CHRONICLE - Nanyang Technological University

www3.ntu.edu.sg

CHRONICLE - Nanyang Technological University

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CHRONICLE

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02 NEWS

News Bites

NTU

NTU DEVELOPS ROBOT FOR

HUMAN AID

A team led by Prof Xie Ming from

the School of Mechanical and Aerospace

Engineering, has developed

a humanoid robot called NASH, or

NTU Advanced Smart Humanoid.

NASH can perform simple tasks,

and learn and adapt. It is intended

to help people with menial tasks

and assist the elderly.

BLOOD TEST KIT TO PREDICT

HEART ATTACK AND STROKE

RISKS

Researchers are working with

the National University Hospital

(NUH) on a blood test kit that

can predict the chance of a person

having a heart attack in the future.

The team is working on identifying

proteins called biomarkers that

can be used to pinpoint those at

risk of cardiovascular disease.

Lead scientist Professor Newman

Sze said they hope the kit would

produce more accurate readings,

compared with the current tests

based on weight, blood pressure

and cholesterol level.

$3M GIFT TO NANYANG BUSI-

NESS SCHOOL

NTU Pro-Chancellor, Dr Wee Cho

Yaw, gave S$3 million to establish

a new scholarship fund at for

students in the Master of Science

(Finance) programme. It is aimed

at enhancing relations between

Singapore and Chinese institutions,

the Wee Cho Yaw Master

of Science (Finance) Scholarship

Fund will be open to eligible and

qualified Chinese financial sector

regulators.

MASTER’S PROGRAMME FOR

AEROSPACE PROFESSIONALS

NTU partnered The University of

Manchester, UK, to launch a new

masters programme targeted at

aerospace industry professionals.

The degree programme in Project

Management aims to cater to

working professionals, with Rolls-

Royce’s staff and their partners in

Asia among the first to benefit.

The Duke of York Prince Andrew

was present at the signing of the

Memorandum of Understanding

between the two universities.

ELECTRONIC TABLET TO BE

USED IN INDIA

The I-slate, a low-cost electronic

tablet developed by the Institute

of Sustainable and Applied Infodynamics

(ISAID), has undergone

successful trials in India. It will

be used as a substitute for schoolchildren’s

traditional blackboard

slates. The joint institute between

NTU and Rice University is preparing

the solar powered tablet to enter

production.

SINGAPORE

PUB RECOMMENDED TO RE-

LOOK DRAINAGE SYSTEM

A flood panel made its initial

recommendations for the Public

Utilities Board to reexamine the

drainage system. More real-time

information on rainfall should be

collected. Other observations by

the panel were that canals and

drains were no longer enough

to handle rainfall here and other

ways to slow and retain rainwater,

such as ponds or porous roads,

should be added to the drainage

system.

Upcoming Events

MORE DIVERSITY IN UNIVER-

SITY SECTOR

Minister of State for Education

Lawrence Wong called for a more

varied university sector in Singapore.

Speaking at the graduation

ceremony of SIM University,

he said the Ministry of Education

wants to encourage more diversity

in the university sector to meet the

different aspirations of Singaporeans

in higher education. This will

allow each university to develop

niches of excellence based on its

individual strengths and traditions.

INDEPENDENT S-LEAGUE A

POSSIBILITY

The Football Association of Singapore

(FAS) has promised prospective

S-League CEO candidates

full autonomy in the running of

the 16-year-old league next season.

This includes employing a

dedicated management team with

a competitions chief and media

manager. For the first time since

1999, the S-League could become

an independent entity. Currently,

key decisions regarding the competition

have to be approved by

the FAS Council.

ACCOUNTING FIRMS CON-

TINUE HIRING

Accounting firms continue hiring

Leading accounting employers

say they will keep hiring figures

for graduates constant for the

upcoming year. The firms, including

PricewaterhouseCoopers

(PwC), Ernst & Young, Deloitte

and KPMG, have said the uncertain

economic situation means

they will have to be more cautious

in hiring. However, business for

the firms is expected to be relatively

resilient even in a downturn,

and they will also need the

manpower in the longer term.

22ND OCTOBER

NATIONAL SANGUOSHA CHAMPIONSHIPS

Time: From 9am onwards

Venue: Exhibition Hall, Level 3, Nanyang Auditorium

Categories: 3V3 and 8-Player

Registration fee: $2

To register: Email your name, matriculation number,

contact details and category to san_guo_sha@

hotmail.com or join he facebook group National Sanguosha

Championships or the QQ Group: 16508837

For 3V3 category, participants may join individually,

as a pair or in groups of three.

Upon successful registration, participants will receive

further details and instructions.

If you have any exciting events to publicise, please

don’t hesitate to contact us at

chronicle@ntu.edu.sg

WORLD

SWEDISH POET WINS 2011

NOBEL LITERATURE PRIZE

Swedish poet wins 2011 Nobel

Literature prize Swedish poet

Tomas Transtromer has won the

2011 Nobel prize for literature, the

awarding committee said on October

6th. The Swedish Academy

said the poet, 80, had won ‘because,

through his condensed,

translucent images, he gives us

fresh access to reality’. The prize

of 10 million Swedish crowns

(S$1.9 million) was the fourth of

this year’s Nobel prizes. Awards

for medicine, physics and chemistry

were previously given out.

LIBYA MILITIA FINDSD MASS

GRAVES

Two mass graves in Tripoli containing

the bodies of more than

900 people who died during the

rebel assault that ousted Mummar

Gaddafi has been discovered, said

a Libyan military unit on October

5th. An official from the cemetery

said the corpses had been collected

from streets and hospitals

following the rebel assault on the

Libyan capital in late August. Naji

al-Issawi, a commander in a unit

of Tripoli’s military council, said

officials planned to dig up more

of the site and start identifying

the remains.

I AM WEARING...

A short sleeved

men’s cardigan

from with a pair of

baby blue Bermudas

from Taiwan. My

checkered shirt is

from Padini, $60,

paired with my

converse sneakers..

