoyed going to concerts, especially Tanglewood. He is

survived by his wife, children, and extended family. There will

be no calling hours. A memorial gathering will be held at a

later date. Memorial contributions may be made to the Kellogg-Hubbard

Library in Montpelier, Vermont.

WARREN TRIPP, 85, of Howard Street passed

away on Thursday, November 17, 2022, at the

Woodridge Nursing Home in Berlin. Born on

October 15, 1937, in Connecticut, he was the son

of Percy and Rena (Bunnell) Tripp. Warren was

educated well, first by a single teacher through

all of Hebron grade school, and then at Bristol

high school. He met Frances Frost while working in NH; afterwards

they were married on August 28, 1957. Survivors include

his wife, son-in-law, grandchildren, and extended family.

The service to honor and celebrate his life was held on

Tuesday, November 29, 2022, in the Bible Baptist Church, 68

Vine Street, Berlin, VT. Family and friends called on Monday

in the Hooker Whitcomb Funeral Home, 7 Academy Street,

Barre. Interment will take place in the spring of 2023. For a

memorial guestbook, please visit www.hookerwhitcomb.com.

DAVID WILKINSON, 66, passed away on Wednesday,

November 16, 2022, at his home in Enosburg Falls. Born in

Barre, he was the son of James E. and Betty (Walker) Wilkinson.

David lived 66 years with cerebral palsy and 46 years

with mental illness. A Spaulding High School graduate, he

worked for Norwich University, had a vivid imagination and

enjoyed the outdoors, the Red Sox and Raiders, rock music,

and action films. He leaves behind his siblings, nieces, nephews,

and cousins who will remember him with heavy hearts.

The memorial service to honor his life will be held on Saturday,

December 3, 2022, at 2:00 p.m. in the Hooker Whitcomb

Funeral Home, 7 Academy Street, Barre. There are no calling

hours. For a memorial guestbook, please visit www.hookerwhitcomb.com.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions

may be made to Washington County Mental Health Services

www.wcmhs.org or to the National Alliance on Mental Illness

www.namivt.org You are not alone.

JOSEPH L. WOOD went home to be with his

Lord on 11-11-22. His battle with cancer has

ended. He is finally free. He was born 6-30-1969

in Honolulu, Hawaii to parents Delbert and Hattie

Wood. He was raised in Montpelier, Vt. He is

survived by his wife Michelle, his children,

grandchildren, and extended family. He has

many friends who stood by him to the end. As Jamie Lee Thurston

sang “Heaven gained a hell raiser” today. A Memorial

service will be held on December 3, 2022 at 11 am at Enough

Ministries, 27 Washington Street, Barre, VT 05641. Please

visit awrfh.com to share your memories and condolences.

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Montpelier’s Green Mount Cemetery

Illuminates City History

• • •

Have you ever wondered

about the myth of “Black Agnes,”

why Joel Foster has such

a prominent spot leaning on a

post, or if there’s really a dog

named “Ned” buried where

people should be in Green

Mount Cemetery? Who was

“Little Margaret?” And why

did someone carve stairs into

the rock by Route 2? The

answers to these and many

other questions can be found

in historian Paul Heller’s latest

book, Montpelier’s Green

Mount Cemetery: A History

and Guide.

Believing that the cemetery reflects the

“chief actors” in Montpelier’s history, Heller

offers an extensive look at the many individuals

who influenced Montpelier as we now

know it. And for those who enjoy the artistry

of cemetery grounds and monuments, it offers

stories about some of the more noteworthy areas

not to miss on a tour.

Heller says that Green Mount Cemetery reflects

the city’s founders, movers and shakers,

from the Kelloggs and the Hubbards, to its

Civil War dead, to more recent personalities.

The book begins with a necrological history

of the city and then details the design and creation

of Green Mount which opened in 1855.

Separate chapters cover the building of the

Stowell Stairs in 1898 and, in 1905, of Hubbard

Chapel, the cemetery’s

formal entrance, both highly

visible from Route 2. Other

special areas on the cemetery

include the Jewish cemetery,

Potter’s Field, and the Soldier’s

Lot, created after the

Civil War.

Ten years in the making,

the book offers the backstory

about many of Montpelier’s

significant people and their

monuments in Green Mount.

Dipping into its 37 chapters,

you’ll learn about abolitionist

hero J. P. Miller, loveable and

odd historian D. P. Thompson,

artists Thomas Waterman Wood and

Ruth Payne Jewett Burgess, and mechanical

genius Dennis Lane.

Heller encourages browsing Green Mount

on foot but also acknowledges the difficulty

of walking everywhere. “You need to be as

spry as a mountain goat to climb some of the

terraces,” he says. A map at the beginning of

the book offers the locations of what Heller

considers the most famous monuments in the

35 acre site. The final pages of the book include

GPS coordinates for each major monument

discussed.

Montpelier’s Green Mount Cemetery is

available at Bear Pond Books and the Vermont

History Museum gift shop as well as

Amazon.com.


Gifford CMO: Enjoy the Holidays with Your Family

Gifford Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Josh White has a message

for people still fearful about Covid heading into the

holiday season, the situation has changed and your thinking

should change.

“When the pandemic started, we talked about how to avoid

the virus and not get sick by practicing social distancing and

masking,” Dr. White said. “In this day and age, that’s not

going to happen.”

By some estimates, the Omicron virus is the most infectious

agent known to science, more so than measles. That

means you are likely going to be exposed to and probably get

Covid at some point.

“The most significant difference from previous conversations

about Covid is that there are several incredibly effective

vaccines and treatments,” Dr. White said. “If you do get

Covid and it’s a worrisome situation because you’re older or

have health care risks, there are things we can do about it.”

According to the CDC, for people who have had the vaccine

and boosters, the Covid mortality is about 0.1 per

100,000 people every week. To put this into context, Vermont

auto fatalities in the year 2020, were about 0.18 deaths per

100,000 Vermonters every week.

“So, if you get in a car today, you should be about twice as

concerned as you should for Covid if you’ve been boosted,”

Parents have not been keeping

me bored – or should I say “snow

board” – with their questions

about safety when their children

are on the slopes this season. Let

me see if I can glide through a

few safety tips with you on ski

and snowboard safety.

Proper Equipment is Critical

•Be sure to buy or rent skis or

snowboards that are appropriate

for your child’s skiing ability -

the larger or longer the ski or

snowboard, the faster it goes and

the harder it is to control.

•Have skis, bindings, poles, and boots fitted by a trained

professional at a ski shop. Don’t just give your child hand-medowns

that they will grow into.

•Snow boarders should have kneepads, wrist, and elbow

pads to cushion falls.

•Dress your child in layers to deal with the changes in temperature,

keep them hydrated, and don’t forget to use sun

protection even on cloudy days. This includes eye protection

with goggles to filter out the sun rays that can be quite bright

as they reflect off the snow.

The Importance of a Properly Fitted Helmet

•More than 50% of head injuries in children can be prevented

on the slopes yearly if ski helmets are worn.

•What if your child will not wear one? The best way to get

your children to wear a helmet is for parents to wear one as

well. If your children think it’s not cool, have them customize

• • •

Ski and Snowboard Safety

Dr. White said. “If you want to live in an environment where

you’re at lower risk, you have the opportunity to get vaccinated

and get the boosters.”

In the early stages of the pandemic, Dr. White didn’t know

how much risk there was for his family and didn’t know how

he was going to be able to take care of his patients.

“I contributed to putting fear into people’s hearts, because

I was worried too. Fortunately, we don’t live there anymore,”

Dr. White said.“I encourage you to go see your family or have

your family come to see you. Do the things that you used to

do for the holidays. Those kinds of things are really important,

particularly with the angst and stress in this post-Covid

world that we all now live in.”

Gifford is a community hospital in Randolph, Vt., with

family health centers in Berlin, Bethel, Chelsea, Randolph,

Rochester, and specialty services throughout central Vermont.

A Federally Qualified Health Center and a Top 100 Critical

Access Hospital in the country, Gifford is a full-service hospital

with a 24-hour emergency department and inpatient unit;

many surgical services; an adult day program; 49-unit independent

living facility, and nursing home. Its mission is to

improve individuals’ and community health by providing and

assuring access to affordable, high-quality health care in

Gifford’s service area.

the helmet with stickers to

make it even cooler.

•Important reminder: bike

helmets are not a substitute

for a ski helmet.

New to a Winter Sport?

•Always take at least one

lesson. In your child’s case,

consider having them take

lessons from a certified ski or

snowboard instructor who

will not only teach your child

how to ski or snow board, but

check the fit of the equipment

and even teach your child

how to get on and off the lifts.

•Most ski schools are willing to teach from age four upward

although it is often not until seven that snowboard teaching is

usually offered.

If your children are more experienced, remind them of the

rules of the slopes including stopping only in places where

children can be seen and are not blocking a trail.

Hopefully, tips like these will slide down easily the next

time you are concerned about keeping your children safe on

skis or a snowboard this winter.

Lewis First, MD, is Chief of Pediatrics at The University of

Vermont Children’s Hospital and Chair of the Department of

Pediatrics at the University of Vermont’s Larner College of

Medicine. You can also catch “First with Kids” weekly on

WOKO 98.9FM and NBC5.

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November 30, 2022 The WORLD page 9


.

PUBLIC NOTICE

BULLETIN BOARD

WASHINGTON COUNTY

PRELIMINARY BUDGET

PLANNING MEETING

JULY 1, 2023 through JUNE 30, 2024

Washington County Assistant Judge Miriam

Conlon and Assistant Judge Leah Jones invite you

to attend and participate in a preliminary budget

meeting for the Washington County budget for

fiscal year July 1, 2023 through June 30, 2024.

The meeting will be held on Friday, December

16, 2022 at 10:00am at the Washington County

Clerk’s Office, 10 Elm Street, side door.

This meeting is open to the public.

Jo Romano

Washington County Clerk

FREE COVID-19 Booster

Shots and Flu Vaccines

Waterbury Ambulance in partnership with Vermont Department

of Health is offering FREE COVID-19 Booster Shots

and Flu Vaccines at 58 Eastview Lane, Berlin, VT. We have

the new omicron-specific Pfizer and Moderna Bivalent

boosters for those 5 years and older. We also have Flu Shots

for those between 6 months and 64 years of age. We also

hold COVID-19 primary series vaccine for those 6 months

– 5 years old. This clinic is walk-in only. Please bring your

vaccines card with you to the vaccine clinic. This clinic is

open for the following hours every week indefinitely:

Hours of Operation:

Monday: 7:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Tuesday: 7:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Wednesday: 11:00 AM – 7:00 PM

Thursday: 11:00 AM – 7:00 PM

Friday: 11:00 AM – 7:00 PM

Saturday: 7:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Sunday: CLOSED

For more information, please check out Vermont Department

of Health website with all vaccine clinic locations

and vaccine offerings. Check out this link with a list of all

vaccine clinics! https://experience.arcgis.com/experience/

cdf6b5c920a54a5f960ca73bda5943c2/”

“Central Vermont’s Newspaper”

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page 10 The WORLD November 30, 2022

The WORLD welcomes Letters to the Editor concerning public issues. Letters should be 400 words or less and may

be subject to editing due to space constraints. Submissions should also contain the name of the author and a contact

telephone number for verification. For letters of thanks, contact our advertising department at 479-2582; non-profit

rates are available.

By Jonathan Dowds

Deputy Director, Renewable Energy Vermont

Vermont has a plan to combat climate change – accelerate

our transition to electric vehicles, switch our heating and

cooling systems to electric heat pumps, and power it all with

electricity that is increasingly green and renewable. There is a

lot to like about the plan, in addition to protecting the environment,

EVs and heat pumps will save most Vermonters money

in the long run. But the plan rests on a foundation made of

paper because Vermont’s most consequential energy policy –

our Renewable Energy Standard or “RES” – papers over our

region's fossil use and does not move the needle when

it comes to making our region’s power supply greener and

more renewable.

The RES requires utilities to get 75% of their electricity

from renewable sources by 2032 but this topline requirement

is ineffective when it comes to increasing renewable generation

and combating climate change. Vermont’s Department of

Public Service has confirmed as much, stating that it only has

a limited impact on regional renewable development. Our

RES – unlike similar laws throughout the northeast – only

requires utilities to get a small fraction of their electricity

from new renewables. As a result, utilities meet their overall

renewable energy obligation by retiring renewable energy

credits from older hydroelectric facilities. The problem is that

none of these hydro facilities are generating more electricity

because we passed the RES. And if the hydro facilities do not

generate any more electricity because we passed the RES,

then the natural gas plants located throughout New England

do not generate any less. While, legally speaking, Vermont’s

electricity may have become more renewable, the region’s

overall renewable generation and carbon emissions have not

changed much at all.

To be clear, it’s not the utilities that are at fault here. By

using old hydro credits to meet the renewable requirement,

they are following the letter of the law while keeping their

costs as low as they can. If they opted to spend more on

renewable credits that have a real impact on regional carbon

emissions, they would likely face pushback from the Public

Utility Commission. Utilities are incentivized to sell the cred-

Lisa Huttinger (she/her)

Director of Development

Outright Vermont

Like you, we were devastated to learn of the horrific mass

shooting at Club Q in Colorado Springs over the weekend. We

mourn for those whose lives were taken, and our hearts are

with their family and friends, those who survived the attack,

and the entire Colorado community. We stand together in

heartbreak with our LGBTQ+ community nationwide, whose

sense of safety has been shattered yet again by this unthinkable

tragedy.

This grief is not unfamiliar. This is not an isolated incident,

but a snapshot of an escalating nationwide pattern of hatebased

violence. When right-wing politicians across the country

base their campaigns on the idea that LGBTQ+ people are

a threat, promising to decimate the rights of queer and trans

youth to keep our community in line - we must connect the

dots. On the heels of Transgender Day of Remembrance, the

fallout of these hate campaigns is all too clear.

No one should have to choose between safety and authenticity.

And yet, here in Vermont, LGBTQ+ youth experience

You Will Not Hear It Fall

By G. E. Shuman

Something is coming to New England,

in a very short time. We receive it

every year, and if it has not arrived

by the time this issue of the World is published,

don’t worry. It will be here soon

enough. You probably are already aware that the ‘something’

I’m referring to here, is snow.

Snow first appears in the north, each late fall or early winter,

almost in secret. Weather experts tell us, and are sometimes

right, when the first or the next snowfall will happen,

but it can still often take us by surprise. I still remember, as a

child in Maine, being so excited to wake up some crisp latefall

morning to discover that the first snowfall of the year had

come, softly, silently, as I peacefully slept. I always think, that

when that clean white snow first comes, it arrives, as the fog

in Carl Sandburg’s poem “Fog,” “on little cat feet.” It does not

make a sound.

My faith makes me believe that a big snowfall is a sign of

God’s power, in effortlessly blessing, or hindering us, depending

on your feelings about snow, with many tons of frozen

water, without making a sound. Our world meters all of this

out to us, one flake at a time, because the land needs the moisture.

It is a medicine which we need, and take, willingly or not

so willingly, each winter. It comes, and it will always come,

but you will not hear it fall.

• • •

Vermont’s Climate Plan is Built on a Foundation Made of Paper

• • •

• • •

its from the new Vermont projects that do reduce emissions to

Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island and to replace

them with credits from older hydro projects that do not. The

system is working, but it is a bad system.

The good news is two components of the RES are making

a difference for renewables and the climate. The first is a

requirement that utilities get 10% of their electricity from new

in-state renewable energy like net-metered solar on rooftops.

Because this requirement actually increases the amount of

renewable electricity on the grid it does displace fossil fuel

generation and reduce emissions. The second is a requirement

for utilities to help customers reduce their fossil fuel use,

typically achieved by incentivizing heat pumps and electric

vehicles. Again, because these technologies are more efficient

than their fossil fuel counterparts the switch reduces overall

greenhouse gas emissions. The problem is that these requirements

are just too small to match the moment.

The decision to use old renewables to satisfy the overall

renewable energy target was not an accident. It was a strategic

decision made in 2015 to keep costs low. But it was a mistake,

albeit one made with good intentions. It’s clearer than ever

that the overall renewable energy target provides only the illusion

that we are doing our part on climate. Now we know.

It is time to update that RES so it provides a solid foundation

for climate action. This summer Rhode Island updated its

Standard to get to 100% renewable electricity and Vermont

should do the same. While we raise our overall target, we

need to make sure that as much of this electricity as possible

is coming from new renewables rather than simply taking

credit for existing generation. Doubling or tripling the

requirement for new, in-state renewable generation would be

good policy too. It’s a way for us to take responsibility for the

impact of our energy usage (Vermont is currently 49 th in the

share of the electricity that it uses that is generated in-state)

rather the exporting these impacts to vulnerable communities

elsewhere. Since the cost of wind, solar, and storage have all

declined dramatically and the Inflation Reduction Act will

cover 30% - 50% of the cost of renewable energy projects,

there is no excuse not to invest in real energy transformation

with real climate benefits. It’s time to meet the moment.

Outright Vermont Responds to the Shooting at Club Q in Colorado

violence and the constant threat of harm daily. A continuous

barrage of messages tells them they are not valued, cared for,

or allowed to exist. We cannot continue to accept hate and

intolerance in our schools and communities.

Now is the time for adult allies to take action. LGBTQ+

youth need to hear that they are not alone, and that the limitations

of closed minds don’t define them. They need to grow

up in communities where they are safe, seen, and celebrated

exactly as they are.

If you have a youth in your life who is struggling with this

news, please access our grief resources for suggestions on

how to navigate these incredibly hard conversations.

For those who feel called to donate, a fund has been set up

for the victims’ families and the survivors of the Club Q

shooting. The Colorado Healing Fund is a secure way for

people to directly support those affected by mass tragedies in

Colorado.

As always, Outright is here to support our community.

Information about our social and support programs can be

found online at outrightvt.org, or by calling our office at

(802)865-9677.

Rain arrives in the other seasons, and often beats the

ground, splashing into itself, in the very puddles that it forms.

It is a sometimes-comforting sound on the roof, and then it

immediately rushes to streams, rivers, and lakes. It is not the

same with snow. Yes, sleet and hail can noisily pound on your

frozen windshield in winter, but not snow. Wind whips around

our homes, vibrating old windowpanes, seeking to enter at any

spot that it might, but it’s not that way with snow. Snow

comes, but you will not hear it fall. It then waits patiently, to

fill the waterways when warmer weather arrives.

This winter, go outside during a fall of snow, and just stop.

Don’t talk, don’t look at your cellphone, and for a moment,

don’t even breathe. Be still and listen. You may hear cars, or

someone’s cranky old snow blower in the distance. If you do,

even those sounds will seem quieter, more distant, and muffled,

all because of the blanket of white on the ground. Unless

there is wind, the new snow will drop softly, silently, in peaceful

stillness, straight down to the earth. You will see it, and you

might feel it on your face, but love it or hate it, you will not

hear it fall.

“Whose woods these are I think I know.

His house is in the village though;

He will not see me stopping here

To watch his woods fill up with snow.”

(Robert Frost)


.

The WORLD welcomes Letters to the Editor concerning public issues. Letters should be 400 words or less and may

be subject to editing due to space constraints. Submissions should also contain the name of the author and a contact

telephone number for verification. For letters of thanks, contact our advertising department at 479-2582; non-profit

rates are available.

Central Vermont Chamber of What?

By Kevin Eschelbach

President, Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce

What does the Central Vermont Chamber do? Why do

we need it, when Google can provide so much of the

information that Chamber’s across the country can

provide? Good questions, and questions that we here at the

Chamber grapple with, a lot. Some folks think we’re purely a

business association, promoting our member’s interests and

advocating on their behalf. Some believe we’re here purely to

promote our area, to showcase the attractions of Central

Vermont and entice visitors to come see what Central Vermont

has to offer. Some think we’re here to provide technical assistance,

marketing assistance, referrals for services, education,

information about moving here or simply provide meeting

places for groups to meet. While all of this is true, I’d like to

answer a question with a question and ask you, “Did you

know?”

Did you know that our website is a platform to discover

recreation activities, local business listings as well as educational

opportunities? If you’re a local, you may ask why you

would need that information. However, as a local, we can

promote your business or organization on our platforms to

reach these visitors. Did you know that our website has an

average of between 400 and 700 visitors a day and our social

media posts reach upwards of 19,000 people per month?

We’re happy to discuss how this can be put to work for you to

promote your business, organization, or event. One local business

reported that after we promoted their grand opening with

The FBI Story (1959)

★★★1/2

It’s interesting for me to imagine the perspective of someone

who supports the FBI and isn’t frightened of it.

In my reading of history, the FBI has been arbitrarily

oppressing Americans since its inception.

For decades, the Bureau singled out and surveilled domestic

Communists. I am as opposed to Communism as they

were; but harassing a minority group for their unorthodox

beliefs is plainly unAmerican.

In the 1950s, the Bureau assembled files on suspected

homosexuals and used its surveillance equipment to gather

more evidence against them. The goal was to rid the organization

– and the entire federal government – of gay people.

What the heck was J. Edgar Hoover

thinking? Why haven’t we demanded the

abolishment of the FBI? The FBI should be

a shameful remnant of our past, like Jim

Crow.

Oh, speaking of Jim Crow: J. Edgar

Hoover actively opposed the Civil Rights

Movement. And the Anti-war Movement.

And, for some reason, the Women’s

Liberation Movement. The Bureau is a

secret police without restraint or accountability.

The question isn’t whether the FBI

will arbitrarily oppress people; the question

is: who’s next?

To complicate things, there have been

times when the FBI went after actual bad

guys rather than just its political opponents.

The propaganda film “The FBI Story” is a

surprisingly effective counterpoint to everything

I’ve said.

Jimmy Stewart is amazing as always as Chip Hardesty: a

lifetime G-Man.

One of his first missions is to head down south to take on

the Ku Klux Klan.

Then Hardesty is off to Oklahoma to unravel the mystery

of a greedy banker who is killing Native Americans to steal

their oil-rich property.

“The FBI Story” is so much better than I was expecting. I

enjoy watching intelligent films that present ideas that I had

never considered before.

• • •

• • •

• • •

a ribbon cutting their website had over 1400 visits over the

next 24 hours.

Did you know there are other ways we can promote your

business? In addition to the above, we offer our member businesses

the opportunity to network with other businesses to

gain clients and find potential mentors. One of our members

joined, attended one of our business mixers and left with more

new clients than he’d gained in the previous month.

If you’re a local, we post job openings as well as helping

find opportunities you may not have known about. On a certain

well known search engine, yes you can search for “stuff

to do.” But, did you know that some of the best, small, locally

owned places won’t show up until page three of the search

due to their size?

For organizations, did you know we have a conference

center available to rent for meetings and events? That everything

mentioned above can draw attention to your organization’s

mission?

The purpose of this article is not to bash any search engine.

They’re good at what they do, and I use them myself. The

purpose of this article is to highlight the differences between

the Chamber and a search engine and to point out that here at

the Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce, we’re neighbors

here to help our neighbors. The staff here at the Chamber have

lived in Central Vermont for over 110 years combined. We

have very definite differences of opinion about where to get

the best sandwiches, but one thing is for sure: The Central

Vermont Chamber has never gotten one truck stuck in The

Notch.

Director Mervyn LeRoy takes the time to

show us how stressful Hardesty’s job is and

the toll it takes on his family. The biggest

surprise about “The FBI Story” is how

respectful it is to Hardesty’s wife Lucy. She’s

a three-dimensional character and she isn’t

always supportive of the Bureau.

To fight bootleggers and gangsters in the

1930s, Congress agrees to arm federal agents

with machine guns. Hardesty is pumped.

Lucy thinks it’s a bad idea. And the movie lets

you decide who’s right. Plenty of notorious

criminals get gunned down. But is that really

what federal bureaucrats are supposed to be

doing?

Agent Hardesty boasts of the work that his

team did to protect us from Nazi sympathizers

during World War II.

But then he glosses over the unforgivable

treatment of Asian Americans. In 1940 and

‘41, the FBI compiled a list of the names and addresses of

Japanese-Americans. On the very day of Pearl Harbor, federal

agents sprung into action – rounding up and arresting

thousands of innocent people.

The FBI certainly must do some good, but it is too powerful

and too scary for me to support.

The FBI harassed Martin Luther King Jr. The FBI arrested

four-year-old George Takei. With the internet and The Patriot

Act, the Bureau has more surveillance power than ever. What

on Earth is there to stop them from coming after you?

PUBLIC

NOTICES

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TREASURES

802-917-6624

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DECEMBER 2022

Full moon Dec 7, 2022 09:09:48 PM 248,592 miles

Last quarter Dec 16, 2022 01:59:27 AM 245,498 miles

New moon Dec 23, 2022 03:17:56 AM 226,972 miles

First quarter Dec 29, 2022 06:22:34 PM 233,530 miles

Full Cold Moon - his is the month when the winter cold

fastens its grip and the nights become long and dark. This

full Moon is also called the Long Nights Moon by some

Native American tribes.

01 THU World AIDS Day

02 FRI National Mutt Day

03 SAT International Day of

Persons with Disabilities

04 SUN National Cookie Day

05 MON Day of the Ninja

06 TUE St. Nicholas Day

07 WED Pearl Harbor

Remembrance Day

08 THU Feast of the Immaculate

Conception

09 FRI Christmas Card Day

10 SAT Dewey Decimal System

Day

11 SUN UNICEF Birthday

12 MON Gingerbread House Day

13 TUE National Day of the Horse

14 WED Monkey Day

15 THU National Cupcake Day

16 FRI National Ugly Sweater

Day

~ THIS AD SPONSORED BY~

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MONTPELIER

STATE OF VERMONT

SUPERIOR COURT

Orange Unit

PROBATE DIVISION

Docket No. 22-PR-03726

RE: ESTATE OF

ELSIE C. DuBOIS

Notice To Creditors

To the Creditors of:

ELSIE C. DuBOIS

late of Graniteville, Vermont.

I have been appointed to administer

this estate. All creditors having

claims against the decedent or the

estate must present their claims in

writing within four (4) months of the

first publication of this notice. The

claim must be presented to me at

the address listed below with a copy

sent to the Court. The claim may be

barred forever if it is not presented

within the four (4) month period.

Dated: November 23, 2022

Signed:

Jody M. DuBois

Executor/Administrator

Address:

26 Long Street

Barre, VT 05654

Phone: (802) 249-2987

Name of Publication: The WORLD

Publication Date: Nov. 30, 2022

Vermont Superior Court

Orange Civil Division

Chelsea Probate Division

Address of Probate Court:

5 Court Street

Chelsea, VT 05038

(802) 685-4610 PE32-Notice to Creditors

17 SAT Wright Brothers Day

18 SUN Hanukkah

19 MON National Emo Day

20 TUE International Human

Solidarity Day

21 WED Winter Solstice

22 THU National Cookie

Exchange Day

23 FRI Festivus

24 SAT Christmas Eve

25 SUN Christmas Day

26 MON Kwanzaa

27 TUE International Day of

Epidemic Preparedness

28 WED Pledge of Allegiance Day

29 THU Wounded Knee

30 FRI No Interruptions Day

31 SAT New Year’s Eve

190 E. Montpelier Rd, Montpelier•229-9187

November 30, 2022 The WORLD page 11


Holiday

Decorating

Home Holiday Decorating Ideas

The holidays often involve purchasing gifts for close friends and loved ones as well as making a delicious meal the entire family will love. But

nothing sets the holiday scene and overall mood more so than beautiful decorations and other seasonal accoutrements.

Many people leave no room untouched for the holidays,

meaning color schemes or trinkets may carry through from

top to bottom. Decking the halls this season can be made

even easier with some of these handy ideas.

HOLIDAY TIMELINE

If you keep holiday photo cards each year, put them in

chronological order and hang them from a piece of garland

from the mantel or drape on a staircase banister. This can be

a fun way to see how your own children or other members of

the family have grown.

MAKE MINI EVERGREEN DISPLAYS

Clip your favorite pieces of evergreen and push the stems

into floral foam. Display in small vases or other containers

and place in groupings to emulate an evergreen forest.

Bring Holiday Cheer to Work

Holiday decorating doesn’t have to be limited to your home. Given how many hours people spend at work,

it makes sense to decorate one’s work space with seasonal cheer.

Be respectful of the diverse cultures of your co-workers

when you are decorating your cubicle. Consider adding

elements of different winter holidays or staying away from

anything that would fall outside the realm of professionalism.

If you’re looking for inspiration, turn to Pinterest, Instagram

or even TikTok for a treasure trove of images people

have created to show off how they have decorated their work

spaces. You’ll find everything from light displays to cardboard

winter houses to garland and electric candles.

TREE TRIMMING

Decorating a holiday tree can be an all-office team building

activity. Each person can bring in or make an ornament.

At a large organization, each department can have their own

tree and its members decide what their theme is going to be.

PLAN THE OUTSIDE

Exterior illumination and other exterior decorations share

the holiday spirit with others. It can be overwhelming trying

to visualize it all without a plan in place. Take a photo of the

house and map out where you want lights and decorations

to go. Then with your “map” in hand, you can more readily

purchase supplies and start decorating.

GO FOR A SPECIFIC NATURAL COLOR SCHEME

If you desire an overall holiday feel but aren’t interested

in Santa figurines or kitschy elements, decorating with color

in mind can be key. It’s easy to tie things together with some

natural elements in your desired palette. For example, white,

gold and green may look beautiful. Put boxwood clippings

and white amaryllis flowers together. Pine cones, twigs and

holly pieces also can add touches to mantels, doorways and

table centerpieces.

LIGHT DISPLAYS

One easy way to brighten up your work space is to bring

in strands of holiday lights and festoon them around your

cubicle or office.

It can be as simple as a string of white lights or a more

elaborate display of multiple lights that flash or outline

holiday shapes.

HOLIDAY THEMES

Teambuilding.com offers some holiday inspiration by suggesting

several decorating themes to get people in the spirit. •

Gingerbread village.

• Toy factory.

• Sweets and treats.

• Nutcracker suite.

• 12 Days of Christmas.

• Christmas movie scenes.

• Cozy cabins.

ORNAMENTS ELSEWHERE

Who says ornaments only have to go on a tree? Display

antique or favorite ornaments by hanging them from beautiful

ribbons throughout the home.

SCENT THE SCENE

Hang something aromatic on the tree to mingle with the

pine. Fresh cinnamon sticks tied with twine or ribbon can be

nestled among the boughs. Another scented idea is to make

pine cone candles and use pine or cinnamon scents to make

them smell just like the season.

Holiday decorating gets a hand from some creative ideas.

Always follow safety precautions, especially when using

candles, hanging lights and plugging in multiple items to

electric sockets. With ingenuity and safety in mind, holiday

decorations can be extra special.

SUPPLIES

You don’t want to break your holiday budget purchasing

decorations for the office. Sometimes the simplest of supplies

can have a cheerful effect — lights, garland, wrapping paper,

ribbons, balloons or candy canes.

It’s also a great time to go green and use recycled items.

Combine paper cups with garland or saving old paper towel

tubes to wrap with red and white ribbons or decorate with

Sharpies to create candy canes. They shared how one person

took larger-sized cardboard tubes that were being thrown out

and transformed her cubicle into a holiday log cabin.

Maybe you don’t have time or the creative urge to do a lot

of holiday decorating? If so, you can add a dash of seasonal

cheer by picking a screensaver with a roaring fire or a winter

wonderland scene.

Quality Gifts For Every Occasion

124 North Main Street Suite 1

Barre, VT 05641

(802) 476-4031

www.richardjwobbyjewelers.com

20% OFF

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Don’t forget your camera!

.

page 12 The WORLD November 30, 2022


Simple Ways to Involve Kids in Decorating

Millions of people across the globe feel that the holiday season is a magical time of year.

Though those people come from all walks of life, it’s likely that no group is as taken by the

unique spirit of the holiday season as much as children.

Whether they’re looking forward to Santa’s arrival or

preparing for a school holiday pageant, kids have much to

be excited about come December. Parents can channel that

enthusiasm by involving kids when decorating around the

house this holiday season.

• Make homemade ornaments. The options are limitless

when making holiday ornaments with children. From simple

ornaments made from pine cones picked up outside to more

complex projects designed for children nearing adolescence,

parents can look to the internet to find design ideas and

directions for hundreds of ornaments.

• Let kids lead the way when decorating the tree. Families

that celebrate Christmas can let kids lead the way when

decorating their Christmas tree. Kids are likely to spend

the weeks leading up to Santa’s arrival gazing in awe at the

tree, and knowing they decided where to place the various

ornaments on it might make the season even more special for

youngsters.

• Take kids along when choosing lawn ornaments. It’s not

safe to involve children when installing lighting displays, but

kids will get a kick out of choosing inflatable lawn decorations

and other items to place around the yard. Take kids

along when buying new items and then seek their input when

placing Frosty, Santa and his reindeer friends around the

yard.

• Include kids in culinary decor. Many celebrants cannot

imagine a holiday season without gingerbread houses and

cookies. These traditions provide another great opportunity

to involve children in holiday decorating. Set aside some

time to make homemade gingerbread houses, which can be

used as decorations before they’re ultimately eaten. Cookies

may not have the shelf life of a typical gingerbread house,

but kids can pitch in and decorate cookies prior to a holiday

party or family meal.

The spirit of the holiday season can be seen on the faces

of children each December. Inviting kids to pitch in when

decorating for the holidays can make the season even more

special for its youngest celebrants.

Deck the Halls with DIY Decor

Decorating is one of the joys of the holiday season. Families often decorate together, and

such traditions may include dressing the Christmas tree and hanging lights around the house.

A day spent making homemade ornaments is another great

way to decorate and spend quality time together as a family

during the holiday season. Though families can let their

imaginations run wild when making ornaments at home, the

following are some great starting points that can serve as

springboards for holiday crafting sessions.

• Snowmen: The holiday season simply wouldn’t be the

same without snowmen. Homemade snowmen can be made

out of ping pong balls, which are the ideal size when making

ornaments for the Christmas tree. Those who want to go a

little bigger can glue wiffle balls or large polystyrene balls

together or create their own papier mâché snowmen to display

on mantles or on console tables in a foyer or hallway.

• Santa Claus: Another staple of holiday decor, Santa Claus

has inspired many a DIY holiday ornament over the years. A

paper plate Santa Claus with a cotton ball beard glued on can

make for a fun Christmas craft, especially for young children

who can’t wait for the big guy to appear on Christmas Eve.

• Penguins: Though they might not have a direct link to the

holiday season, penguins evoke feelings of cold weather,

making them an ideal addition to holiday decor schemes.

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Make your own penguin family using polystyrene craft balls

in assorted sizes and then hang them on the tree or place

them around the house.

• Reindeer: Santa would not be able to get the job done each

Christmas Eve without his trustworthy team of reindeer.

Popsicle stick reindeer projects can be fun for kids of all

ages and a great way for youngsters to recognize the efforts

of Dasher, Dancer, Comet, Cupid, and, of course, Rudolph,

among others.

• Cookie cutters: Family baking sessions are a holiday

tradition for millions of people. Though that often leads to

batches upon batches of tasty cookies, it also means families

tend to have a surplus of holiday cookie cutters around

the house. Surplus cookie cutters tend to be discarded or

relegated to the miscellaneous items drawer in kitchens, but

a more awe-inspiring fate can await them. A coat of paint,

some glitter and a little bit of string or twine is all families

need to transform their extra cookie cutters into colorful tree

ornaments.

Holiday decorating sessions can be made even more fun

when families take time to craft some DIY decorations

together.

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They were inspired to create Gramp

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that daily exposure to the elements

often left Gramps’s hands dry, rough

and cracked. This light, greaseless

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Order at gramplyford.com

Find our products at

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Visit website for specific info.

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802)476-5700 188 North Main Street, Barre

Treasures of the Kingdom, LLC

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Interested retailers may contact us at: rich@gramplyford.com

November 30, 2022 The WORLD page 13


Holiday

Decorating

.

Hey Kids!

Drop off your wish lists at my

Letters to Santa Mailbox.

Look for it daily

on North Main

Street in front of

Richard J. Wobby

Jewelers

124 No. Main St.

Barre, VT

No Postage Necessary!

Love, Santa

Christmas

Craft Fair

Saturday, December 10, 2022

Williamstown Middle-High School

Williamstown, VT

9:00 A.M.-3:00 P.M.

Free Admission

Shop For That Special

Person On Your List

29th Annual

If you want to register as a

vendor or crafter there is still

time, just contact:

Kathy Laughlin

802)793-0033 or

Karla Perkins

(802)433-6031

See You There!