MY PERSONAL

STYLE...

I prefer European

fashion and style

as they are more

mature looking.

MY STYLE ICON

IS...

Edison Chen.

NTU CAMPUS

STYLE IS...

I think it is rather

effortlessly stylish.

I'D NOT BE

CAUGHT DEAD

WEARING...

A singlet paired

with three –quarter

loose pants!

�����������

CHRONICLE

����

18

���

02

AUSTRALIAN PEOPLE ARREST

ALLEGED PEOPLE SMUGGLERS

Australian police arrest alleged

people smugglers Australian police

have disrupted an international

people smuggling ring

by arresting two suspected key

players. Australian Federal Police

officers arrested the pair, who allegedly

helped foreign nationals

to Australia illegally on boats

from Indonesia, following a 10month

undercover sting operation.

Undercover agents contacted

the suspects to arrange for a

fictitious Afghan family to be

brought to Australia by boat from

Indonesia, he said.

TRANSGENDER AUSTRALIANS

WIN RECOGNITION AS MEN

Two transgender people won an

appeal in Australia’s highest court

on Thursday giving them legal

recognition as men despite not

having complete sex change surgeries.

The court ruled that characteristics

that identify a person

as male or female are ‘confined to

external physical characteristics

that are socially recognisable.’

This recognition does not require

knowledge of a person’s sexual

organs, the court said. Transgender

and intersex organisations

said the ruling, as a precedent,

would spare others from having

to undergo medically unnecessary

surgery to have their chosen

gender recognised.

LIM CHONG YEN

YEAR 4 / SCHOOL OF

MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE

ENGINEERING


02 NEWS

News Bites

NTU

NTU DEVELOPS ROBOT FOR

HUMAN AID

A team led by Prof Xie Ming from

the School of Mechanical and Aerospace

Engineering, has developed

a humanoid robot called NASH, or

NTU Advanced Smart Humanoid.

NASH can perform simple tasks,

and learn and adapt. It is intended

to help people with menial tasks

and assist the elderly.

BLOOD TEST KIT TO PREDICT

HEART ATTACK AND STROKE

RISKS

Researchers are working with

the National University Hospital

(NUH) on a blood test kit that

can predict the chance of a person

having a heart attack in the future.

The team is working on identifying

proteins called biomarkers that

can be used to pinpoint those at

risk of cardiovascular disease.

Lead scientist Professor Newman

Sze said they hope the kit would

produce more accurate readings,

compared with the current tests

based on weight, blood pressure

and cholesterol level.

$3M GIFT TO NANYANG BUSI-

NESS SCHOOL

NTU Pro-Chancellor, Dr Wee Cho

Yaw, gave S$3 million to establish

a new scholarship fund at for

students in the Master of Science

(Finance) programme. It is aimed

at enhancing relations between

Singapore and Chinese institutions,

the Wee Cho Yaw Master

of Science (Finance) Scholarship

Fund will be open to eligible and

qualified Chinese financial sector

regulators.

MASTER’S PROGRAMME FOR

AEROSPACE PROFESSIONALS

NTU partnered The University of

Manchester, UK, to launch a new

masters programme targeted at

aerospace industry professionals.

The degree programme in Project

Management aims to cater to

working professionals, with Rolls-

Royce’s staff and their partners in

Asia among the first to benefit.

The Duke of York Prince Andrew

was present at the signing of the

Memorandum of Understanding

between the two universities.

ELECTRONIC TABLET TO BE

USED IN INDIA

The I-slate, a low-cost electronic

tablet developed by the Institute

of Sustainable and Applied Infodynamics

(ISAID), has undergone

successful trials in India. It will

be used as a substitute for schoolchildren’s

traditional blackboard

slates. The joint institute between

NTU and Rice University is preparing

the solar powered tablet to enter

production.

SINGAPORE

PUB RECOMMENDED TO RE-

LOOK DRAINAGE SYSTEM

A flood panel made its initial

recommendations for the Public

Utilities Board to reexamine the

drainage system. More real-time

information on rainfall should be

collected. Other observations by

the panel were that canals and

drains were no longer enough

to handle rainfall here and other

ways to slow and retain rainwater,

such as ponds or porous roads,

should be added to the drainage

system.

Upcoming Events

MORE DIVERSITY IN UNIVER-

SITY SECTOR

Minister of State for Education

Lawrence Wong called for a more

varied university sector in Singapore.

Speaking at the graduation

ceremony of SIM University,

he said the Ministry of Education

wants to encourage more diversity

in the university sector to meet the

different aspirations of Singaporeans

in higher education. This will

allow each university to develop

niches of excellence based on its

individual strengths and traditions.

INDEPENDENT S-LEAGUE A

POSSIBILITY

The Football Association of Singapore

(FAS) has promised prospective

S-League CEO candidates

full autonomy in the running of

the 16-year-old league next season.

This includes employing a

dedicated management team with

a competitions chief and media

manager. For the first time since

1999, the S-League could become

an independent entity. Currently,

key decisions regarding the competition

have to be approved by

the FAS Council.

ACCOUNTING FIRMS CON-

TINUE HIRING

Accounting firms continue hiring

Leading accounting employers

say they will keep hiring figures

for graduates constant for the

upcoming year. The firms, including

PricewaterhouseCoopers

(PwC), Ernst & Young, Deloitte

and KPMG, have said the uncertain

economic situation means

they will have to be more cautious

in hiring. However, business for

the firms is expected to be relatively

resilient even in a downturn,

and they will also need the

manpower in the longer term.

22ND OCTOBER

NATIONAL SANGUOSHA CHAMPIONSHIPS

Time: From 9am onwards

Venue: Exhibition Hall, Level 3, Nanyang Auditorium

Categories: 3V3 and 8-Player

Registration fee: $2

To register: Email your name, matriculation number,

contact details and category to san_guo_sha@

hotmail.com or join he facebook group National Sanguosha

Championships or the QQ Group: 16508837

For 3V3 category, participants may join individually,

as a pair or in groups of three.