Solidarity

Craft Fair

Saturday, December 10

9am–3pm

Local & International

vendors in 2 venues!

benefits Main Street Middle School’s

8th grade trip to Canada

Bethany Church,

115 Main Street,

Montpelier

Unitarian Church,

130 Main Street,

Montpelier

Huge Silent Auction

Dessert Crepes, Homemade Lunch & Hot Drinks

sponsored by

Need Info? 802-793-1821 or PlantingHope.org

page 14 The WORLD November 30, 2022

8 Easy Holiday Centerpiece Ideas

The holiday season is a great time to make any home a bit more merry and bright. Most

individuals let their personalities show through their home decor, and holiday decorating is

just as personal as decorating throughout the rest of the year.

The main living areas of a home get the most decorating

attention, with a Christmas tree or menorah taking a

prominent position in the front window. Garlands, candles

and other accoutrements also may dress up spaces. However,

when it comes to holiday hosting, attention also should be

given to the dining table — which can benefit from a festive

centerpiece.

Premade centerpieces are undeniably attractive, but

adding a homespun touch can be a fun creative pursuit and

become a family tradition. Explore these eight simple ideas

to dress up your holiday table.

1. Frosted pine cones: Take advantage of a crisp winter’s day

to venture into a forest or park that is rich with evergreen

trees. Gather pine cones from the forest floor and, if possible,

a few evergreen boughs. Give the pine cones a touch of

winter whimsy with a little faux snow in a can or even white

paint. Nestle the boughs and pine cones into a wide-mouthed

vase or bowl in the center of the table. Individual pine cones

can later be turned into place cards for seating guests.

2. Holiday thanks: Cut many strips of paper roughly 6 inches

in length from various colored pieces of paper to match the

holiday theme. When guests arrive, ask them to write a favorite

holiday memory or two, or what they’re thankful for.

Twirl the paper strips around a pencil to curl them, and then

place the curlicues into a decorative bowl in the center of the

table. Later in the evening, the host or hostess can read some

of the sentiments.

What is Luminarias?

Aside from safety guidelines established by local authorities, there are not many rules

when it comes to decorating for the holidays. Luminarias is one of the lesser known ways

to decorate for the holiday season, but it can be awe-inspiring and even help to bring

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communities together during this special time of year.

WHAT IS LUMINARIAS?

A luminaria is a Christmas lantern that consists of a votive

candle placed inside a small paper bag. The bag is weighted

with sand. Communities or neighborhoods that decorate with

luminarias typically place the luminarias at the end of their

driveways or along sidewalks on a predetermined night, such

as Christmas Eve. When all the candles have been lit, the

result is an awe-inspiring and uniform display.

HOW LONG HAS THE TRADITION OF LUMINARIAS

BEEN AROUND?

According to LumaBase®, a manufacturer of decorative

luminarias, the tradition of luminarias dates back to 16th

century Spain. At that time, small bonfires known as “luminarias”

were lit along roads to help people travel safely to

www.vermontviolinmaker.com

3. Magical forest: Use green and silver conical party hats to

turn a table or sideboard into a veritable evergreen forest. Arrange

them on a blanket of faux snow or white confetti.

4. Freshly cut: Select attractive flowers in vibrant holiday

hues from a florist or even the supermarket floral section.

Cut the stems and place them into an unusual display container,

such as holiday themed mugs or a punch bowl.

5. Glass baubles: Who says ornaments should be exclusive

to the tree? A crystal or glass cake stand can be transformed

into an icy delight when topped with silver and clear glass

ornaments.

6. Birch wood: The crisp white coloring of birch bark is right

at home with holiday decor. Go stark with pieces of the cut

wood in varying heights intermingled with white candles

that mimic the shapes and scale of the wood.

7. Fruit and vegetables: If guests are coming over and the

race is on for a fast centerpiece, look no further than the

kitchen. Lemons, artichokes, pears, or pomegranates look

festive in a bowl interspersed with some greenery and baby’s

breath.

8. Cornucopia: The horn of plenty can be customized to any

holiday. Purchase a horn in wicker or woven grapevine and

fill with flowers, fruit and greenery, or even painted gourds

or miniature pumpkins.

Holiday hosts and hostesses should not neglect the dining

table when they decorate. Festive centerpieces can be handmade

without much effort on the part of hosts.

Midnight Mass on the final night of Las Posadas, a traditional

celebration in many countries with significant Hispanic

populations that runs from December 16 through December

24. The celebration is meant to serve as a remembrance of the

story of Mary and Joseph seeking lodging in Bethlehem prior

to the birth of Jesus Christ.

WHERE IS LUMINARIAS PRACTICED TODAY?

In North America, luminarias remains a tradition in Mexico

and the southwestern United States, though FLIC Luminaries©

indicates it is practiced in communities throughout the

U.S. and Canada. Modern lights have evolved so individuals

interested in introducing the tradition of luminarias in their

communities need not light traditional candles if they’re

concerned about safety. Battery-powered, electric and solar

options are available as alternatives to candles lit by a flame.

The tradition of luminarias can bring communities together

in celebration of the holiday season.

Spaghetti

Dinner

Fri., Dec. 2 • 6:00pm

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

$10.00 at door or

$6.00 with purchase

of $5.00 raffle ticket

American Legion Post 3

21 Main St, Montpelier, VT

802-229-9043


.

All calendar submissions should be sent to editor@vt-world.

com or mailed to The WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S.

Route 302, Barre, Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00 p.m.,

Thursday preceding publication. The Ongoing section is for

free/low cost/non-profit community events.

Ongoing Events

ONLINE IN VERMONT-Memorable Times Online is a

relaxed social gathering for people with mild to moderate memory

loss and their care partners. It meets the first Wednesday of

each month from 10:30-11:30 a.m. on Zoom. This dementiafriendly

program is offered by Central Vermont Council on Aging

in partnership with the ABLE Library and is free. Come enjoy

stories, memories, music and good company! For information and

to register, please contact Barb Asen at 802-476-2681 or basen@

cvcoa.org.

Al-Anon, Check this site for other announcements. Meetings also

online: vermontalanonalateen.org.

Shepherd of the Hills Welcomes Zoom Worshipers Please join

us on Sunday mornings at 9:30. Visit us on the web at montpelierlutheran.org

for the link to our Zoom service and the bulletin for

worship. There’s always room for folks to come and worship.

Connection Peer Support Group This group will occur on the

1st and 3rd Tuesday of the month from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM on

Zoom. This new peer support group will complement the Monday

night and Thursday afternoon support groups. People can visit

https://namivt.org/support/peer-support-groups/ for more information.

Nurturing Skills for Families in Recovery Meets weekly online

on Mondays from 1:00 –2:30 PM. For information and to join a

group contact Amber: amenard@pcavt.org, 802-498-0603.

Circle of Parents in Recovery Meets weekly online on Thursdays

from 3:00-4:30 PM. For information and to join a group contact

Amber: amenard@pcavt.org, 802-498-0603.

Circle of Parents for Grandparents Meets weekly online on

Thursdays from 4:00-5:00 PM beginning. For information and to

join a group contact Amber: amenard@pcavt.org, 802-498-0603.

Seven Stars Arts Center All-Comers Virtually Slow Jam will

be starting back up monthly on second Thursday evenings 6:30-

8PM! Traditional dance tunes at relaxed, accessible pace.

BYOBeverages and snacks! Free, with a recommended donation

of $10-15. All ages, levels and instruments welcome! The Zoom

link will be sent out to folks that RSVP “maybe” or “yes” by

email: resonance.vermont@gmail.com.

Weatherization Wednesdays at noon. We’ll answer your questions

via Zoom and Facebook Live every Wednesday at noon,

when we present a new topic in weatherization. Get a chance to

win smart thermostats and other prizes. More info and to register:

https://buttonupvermont.org/event.

The Montpelier First Church of Christ, Scientist, is conducting

its Sunday (10:30am) and Wednesday (7:30pm) services on Zoom

for the foreseeable future. You are invited to join us using this

URL: https://zoom.us/j/306295907 or calling 1-646-876-9923

and then keying the meeting ID code: 306 295 907#

The Washington County Democrats (Vermont) invite you to

‘like’ or ‘follow’ us on Facebook, and/or send an email to County

Chair, Linda Gravell (washcountydemsvt@gmail.com) to receive

monthly announcements and meeting reminders. We meet on

Zoom on the Third Monday of each month at 5:30 p.m. All

Happy Birthday!

FROM

BARRE-MONTPELIER RD.

Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone

special a Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the

names in this space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a

FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from Price Chopper (Berlin, VT). No obligation, nothing to

buy. Just send birthday names two (2) weeks prior to birthdate, to: The WORLD, c/o

BIRTHDAY CAKE, 403 U.S. Rt. 302—Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please provide your

name, address & phone number for prize notification.

Nov. 20

Garry Roubalcaba, 70, Woodbury

Dec. 1

Piper Noack, 2, Graniteville

Dec. 2

Carson King, 19, Plainfield

Blaze Weston, 7, Graniteville

This Week’s Cake Winner:

Piper Noack, 2, Graniteville

Dec. 3

Peter Lefcourt, Barre

Dorothy Singleton, DOT!, Calais

Dec. 5

Brandon King, 25, Middlesex

Elizabeth King, 59, Plainfield

CAKE WINNER: Please call Price Chopper (Berlin, VT)

at 479-9078 and ask for the Bakery Department

by Thursday, December 1 to arrange for cake pick-up.

PRICE CHOPPER

“BIRTHDAY DRAWING”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD c/o Birthday Cake

403 U.S. Rt. 302—Berlin

Barre, VT 05641

Open to people of all ages. Just send in the entry blank below, and we will

publish it in this space each week. Plus, we will draw one (1) name each week

for a FREE BIRTHDAY CAKE from the Price Chopper Super Center (Berlin,

VT). No obligation, nothing to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks

prior to birthdate. Telephone calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

BIRTHDATE ___________________________________________

NAME ________________________________________________

AGE (this birthday) ______________________________________

ADDRESS ________________________________________________

PHONE__________________________________ _____________

Democrats living in Washington County, Vermont are welcome to

participate.

Pandemic Stress Relief In this series of monthly virtual gatherings

we will explore the landscape of our Pandemic lives, and

open the unexpected gifts, as well as the sadnesses, the letting go,

the longing, the missing. 1st Sunday of the month, 4-5:30pm.

Register here: passingproject.org.

BARRE- Savvy Speakers Toastmasters International is an

educational club where people learn and practice how to speak

with confidence in a fun and supportive environment. Meetings

held 6-7:30pm on Zoom 1st Tuesdays of the month, and in downtown

Barre and on Zoom 3rd Tuesdays. Please contact savvyspeakerstmvt@gmail.com

Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program - Tuesday & Thursday

- 9:30-10:30. Low-impact class providing benefits of reduced

pain, stiffness, and fatigue, improved strength, range of motion,

balance, flexibility, coordination and endurance. Free and dropins

welcome. In-person and also on Zoom. Barre Area Senior

Center, 131 S. Main St., Barre, 802-479-9512.

Seniors in Motion - Monday, Wednesday & Friday - 9:30-10:30.

This program focuses on strength training with weights, flexibility

and overall wellness. $30 for 12 sessions for members; $6 per

class for nonmembers. Drop-in class; try one for free. Barre Area

Senior Center, 131 S. Main St., Barre, 802-479-9512.

Chair Yoga - Mondays - 1:00-1:45. Focusing on slow, relaxed

movement, breath work and brief meditation. Free for members;

$5 per class for nonmembers. Drop-in class. Barre Area Senior

Center, 131 S. Main St., Barre, 802-479-9512.

Card Playing - Pitch: Mondays - 11:00-12:30. Cribbage: Fridays

- 9:30-11:30. Come learn to play or join in with experience. Dropin

sessions. No cost to play. Barre Area Senior Center, 131 S.

Main St., Barre, 802-479-9512.

Book Discussion - Third Thursday of each month - 11:00-12:00.

Books provided by Barre Area Senior Center, 131 S. Main St.,

Barre, 802-479-9512. Call for book availability.

The Barre-Tones Central Vermont’s women’s a cappella chorus,

the Barre-Tones, welcomes vaccinated women of all ages and

musical ability to join us on Monday nights at 6:30. Please call

802-552-3489 or go to the contact page at www.BarretonesVT.

com to obtain more information and the location of the next

rehearsal.

Step ‘n Time Line Dancers will be starting classes on

Wednesdays, (starting 9/21/2022) 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Old Labor

Hall, 46 Granite St., Barre City. Admission by donation.

Attendees will need to sign a hold-harmless waiver. Instructor:

Sid McLam. Like us on Facebook.

Weekly Business Networking in Central Vermont, Central

Vermont Chamber of Commerce, 33 Stewart Ln. 8AM-9:30AM.

Thurs. Free. Info: mike@eternitymarketing.com.

Church of God of Prophecy Sunday Service at 10:30 am. All

are welcome. Pastor Jeffrey Kelley. (814) 428-2696. Also daily

Facebook devotionals.

Happy

Anniversary

Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts and The WORLD would like to help you wish

a special couple a Happy Anniversary. Just send their name, address & wedding

anniversary date. Each week we publish the names, plus we’ll have a

monthly winner for a 1/2 dozen wrapped red roses at Forget Me Not Flowers

& Gifts, 214 N. Main Street, Barre. No obligation, nothing to buy. Just send

anniversary names two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date, to: The WORLD,

c/o HAPPY ANNIVERSARY, 403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641. Please

provide name, address & phone number for prize notification.

Forget Me Not

Flowers & Gifts

214 N. Main St., Barre • 476-6700

Mon.-Fri. 9-6 | Sat. 9-3

We belong to the Flower Shop Network!

www.forgetmenotflowers.barre.com

November Winners of a 1/2 Dozen Wrapped, Red Roses from

Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts

Melissa & Shadi Battah, 10 years, Barre

December 4

Steve & Carole Fowler, 40 Years, Woodbury

FORGET ME NOT FLOWERS & GIFTS

“HAPPY ANNIVERSARY”

Mail this coupon to: The WORLD

c/o Happy Anniversary

403 U.S. Rt. 302 - Berlin, Barre, VT 05641

Just send in the entry blank below, and we will publish it in this space each week.

Plus, we will draw one (1) couple each month for a 1/2 dozen wrapped red roses

from Forget Me Not Flowers & Gifts, 214 N. Main St., Barre. No obligation, nothing

to buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date. Telephone

calls to The WORLD will not be accepted.

ANNIVERSARY

DATE_______________________# YEARS______

NAMES___________________________________

ADDRESS_________________________________

_________________________________________

PHONE___________________________________

Sons of the American Legion Squadron #10 Meetings, Barre

Legion Post #10, 320 N. Main St. 3rd Thurs. of each month. 6PM.

The American Legion Barre Post 10, Regular Post Membership

Meetings. Barre Post 10, 320 Main St., third Thurs. of each

month, 6PM.

Central VT Adult Basic Education, Free classes. Pre-GED and

high school diploma prep classes at Barre Learning Center, 46

Washington St. Info./pre-register 476-4588.

Central Vermont Woodcarving Group. Free instruction projects

for all abilities. Donation only. Barre Area Senior Center. EF

Wall Complex, Barre. Wednesdays 10:30-12:30. 479-9563.

Heart of Vermont Quilt Guild, meets 3rd Tues. of the month at

First Presbyterian Church, Seminary St. 5:30-7:30PM.

Additional Recycling Collection Center, Open for collection

Mon., Wed., Fri. 11:30-5:30PM, 3rd Sat. 9AM-1PM. 540 N. Main

St., Barre. Visit www.cvswmd.org for list of acceptable items.

Medicare & You, Have questions? We have answers. Central

Vermont Council on Aging, 59 N. Main St., Suite 200, 2nd & 4th

Tues. of the month. Call 479-0531 to register.

Central Vermont Business Builders, Community National

Bank, 1st & 3rd Tues., 8-9AM. Info: 777-5419.

Weekly Storytime, Next Chapter Bookstore, 158 North Main St.,

Sat., 10:30AM. Info. 476-3114.

Vermont Modelers Club, Building and flying model airplanes

year-round. Info: 485-7144.

Community Breakfast, First Presbyterian Church, 78 Summer

St., 3rd Sun. FREE, 7:30-9AM. 476-3966.

Circle of Parents, Confidential support group for parents and

caregivers. Tues. evenings. Info: 229-5724.

Mothers of Preschoolers, Monthly get-togethers for crafts,

refreshments, etc. Christian Alliance Church, 476-3221.

Al-Anon Recovery Center, North Main St., Barre. Sat., 5PM.

Meetings also online: vermontalanonalateen.org.

Alcoholics Anonymous, Meetings in Barre, daily; call 802-229-

5100 for latest times & locations; www.aavt.org.

Al-Anon Family Groups Turning Point, 489 North Main St. Use

back door of parking lot. Older children friendly. Sat 5-6pm. Info:

vermontalanonalateen..

Hedding United Methodist Activities & Meetings, 40

Washington St., 476-8156. Choir: Thurs. 7PM; Community

Service & Food Shelf Hours: Weds & Thurs. 3-5PM.

Turning Point Recovery Center, 489 N. Main St. Safe and supportive

place for individuals/families in or seeking substance

continued on next page

ARIES (March 21 to April

19) Your honesty continues

to impress everyone

who needs reassurance

about a project. But be

careful you don’t lose patience

with those who are still not ready to act.

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Pushing others too hard

to do things your way could cause resentment and raise

more doubts. Instead, take more time to explain why your

methods will work.

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Be more considerate of

those close to you before making a decision that could

have a serious effect on their lives. Explain your intentions

and ask for their advice.

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You might have to defend

a workplace decision you plan to make. Colleagues might

back you up on this, but it’s the facts that will ultimately

win the day for you. Good luck!

LEO (July 23 to August 22) The Big Cat’s co-workers

might not be doing enough to help get that project finished.

Your roars might stir things up, but gentle purrr-suasion

will prove to be more effective.

VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Someone you care

for needs help with a problem. Give it lovingly and without

judging the situation. Whatever you feel you should

know will be revealed later.

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) While you’re to be

admired for how you handled recent workplace problems,

be careful not to react the same way to a new situation until

all the facts are in.

SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Rely on your

keen instincts, as well as the facts at hand, when dealing

with a troubling situation. Be patient. Take things one step

at a time as you work through it.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your curiosity

leads you to ask questions. However, the answers

might not be what you hoped to hear. Don’t reject them

without checking them out.

CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Be careful

not to tackle a problem without sufficient facts. Even surefooted

Goats need to know where they’ll land before leaping

off a mountain path.

AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Appearances can

be deceiving. You need to do more investigating before investing

your time, let alone your money, in something that

might have some hidden flaws.

PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your recent stand on

an issue could make you the focus of more attention than

you would like. But you’ll regain your privacy, as well as

more time with loved ones, by week’s end.

BORN THIS WEEK: You’re a good friend and a trusted

confidante. You would be a wonderful teacher or a respected

member of the clergy.

(c) 2022 King Features Synd., Inc.

November 30, 2022 The WORLD page 15


.

abuse recovery. Open Mon/Tue/Thur: 10AM-5PM; Wed/Fri:

10AM-9PM; Sat: 6PM-9PM. For info and programs, call 479-

7373.

Green Mountain Spirit Chapter, National women bikers club.

2nd Wed. Info: grnmtnspirit@hotmail.com.

Grief & Bereavement Support Group, Central Vermont Home

Health and Hospice office, 600 Granger Road. This group is open

to anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one. Mondays

4-5:30 Wed. 10-11:30AM, Meeting via Zoom. 6 consecutive sessions.

Free. Info: 223-1878.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs, Barre City Police, 15

Fourth St., 476-6613. Get rid of old or unused meds.

Small Group Bible Studies sponsored by VT Christian Radio

WJPL-LP 92.1 FM. In the Aldrich Public Library upstairs conference

room, 6 Washington St. Thursdays at 6PM. All are welcome.

Savvy Speakers Toastmasters International is an educational

club where people learn and practice how to speak with confidence

in a fun and supportive environment. Meetings held 1st and

3rd Tuesday of the month 6-7:30 p.m. at Capstone Community

Action, 20 Gable Place, Barre, VT 05641 Please call Margaret

Ferguson 802-476-0908 or MLFerguson2002@yahoo.com

Memorable Times Cafe Third Wednesday of each month from

1:30 to 3 p.m. at the VT History Center, 60 Washington St. A

relaxed social time for people living with mild to moderate

memory loss and their care partners. Come enjoy stories, memories,

music and community. Free, refreshments provided.

Sponsored by Central VT Council on Aging and the ABLE

Library. 802-476-2681 for more information.

Helping Older Taxpayers Get the Refunds & Credits They

Deserve is FUN and REWARDING! February 1, 2023 through

April 14, 2023 2-days a week. At the Aldrich Library. More info:

skhoule@aol.com.

BERLIN- Contra Dance Dances resume in May. However

please check www.capitalcitygrange.org/dancing/contradancing

for most up-to-date information. Admission $12 adults, $5 kids

and low income, $20 dance supporters. Usually 1st, 3rd, and 5th

Saturday. Check website.

Family Support Groups empower and educate family members

and close friends of individuals with persistent mental health challenges.

All groups are led by trained individuals who have a family

member living with a mental health condition and understand

the same challenges you are experiencing. Central Vermont

Medical Center. Group meets 4th Monday each month.

COVID Booster Shots and Flu Vaccines. Waterbury Ambulance

in partnership with Vermont Department of Health is offering

FREE COVID-19 Booster Shots and Flu Vaccines at 58 Eastview

Lane, Berlin, VT. We have the new omicron-specific Pfizer and

Moderna Bivalent boosters for those 5 years and older. We also

have Flu Shots for those between 6 months and 64 years of age.

We also hold COVID-19 primary series vaccine for those 6

months - 5 years old. This clinic is walk-in only. Please bring your

vaccines card with you to the vaccine clinic. This clinic is open

for the following hours every week indefinitely: Monday: 7:00

AM – 3:00 PM, Tuesday: 7:00 AM – 3:00 PM, Wednesday: 11:00

AM – 7:00 PM, Thursday: 11:00 AM – 7:00 PM, Friday: 11:00

AM – 7:00 PM, Saturday: 7:00 AM – 3:00 PM, Sunday:

CLOSED.

Sambel’s Holiday Season Kick-Off

Prime Rib & Stuffed Chicken Breast

Dinners-To-Go Special!!!

We Cater

All Holiday

Parties Call

802-249-7758

10-oz.

ENGLISH

CUT

WAS $23

NOW

$

20

page 16 The WORLD November 30, 2022

EAST MONTPELIER- FREE Zumba-like Fitness Dance for

Women 18+, East Montpelier Elementary, Sundays, 4-5PM. Info:

zabundancejoy@gmail.com.

Men’s Ministry, Crossroads Christian Church. Mon. 7-9PM.

Men’s Breakfast: 2nd Sat., 8AM. Sun. Service: 9:30-11AM. Info:

476-8536.

Twin Valley Senior Center, 4583 U.S. Rte 2. Open Mon., Weds.,

Fri., 9AM-2PM. For class listing & info: 223-3322.

Twin Valley Senior Center- Bone Builders/Arthritis Foundation

Exercise Program at Twin Valley Senior Center. Monday and

Wednesday at 9:00 am Zoom and in-person. Monday, Wednesday

and Friday 7:30 am Zoom only. Exercises done with or without

weights to maintain muscle mass, bone density, flexibility and

balance. Through November.

Fall Prevention TaiChi will start Friday, June 3 at 10:00 AM at

Twin Valley Senior Center in East Montpelier. The health benefits

of TaiChi are well documented by medical studies in several journals

including the Harvard Medical School and the Mayo Clinic.

Some of these benefits show improvement in balance, reduction

in stress, anxiety, depression, blood pressure and joint pain.

Classes are free and open to all ages. Twin Valley Senior Center

is located at 4583 US Route 2, East Montpelier. For information

call Dyne (Deanie) Sapp at 802-229-1549. Thru November.

Chair Yoga at Twin Valley Senior Center, Mondays at 3:00 PM.

Gentle movements taught for beginners or those with experience.

Call 802-223-3322 for information. Twin Valley Senior Center is

located at 4583 US Route 2. Thru November.

Sun Style Taichi at Twin Valley Senior Center,Tuesdays at 10:00

AM. Call 802-223-3322 for information. Twin Valley Senior

Center is located 4583 US Route 2. Thru November.

Monthly Book Club is meeting the first Thursday of each month

at 3:00 PM at Twin Valley Senior Center located 4583 US Route

2. A new book will be selected each month with a focus on mysteries.

Call 802-223-6954 for information. Thru November.

Walk-Through Wednesday Open House at Orchard Valley

Waldorf School, Grace Farm Campus 2290 VT Rt. 14N, 8:30-

9:30am. Join us on the first Wednesday of each month for an

introductory visit to the OVWS grades school from 8:30-10:30

a.m. Campus tour and Q&A. Contact enrollment@ovws.org or

call 456-7400 with questions. Please register by noon the day

prior to the Walk-Through.

GROTON- YA Book Club, 3rd Mon., 6:30PM; Book Discussion

Group: 4th Mon., 7PM; Crafts & Conversation, Wed., 1-3PM.

Round Robin Storytime for kids age 0-5: Tues., 10AM. All at

Groton Public Library. Info: 584-3358.

HARDWICK- Caregiver Support Group, Agency on Aging,

rear entrance Merchants Bank, 2nd Thurs. 229-0308 x306.

Peace & Justice Coalition, G.R.A.C.E. Arts bldg (old firehouse),

Tues., 7PM. Info: 533-2296.

Nurturing Fathers Program. Light supper included. Thurs.,

6-8:30PM. Registration/info: 472-5229.

MARSHFIELD- Playgroup, Twinfield Preschool, Mon., 8:15-

9:45AM (except when school is not in session).

MONTPELIER- Al-Anon, Trinity Methodist Church, Main St.,

Montpelier Sun., 6:15-7:30PM. Meetings also online: vermontalanonalateen.org.

14-oz.

QUEEN

CUT

WAS $28

NOW

$

25

16-oz.

KING

CUT

WAS $33

NOW

$

30

STUFFED

CHICKEN BREAST

$

20

Includes Baked Potato,

Cole Slaw & Dinner Roll

ORDER BY

THURSDAY, DEC. 1

PICK UP SAT., DEC. 3

NORTHFIELD FALLS 3-6PM

WEST DANVILLE

4PM SHARP

(ACROSS FROM HASTING’S GENERAL

STORE IN THE STATE PARKING LOT)

To Order & Pay By Card

802-249-7758

Calendar

Deadline Is

THURSDAY

Before 5PM

INTRODUCING

They’re back!

PUMPKIN

SPIDER

DONUTS

for a limited time

NEW!

BLOOD

ORANGE

REFRESHERS

plus other great flavors

Circle of Recovery Mondays and Fridays 10am-11am at

Another Way, 125 Barre Street. 802-229-0920. Confidential space

to receive support for recovery in all of its forms.

First Church of Christ, Scientist Sunday School welcomes

children for Sunday school to learn how to feel close to God

everyday. 10:30AM. 223-2477.

Vermont College of Fine Arts Friday Night Reading Series,

Cafe Anna, 1st floor of College Hall, 36 College St. 5:30-7:30PM.

Free snacks.

Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup, North Branch Nature Center.

Mon. 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 229-6206.

Montpelier Kiwanis Club, Tues., 6PM. at The Capital City

Country Club. All are welcome. 203 Country Club Road. Info:

229-6973.

Meditation, Mon. 1PM.; Intro to Yoga, Tues. 4PM; Consults,

Fri. 11AM. Free classes, limits apply. Fusion Studio, 56 East State

St. Info: 272-8923.

Playgroups: Dads & Kids, Thurs., 6-7:30PM & Sat., 9:30-

11AM, at Family Center of Washington County. Held during

school year only.

Celiac Support Group, Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm St., 2nd Wed.,

4-5PM. Info: 598-9206.

A Course in Miracles, at Christ Episcopal Church, 64 State St.,

each Tues., 7-8PM. Info: 622-4516.

Parent’s Group & Meet-Up, Connect with local parents to share

advice and info. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Hayes Rm., 1st Mon.,

10-11:30AM. Info: mamasayszine@gmail.com.

Freeride Montpelier Open Shop Nights, Need help w/a bike

repair? Come to the volunteer-run community bike shop. 89 Barre

St., Wed. 4-6PM and Fri. 12-4PM. Info: freeridemontpelier.org.

Free Community Meals, Mon: Unitarian Church, 11AM-1PM;

Tues: Bethany Church, 11:30AM-1PM; Wed: Christ Church,

11AM-12:30PM; Thurs: Trinity Church, 11:30AM-12PM; Fri: St.

Augustine Church, 11AM-12:30PM; Last Sun., Bethany Church,

4:30-6:30PM.

Calico County Quilters, All skill levels welcome. 2nd Sat. Sept.

through June, 1-3PM. Location info: 244-7001.

Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA), Bethany Church basement,

Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 229-9036.

CHADD ADHD Parent Support Group, Childcare not available.

Woodbury College, 2nd Tues., 5:30-7:30PM. Info: 498-

5928.

Resurrection Baptist Church Weekly Events, 144 Elm St. Sun.,

9:45AM. Bible Study; 11AM. Worship Service; Wed., 7PM.

Prayer Meeting.

Good Beginnings of Central VT, 174 River St. Drop-In hours at

the Nest. 1st floor Weds/Thurs/Fri., 9AM-3PM. Babywearers of

Central Vermont meet upstairs, 4th Mon., 5:45-7:45PM & 2nd

Thurs., 9:30-11:30AM. Info: 595-7953. Breastfeeding support:

3rd Thurs., 9:30- 11:30AM; Nursing Beyond a Year: 3rd Fri.,

9:30-11:30AM (802-879-3000).

Al-Anon, Trinity Methodist Church, Main St., Sun., 6:15-

7:30PM. Available online: vermontalanonalateen.org.

Al-Anon, Bethany Church basement, 115 Main St., Tues. &

Thurs. 12-1PM, Wed. 7-8PM. Available online: vermontalanonalateen.org.

SL AA, 12-step recovery group for sex/relationship problems.

Bethany Church, Wed., 5PM. Info: 249-6825.

Survivors of Incest Anonymous, Bethany Church parlor, 115

Main St., Mon., 5PM. Please call first: 229-9036 or 454-8402.

continued on next page

RUNNIN’ HAS

ITS REWARDS

EARN POINTS ANYWAY

YOU PAY

Order ahead in the app or

scan your

Duncan Rewards ID

in-restaurant to earn

10 points per $1 spent

TURN POINTS INTO

REWARDS

Get FREE food and drink

rewards starting at just 150

points ($15 spent)

UNLOCK MORE WITH

BOOSTED STATUS

The more you go the more

you get. Visit 12 times in the

calendar month to reach

Boosted Status. That earns

you 12 points per $1

spent. so you’ll get FREE

food and drink rewards

even faster.

NEW!

HOT OR ICED

PEANUT

BUTTER

MACCHIATO

YOUR REWARDS

YOUR CHOICE

150 POINTS LIL’ TREATS

250 POINTS DONUTS

400 POINTS TEA

500 POINTS COFFEE

600 POINTS

BITES & BAGELS

700 POINTS

CRAFTED DRINKS

800 POINTS

BREAKFAST SANDWICHES

900 POINTS

PREMIUM SIPS

PLUS members-only offers

and deals including boosted

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Save your points and turn

them into FREE food and

drinks redeem for multiple

rewards at once.

Points will never expire as

long as you remain active.

EARN FREE DUNKIN’ JOIN

ON THE APP TODAY

ALREADY A MEMBER?

YOU’RE READY TO GO!

THANK YOU for your

patience while our Berlin store

completes its exciting new drive

thru and interior renovations.

Watch for our big celebration

coming soon.

BERLIN 622-0250 Mon.-Sun. 6am-7pm

BARRE 622-0730 Mon.-Sat. 5am-8pm; Sun. 6am-8pm

MONTPELIER 223-0928 Mon.-Sat. 5am-8pm; Sun. 6am-8pm


.

Brain Injury Support Group, Unitarian Church, 3rd Thurs.,

1:30-2:30PM. Info: 1-877-856-1772.

Kindred Connections Peer to Peer Cancer Support, for

patients and caregivers. Info: 1-800-652-5064.

Christian Meditation, Christ Church, Mon., 12-1PM.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs, Montpelier Police, 1 Pitkin

Court, 223-3445 at Washington County Sheriff, 10 Elm St., 223-

3001. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local permanent safe

disposal sites.

Community Song Circle, Center for Arts and Learning, 46 Barre

St. 1st Sun. except July/Aug., 6-8PM. Info: vtcommunitysing@

gmail.com.

Suicide Grief Support Group - For anyone who has lost a loved

one to suicide. Meets the first Monday of each month, 6:00-7:30.

Please contact Michele Delaney at 802-223-4752 for intake

screening and location. Starting Oct. 4. Group will meet in-person,

masks required.

Flat Track Roller Derby, Montpelier Rec Center, 55 Barre St.

Sunday afternoons - email for practice times. 18+, all genders

welcome, no experience necessary, please bring a mouthguard -

all other gear provided. First practice free then $30/month. Will

resume after COVID pandemic. Info:vtderbytcr@gmail.com.

Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Recovery

Mondays at 4:00. Contact Cindy Wells, Family Support Programs

Coordinator, at 802-498-0611 or cwells@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Skills for Families Tuesdays and Thursdays at 10:00.

Contact Cindy Wells, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at

802-498-0611 or cwells@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Skills for Families Mondays at 10:00 Contact

Heather Niquette, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-

498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Recovery

Tuesdays at 11:00. Contact Amber Menard, Family Support

Programs Coordinator at 802-552-4274 or amenard@pcavt.org)

Nurturing Skills for Families Thursdays at 5:30. Contact Cindy

Atkins, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0608

or catkins@pcavt.org.

Nurturing Fathers Program Mondays at 5:30. Contact Amber

Menard, Family Support Programs Coordinator at 802-552-4274

or amenard@pcavt.org.

Circle for Foster & Adoptive Families Thursdays at 5:00.

Contact Heather Niquette, Family Support Programs Coordinator,

at 802-498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org).

Circle for Kinship & Guardianship Families Thursdays at 8:00

PM. Contact Heather Niquette, Family Support Programs

Coordinator, at 802-498-0607 or hniquette@pcavt.org.

Circle of Parents open to all. Thursdays at 10:00; Contact Cindy

Atkins, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0608

or catkins@pcavt.org.

Circle of Parents in Recovery Tuesdays at 5:30; Contact Cindy

Atkins, Family Support Programs Coordinator, at 802-498-0608

or catkins@pcavt.org. Contact the program manager or call

1-800-CHILDREN.

The Heart of Vermont BNI Chapter meets weekly at Bethany

Church Main St. for Central Vermont business networking.

Meetings are held each Friday from 8am to 9:30am, and visitors

are welcome. For information or a reservation to attend, please

contact Kristin Dearborn at 802-223-3425. Kristin.dearborn@

edwardjones.com.

MORETOWN- Mad River Chorale. Rehearsals at Harwood

Union H.S., Mon., 7-9PM. Info: 496-2048.

MORRISVILLE- “The Role of Power, Authority & Control in

Groups” Monthly Meeting, Morristown Centennial Library, 20

Lower Main St. 1st Tues. 5:30PM-7PM. Info: gerette@dreamhavenvt.com.

Overeaters Anonymous, 12-step program for people who identify

as overeaters, compulsive eaters, food addicts, anorexics,

bulimics, etc. All welcome; no dues or fees. Info re: place & time:

863-2655.

River Arts Events, Photo Co-op Drop-in 3rd Thurs., 6PM-8PM.

$5 suggested donation. Poetry Clinic Drop-in 1st & 3rd Tues.,

6PM-8PM. $5 suggested donation.

NORTHFIELD- Bingo, Northfield Senior Center. Mon., 4PM.

Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program, Ages 12-18. Edward F Knapp

State Airport Passenger Terminal, Tues, 6-8:30PM. Info: info.

vt033@vtcap.org.

Clogging & Irish Step Lessons, w/Green Mountain Cloggers,

ages 8-78. Sun., 5-8PM. Info: 522-2935.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs, Northfield Police, 110

Wall St., 485-9181. Get rid of old or unused.

Playgroup- Every Friday from 10-11 am located in our

Community Room at the Brown Public Library, 93 South Main

St.

Storytimes at 10 am on Mondays and 10:30 am on Saturdays at

the Brown Public Library, 93 South Main St.

PLAINFIELD- Community Supper Support Group, Grace

United Methodist Church. 4th Tues., 6PM-7PM. Info: michaelbix@gmail.com.