Upon successful registration, participants will receive

further details and instructions.

If you have any exciting events to publicise, please

don’t hesitate to contact us at

chronicle@ntu.edu.sg

WORLD

SWEDISH POET WINS 2011

NOBEL LITERATURE PRIZE

Swedish poet wins 2011 Nobel

Literature prize Swedish poet

Tomas Transtromer has won the

2011 Nobel prize for literature, the

awarding committee said on October

6th. The Swedish Academy

said the poet, 80, had won ‘because,

through his condensed,

translucent images, he gives us

fresh access to reality’. The prize

of 10 million Swedish crowns

(S$1.9 million) was the fourth of

this year’s Nobel prizes. Awards

for medicine, physics and chemistry

were previously given out.

LIBYA MILITIA FINDSD MASS

GRAVES

Two mass graves in Tripoli containing

the bodies of more than

900 people who died during the

rebel assault that ousted Mummar

Gaddafi has been discovered, said

a Libyan military unit on October

5th. An official from the cemetery

said the corpses had been collected

from streets and hospitals

following the rebel assault on the

Libyan capital in late August. Naji

al-Issawi, a commander in a unit

of Tripoli’s military council, said

officials planned to dig up more

of the site and start identifying

the remains.

I AM WEARING...

A short sleeved

men’s cardigan

from with a pair of

baby blue Bermudas

from Taiwan. My

checkered shirt is

from Padini, $60,

paired with my

converse sneakers..

MY PERSONAL

STYLE...

I prefer European

fashion and style

as they are more

mature looking.

MY STYLE ICON

IS...

Edison Chen.

NTU CAMPUS

STYLE IS...

I think it is rather

effortlessly stylish.

I'D NOT BE

CAUGHT DEAD

WEARING...

A singlet paired

with three –quarter

loose pants!

�����������

CHRONICLE

����

18

���

04

AUSTRALIAN PEOPLE ARREST

ALLEGED PEOPLE SMUGGLERS

Australian police arrest alleged

people smugglers Australian police

have disrupted an international

people smuggling ring

by arresting two suspected key

players. Australian Federal Police

officers arrested the pair, who allegedly

helped foreign nationals

to Australia illegally on boats

from Indonesia, following a 10month

undercover sting operation.

Undercover agents contacted

the suspects to arrange for a

fictitious Afghan family to be

brought to Australia by boat from

Indonesia, he said.

TRANSGENDER AUSTRALIANS

WIN RECOGNITION AS MEN

Two transgender people won an

appeal in Australia’s highest court

on Thursday giving them legal

recognition as men despite not

having complete sex change surgeries.

The court ruled that characteristics

that identify a person

as male or female are ‘confined to

external physical characteristics

that are socially recognisable.’

This recognition does not require

knowledge of a person’s sexual

organs, the court said. Transgender

and intersex organisations

said the ruling, as a precedent,

would spare others from having

to undergo medically unnecessary

surgery to have their chosen

gender recognised.

LIM CHONG YEN

YEAR 4 / SCHOOL OF

MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE

ENGINEERING


News

WKWSCI students premiere two

controversial films nation-wide

OVERCOMING BARRIERS: Organisers Roshilah bte Atan (LEFT) and Naresh Subhash (RIGHT) are set to screen films with explicit

content.

PHOTO | COURTERSY OF IVAN TAN

�����������

TWO controversial films that have

never been shown in Singapore

before will premiere in an NTU

film festival from October 27th to

30th.

These two films have been rated

R21, and will be shown without

any cuts for Wee Kim Wee School

"SYNDROMES AND

A CENTURY"

Director: Apichatpong

Weerasethakul

The story is about director

Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s

parents who were

both doctors, and director’s

memories about growing up

in the hospital environment.

"CZECH DREAM"

Director: Vít Klusák & Filip

Remunda

Czech Dream documents

the transformation of two

final-year film students

into young, aspiring businessmen

as they launch

a nationwide advertising

campaign for a hypermarket.

But the hypermarket

does not exist.

of Communication and Information’s

(WKWSCI) Perspectives Film

Festival 2011.

“A Clockwork Orange”, the

main draw of the festival with

graphic portrayals of sex and violence,

was previously denied from

being shown in Singapore when

another film festival tried to bring

the film in under a M18 rating.

The second film, “Caterpillar”,

is a humanised portrayal of Japanese

writer Edogawa Rampo’s horror-fantasy

short story on an insatiable

sexual instinct which was

banned from reprinting in 1939.

Apart from these, the four other

films to be showcased are “The

Battle of Algiers”, “Syndromes

and a Century”, “Czech Dream”

Interview with the Associate Provost – Page 7

and “The Blue Kite”.

All the films are centred on the

theme of controversy and will be

screened at the theatres at VivoCity’s

Golden Village and French

language center Alliance Francaise.

The organising team, consisting

WKWSCI students, sought out

films portraying controversial issues

like sex and politics, because

they felt that the film industry in

Singapore works within restricted

boundaries, and securing the

rights for these films would make

the film festival more appealing.

“We initially brainstormed

on several themes but settled

on the theme of controversy after

we became attracted to the

word “banned”, “taboo”, and “red

tape”,” said Eternality Tan, the

festival’s director.

“Controversies unite and divide

us. Many of these films provide

strong socio-cultural insights

and are powerful commentaries

on the nature of controversy, and

indirectly, they broach the topic of

censorship of cinema.”

They hope to provoke conversation

and inspire audiences to

think about issues raised in the

films.

Although the R21 rating

placed on “A Clockwork Orange”

and “Caterpillar” may potentially

alienate the younger crowds, Tan

says that it is not a cause for concern.

According to Mr Tan, their

target audiences are young adults

who are film enthusiasts or work-

ing professionals interested in the

arts.

"We are also targeting the

older demographic because some

of our films were released decades

“Many of these

films provide

strong sociocultural

insights

and are powerful

commentaries."