Cardio Funk Class. At the Community Center. Fri., 5-6PM. Info:

email shannonkellymovement@gmail.com.

Cutler Memorial Library Activities, Classic Book Club: 1st

Mon., 6PM; Tuesday Night Knitters (except 1st Tues.). Info:

454-8504.

Diabetes Discussion & Support Group, Everyone welcome.

The Health Center conf. room, 3rd Thurs., 1:30PM. Info:322-

6600.

RANDOLPH- Health Support Groups, Maple Leaf Room at

Gifford Medical Center. Tobacco Cessation Program regularly

offers four-week “Quit in Person” group sessions. Info: 728-7714.

Caregiver Support Group, Gifford Medical Center. 2-3PM.

Meets 2nd Wed. of the month. Info: 728-7781.

Diabetes Management Program, Kingwood Health Center

(lower level conf. room), 1422 VT Route 66. Thurs., 10-12:30PM.

Six week program for people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes.

Info/register: 728-7714.

New Business Forum, Vermont Tech Enterprise Center, 1540 VT

Rte 66, 2nd Weds., 11:30AM-1PM. Info: 728-9101.

Cancer Support Group, Gifford Conference Ctr, 2nd Tues.,

9:30-11AM. Info:728-2270.

Storytime. Kimball Library. Wed., 11AM, ages 2-5; Toddler-time,

Fri., 10:30AM; Gathering for handwork, 2nd & 4th Mon., 6PM.

Pregnancy and Post-Partum Support Group - For those struggling

with anxiety or depression related to pregnancy, Gifford

Health Care is here to help. Every Tuesday from 1:30 p.m. – 3:00

p.m., in the conference room at Gifford Medical Center. If you

have questions or would like to enroll, email ESchleif@giffordhealthcare.org,

SRoberts@giffordhealthcare.org or call Sarah

Roberts at 728-2372.

WASHINGTON- Central VT ATV Club, Washington Fire

Station, 3rd Tues., 6:30PM. Info: 224-6889.

Calef Mem. Library Activities, Art and Adventure w/ April:

3rd Sat., 1PM; Storytime: Mon., 11AM; Tech Help Drop-In:

Sat., 10AM-2PM. Info: 883-2343.

Washington Unitarian Universalist Congregation Service, in

person, at 10:00am. From June 19 – September 4, 2022. Layman

speakers and interesting topics each week. All are welcome! 2938

VT Route 110.

Farmers Market every Saturday 9am – noon. At Carpenter Park.

WATERBURY- Waterbury Public Library Activities,

Preschool Story Time: Thurs., 10AM. Baby and Toddler Story

Time: Mon., 10AM. Crafts: Tues., 3-4PM. Info: 244-7036.

WEBSTERVILLE- Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs,

Barretown Police, 149 Websterville Rd., 479-0508. Get rid of old

or unused meds.

WEST TOPSHAM- Bible Study, New Hope Methodist Church,

2 Gendron Rd. Wed., 6:30PM.

WORCESTER- Knitting Night, The Wool Shed, Tues., 6:30-

8:30PM.

Friday, December 2

BRADFORD- The Regifters When a couple “regifts” a not-sogreat

Christmas present, then finds out it’s worth a fortune, they

will stop at nothing to get it back. 7PM at the Bradford Academy,

172 North Main Street. Tickets: (https://www.oldchurchtheater.

org/plan-your-visit/tickets/) $12.00 adults, $10.00 seniors (60+),

$6.00 students.

MONTPELIER- Art Walk Art Walk provides a fun and casual

way to experience art, meet local artists, and explore downtown

shops, restaurants, and galleries. Guidebooks will be available at

participating venues. 4 - 7PM.

Annual Holiday Fair at the Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 130

Main St. Snacks and music, children’s books, jewelry, quilt raffle,

gift table, holiday items. 5-7PM.

Elf the Musical, JR Kick off the holidays with this great show!

7:00 PM at U-32 Middle & High School. $5.00 suggested donation.

Tickets available at the door. Show runs one hour and is good

for the whole family. Wear an ugly Christmas sweater to the show

to compete in the Christmas sweater contest for yummy prizes!

RANDOLPH- Our Lady of the Angels Christmas Bazaar,

Rte., 66 and Hebard Hill Rd., 2-6. 25 delightful tables featuring a

wide variety of crafts, gifts, decor, food and more. Parish bakery

tables filled with delicious desserts, plus a 50/50 raffle.

Saturday, December 3

BRADFORD- The Regifters See December 2 listing for details.

BARRE- Annual A Cappella Holiday Concert Join the Green

Mountain Chorus and the Barre-Tones a cappella barbershop

harmony choruses for an afternoon of holiday favorites. At

Hedding United Methodist Church, 40 Washington Street at 2PM.

Suggested donation of $10 at the door or online at www.

BarretonesVT.com.

FAYSTON- Bid to Build Habitat for Humanity’s affordable

homeownership program. The event will have hor d’orves, cash

bar, live music, shuffleboard, foos ball and an open hearth fireplace

at the idyllic Mad River Barn, 2849 Mill Brook Rd. Register

now and receive a 20% discount to stay overnight at the Mad

River Barn. The live auction will be conducted by Merrill

Auctions. 6:30-9PM.

MONTPELIER- Elf the Musical, JR Kick off the holidays with

this great show! 10 AM at U-32 Middle & High School. $5.00

suggested donation. Tickets available at the door. Show runs one

hour and is good for the whole family. Wear an ugly Christmas

sweater to the show to compete in the Christmas sweater contest

for yummy prizes!

Annual Holiday Fair at the Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 130

Main St. Wreaths, fresh pecans, food, children’s books, jewelry

quilt raffle, gift table, plants, toys, local crafts, full lunch, holiday

items. 9-2.

RANDOLPH- Our Lady of the Angels Christmas Bazaar,

Rte., 66 & Hebard Hill Rd., 9-2. 25 delightful tables featuring a

wide variety of crafts, gifts, decor, food and more. Parish bakery

tables filled with delicious desserts, plus a 50/50 raffle. Breakfast

and lunch will be offered.

Sunday, December 4th

BRADFORD- The Regifters When a couple “regifts” a not-sogreat

Christmas present, then finds out it’s worth a fortune, they

will stop at nothing to get it back. 3PM at the Bradford Academy,

172 North Main Street. Tickets: (Link: https://www.oldchurchtheater.org/plan-your-visit/tickets/)

$12.00 adults, $10.00 seniors

(60+), $6.00 students.

NORTHFIELD- Breakfast Buffet at The American Legion 8 -

11 a.m. Open to the public. $12 adults, $6 children under 10. Eggs

and omelets made to order, pancakes, French toast, chipped beef

on toast, corned beef hash, bacon, sausage, home fries, juice, coffee,

tea and more.

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Monday, December 5

ONLINE- Task Force to Revitalize the Vermont Dairy

Industry 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Members of the public may

attend the meeting at the State House or view it via YouTube at:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/

UCQXkUCDAVlCkzSdNeipFDkA/featured. Info: https://legislature.vermont.gov/committee/detail/2022/366.

continued on next page

November 30, 2022 The WORLD page 17

AT

WE NOW

HAVE

Creative Engagement & Storytelling

Wed., Dec. 14, 2022

LUNCH 12 PM - WORKSHOP 1 PM

Twin Valley Senior Center

4583 US Rte. 2, East Montpelier, VT

Questions? Call Gene Trio, Director

at (802) 223-3322


.

ART EXHIBITS

BARRE- Marcia Hill & Cindy Griffith at Espresso Bueno,

November 14 to December 28. Art for sale for the holidays:

vibrant pastels capturing the spirit, energy and inner intensity

of the natural world. 248 N Main St. Info, events@espressobueno.com.

Artists Showcase – At the Rainbow Bridge Community

Center. Various artists display their work for sale and to just

enjoy. Many styles to see. Always looking for more artists.

Always changing pieces. 81 N Main St. Suite 2 Barre, VT.

Hours and info at rainbowbridgevt.org.

Celebrate! A vibrant holiday show involving more than 70

SPA member artists. A staple since 2000, this show includes

a diverse selection of fine art and crafts displayed creatively

throughout the 3-floor historic Studio Place Arts building,

201 N. Main St. Shop local at SPA – you’ll be supporting

local artists and our community art center! Exhibit dates:

November 9 – December 28, 2022.

GLOVER- Coming Clean The Museum of Everyday Life

announces the opening of its new exhibition, Coming Clean

on Saturday June 4th, from 1-6 p.m. Opening celebration

features live music and performances, and snacks and beverages

will be served. Admission by donation. The exhibition

will be on view through May of 2023. The Museum of

Everyday Life is a self-service museum, open every day from

8 a.m.-8 p.m., and is located at 3482 Dry Pond Rd. (Rt. 16).

See www.museumofeverydaylife.org for more details or for

more information contact Clare Dolan at 802-626-4409.

JEFFERSONVILLE- Legacy Collection Bryan Memorial

Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of its 2022 season.

The season kicks off with the “Legacy Collection” exhibit,

displayed in the Main & Middle Room galleries, featuring the

works of 16 distinguished New England landscape artists.

Bryan Memorial Gallery is at 180 Main Street, Jeffersonville,

VT., 802-644-5100. A preview of the exhibit can be seen at

www.bryangallery.org. Thru December 24.

GEMS & Giants 2022 presented by the Bryan Memorial

Gallery An annual exhibition of artworks by gallery members.

Artworks range from landscapes to abstracts, from florals,

portrait, and still-life. Opens Thursday, November 3, and

will conclude on Saturday, December 24. The opening reception

will be held Saturday, November 12 from 1:00 p.m. to

3:00 p.m. The Gallery’s hours are Thursday - Sunday 11:00

a.m. to 4:00 p.m. or by appointment. To learn more about the

exhibitions visit www.bryangallery.org.

JOHNSON- Scattered Cohesion By Marya Lowe Modern

quilts and textiles. November 12th - Jan 14th. Opening reception:

Sunday, November 13th, 2-4pm. At the Minema Gallery,

2 Lower Main Street East.

Andrea Pearlman: Two Thousand Light Years from

Home. Vermont Studio Center’s Red Mill Gallery show

opens December 7th, 2022 and closes January 26th, 2023. An

opening reception will take place on December 7th, starting

at 7:00 p.m. This event is free and open to the public. To

schedule a gallery visit email: gallery@vermontstudiocenter.

org or call: 802-635-2727 ext. 211.

MONTPELIER- Common Cracker at the Vermont History

Museum. The exhibit explores the history of just what a

cracker is, how they were made and the many bakeries that

produced them. Opening reception, Saturday, August 6th,

2:00 to 4:00, remarks at 3:00. August 4 - January 28, 2023.

House Completing the 2022 season of exhibitions at the

Vermont Supreme Court Gallery (115 State St.) is Middlesex

artist Axel Stohlberg in a solo exhibition, from October 4

through December 30 with an opening reception as part of

Montpelier Art Walk on Friday, October 7 from 4:30-7:00

pm.

NORWICH- Exploring Science Through Art: I Never Saw It

That Way at the Montshire, 1 Montshire Road. A self-curated

exhibition of mixed-media art by Montshire staff celebrates

the many different ways one can interface with science and

present those interactions to the world. October 7th 2022 to

January 2nd 2023.

RANDOLPH-ART, etc. presents their December & January

exhibits featuring the work of 13 artists from across Vermont

who were Gallery Artists with ART, etc. during 2022. This

show will feature paintings, photography, collage and sculpture.

These artists displayed their work in the Northfield and

Randolph store locations, coming together for this exhibit.

This show begins December 1 and will be on view until

January 29, 2023.

The public is invited to an Opening Reception for these artists,

Friday December 2nd, 5-8pm, which coincides with

Randolph’s downtown tree lighting, an Art Walk featuring

various downtown businesses and The Chandler’s Holiday

Market. Come meet the artists, join us for light refreshments

and live music from 5-8pm.

ART, etc. is an artisan craft store with two dedicated gallery

spaces. Accented by an exciting array of pottery, woodwork,

jewelry, iron work, candles and an assortment of artwork

from Vermont artisans, ART, etc. is truly a celebration of

Vermont’s beauty and artistic talents.

ART, etc. is located at 26 North Main Street, Randolph VT, in

a newly restored 1880s building. For more information please

email artetcvt@gmail.com, visit www.artetcvt.com, or FB/IG

@artetcvt. Store hours Wednesday-Saturday 10-5pm, Sunday

11-2pm with extended hours beginning in December.

STOWE- When the well is dry, co-curated by Rachel

Moore, Executive Director + Director of Exhibitions at The

Current, and Adriana Teresa Letorney, Visura founder. This

international group exhibition visually explores the interconnection

of environment, climate change, culture, and community

through the compelling work of eleven visual artists,

journalists, and storytellers worldwide. August 20 - December

10, 2022. At The Current, 90 Pond Street.

WAITSFIELD- Vermont Watercolor Society Awards

Show Sunday, October 23rd, 3:00-5:00 PM, 5031 Main

Street, (802)-496-6682. The show continues in the Gallery

Wednesdays-Saturdays 1:00-5:00 or by appointment. The

show ends on December 16, 2022.

page 18 The WORLD November 30, 2022

www.pointfm.com

THANK YOU FOR SAYING

I SAW IT IN

CVTV Channel 192 • BARRE, VT

Wednesday - Art and Music

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - Art and Music Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global

News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - Art and Music Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 12:00PM - Art and Music Programs

Thursday - International and Multicultural

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - International and Multicultural

Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global

News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - International and Multicultural

Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 12:00PM - International and Multicultural

Programs

Friday - Local Vermont and Conversation

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - Local Vermont and Conversation

Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global

News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - Local Vermont and Conversation

Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 12:00PM - Local Vermont and Conversation

Programs

“All schedules are subject to

change, please call us

with questions - 479-1075.”

Saturday - Education and Nature

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Barre Congregational Church

8:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

9:00AM - 6:00PM - Education and Nature Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00PM - 10:00PM - Education and Nature Programs

10:00PM - Local Sports

11:00PM - 12:00PM - Education and Nature Programs

Sunday - Church Services and Spirituality

6:00AM - 2:00PM - Chruch Services and

Spirituality Programs

2:00PM - New England Cooks

3:00PM - 7:00PM - Chruch Services and

Spirituality Programs

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

7:00PM - 12:00PM - Chruch Services and

Spirituality Programs

Monday - Science

6:00AM - 3:00PM - Science Programs

3:00PM - Local Sports

4:00AM - 6:00PM - Science Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest and Humanities

8:00AM - 12:00PM - Science Programs

Tuesday - History

12:00AM - 6:00AM - Arts and Culture Programs

6:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00AM - 10:00AM - History Programs

10:00AM - Democracy Now! Independent

Global News

11:00AM - 5:30PM - History Programs

6:00PM - Democracy Now! Independent Global News

7:00PM - Public Interest

8:00PM - 12:00PM - History Programs

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also be viewed online at cvtv723.org

ONION RIVER COMMUNITY ACCESS MEDIA

• Bethel • Braintree • Montpelier • Randolph • Rochester • U-32 District Towns • Waterbury Schedules subject to change without notice.

ORCA Media Channel 1075

Public Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, Nov 30

6:00a Vermont Land Trust

7:30a Vermont Production Collective - The

Street Project

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Halloween Parade

11:00a Bill Doyle on VT Issues

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Shidaa Projects - Celebration of

Community

3:00p Hunger Mtn Coop 2022 Annual Meeting

4:30p The World Fusion Show

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Octagon St. Laveau

6:30p Celluloid Mirror

7:00p Vermont Humanities Council

9:00p St. Laveau's World Cinema

9:30p The Kindness Project - Money Matters

Thursday, Dec 1

6:00a Moccasin Tracks

7:30a A Vermonter from Havana

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a ORCA Media Board Meeting

11:00a Vermont Humanities Council

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p Bear Pond Books Events

2:30p Kellogg-Hubbard Library

4:30p Vermont Production Collective - The

Street Project

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p David Pakman Show

7:00p Institute for Social Ecology Summer

Gathering

10:00p Senior Moments

Friday, Dec 2

6:00a Senior Moments

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Abled and on Air

10:00a All Things LGBTQ

11:00a Talking About Movies

11:30a M Rug Hooking Guild 2022 Show

12:00p Brunch with Bernie

1:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

2:00p Institute for Social Ecology Summer

Gathering

5:00p Democracy Now!

7:00p Migrant Justice

8:00p Gay USA

9:00p A Vermonter from Havana

9:30p The Juxtaposition

10:00p Summit School of Traditional Music

and Culture

Saturday, Dec 3

6:00a Shidaa Projects - Celebration of

Community

8:00a Hunger Mtn Coop 2022 Annual Meeting

9:30a Migrant Justice

10:30a The Talk, Vermont

12:00p Senior Moments

2:00p Halloween Parade

4:00p The Juxtaposition

4:30p Roman Catholic Mass

5:00p Washington Baptist Church

6:00p A Vermonter from Havana

6:30p St. Laveau's World Cinema

7:00p Montpelier Senior Activity Center

8:00p All Things LGBTQ

9:00p Banter and Beans/Vote for Vermont

10:00p Vermont Production Collective - The

Street Project

10:30p Betty St. Laveau's House of Horror

Sunday, Dec 4

6:00a The Kindness Project - Money Matters

7:30a St. Laveau's World Cinema

8:00a Bear Pond Books Events

9:30a Washington Baptist Church

10:30a Roman Catholic Mass

11:00a Celluloid Mirror

11:30a The World Fusion Show

12:00p Vermont Land Trust

1:30p Summit School of Traditional Music

and Culture

3:30p The Talk, Vermont

5:00p Banter and Beans/Vote for Vermont

6:00p Montpelier Senior Activity Center

7:00p Moccasin Tracks

8:30p Abled and on Air

9:30p Octagon St. Laveau

10:00p Kellogg-Hubbard Library

Monday, Dec 5

6:00a Kellogg-Hubbard Library

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Banter and Beans/Vote for Vermont

10:00a Montpelier Senior Activity Center

11:00a The Juxtaposition

11:30a Octagon St. Laveau

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p ORCA Media Board Meeting

3:30p Moccasin Tracks

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Migrant Justice

7:00p Shidaa Projects - Celebration of

Community

9:00p Hunger Mtn Coop 2022 Annual Meeting

10:30p GM Rug Hooking Guild 2022 Show

11:00p The Talk, Vermont

Tuesday, Dec 6

6:00a Summit School of Traditional Music

and Culture

8:00a Democracy Now!