Eternality Tan

Director

Film Festival

ago, and these people may have

some memory about the controversy

and censorship issues surrounding

these films and would

like the chance to see them,” said

Tan.

Faced with difficulties liaising

with overseas distributors,

and bringing in directors to speak

about their films during their

screenings, the team is relieved

that they were able to pull everything

together in the last three

months.

“I think this stems from the

fact that we all really like films,

and really want to build the perspectives

brand into a film festival

that people will look out for,” said

Grace Auyong, head of publicity

and sponsorship.

"CATERPILLAR" "THE BATTLE OF

"THE BLUE KITE"

"A CLOCKWORK

ALGIERS"

ORANGE"

Director: Koji Wakamatsu

Lieutenant Kurokawa is the

“god soldier” — a Japanese

war hero who earns fame

and glory for killing Chinese

people in the Second Sino-

Japanese War of the late

1930s. He returns home as a

war victim, deaf and mute,

with all four limbs amputated

and his face scarred with

vicious burns.

The burden falls on his wife,

Shigeko, who struggles to

meet the lieutenant’s unending

demands for food and

sex.

Although she is repelled by

him, she feels the duty to

take care of him.

Director: Gillo Pontecorvo

The Battle of Algiers was

created based on events

during the Algerian Revolution

that led to Algeria’s

independence from France

in 1962.

The film is about the organisation

of a guerilla movement

and the methods used

to break free from colonial

power.

As Algerian insurgents

plant bombs, demonstrate

in the streets, and plan their

next moves, the French

army attempts to stop them

by figuring out and dismantling

the terrorists’ operation

system.

Director; Tian Zhuangzhuang

Set in China during Chairman

Mao’s regime in the

1950s and 1960s, The Blue

Kite conveys the impact of

political movements on the

family unit.

Told through the perspective

of a young boy, Tietou, the

story portrays the evolution

of his family through the

course of the Anti-Rightist

Movement, the Great Leap

Forward and the Cultural

Revolution.

For example, the real father

evolved from the loving patriach

to the protective but

unemotional stepfather.

Director: Stanley Kubrick

Set in a dystopian future in

Britain, this bold and satirical

crime-drama focuses on

Alex, a young, domineering

delinquent whose penchant

for violence and sex leads

him to be set up by his resentful

gang.

In prison, Alex volunteers

to undergo an experimental

psychological treatment developed

by the government

as a cure for all criminal

problems.

Alex is conditioned to feel

nausea in relation to violence

and sex, and returns

to society soon after — but

is he really cured?


04

NEWS

�����������

CHRONICLE

Starbucks opens at NTU campus

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YOU can now get your daily dose

of Starbucks coffee right in school,

from an outlet that has just opened

on October 5 at the Student Activities

Centre (SAC).

Students and staff will also get

10 per cent off the prices of all

food and drinks when they flash

their NTU identification cards at

the counter.

However, there are no seats

in the outlet, although customers

can turn to the sofas and

armchairs at the SAC and Global

Lounge.

Starbucks said that this is due

to space constraint at the SAC.

President of the NTU Students’

Union, Ramanan Kumarasamy, 21,

said the decision to bring in Starbucks

to NTU was made after students

expressed that they wanted

a good place to have coffee while

studying late.

The Starbucks outlet will operate

from 7.30am to 10pm on

weekdays, later than most cafes

and canteens in NTU, which close

at 9pm. The outlet will also be

open on Saturdays from 8am to

6pm, and on Sundays from 10am

to 4pm. During the holidays, the

coffee also continues brewing,

from 8am to 5pm.

ENGINEERS are not usually famed

for their eloquence, but when Mitali

Kakran speaks, the audience is

sure to listen.

The Ph.D student from the

School of Mechanical and Aerospace

Engineering came out tops

in the NTU round of the annual

Present Around The World (PATW)

public speaking competition.

However, if the store traffic

remains high, the outlet may operate

24 hours instead, on weekdays

during the school term, said

a Starbucks spokesman.

Final-year student from the

School of Electric and Electronic

Engineering, Marcus Lee, 28, believes

that the main draw of having

an outlet on campus is the

convenience of getting quality

coffee.

Some students have expressed

doubt that this outlet can replicate

Starbucks’ ambience, without sofas

and coffee tables.

National Institute of Education

third-year student Ng Wan Ching,

21, said: “I envision a cosy setting

when I think of Starbucks but this

is lost at the school’s outlet without

the sofas.”

However this was not an issue

with others, who said that there

were many seating options nearby

such as the Global Lounge.

“Most students just buy and

bring their drinks to lectures or

elsewhere to sit,” said Lim Ee Huai,

first-year-student from the School

of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

School of Mechanical and

Aerospace Engineering third-year

student Muhammad Saufi, who

visits Starbucks once a month,

was also surprised by the outlet’s

location.

“It should be in a more well

exposed area, like where Mac-

Donald’s is, so that people can see

the store once they step into the

school,” said the 23-year-old.

Director of Students, Associate

Professor Lok Tat Seng, welcomed

the opening of Starbucks.

“A great café which serves

good coffee and food can contribute

to the ambience and promote

student interaction at the new Student

Activities Centre and Global

Lounge,” he said.

Besides getting their coffee

fix, students can also put up

publicity materials for schoolbased

events on the café’s com-

Public speaking champ

HONG KONG: The winner of PATW will represent Asia-Pacific in London.

PHOTO | CURTESY OF MITALI KAKRAN

�����������

The competition was organised

by the Institute of Engineering and

Technology (IET) to encourage engineering

students to hone their

public speaking skills.

After progressing through the

national level, Kakran also won the

Asia-Pacific regional round, held in

Hong Kong. In November this year,

she will represent the Asia-Pacific

at the global round in London.

Kakran, 25, clinched the top

����

18

���

04

WHAT’S BREWING?: Students queue up for a cup of Starbucks coffee. PHOTO | MALCOLM KOH

spot in the NTU round with her

presentation on Graphene, a carbon

nanomaterial with numerous

applications in the fields of Electronics

and Biomedicine.