9:00a Institute for Social Ecology Summer

Gathering

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

1:00p All Things LGBTQ

2:00p Vermont Humanities Council

3:00p The Kindness Project - Money Matters

4:30p Green Mountain Rug Hooking Guild

2022 Show

5:00p Democracy Now!

6:00p Abled and on Air

7:00p Vermont Land Trust

8:30p Celluloid Mirror

9:00p Friends of Waterbury Reservoir Annual

Community Meeting

11:00p ORCA Media Board Meeting

ORCA Media Channel 1095

Education Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wednesday, Nov 30

12:00p North Branch Nature Center

1:30p First Wednesdays

3:00p Waterbury Library

4:30p Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

6:30p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

Thursday, Dec 1

12:00p Harwood Unified

3:30p Randolph TCC School Board

4:30p North Branch Nature Center

8:00p Wash Central Union School Board

11:00p Norwich University

Friday, Dec 2

12:00p Washington Central Union School

Tuesday, December 6

RANDOLPH- The Changing Landscape of Infrastructure:

New Challenges and Solutions. The annual event will take place

at the Chandler Center for the Arts. Morning snacks and lunch

will be provided. www.vtcda.org/spring-2022.html.

Thursday, December 8

JOHNSON- A Visiting Artist Talk with Tom Burckhardt

Vermont Studio Center will host a Visiting Artist Talk as a part of

the Visiting Artist Program. 7:00 - 8:00 PM, the talk will take

place in the Red Mill Building. This event is free and open to the

public. Limited seating is available. Contact VSC for more information.

Friday, December 9

BRADFORD- The Regifters When a couple “regifts” a not-sogreat

Christmas present, then finds out it’s worth a fortune, they

will stop at nothing to get it back. 7PM at the Bradford Academy,

172 North Main Street. Tickets: (Link: https://www.oldchurchtheater.org/plan-your-visit/tickets/)

$12.00 adults, $10.00 seniors

(60+), $6.00 students.

Saturday, December 10

BRADFORD- The Regifters See December 9 listing for details.

Sunday, December 11

BRADFORD- The Regifters When a couple “regifts” a not-sogreat

Christmas present, then finds out it’s worth a fortune, they

will stop at nothing to get it back. 2PM at the Bradford Academy,

172 North Main Street. Tickets: (Link: https://www.oldchurchtheater.org/plan-your-visit/tickets/)

$12.00 adults, $10.00 seniors

(60+), $6.00 students.

Monday, December 12

JOHNSON- A Visiting Writer Reading and Craft Talk with

Lysley Tenorio Vermont Studio Center will host Lysley Tenorio as

a part of the Visiting Writer Program. 7:00 - 8:00 PM, the reading

will take place in the Red Mill Building. The following morning,

Tuesday, December 13th, 10:00 - 11:00 AM, Tenorio will present a

writing craft talk in Mason House Library. These events are free and

open to the public. Contact VSC for more information.

CVTV CHANNEL 194

Wednesday

12:00AM - 6:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00AM - Community Bulletin

7:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

9:00AM - Barre City Council

12:00PM - Barre City Council

3:00PM - Barre City Council

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Williamstown Select

10:00PM - Williamstown Select

Thursday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Williamstown Select

9:00AM - Williamstown Select

12:00PM - Williamstown Select

2:00PM - Community Bulletin

3:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

10:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

Friday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Barre Unified Union School

9:00AM - Barre Unified Union School

12:00PM - Barre Unified Union School

3:00PM - Barre Town Select

5:30PM - Community Bulletin

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Barre Town Select

10:00PM - Barre Town Select

Saturday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Barre Town Select

9:00AM - Barre Town Select

12:00PM - Barre Town Select

3:00PM - Community Bulletin

4:00PM - 7:00PM - State House

Programming

7:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

10:00PM - Barre Town Select

Sunday

12:00AM - 6:00PM - State House

Programming

CHARTER COMMUNICATIONS OF BARRE

ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

Board

3:00p Harwood Unified

6:30p Montpelier High School Fall Concert

8:00p Orange Southwest School District

Superintendent Forum

10:30p Game of the Week

Saturday, Dec 3

12:00p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

4:00p All Brains Belong VT - Brain Club

6:00p Montpelier Historical Society

8:00p Waterbury Library

9:30p Montpelier High School Fall Concert

11:00p Orange Southwest School District

Superintendent Forum

Sunday, Dec 4

12:00p Orange Southwest School District

3:00p Randolph TCC School Board

4:00p Washington Central Union School

Board

6:00p Montpelier High School Fall Concert

7:00p Montpelier/Roxbury School Board

11:00p Norwich University

Monday, Dec 5

12:00p White River Valley Supervisory Union

2:00p White River Unified District Board

5:00p Montpelier Historical Society

7:00p VT State Board of Education

11:00p GMALL Lectures

Tuesday, Dec 6

12:00p Rochester-Stockbridge Unified District

3:00p Orange Southwest School District

6:00p All Brains Belong VT - Brain Club

7:30p Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

9:00p White River Valley Supervisory Union

11:00p White River Unified District Board

ORCA Media Channel 1085

Government Access

Weekly Program Schedule

Wed. Nov 30

6:00a Bethel Selectboard

9:00a Rochester Selectboard

11:30a Press Conference

4:00p Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

6:30p Montpelier City Council

Thu, Dec 1

6:00a Middlesex Selectboard

9:00a Montpelier Social and Economic

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also

be viewed online at cvtv723.org

6:00AM - 7:00PM - Church Services

Monday

12:00AM - 6:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00AM - State House Programming

9:00AM - State House Programming

12:00PM - State House Programming

3:00PM - Plainfield Select

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Plainfield Select

10:00PM - Plainfield Select

Tuesday

12:00AM - 5:00PM - State House

Programming

5:00AM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

6:00AM - Plainfield Select

9:00AM - Plainfield Select

12:00PM - Plainfield Select

3:00PM to 5:00PM - State House

Programming

6:00PM - Democracy Now!

Independent Global News

7:00PM - Barre City Council “Live”

10:00PM - Barre City Council

Justice Advisory Committee

10:00a Calais Selectboard

2:00p Central Vermont Public Safety Authority

4:00p Central Vermont Fiber

7:30p Waterbury Selectboard

11:30p Moretown Selectboard

Fri, Dec 2

6:00a Berlin Selectboard

9:00a Berlin Development Review Board

10:30a East Montpelier Selectboard

4:00p Middlesex Selectboard

9:30p Rochester Selectboard

10:30p Randolph Selectboard

Sat, Dec 3

6:00a Cannabis Control Board

11:00a Press Conference

1:00p Randolph Selectboard

4:30p Calais Selectboard

8:00p Moretown Selectboard

11:00p Green Mountain Care Board

Sun, Dec 4

6:00a Waterbury Selectboard

10:00a Berlin Selectboard

11:30a East Montpelier Selectboard

2:00p Montpelier Social and Economic

Justice Advisory Committee

3:00p Montpelier Planning Commission

5:00p Montpelier Design Review Committee

6:00p Montpelier Development Review Board

8:00p 203 Country Club Road Project

(Elks Club)

9:30p Montpelier City Council

Mon, Dec 5

6:00a Green Mountain Care Board

11:00a Press Conference

12:00p Bethel Selectboard

5:30p Montpelier Design Review Committee

LIVE

7:00p Montpelier Development Review

Board LIVE

9:00p Central Vermont Public Safety Authority

Tue, Dec 6

6:00a Moretown Selectboard

9:30a Racial Disparities Advisory Panel

12:00p Press Conference

1:00p 203 Country Club Road Project

(Elks Club)

5:30p Montpelier Planning Commission

10:30p Cannabis Control Board

Community Media (802) 224-9901 Check out our Web page at www.orcamedia.net/schedules


CLASSIFIEDS

DEADLINE: MONDAY 10:00AM DISPLAY ADS THURSDAY AT 5:00PM

802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • Fax 802-479-7916 Email: sales@vt-world.com

.

JOB

OPPORTUNITIES

FULL-TIME & PART TIME Experienced

Auto Technicians,

must have own tools & Love

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LOOKING TO HIRE a Motivated,

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pay $18+ / hr Call 802-249-

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RESPITE CARE WORKER

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needs including bed baths,

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medical knowledge is preferred,

but willing to train. This

a great place to start if you are

interested in the health care

fi elds. It is three successive

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Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

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WORK AT HOME AND EARN

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at your leisure in your own

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big profi ts from this and

many similar at home jobs is

slim. Promoters of these jobs

usually require a fee to teach

you useless, and unprofi table

trades, or to provide you with

futile information. TIP: If a

work-at-home program is legitimate,

your sponsor should

tell you, for free and in writing,

what is involved. If you question

a program’s legitimacy,

call the ATTORNEY GEN-

ERAL’S CONSUMER ASSIS-

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649-2424.

BUSINESS

OPPORTUNITIES

LOOKING TO EARN A MIL-

LION$? Watch out for business

opportunities that make

outrageous claims about

potential earnings. Don’t

get fooled into get rich quick

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be cautious of any business

that can’t refl ect in writing

the typical earnings of previous

employees. TIP: Investigate

earning potential claims

of businesses by requesting

written information from them

before you send any money,

or by calling the ATTORNEY’S

GENERAL CONSUMER AS-

SISTANCE PROGRAM, at

1-800-649-2424.

FREE ITEMS

$ A1-CASH PAID

Pending the Market

JUNK CARS, TRUCKS

FOR INFO, 802-522-9140

FREE “BEWARE OF THE

VERMONT LAND TRUST”

Bumper Stickers, Call

802-454-8561

HEALTH CARE

Attention oxygen therapy users!

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LOOKING FOR A MIRACLE /

Lose 20 pounds in one

week? This is almost impossible!

Weight loss ads must

refl ect the typical experiences

of the diet users. Beware

of programs that claim

you can lose weight effortlessly.

TIP: Clues to fraudulent

ads include words like:

“breakthrough,”effortless,”

and “new discovery.” When

you see words like these be

skeptical. Before you invest

your time and money call the

ATTORNEY GENERAL’S

CONSUMER ASSISTANCE

PROGRAM, at 1-800-649-

2424.

WANT A CURE-ALL?

Health fraud is a business

that sells false hope. Beware

of unsubstantiated claims for

health products and services.

There are no “Quick Cures”

— no matter what the ad is

claiming. TIP: DO NOT rely

on promises of a “money back

guarantee!” Watch out for

key words such as “exclusive

secret,”amazing results,” or

“scientifi c breakthrough.” For

more information on health related

products or services, call

the ATTORNEY GENERAL’S

CONSUMER ASSISTANCE

PROGRAM at 1-800-649-

2424, or consult a health care

provider.

WANTED

ANTIQUES, OLD items, costume

jewelry, sterling, coins,

glass, pottery, cast iron,

bottles, jugs, crocks, mixing

bowls, vases, postcards, pre-

1970 stuff. Estates

Rich Aronson 802-595-3632

COIN COLLECTOR will Pay

Cash for Pre-1965 Coins and

Coin Collections. Call Joe

Blakely 802-498-3692

WANTED: OLD auto license

plates before 1930 or collections.

Lifelong cash buyer.

Conrad Hughson, Box 1

Putney, VT 05346.

conrad_hughson@

comcast.net

802-387-4498

Please leave message.

MISCELLANEOUS

!! OLD GUITARS WANTED!!

GIBSON, FENDER, MARTIN,

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continued on next page

How to modernize your résumé

Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic more than two years ago, businesses, especially

small firms, have struggled to find employees to fill vacancies within their companies. A

survey from CNBC/Survey Monkey released in May 2022 indicated that 52 percent of small

business owners reported it had grown more difficult to find qualified people over the

The difficulty many businesses are having in regard finding

qualified applicants can be seen as a great opportunity

by skilled professionals looking for a new job. Qualified

job seekers can take advantage of the lack of competition to

land their dream jobs. Prior to beginning a new job search,

seasoned professionals might want to consider some strategies

to modernize their résumés and improve their chances of

finding a dream job.

• Reconsider your résumé template. If it’s been awhile since

you looked for a new job, chances are strong the design of

your résumé could be viewed as outdated. Fairly or unfairly,

an old template could give prospective employers the impression

that your skills are as outdated as your résumé. Jobscan.

co/resume-templates offers a host of Microsoft Word-compatible

free résumé templates. These templates are categorized,

with some specifically for senior- and executive-level

positions and others based on how job seekers want to list

their skills and experience (i.e., chronological, hybrid, etc.).

• Prominently display your abilities. The job-seeking experts

at Jobscan indicate that the average recruiter spends around

six to seven seconds glancing at a typical résumé before

deciding if an applicant could be a good fit. With such little

• • •

previous 12 months.

WANTED

time to make a strong first impression, applicants will want

to emphasize their skills at the top of their résumés. Recruiters

and human resources professionals who see an attractive

skillset might then be compelled to explore the document

further to determine how those skills were acquired.

• Avoid information overload. If HR professionals and

recruiters are only spending a few seconds scanning each résumé,

applicants will want to keep job descriptions short and

sweet. Condense responsibilities into bullet points, ideally

using just a single line for each point. Avoid listing too many

bullet points for each job, as that could affect the likelihood

that the résumé will get more than a passing glance.

• Remove outdated information. The online jobs resource

Indeed notes that seasoned professionals who have been with

their current employers for more than five years can remove

certain sections on a résumé. Sections like internships,

awards received early in a career, volunteer gigs from years

ago, and pre-college educational background do not need to

be listed on experienced professionals’ résumés.

Now could be a good time for experienced professionals

to look for a new job. The first step in a successful job search

could be modernizing a résumé to more closely reflect where

candidates are in their careers.

Production Position Available

Must be able to lift up to 50# on a regular basis.

Shift is Full-time, Mon.-Fri. 5:00am-1:30pm with

OT during busy times. Pay based on experience.

Attendance premium. Benefits available.

Please apply in person to:

Highland Sugarworks 49 Parker Rd. Websterville, VT

No phone calls please.

STOP

NEVER GIVE YOUR:

•SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER

•CREDIT CARD NUMBER

•BANK ACCOUNT NUMBER

Or any other

personal information

To someone you don’t know

when answering an advertisement.

A public service announcement

presented to you by The WORLD

Goddard College, a leader in non-traditional

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employment-opportunities/

TOWN OF BARRE

EMS APPLICATIONS

The Town of Barre is accepting applications to fi ll one full-time position

and for per diem work. Advanced EMTs and paramedics are

welcome to apply. Barre Town EMS full-time staff work 48 hours

(two 24-hour shifts) per week. Per diems have the opportunity to

fi ll ten 8-hour, M-F day-time shifts and four 24-hour weekend shifts.

Barre Town EMS is a transporting agency that covers all or part of

six central Vermont towns. BTEMS responds to 911 calls and performs

inter-facility transfers. The department performs about 3,000

billable calls per year. For the full-time position the starting annual

base pay is $51,348 for an AEMT and $60,407 for a paramedic.

Excellent benefi ts are offered. For per diem work the starting hourly

wage rate is $20.20 for an AEMT and $24.25 for a paramedic.

Minimum qualifi cations are high school diploma or GED, Vermont

AEMT license, two years EMS experience, valid Vermont driver’s

license, and physical ability to climb stairs and steep banks, and to

lift and carry heavy loads. For more information visit the department

website (www.barretown.org/departments/emergency_services/

ems/), or call Director Chris LaMonda at 476-3147. Applications

are available from the Town Manager’s Offi ce (479-9331), or online

at www.barretown.org/departments/fi nance_and_administration/

town_manager/human_resources.php. Completed application, resume

and copy of current EMS license will be submitted to the Town

Manager’s Offi ce, P.O. Box 116, Websterville, VT, 05678 or emailed

to offi ces@barretown.org by 4:00 pm, Friday, December 9, 2022.

On the application or in the cover letter/email state if the application

is for the full-time, per diem or either position.

The Town of Barre is an Equal Opportunity Employer

November 30, 2022 The WORLD page 19


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479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753

sales@vt-world.com

4 for 3

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page 20 The WORLD November 30, 2022

LINE RATE 1-3 Words Per Line $1.75/LINE

CAPITALIZATION:

Capitalizing more than the first 2 words, etc. 70¢/WORD

DEADLINE: For The WORLD is MONDAY by 10:00

AM

CANCELLATIONS: A classified ad cancelled before 10:00 AM

on Monday will receive credit for the remaining paid weeks.

The WORLD asks that you check your ad on its first publication. If you find an error

please notify us immediately so that corrections can be made. The WORLD will not be

responsible for more than one incorrect publication of the ad.

PHONE NUMBER ___________________________________________________________________________

LAST NAME _______________________________________________________________________________

FIRST NAME ______________________________________________________________________________

ADDRESS _________________________________________________________________________________

CITY _______________________________________________ STATE ____________ ZIP _______________

START DATE: ___________ NUMBER OF ISSUES: __________

EXACTLY HOW YOU WANT THE AD TO READ

Please print, we cannot be responsible for words we can't read.

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THE COST OF YOUR AD IN THE WORLD

Each separate word, each phone number counts as one word

Number of words ____________ times 35¢($3.50 min.) _________________ (cost for one week)

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CHECK HEADING:

■ Animals-Farm ......................500

■ Animals-Pet .........................430

■ Antiques/Restorations .........144

■ Baby/Children Items ............140

■ Bicycles ...............................220

■ Boating/Fishing ...................210

■ Building Materials ................300

■ Business Items ....................080

■ Business Opportunities .......060

■ Camping ..............................205

■ Childcare Service ................030

■ Christmas Trees ..................370

■ Class & Workshops .............103

■ Clothing & Accessories .......130

■ Computers/Electronics ........100

■ Farm/Garden/Lawn .............410

■ Free Ads ..............................108

■ Furniture ..............................180

■ Garage Sales/Flea Mkt. ......145

■ Health ..................................113

■ Home Appliances ................160

■ Hunting/Guns/Archery .........305

■ Insurance/Investments ........090

■ Job Opportunities ................020

■ Lost and Found ...................110

■ Miscellaneous .....................150

■ Musical ................................200

■ Personals ............................105

■ Professional Services .........540

■ Rideshare ............................125

■ Snow Removal Equip. .........355

■ Snowmobiles/Access. .........360

■ Sporting Equipment ............250

■ Storage................................235

■ Support Groups ..................107

■ Tools ....................................330

■ Wanted ................................120

■ Wood/Heating Equip. ...........350

■ Work Wanted .......................040

AUTOMOTIVE

■ Campers/Motor Homes .......845

■ Cars & Accessories ............875

■ Motorcycles/ATV’s ...............850

■ Trucks/Vans/Jeeps Access. .870

■ Vintage/Classic Vehicles .....873

■ Work Vehicles/Heavy Equip. ....855

REAL ESTATE

■ Apts./House for Rent ...........630

■ Camps for Sale ...................650

■ Comm. Rentals/Sales .........605

■ Condominiums ....................680

■ Apt. Blds. for Sale ................685

■ Homes .................................690

■ Land for Sale .......................670

■ Mobile Homes .....................600

■ Vacation Rentals/Sales .......645

■ Wanted to Rent/Buy ............610

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continued on next page

KOVELS ® Antiques

By Terry and Kim Kovel & Collecting

Stickley Furniture

Gustav Stickley has created icons of American design.

Inspired by John Ruskin and William Morris of the English

Arts and Crafts movement, Stickley started the Craftsman

workshop in 1900. He originated what was later

called mission furniture, with its simple, sturdy shapes,

iron and hammered copper hardware, and emphasis on

skilled craftsmanship and practicality instead of decoration.

He favored oak because it is strong and heavy. Like

the movement in England, Stickley’s style went beyond a

furniture brand; it was an entire philosophy. He published

a magazine called “The Craftsman.”

This early Stickley desk, made around 1900, sold for

$3,900 at Cottone Auctions in Geneseo, New York. It has

a fall front that could be folded up when the writing surface

wasn’t in use, taking up less space in the room. Other

adjustable or multifunction Stickley designs include an

adjustable recliner and a bookshelf that could also be used

as a table.

* * *

Q: I recently bought a cut-glass decanter at an auction. It

has a white residue on the very bottom. How can I remove

this without damaging the crystal?

A: The white residue is caused by calcium, lime and

other minerals found in hard water. It can be removed by

filling the decanter with warm water and adding white vinegar,

vinegar and baking soda, or a denture tablet. Let it sit

for several hours or overnight. Rinse out the solution and

wash the decanter in a plastic tub or in a sink lined with a

towel or rubber mat to prevent chipping. Turn the faucet to

one side or put a rubber collar on the spout to avoid hitting

the metal. Wash in warm (not hot) water and detergent,

rinse and put upside down on a dish rack to dry. The inside

of the decanter can be dried by inserting pieces of an old

cotton sheet and using the handle of a wooden spoon or a

wooden dowel to wipe it.

* * *

TIP: Never wear rubber gloves when cleaning or handling

silver. The sulfur from the gloves tarnishes silver.

* * *

CURRENT PRICES

Candy container, turkey, molded papier-mache, realistically

painted, two metal feet, head pulls off to reveal opening,

Germany, 5 x 3 inches, $200.

Coin, Pilgrim half-dollar, side view of a pilgrim man holding

prayer book, “In God We Trust,” Mayflower ship on

reverse with Pilgrim Tercentenary Celebration 1620-1920,

$300.

Lamp, chandelier, pendant, Sputnik, 24 arms with lights

radiating from bronze ball center, white enamel perforated

shades, Italy, midcentury modern, 58 x 62 inches, $1,250.

For more collecting news, tips and resources, visit www.

Kovels.com

(c) 2022 King Features Synd., Inc.


MISCELLANEOUS

WE CAN remove bankruptcies,

judgments, liens, and

bad loans from your credit fi le

forever! The Federal Trade

Commission says companies

that promise to scrub your

credit report of accurate negative

information for a fee are

lying. Under FEDERAL law,

accurate negative information

can be reported for up to

seven years, and some bankruptcies

for up to 10 years.

Learn about managing credit

and debt at ftc.gov / credit. A

message from The World and

the FTC.

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ANTIQUES/

COLLECTIBLES/

RESTORATION

LAST TIME Around Antiques

**New Location**

4 Summer St

East Barre

802-476-8830

HOME

APPLIANCES

WE SELL

REFURBISHED

APPLIANCES

LOW, LOW PRICES!

WE OFFER SMALL ENGINE REPAIR

for Your Mower, Snow Blowers, Lawn Tractors, Etc.

EQUIPMENT MAY BE DROPPED OFF AT OUR STORE

7 Days A Week. Call 479-2541 for More Details

Husqvarna, Craftsman, PoulanPro, MTD Yard Machines

and most other brands

Owned & Operated by Dave & Lu Thomas

1598 US Route 302 Berlin,

Barre, VT 802-479-2541

SPORTING

EQUIPMENT

JP PILATES PERFORMER,

excellent condition. Folds for

Transport, $250 obo 802-272-

5373

HUNTING/GUNS/

ARCHERY

THOMPSON CENTER Firehawk

50 cal muzzleloader,

like new. $325

802-229-5173

TOOLS/

MACHINERY

OXY-ACETALENE REGULA-

TORS, New, $50. WELDING

CABLES, 200’ with Tweco

connectors. 2 Stingers. 1

Ground Clamp $400 obo.

802-272-5373

WOOD/HEATING

EQUIP.

FIREWOOD

LET STEPHEN keep you

warm this winter.

802-498-3159

BEWARE OF The Vermont

Land Trust. You shake hands

with them be sure to count

your fi ngers when you are

done. 802-454-8561.

DAVE’S LOGGING &

FIREWOOD

Green & Seasoned & Shed

Dry. 802-454-1062

FIREWOOD All Hardwood

cut, split and delivered Green

$325 / cord. Price subject to

Change. 802-485-8525 or

1-800-707-8427

GET READY Vermont Land

Trust, Hell’s Coming and

Charley’s Coming with Them.

ROUND ACORN Wood

Stove, works like new, good

condition. $300 obo. 802-272-

5373

THANK YOU FOR SAYING

I SAW IT IN

CLASSIFIEDS

CHRISTMAS TREES

MANY SIZES of Christmas

trees, kissing balls & wreaths.

You choose & we cut. Really

fresh. Christmas Barn Open

LH Stowell & Son,

Twin Pond Road, Brookfi eld,

802-276-3382, www.lhstrees.

com or Facebook.com / Stowelltrees.

Credit & debit cards

accepted.

FARM/GARDEN/

LAWN

5 GALLON PAILS W/Covers

$1.00 each.

The Barrel Man

802-439-5519

Classifi ed Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

FARM/GARDEN/

LAWN

FOOD GRADE Barrels totes,

We have over 700 in stock

from 2 1/2Gal — 275 Gal totes.

Call for Info; Bicknell Barrels

The Barrel Man

802-439-5519.

ANIMALS/PETS

REGISTERED BORDER

COLLIE Puppies, Blonde hair

blue eyed, smart and loving.

Ready anytime, 2 Shots,

$1000. 802-565-7749

SIAMESE / ORIENTAL KIT-

TENS Vet checked, Health

Certifi cate First shot, wormed,

boxed trained. PKD and feline

leukemia negative. $475 fi rm.

Ready to go. 802-296-2061

Plan Now for the Cost

of a New Pet

DEAR PAW’S CORNER: As the holiday

season approaches, many people

are thinking about adopting or purchasing

a pet as a gift. Can you remind

readers that the cost of owning a pet

can be quite high? Unexpected pet

care expenses are one reason that pets wind up at shelters

after the holidays. -- Carl W., Indianapolis

DEAR CARL: You brought up this issue at the perfect

time, as many families start thinking about and committing

to getting a pet for Christmas. Potential owners have

a lot of things to think about and discuss, and one big item

is the cost of owning a pet.

Bringing home a cat or dog from the shelter can cost

$1,200 to $1,800, a Geico Living post reports. Adoption

fees, the initial vet visit and supplies are part of the upfront

costs. Smaller pets like hamsters and goldfish will

cost about $200 initially when a tank, cage and supplies

are factored in.

Then there’s the cost of continuing care. A cat will cost

at least $800 per year in litter, food, toys, medical care

and more. Dogs can cost $1,500 per year or more, and if a

professional trainer is needed, that adds to the cost. And if

your pet gets sick, veterinary bills can be quite expensive.

This is not to talk people out of owning a pet, but to

make them aware that a pet will impact the household

budget more than most new owners expect. Know the upfront

cost of a new pet. Budget for the monthly and annual

costs of keeping a pet healthy and happy. Minimize

financial surprises, and you can focus fully on your pet’s

well-being.

Have unexpected pet expenses affected you? Tell us

your story at ask@pawscorner.com.

(c) 2022 King Features Synd., Inc.

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

AFFORDABLE TRASH SER-

VICES & RECYCLING, Commercial

/ Residential. Also metal

recycling, brush removal.

Contact Steve (802)595-3445

or trashsrv4u@hotmail.com

or www.trashserv4u.com

Ask about cash discount.

DAVE’S APPLIANCE REPAIR

We fi x all makes of Appliances

(except refrigerators).

802-696-2840

or Tim 802-585-8604. Email:

DAVID17SMALL@GMAIL.

COM

DmFURNACE

MAN

•Oil Furnace Tune-Ups

•Cleanings •Repairs

•Installations

Fully Licensed & Insured

Reasonable Rates

Call Daryl

802-249-2814

FULL QUALITY

TREE SERVICE

Removal & Full Tree Services,

Stump Grinding, Hedge

and Shrubs trimming, for free

estimates call Randy 802-

479-3403/802-249-7164 35+

years experience, Fully Insured.

SNOW PLOWING

&

SANDING in Barre, Northfi

eld, Montpelier area, Call

Bob for estimate,

802-281-9645

SNOWBLOWERS

3

MODELS TO

CHOOSE FROM

MODELS

AVAILABLE

PORTABLE

GENERATORS

Power Where You Need It

For work For home

For play

SALES & SERVICE

85 SOUTH MAIN ST. • BARRE, VT

802-476-5400

PET OF THE WEEK

Cobbler is an outgoing feline who came to

CVHS as a stray feline, and we are still

getting to know her. She loves being out

and about in her cat colony room, exploring

and getting to know the other cats. She is

fine with the other cats with similar

personalities, and sometimes can be a little

much in the other cats' faces.

All adoptions are done by a phone

appointment only (no one is allowed

in the building). Contact an adoption

counselor to set up an appointment

at 802-476-3811 or emailing

info@centralvermonthumane.org

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November 30, 2022 The WORLD page 21


AUTO AUTO REPAIR REPAIR BUSINESS FOR SALE

Well established Well established local area local repair area business repair business with with

a loyal customer a loyal customer base is becoming base is becoming available available

due to planned due to retirement. planned retirement. The current The current owner owner

will work with will work the buyer with the to buyer assist to in assist thein the

transition of transition the business of the business to the new to the owner. new owner.

This is an excellent This is an excellent opportunity opportunity for a qualifi for a qualifi ed ed

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2014 FORD ESCAPE SE 4WD

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2013 FORD ESCAPE 4WD

auto.,PW, PL, AC,

low miles, 100K

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2012 CHEV. MALIBU LT

auto.,PW, PL, AC, sunroof,

low miles

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2012 FORD F150 XLT

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auto.,PW, PL, AC,

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2011 CHEV. IMPALA LT

auto.,PW, PL, AC, low miles

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2011 FORD F150

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auto.,PW, PL, AC,

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auto., PW, PL, AC,

sunroof, low miles

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TEXT 13O8 TO 27414

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WE

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EBT

WRANGLER HANKOOK COOPER

page 22 The WORLD November 30, 2022

ALL SIZES BF GOODRICH GENERAL

AUTOMOTIVE

TRUCKS/VANS/

JEEPS/ACCESS.

2016 DODGE GRAND CARA-

VAN $10,900. East Barre Auto

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Text 1D08 to 27414.

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

2013 CHEVROLET IMPALA

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802-476-5370 or 866-928-

9370 or TEXT 0T04

TO 27414

Thunder Road Releases Schedule of Events for 64th Season in 2023

Thunder Road officials have finalized the 2023 Schedule of

Events for the venerable Central Vermont speedbowl. Along

with the Silver Anniversary of the Community Bank 150 and

the Diamond Jubilee for the Mekkelsen RV Memorial Day

Classic, exciting format changes for the bookending weekends

of the 64th season of stock car racing have been created

with fan-favorites ready to roll all summer long.

Beginning with the annual Thunder Road Car Show on

Saturday, May 6th, an exciting addition has been brought to

the schedule. Following the car show and open practice for

Thunder Road teams, an evening lid-lifter, headlined by the

Pro All Stars Series (PASS) Super Late Models will be the

first feature event of 2023. The night will also include the

eventful PASS Modifieds and the return of the R&R Race

Parts NH Open Street Stock Series. The PASS Super Late

Models will also return as part of Booth Bros./Hood Milk

Bowl Qualifying Day on Saturday, September 30th.

Sunday, May 7th brings the American-Canadian Tour back

to their home track for the 25th Community Bank N.A. 150.

The Stars and Cars of the ACT Tour will also return for the

45th Labor Day Classic presented by New England Federal

Credit Union on Sunday, September 4th. Both the silver anniversary

of the Community Bank 150 and the $5,000 to win

Labor Day Classic will also feature the track championship

implications for the Lenny’s Shoe & Apparel Flying Tigers

and rk Miles Street Stocks along with the non-point Burnett

Scrap Metals Road Warriors.

Memorial Day weekend brings back the epic doubleheader

of the 60th Mekkelsen RV Memorial Day Classic 125 for the

Maplewood/Irving Oil Late Models and the Monaco Modified

Tri-Track Series Granite City 100. Last year’s inaugural

$10,000-to-win Granite City 100 was such a success for the

tour-type modifieds, both track and series officials jumped on

the opportunity for their return just one day after the spectacular

showing.

The weekly season starts in earnest with the annual Friday

night special on June 9th that includes the first round of the

Myers Container Service Flying Tiger Triple Crown Series.

The Flying Tigers will also take center stage with Myers

Container extra-distance competition on July 6th and the 100-

lap championship round set for Cody Chevrolet-Cadillac

Night on August 3rd.

June 15th brings the first Thursday night racing of the season

on Casella Waste Management Night. The New England

Antique Racers (NEAR) and their mobile hall of fame, featuring

many Thunder Road short track heroes, will be on hand to

celebrate the 64th season of Thursday night action on Quarry

Hill.

Community College of Vermont Night on July 22nd will

host the 9th annual Marvin Johnson Memorial First-Time

Winners race for the rk Miles Street Stocks with the annual

Scouts Night and Kids Rides rounding out the month of June

on Thursday the 29th.

July kick-starts with the Preston’s KIA Fourth of July

Spectacular on Sunday, July 2nd. Along with the on-track

action, the holiday spectacular wouldn’t be complete without

the biggest fireworks display in Central Vermont courtesy of

Northstar Fireworks.

Thursday, July 13th hosts the 44th Vermont Governor’s

We Repair All

Snowplow

Brands

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4 ALL Season Yokahama

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tires. Asking $425. 802-479-

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SPRING & CHASSIS

“Your Truck Chassis Specialists”

32 BLACKWELL ST., BARRE, VT 05641 • 1-802-476-4971

• • •

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

Donate Your Car to Veterans

Today! Help and Support our

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Cup presented by the Vermont Lottery. The 150-lap spectacular

is the longest points-counting event of the season for the

Maplewood/Irving Oil Late Models with Flying Tigers and

Street Stocks ready to show off for the big midsummer

crowds expected on New England NASCAR weekend.

July caps off with two iconic Thunder Road events starting

off with the Times Argus Mid-season Championships on July

20th. Double points are on the line for the championship chasers

plus the first of two double purse nights courtesy of

FloRacing, Thunder Road’s Official Streaming Partner. July

27th brings WDEV/Calkins Portable Toilets Night with the

fan-favorite Port-a-Potty Grand Prix as the top team in each

division competes for the golden toilet seat.

After wrapping up the Myers Container Triple Crown

Series on August 3rd, Sunday the 6th brings the 39th annual

Bolduc Metal Recycling Enduro 200. The $3,000-to-win

‘People’s Race’ is a fan-favorite of the season and wouldn’t be

complete without the annual 50-lap rk Miles Street Stock

Special.

August rolls off with a trio of special events starting with

the 5th annual Burnett Road Warriors Challenge on Thursday

the 10th followed by Vermont Tire and Service Night on

August 17th which will serve as the second FloRacing Double

Purse night along with the annual Kids Poster Contest.

The final Thursday event of the season on August 24th

features the always popular Run-What-U-Brung spectator

drags on Jet Service Envelope/Accura Printing Night where

everyone’s favorite keyboard warriors put their money where

their mouths are and tackle the Barre high banks.

Thunder Road championship night returns on Friday,

September 8th with the Maplewood/ Irving Oil Late Model

‘King of the Road’ Track Champion crowned. The Lenny’s

Shoe & Apparel Flying Tiger and rk Miles Street Stock track

champions will also be awarded their season-long bounties as

Thunder Road champions in season sixty-four.

The 61st Vermont Milk Bowl presented by Northfield

Savings Bank rounds out the 2023 Thunder Road season. The

‘Toughest Short Track Stock Car Race in North America’

proved its namesake once again in 2022. With that in mind,

officials have determined the same $100,000+ purse will be in

effect for 2023 as well and the Milk Bowl once again set as

an American-Canadian Tour 100%er event.

“We had great reactions from the fans and from teams with

the epic Milk Bowl purse and having the ACT 100% teams,”

said Thunder Road managing partner Cris Michaud. “After

the success of last season, why change the formula? The

Vermont Milk Bowl is growing once again and we’re excited

about keeping that growth going.”

With the 2023 Thunder Road schedule released, 2023

forms and paperwork have also been posted online for teams

to prepare for the upcoming year. Sponsorship opportunities

are readily available for those wishing to join the Thunder

Road family. Interested parties can contact Marketing Director

Marvin Galarneau at mfg@thunderroadvt.com.

For more information, contact the Thunder Road offices at

(802) 244-6963, media@thunderroadvt.com, or visit www.

thunderroadvt.com. You can also follow us on Facebook,

Twitter, and Instagram at @ThunderRoadVT.

WHEN WINTER GETS TOUGH…

GET TOUGHER

ERASE BAD CREDIT

FOREVER!

Credit repair companies make

false claims and promises to

erase a trail of unpaid bills or

late payments from your credit

report. However, only time can

erase negative, but accurate

credit information. In addition,

federal law forbids credit repair

companies from collecting

money before they provide

their service. TIP: If you have

questions about your credit history

or you want to know how

to get a free copy of your credit

report call the ATTORNEY

GENERAL’S CONSUMER

ASSISTANCE PROGRAM at

1-800-649-2424. Don’t send

any money to a credit repair

company until you check it out.