Her strategy for the 10-minute

presentation was not to use scientific

jargon, but to explain it simply.

“I presented by giving some real

life examples. For instance, to illustrate

how thin the graphene sheet

is, I suggested that stacking three

million of them will give thickness

of about only 1 mm,” she said.

Besides avoiding technical jargon,

Kakran also noted that enthusiasm

is key to charming the audience.

“If you are passionate about the

subject, the audience can feel that

energy too,” she added.

According to Kakran, the competition

has helped engineers connect

with engineering circles across

the world.

In addition to the excitement of

meeting other engineers and learning

about their work, Kakran added

that PATW was also “a wonderful

learning experience for engineers

to brush up their presentation

skills”.

“I envision a

cosy setting

when I think of

Starbucks."

Ng Wan Ching

Third-year student

National Institute of Education

get

munity board located in front of

the counter.

School of Material Science

and Engineering first-year student

Grace Chua said that she does not

mind visiting Starbucks occasionally

to unwind with friends.

“It is a nice environment to

hang out with friends, with the

fragrance of coffee lingering,” said

the 19-year-old.

reach out to

30,000 readers

firsthand

experience of

journalism*

*and some extra AUs / Hall Points never hurt

now recruiting

- news editors

- layout editors

- business managers

- photo editors

apply to duffy@ntu.edu.sg

�����������

CHRONICLE


����

18

���

04

�����������

CHRONICLE

Making an honest living

SELF-STARTERS: Lee Jie Sheng (Left) and Ewan Sou (Right) have set up Alldealsleak to solve your group-buying woes.

PHOTO | MALCOLM KOH

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DESPITE its beginnings as a spontaneous

response to a dishonest

online group-buy deal, reviews

website AllDealsLeak, has developed

into a fully-fledged business

venture. Recently, the site even

clinched a $20,000 grant.

It was set up in a collaboration

by NTU undergraduates and

alumni.

Over a year ago, undergraduates

Ewan Sou and Lee Jie Sheng,

both 22 then, bought a food deal

coupon online which entitled

them to a discount.

But they arrived at the store

to find that the original price was

understated, which reduced the

discount.

Frustrated, the two students

from the School of Humanities

and Social Sciences created a blog

where they wrote entries about

dishonest deals which they had

heard about from friends. This

was their attempt to make more

people aware of such deals.

“At that time, the website was

only a blog to inform other consumers

out there to be careful of

certain deals,” said Sou.

The two started receiving

emails requesting for reviews on

particular deals. They saw the potential

to start a business when

site traffic began to increase,

and roped in Terrance Chung, a

32-year-old NTU alumni formerly

from the School of Computer Engineering.

Together, the trio founded

AllDealsLeak (ADL), a website

that reviews and advises consumers

of group buys.

The site now has about 1200

visitors every day, and has even

been featured in The Sunday

Times, The Business Times and

iWeekly.

ADL selects different deals

from group-buy sites such as

Groupon and StreetDeal and re-

“At that time, the

website was only a

blog to inform other

consumers out

there to be careful

of certain deals."

Ewan Sou

Third-year student

School of Humanities and Social

Studies

views them.

These group-buy sites harness

the power of bulk-buying to get

discounted prices for products

and services for all.

After doing the necessary research,

ADL’s writers will com-

pare the cost and advise consumers

on whether the deal is worth

purchasing.

However, they do not comment

on the quality, as they do

not purchase the deals themselves.

Customers can also give more

information about the various

deals by posting on a reviewing

forum on ADL’s website.

“Consumers who have

bought or redeemed their deals

can share their experiences with

other consumers,” said Sou.

In August this year, their venture

was greatly boosted by the

Chua Thian Poh Venture Grant

worth $20,000, when they submitted

their business plan for the

site.

The grant was available only

to students who have done a minor

or a Masters in Entrepreneurship.

Fortunately, Sou and Lee had

previously taken NTU’s Minor in

Entrepreneurship (MIE) program.

The minor programme taught

them the theoretical aspects of

running a business, such as marketing

and accounting, as well

as how to write a business plan,

which helped them when they applied

for the grant.

“During the course of the program,

we had to work with different

people and teams to complete

tasks in a short time frame,

gaining essential skills that we use

in every aspect of running ADL,”

said Sou.

ADL’s website is at http://alldealsleak.com.

NTU’S Food Connection was

hit by blackouts during lunchtime

last Tuesday, disrupting the

business of food stalls there. The

series of blackouts occurred at

10.55 am and lasted two hours.

The gas supply was cut off as

a result of the power shortage.

This prevented stalls from running,

thus affecting the amount

of money earned that day. It is

still unclear what caused the

problem.

Ms Jannie Toh, manager of

Broadway Holdings Pte Ltd, the

company that runs Food Connections,

said that the Japanese

and mixed rice stalls had to

throw two pots of rice as they

were going bad.

According to Ms Esther

Chew, who helps her husband

at the Japanese food stall, the

rain had brought in more business

than usual as people took

shelter in the canteen. She said

that there was an increase of

20 per cent before the blackout

occurred. After which, business

was halted, resulting in lower

earnings compared to most days.

“I was in a bad mood because

the power shortage affected my

business,” said the 33-year-old.

Korean stall owner Chen

Wen said his total loss amounted

between $300 to $400 as the

blackout left him with only uncooked

ingredients since all his

dishes are usually cooked on the

spot, and this was impossible

with the gas cut.

Mr Chen was unhappy that

this happened during lunchtime,

NEWS 05

Blackout disrupts

business at Can A

LIGHTS OUT: The Japanese food stall's earnings were affected by the blackout.

PHOTO | MALCOLM KOH

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which is the peak period for

business, and that no explanation

was given by the Broadway

Holdings.

Power was initially restored

but it was cut off again after 15

minutes. This continued for three

more times before the electricity

was fully restored two hours later.

Although the cause of the

short-circuit is still under investigation,

Mr Wong, technical

officer of the Office of Facilities

Planning and Management, suspects

faulty appliances.

“I was in a bad

mood because the

power shortage

affected my

business."

Ms Esther Chew

Stall owner

Japanese food stall

To prevent such incidents

from happening again, vegetarian

food stall owner Thuy Nhi

believes that the management

should conduct more frequent

checks on the power supply.

“I hope that the school can

send someone who is experienced

to solve the problem once

and for all,” she said.

Mr Wong said that while his

first response is to resume operation

as soon as possible, he

would also feedback to the management

that thorough checks

on the appliances should be

more frequent.


06 NEWS

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CHRONICLE

Rising demand for TCM clinic

TCM: The clinic also serves the NTU popullation as well as the general public. PHOTO | LAM ZHAO YAO

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EVEN the slightest breeze can

cause student, Derrick Soh, 23,

to break out in hives all over his

body.

It is a condition he has been

marked with since his days in

National Service. With hot and

humid weather or wind elements

like “the fan blowing straight at

[him]”, a breakout will occur. The

itchiness irritates him most especially

when he’s studying.

However, since he decided to

seek treatment at the NTU Chi-

nese Medicine Clinic, the School

of Biological Sciences (SBS) student

has had less frequent breakouts.

Soh has not had a single red

spot on his body in two weeks.

Soh and thousands of NTU

students, staff and public have

been benefiting from the treatment

at the clinic, located at the

School of Biological Sciences,

since it opened. The high demand

had even led to the clinic extending

its hours.

Since September 6th, the clinic

has been operating till 8.30pm on

Tuesdays and Thursdays, instead

of 6 pm - a timing that better

serves working adults, especially

NTU and NIE staff.

The clinic now receives more

than 1000 customers every month

since it began operations in 2010

last year.

Speaking in Mandarin, senior

physician Dr. Yuan Jinhong said:

“TCM’s benefits as compared with

Western medication is that other

than curing the illness or sickness,

it can nurse one’s health from

within the body itself rather than

just treating the illness or sickness

alone.

“Some people who have been

going to Western doctors may feel

like they are not getting better as

well. For example, if he or she has

insomnia, they may not want to

take sleeping pills so they head for

TCM as a solution.”

According to publicity officer

Ms Poh Si Jia, 50 per cent of the

clinic’s customers are from the

public while students and staff

from NTU and NIE make up the

remaining 40 and 10 percent respectively.

The TCM clinic serves as a

learning base for students pursuing

a double degree programme in

Biomedical Sciences and Chinese

Medicine.

As part of their internship in the

second year students observe the

senior physicians they are attached

to during general clinical hours.

The internship period this semester

ends on November 11 and

till then, prices are reduced to 50

and 30 percent respectively for

NTU and NIE students and staff.

A tui na therapy session which

normally costs $10-20 in a private

consultation, is only $5-10 at NTU

TCM Clinic during clinic hours

that students are interning. The

general public can also enjoy a 15

per cent discount.

Students often stream into the

NTU TCM clinic and tend to seek

treatment for common illnesses

such as the flu, skin problems like

acne, insomnia, stress, or they

want to improve well-being or do

tui na therapy for sports-related

injuries, said Ms Poh. The physicians

have also dealt with problems

like infertility or backaches

for older patients.

The convenient location of the

clinic and its affordability are the

two main incentives for many students,

especially those that stay in

NTU’s hall of residences like Teng

Ying Ying, a third-year student

from the School of Humanities

and Social Sciences.

The 20-year-old hoped to improve

her general health and wellbeing

and the NTU TCM clinic was

just what she needed. She has visited

the clinic twice.

“If it’s for flu, fever, cough,

I will go to a Western doctor for

medicine because the treatment is

slightly faster. If it’s for general

well-being, things that are more

intangible, I will go to the Chinese

side,” she said.

“The doctors are quite trustable

as well because they teach

around here.”

More enroll in Chinese Medicine course

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HIS friend, suffering from severe

diarrhea at home, was too frail to

travel to a hospital, so 27-year-old

David Huang tapped on his Traditional

Chinese Medicine (TCM)

knowledge and administered acupuncture

to him, and massaged

his stomach.

“He was skeptical at first, but

the symptoms started to alleviate.

After a nap, the pain and diarrhea

were gone. I was amazed at

the speed of his recovery,” said

Huang.

Huang was among the pioneer

group of nine students who

graduated with a double degree in

Biomedical Science and Chinese

Medicine (BMS).

He said he always felt curious

about the concepts and logics

behind TCM, and felt that taking

such a course allows him to ‘demystify’

TCM.

Others like Ivan Ho, 23, a second-year

BMS student, chose the

course because he was interested

in acupuncture as he was cured

of appendicitis by acupuncture in

the past.

The BMS programme is currently

in its seventh year running.

Two batches have graduated

since. Around 50 students are

taken in each year and the programme

comprises of three years

of education in NTU followed by

two years in Beijing University of

Chinese Medicine (BUCM), China.

The students got to experience

the coldest winter Beijing had in

60 years where the temperature

fell to -16 degree Celsius, said

Huang.

Students also have to cope

with Chinese language as the

teaching medium, and had to learn

anatomical and chemical names

in Chinese, which was something

out of the comfort zone of most

students.

However, he added that despite

the rigorous teaching on

the academic side, they had the

chance to venture into the opera-

IN THE CLASSROOM: Lessons are conducted in Chinese. PHOTO | NG JUN FENG

tion theatre and witness gynecology

operations during internship,

something they did not get to experience

in Singapore.

However, a problem students

face from BCM double degree programme

is its financial demands.

Apart from the five-year tuition

fee, they also had to save up for

their accommodation in Beijing,

which can be taxing.

With regard to the prospects

of TCM practitioners, Ho, 21, felt

that although the local TCM industry

is not established now as

compared to those in mainland

China and Hong Kong, the market

is expanding and there should be

opportunities in the future.