PARTS

SALES

SERVICE

33 WATERMAN ROAD | EXIT 3 OFF I89 | SOUTH ROYALTON, VT

802-764-8150

www.bigtextrailerworld.com/royalton


COMMERCIAL

RENTALS/SALES

MONTPELIER 3 OFFICES

for Rent in Federal Brick style

building, downtown district,

28 Barre Street. SUITE 1A-

Ground fl oor offi ce-1100 sq /

ft. $1800 / mo + heat. SUITE

1B-Ground fl oor offi ce-728

sq / ft.- $1100 + heat. SUITE

2-Second Floor Office-1200

sq / ft, $1600 / mo + heat & Utilities.

Will combine units if more

space is needed. Available

Now. Call Stephen at 802-

229-0779 for more information

and leave a message.

APARTMENTS

ROOMS/HOUSES

FOR RENT

RULE OF THUMB......

Describe your property,

not the “appropriate” buyer or

renter, not the landlord,

not the neighbors.

Just describe the property

and you’ll almost always obey

the law.

SPACIOUS 2 bedroom, 1

bathroom apartment w/large

kitchen and living area. This

apartment is approximately

1200 square feet with easy

access from VT RTE 2 in East

Montpelier, Vermont. Pleasant

covered porch off the

back with a shared large yard.

Includes all utilities, trash removal,

snow plowing and off

street parking. $1400. per

month. No smoking and no

pets. First and last month rent

and reference check required.

Contact Denise Wheeler at

802-456-8730

REAL ESTATE

VACATION

RENTALS/SALES

Warm Weather is Year Round

in Aruba. The Water is safe,

and the dining is fantastic.

Walk out to the beach. 3-bedroom

weeks available. Sleeps

8. Email: carolaction@aol.

com for more information.

LAND FOR SALE

MONTPELIER, VT 3.93 acre

building lot for sale. Could be

divided into up to 6 lots or up

to 18 units of multi-unit housing

with town water and sewer

available. $100,000. Contact

Soren Pfeffer at 802-249-0167

or soren@centralvermontre.

com

WINDSOR, VERMONT -IN-

VEST- 15 ACRE BUILDING

LOT, Beautiful, Unique, Quiet,

Peaceful. Camping, Hiking,

Hunting, Firewood, Logging,

Solar, Wind. $63,000. 315-

528-0172

HOMES

WORRIED ABOUT

FORECLOSURE?

Having trouble paying your

mortgage? The Federal Trade

Commission says don’t pay

any fees in advance to people

who promise to protect

your home from foreclosure.

Report them to the FTC, the

nation’s consumer protection

agency. For more information,

call 1-877-FTC-HELP or click

on ftc.gov. A message from

The World and the FTC.

Green Light Real Estate Celebrates the Holidays by Giving

Green Light Real Estate will host a Holiday Food Drive

from November 18, 2022, to December 14, 2022. Anyone can

come to our office at 63 Barre Street in Montpelier to donate

non-perishable food items or toiletries and enter to win one

of five gifts specially picked out from some of our favorite

Central Vermont businesses.

As the holiday season gets into full gear and the snow starts

to fall, the Green Light family finds that we have much to be

grateful for. We’ve opened three offices and recently moved

our Montpelier office to a larger location. Our agents, old and

new, are excelling and helping the people of Central Vermont

to purchase and sell properties across the area. The Green

Light Real Estate family continues to expand and grow, and

to celebrate these successes, we are giving back to the community

that has supported us over the last ten years.

This year we’re collecting non-perishable food items to aid

the organizations that are tackling our state’s growing food

insecurity problem. As of 2021, 13.5 million households in the

U.S were food insecure, and 5.1 million households had inadequate

food security. A University of Vermont study found

that nearly 30% of Vermont households have been food insecure

since COVID-19, and about a third of that population

were newly food insecure. Hosting this drive lets us give back

to the community in a way that allows us to continue fulfilling

some of our core commitments.

• • •

What to give new homeowners

this holiday season

The real estate market has been a wild ride in recent years.

Sellers have cashed in on record-breaking profits, and buyers

have had to compete against many others — sometimes

in bidding wars — for a limited number of properties. Once

listed, homes are selling fast. As interest rates rise and inventory

increases, things are likely to change, though for some it

did not come soon enough.

Individuals who were lucky enough to find a new home

this year may discover they now have little money to outfit

those homes. Shoppers with new homeowners on their holiday

shopping lists may want to help those loved ones outfit their

homes this season. The following are some home-related gift

ideas to get shoppers started.

• Video/smart doorbell: Although the smart doorbell market

began with only a handful of options, there’s now a bevy

of manufacturers who make video and smart home doorbells.

These doorbells serve the dual purpose of alerting homeowners

to someone at the door, while providing surveillance of

the comings and goings outside of the home. Depending on

the product, a subscription may be needed to access video history.

Doorbells range from $50 to $200 and more depending

on features and resolution.

• Furniture gift card: There’s a good chance new homeowners

will need to furnish new rooms in a home, particularly if

they’re coming from an apartment or a smaller place. Many

people also like to update furnishings when they move into

new places. A gift card to a popular furniture store in the area

will provide the head-start new homeowners need to secure

sofas, dining sets, lamps, rugs, and more.

• Customized doormat: Give that new home additional curb

appeal with a doormat customized with a special message or

the new homeowners’ names, such as Welcome to the Smith

Home. Other customizeable products include cutting boards

and wall plaques.

• Programmable thermostat: A programmable or learning

thermostat will help new homeowners save on their energy

bills. Many thermostats now pair with smart home systems

and phones and automatically adjust the temperature as needed

to reduce energy consumption.

• Linens: A high thread count sheet set or plush Turkish cotton

towels may not be something new homeowners think to

get for themselves. But these luxurious gifts can make life at

home more comfortable.

Moving into a new home is an exciting yet expensive endeavor.

Carefully curated gifts can tap into what new homeowners

need the most.

“Supporting our community, local businesses, and local

initiatives is extremely important to us. Our business invests

heavily in Vermont towns, and we understand that our business

thrives when our towns thrive,” notes Ray Mikus, Green

Light Real Estate’s principal broker.

“We make it a point to work with and refer local businesses

to our clients when buying and selling homes. We understand

that you get better and more personalized products and services

when you go local, and it’s also a core value of our company.

We understand that supporting local businesses translates

to bolstering our community and decreasing the number

of food insecure families in Central Vermont.”

You can drop your goods off at our Montpelier office on

63 Barre Street. There will be a drop-box on the front porch.

While you’re there, you can enter the contest by filling out the

form or scanning the QR code. If you see our Realtor On Duty

sign–come in and say hi.

Green Light Real Estate specializes in Washington and

Chittenden County. With offices in Montpelier, Barre, and

Northfield we have worked for the last ten years to successfully

cultivate a network of agents, professionals and contractors

that are the best in their respective fields. In 2022 alone

Green Light Real Estate has been involved in over 200 property

transactions giving it one of the broadest reaches of any

real estate brokerage in the area.

FINAL PHASE

WINDY WOOD – BARRE TOWN

WINDY WOOD – BARRE TOWN

“A common interest community”

VIEW “A HOMES common BEING interest BUILT SUNDAYS community”

1 PM – 3 PM

SHOWN BY

BY APPOINTMENT

ANYTIME

CALL 802-249-8251 OR 802-734-1920

CALL 802-249-8251 OR 802-734-1920

One Level Living: single and duplex units, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, full basement, 1 or 2 car garage option

Single family homes priced from $267,000 and Duplex homes priced from $229,000

One Level Living: single units with 2 bedrooms, 2 baths,

full basement, and 2 car garage.

Single family homes priced from $335,000

Directions: From RT 302, turn onto Hill Street at Elmwood Cemetery, ¾ mile on Hill Street, left onto

Windy Wood Road, look for sign on left and turn into Windy Wood.

Directions: From RT 302, turn onto Hill Street at Elmwood Cemetery, ¾ mile

on Hill Street, left onto Windy Wood Road, look for sign on left and turn into

Windy Wood.

AFFORDABLE

APARTMENTS

WITH HEAT

INCLUDED

Highgate

Apartments

located in Barre, is currently accepting applications

for 2 bedroom apartments

Hardwood floors, fresh paint, modern kitchen & baths, yard space,

ample closets, & washer/dryer hook-ups. Laundry room on site.

Rent includes heat/hot water, 24-hour emergency maintenance,

parking, snow removal, & trash removal. Income limits apply.

To request an application, call 476-8645 or stop by the

on-site rental office at 73 Highgate Drive, #121, Barre, VT.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL

TOMORROW WHAT YOU

CAN SELL TODAY!

479-2582

Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753

Central Vermont’s Newspaper

CLASSIFIEDS

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, Vermont 05641

.

CONTACT US

editor@vt-world.com

sales@vt-world.com

www.vt-world.com

Fax:

(802)479-7916

403 Route

302-Berlin

Barre, VT 05641

Telephone

(802)479-2582

1-800-639-9753

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this

newspaper is subject to the fair housing

act which makes it illegal to advertise

“any preference, limitation or discrimination

based on race, color, religion,

sex, handicap, familial status or

national origin, or an intention, to make

any such preference, limitation or discrimination.”

Additionally, Vermont’s Fair Housing

and Public Accomodations Act prohibits

advertising that indicates any preference,

limitation or discrimination based

on age, marital status, sexual orientation

or receipt of public assistance.

This newspaper will not knowingly

accept any advertising for real estate

which is in violation of the law. Our

readers are hereby informed that all

dwellings advertised in this newspaper

are available on an equal opportunity

basis.

To file a complaint of discrimination,

call the Vermont Human Rights

Commisson toll-free at 1-800-416-2010

(voice & TTY) or call HUD toll

free at 1-800-669-9777 (voice)

or 1-800-927-9275 (TTY).

Home Mortgage Rates

LAST

DOWN

LENDER UPDATE RATE APR TERM PTS PAYMENT

Community National 11/25/22 6.625% 6.647% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Bank 1-800-340-3460 6.125% 6.161% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

New England Federal 11/25/22 6.250% 6.278% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Credit Union 866-805-6267 5.875% 5.921% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

Northfield Savings 11/25/22 6.250% 6.294% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Bank (NSB) 5.875% 5.948% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

802-485-5871

VT State Employees 11/25/22 6.375% 6.440% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Credit Union (VSECU) 6.125% 6.210% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

1-800-371-5162 X5345

Rates can change without notice. ***APRs are based on 20% down payment. Some

products are available with as little as 5% down, with purchase of Private Mortgage

Insurance (PMI). The cost of PMI is not included in the APR calculations.

Find your Peace and Quiet!

Custom-built Contemporary, privately sited on 111.2

acres in Barre Town. Graceful lines. Soaring ceilings. Wall

of windows bring the outside, inside. Impressive stone

fireplace. Kitchen with granite countertops, Garland

range/oven, and walk-in pantry. Primary bedroom suite.

Detached 3-car heated garage with walk-up storage

overhead. Whole house generator. Private spring fed

pond, mixed woodland with trails, stonewalls and

gardens. Variety of woodland creatures and birds. Only

a short drive down Trow Hill to services, too. $875,000.

Lori P. Holt, Broker

317 River Street | Montpelier, VT 05602

LoriHolt@VTREGroup.com

802-793-6223 cell

© 2020 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated

franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices

and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service

marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.

November 30, 2022 The WORLD page 23


CHRISTMAS TREES & WREATHS

By Andrea Knepper

Extension Master Gardener

University of Vermont

My grandmother had a green thumb. A self-taught

gardener, she cultivated a bountiful garden every summer,

tended a large variety of indoor plants and was always ready

to experiment with and learn about new varieties. One of

my favorite memories of her as a gardener relates to a small,

green, succulent-like leaf she found on the sidewalk near her

apartment.

We had just arrived for a visit when she found this small

leaf. Her excitement seemed excessive as she described how

she had found a piece of a Christmas cactus. I watched as

she carefully put the leaf in some moist potting soil. I forgot

about this incident until some time later when Grandma

showed me a lush green plant, which she proudly reported

had grown from that small leaf she picked up from the sidewalk.

Christmas cactus (Schlumgera bridgesii), and its close relative,

the Thanksgiving cactus (Schlumgera truncata), appear

for sale in garden centers at this time of year. They make

wonderful gifts as they are easy to care for and, with a bit of

knowledge, can be coaxed to rebloom with modest effort.

Identification of these cacti can be made by examining

their leaf segments. Both types have projections along the

edge. The Thanksgiving cactus leaf projections are pointed

while those of the Christmas cactus are more rounded. Both

types bloom in a variety of colors, most commonly red, pink,

purple and white.

Christmas Cacti

The Christmas cactus with its showy flowers that bloom in winter

is a popular, easy-to-grow holiday plant. (photo: Sabine Schwoaze/

Pixabay)

They are native to the rainforests of Brazil where their

roots anchor them to tree branches or rocky outcrops.

Because of this heritage, their needs are different than other

popular succulents.

A succulent potting mix is the best choice for these cacti.

Water when the surface of the soil is dry. Christmas and

Thanksgiving cacti also prefer a humid environment.

This can be simulated by placing a drip tray of small stones

under the plant pot. Keep a small amount of water in the tray

to evaporate. The pot should not be submerged in the water

but sitting atop the stones. These plants prefer bright light,

but not direct sunlight.

Both the Christmas and Thanksgiving cactus are shortday

plants. To encourage them to bloom, they must have a

minimum of 12 hours of darkness and cooler temperatures,

ideally in the 50-60 degree Fahrenheit range, for about six

weeks. Once buds begin to appear, you can return the cactus

to its usual location. Do not fertilize your cactus while it is in

bloom.

These beginner-friendly cacti are relatively disease-free.

The most common problem is stem or root rot, caused by

excessive moisture. This easily can be avoided by using

well-draining soil, such as a succulent potting mix, and allowing

the soil to dry between waterings. There are reports of

lovingly cared-for Christmas and Thanksgiving cactus living

for decades.

Christmas and Thanksgiving cacti prefer to have their roots

fit snugly in their pot, so replanting is only necessary every

three to five years.

In addition to being easy to care for, both are excellent

candidates for propagating from cuttings. Take a cutting of

one or more leaf segments and simply allow to dry out for a

couple of days. Once dry, place the cutting in moist soil. After

roots have developed, which takes a few weeks, transplant

into succulent potting mix and water as you would for an

established plant.

GILBERT

TREE FARM

Choose & Cut Trees $ 50

PRE-CUT TREESES

(Priced By Size)

BALSAM WREATHS

Sm. $20 Lg. $30

9am-4pm Fri., Sat., Sun.

Opening Day Nov. 25

- CASH ONLY PLEASE -

1865 Weir Road • Williamstown

802-433-1260

DOG RIVER FARM

WREATH SALES BEGIN SAT., NOV. 19

TREE SALES BEGIN SAT., NOV. 26

TREES - WREATHS - GARLANDS

MANY SIZES TO CHOOSE FROM

Kissing Balls • Wreaths 24”, 36”, 48”

Wreaths & Garlands by Order Now

3 ft. & 4 ft. Wreaths Made-to-order

for your home or business

5665 Route 12 Berlin (Northfield Rd.)

Call 249-0383 for orders or more information

OPEN EVERY DAY 10-6

(After Thanksgiving)

Huge Selection Of

Trees, Wreaths

Poinsettias,

Houseplants,

Decorations,

Customized Baskets,

Pottery, Etc.

Thomas

Farm & Garden

535 US Rt. 302-Berlin

802-622-8466

thomasgroupusa.com

.

CHRISTMAS TREES

Wreaths, Garland,

Kissing Balls,

Ornaments,

Make-Your-Own

Wreath Decorations

Great Selection Of

Poinsettias, Cyclamens

Frosted Ferns,

Christmas Cactus

CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS

& GIFT ITEMS

Come Check Us Out!

MONTPELIER

190 East Montpelier Road

Montpelier, VT 05602

802-229-9187

www.MontpelierAgway.com

M-F 8AM-6PM • SAT 8AM-5PM • SUN. 9AM-4PM

Fresh Cut

BALSAM

CHRISTMAS

TREES

Beautiful

Decorated or

Undecorated

WREATHS

Balsam Garland, too!

from our farm

OPEN M-F 8:30am-5:00pm

CLOSED Wednesday

1 mile north of E. Montpelier Village

on Rt. 14 (follow signs)

We Ship Anywhere • 223-5757

page 24 The WORLD November 30, 2022

BARRE LIONS CLUB

PREMIUM

NATIVE FRESH-CUT

CHRISTMAS

TREES

Premium Select from the

Moffat Farm in Craftsbury

$40ea.

DEC. 2, 3 & 4

Fri. 12:00-5:00

Sat. & Sun.

9:00-5:00

We Serve

at

TATROʻS

ACES

272 Morrison Rd.

Barre Town

across from

OʻReilly Warehouse

Stowell & Son

Christmas Tree Farm

Our 51st

Season

1000's of

Choices

Balsam Fir, Fraser

Fir, & Blue Spruce

4’ up to 20’

Reasonable Prices!

2022 Choose &

Cut Schedule

Nov. 25-Dec. 18

OPEN FRI., SAT. & SUN. 9:00AM-4:00 PM

We Accept Debit & Credit Cards facebook.com/stowelltrees

For directions &

more info go to www.lhstrees.com

lhstrees04@gmail.com 802-276-3382

1591 Twin Ponds Rd., Brookfield

Christmas Barn Open

Bruce’s Hillside

Tree Farm

Locally Grown Pre-Cut Trees

Great Selection Of Wreaths

Open Every Weekend Until Christmas

FRI, SAT., SUN. 10-4

Shawn 249-2509 or Jill 479-0816

946 SOUTH BARRE ROAD

ROUTE 14, SO.BARRE

Fresh trees and

greens cut daily!

(Starting Nov. 25)

Tree Sales

Til 5 PM

Trees wrapped

for travel

Enjoy Hot Spiced Cider

while you shop.

Also, large selection of

Wreaths & Kissing Balls

WE SHIP WREATHS & GIFTS

ALMOST EVERYWHERE

(Mostly Continental US)

Create & send your own

custom holiday gifts.

223-2740

www.morsefarm.com

10AM-5PM

Montpelier ~ Just 2.7 miles up

Main St. from the round-about

"The Capital City's Beautiful Backyard"

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