“I am keeping options open,

still undecided between being a

researcher, a clinical physician

and the prospect of further studies,”

he added.

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TRADITIONAL CHINESE

MEDICINE

What is TCM and what are

its benefits?

Traditional Chinese Medicine

is concerned with the

balance of the yin and yang

energy in the body. When

we are unhealthy, there is

a disharmony in our body.

Instead of looking at the

organs or structure of the

body, TCM is more focused

on the functions of the

body. Diagnosis is mainly

done by measuring the

pulse and looking at the

tongue.

Acupuncture:

Uses needles to inject certain

points in the body to

remove blockages of the qi

(vitality or energy) and xue

(our body functions)

Student Price: $20

Duration: 30 minutes

Benefits: Relieves stress,

treats infertility, reduces

neck or back ache, builds

immunity, weight loss, insomnia.

Cupping Therapy:

A form of heat therapy using

cupping – oxygen is

first removed and a vacuum

is created inside the cup

by using fire when applied

to the body to form skin

suction

Student Price: $5 – 10

Duration: 5 – 10 minutes

Benefits: Pain management

as well – rheumatic pains

(in the joints etc), digestion

problems, cold.

Tui na:

Uses special hand techniques

to knead, roll, press

or rub acupoints, muscles,

tendons or other specific

parts of the body to release

tension

Student Price: $50 – 100

depending on treatment

plan and duration (subject

to changes this semester)

Duration: Generally

Benefits: Pain management

for sports-related injuries,

headache, stiff body parts.

Traditional Chinese Medicine:

Prescription of Chinese

medicine to cure illness

Student Price: $5 – 6

Benefits: Can treat many

problems including common

illnesses like stress,

skin problems, indigestion

etc

*All information provided

by the NTU TCM Clinic

For more information

about its operating or general

clinic hours and to

book an appointment, visit

http://www.ntutcm.com/


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CHRONICLE

QUESTION YOUR

TEACHERS

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NEWS 07

A MAN OF SIMPLE NEEDS: Professor Kwok encourages student-initiated businesses and activities for a better student life. PHOTO | WAN ZHONG HAO

Q: As the Associate Provost for

Student Life, what in your opinion

should a model student be?

A: The first attribute involves

moral character, broadly speaking,

and the ability to reason and

not just obey orders and to think

through things.

The second attribute is to be

able to make a positive difference

by being creative, innovative, by

thinking beyond one’s own disciplinary

confines. This is very important.

The third feature is your own

sense of solid and deep training

in your own discipline. This kind

of self-discipline will also enable

you to engage in life-long learning.

The world today is such that

you have to keep on learning and

perhaps unlearning some of the

things that you have learnt before

and sometimes relearning what

you have learnt before.

Now the fourth attribute involves

leadership and the ability

to work in teams to communicate

your ideas and to also persuade

and bring everybody onboard

with you.

The fifth attribute is the ability

to respond to the world around

you. I am very confident that the

NTU graduates can develop these

attributes, not only in the classroom

but outside the classroom,

our graduates will go out there,

not only making a very positive

difference, but they will stand out

above the crowd.

Q: The transition from junior

college to university is never

an easy one due to the changes

in teaching and study methods.

What’s your advice for first-year

students on how to cope with

these changes?

A: I think students must embrace

university life. It’s a great transition.

The university is really a

great laboratory for one to not

just enjoy learning but also be enriched,

be exposed, be engaged in

experiments, be more proactive.

And also, don’t just be on your

own. Go and question the faculty,

question yourself and your fellow

students. That kind of learning is

a very precious experience.

When you go out to the working

world, you will look back to

the university days as some of the

best years of your life and you

would keep wanting to have best

years.

Q: Are there plans to ease stress

levels for students so they can

enjoy a better student life?

A: There should be absolutely

zero stigma about going up to a

counselor or student helper at the

counseling centre to seek a listening

ear. I’ve been a faculty, I know

the struggles of students.

Very close to the deadline,

even some of my most cheerful,

students turn into zombies, but

somehow when they get through

that hump, they are back to their

normal cheerful selves.

These kinds of challenges are

seasonal and they are temporary

and in life there are many more

challenges still to come.

Q: What has becoming a provost

prevented you from doing?

A: I lead a very fulfilling life. But

I could do with a little more time

to keep up with my reading, my

hobbies and my interests.

I’m a collector of odd objects.

I love stones, for example, and

many simple things in life make

“When you go out

into the working

world, you will

look back to the

university days as

one of the best

years of your life."

me quite happy. Even a pebble

can make my day.

Q: With our advanced technology

around school, and good

facilities, it is hard to imagine a

student life without them. What

was your university life like?

A: When I was an undergraduate,

I certainly didn’t have Internet,

we didn’t have social media,

we didn’t even have the handphone.

I’m a little nostalgic about

those days. I can see the great ad-

vantages of today’s technology.

On the other hand, we have to

be a little careful because nothing

quite replaces one-to-one interaction.

Discussion not just between

professor and student but among

students themselves, and you cannot

do this over MSN because

many good ideas come out by just

facing each other and debating

with each other.

There is a difference between

information, data, knowledge and

“Many simple

things in life make

me quite happy.

Even a pebble can

make my day."

what you might call wisdom and

insight, which cannot be gotten

by pressing just a few buttons.

Q: What are some of the plans

the university has to create a

more vibrant environment for

the students?

A: There are many many things

happening on campus. But somehow

we have to make these many

things add up to give a sense of a

more vibrant environment.

As for the physical environment,

the leadership of the university

has been working with

the Student Union and has identified

many spaces on campus that

can be improved by adding some

weather-proofing features and

adding some new furniture and

create some new spaces like informal

learning spaces, interactional

spaces.

We will also be looking into

schools and even student spaces

can have more art on the walls

or more public sculpture, outdoor

sculpture. If let's say a wall is going

to be painted once every few

years, we could have a graffiti

exhibition. Certainly that can be

done.

Q: Will it be possible for more

Muslim and vegetarian stores to

be opened in all the canteens?

A: Currently there are two can-

teen without halal stalls. I’m sharing

my belief that every canteen,

in principle, should have a halal

stall and there may well be good

reasons why these two canteens

do not. I am looking into why it

is like this and how things can

change.

As for vegetarian food, I think

we could do more to cater to different

dietary needs. This could

be also facilitated by student run

businesses.

Q: Which is your favourite can-

teen?

A: This is quite sad to say but I’m

constantly eating on the run and

grabbing a sandwich or some food

and bringing to my next meeting

during lunch time.

I empathize with any student

or faculty member or staff during

peak hours. We must do something

about this and we must have

a plan. Things of course will be

better in the future. In the years to

come we would have more halls,

learning hubs and canteens.

NATURAL REACTION: Nature's response to Man. PHOTO | LIM WEI TING

Professor's film accepted

at international Film Fest

A film depicting the relationship between Man and nature has

been accepted in the Lucerne International Film Festival held in

Switzerland from October 19 - 22.

In his film, Professor Isaaz Kerlow told of the harmonious relationship

between the couple deteriorated when the man became

unkind to the woman. Her retaliations came in the form of Earth

hazards.

The film will be screened privately at Lido Theatre on October 13.


Lifestyle Explore

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HALLOWEEN HORROR NIGHTS

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BECOME the next big star at Universal

Studios Singapore (USS) come

Halloween, when visitors will find

themselves on the other side of the

camera on the park’s Halloween Horror

Nights.

Modelled after the long running

and highly successful Halloween

events at its sister parks Universal

Studios Hollywood and Universal

Orlando Resort, Halloween Horror

Nights at USS revolves around the

concept of ‘trapping’ visitors in a horror

film.

In what is USS’ first Halloween

special since its opening early last

year, visitors will meet clowns and

characters that look fresh out of a horror

movie, including ‘The Director’—a

sadistic filmmaker obsessed with filming

tortured subjects.

‘The Director’ will cast visitors in

one of his ruthless motion pictures,

in which they have to survive to get

through the night.

As they navigate their way

to escape his clutches, visitors

will have to flee from hordes of

rampaging mummies, deformed

carriers of flesh-eating plague and

mutated zombies in the setting of

a post-apocalyptic town.

Nasty surprises lie in wait,

including ‘The Mad Scientist’

who will also be lurking around

the corner, stalking unsuspecting

visitors, waiting to catch them off

guard and attempt to dismember

their limbs.

Incorporating an Asian twist ,

Halloween Horror Nights will also

feature a dilapidated Peranakan

mansion—haunted by a demented

matriarch—as its main attraction

among the scare zones.

For an alternative adrenaline

rush, visitors can go for select

regular theme park attractions,

such as thrill rides Revenge of the

Mummy, Battlestar Galactica and

Accelerator, which will stay open

specially on Halloween Horror

Nights evenings.

Halloween Horror Nights is a

separately ticketed event and will

not be included in regular theme

park admission prices.

But, daytime theme park

guests will be able to upgrade their

daytime park admission tickets

in order to re-enter the park for

Halloween Horror Nights.

SPI GHOULISH TRAIL, SPOOKY WALK

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SEEK out supernatural scares on

a trek through Singapore’s legendary

haunted landscapes and

visit sites like the abandoned Old

Changi Hospital and the Bukit

Brown Cemetery on the Singapore

Paranormal Investigators (SPI)

Ghoulish Trail.

Previously used as a military

hospital during the Japanese

Occupation, the Old Changi

Hospital is the site of numerous

ghost stories such as Pontianak

sightings.

An abandoned public Chinese

cemetery, the Bukit Brown

Cemetery hosts the tombstones

of famous pioneers, such as Gan

Eng Seng, Lim Boon Lay, and

Khoo Teck Puat.

As such, the SPI Ghoulish

Trail is also a good way to see

monuments in Singapore and

learn more about their past.

Participants will be involved

in small experiments such as the

Dali’s hometown – Page 13

HAUNTED SPOTS: Participants on SPI’s Ghoulish Trail will visit places rumoured

to be haunted, like the Old Changi Hospital.

PHOTOS | COURTESY OF RESORTS WORLD SENTOSA, INTERNET

setting up of gadgets around the perimeter

of the locations, including

motion sensors that could trigger

presence of the supernatural.

SPI Ghoulish Trails are designed

for group activities like corporate

and school events, and require a

minimum of 30 participants for

each group.

They cover two to three locations,

and usually last for four

hours, from 7pm to 11pm, but can

also be extended to 8 hours.

Hardcore paranormal enthusiasts

can explore trails by foot on

the SPI Spooky Walk. Unlike the

Ghoulish Trail that transports

visitors on a coach, the Spooky

Walk is solely a foot-exploration

expedition.

These walks are more focused,

and include tough trekking,

climbing and bush bashing.

The SPI Spooky Walks are

also designed for groups, capping

at 20 people. They visit only one

location, and can be scheduled as

a day or night event.

It is usually free of charge,

unless special logistics such as

transportation to the location is

required.


10

LIFESTYLE

A LUSH ESCAPE: With the opening of Labrador Park station, this hidden park,

which is also rich in history, will now be more accessible than ever.

2

HAW PAR VILLA

PASIR PANJANG WHOLESALE CENTRE

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EVER wondered where restaurants

and supermarkets get their supply

of food? Look no further than

Pasir Panjang Wholesale Centre.

The compound houses 26 blocks

of warehouses that sell fruits,

vegetables and dried goods such as

nuts and tidbits at wholesale prices.

Even if you are not prepared to

lug home a few kilogram of supplies,

the friendly shopkeepers will

welcome you even if you only wish

to buy small quantities for personal

consumption.

In fact, shopkeepers hope the

opening of nearby Haw Par Villa

station will encourage shoppers to

get their groceries here.

“We’re very excited here in the

shop because this is an area that’s

very difficult to get to unless you

have your own vehicle. With the

circle line in operation it’s just going

to be a ten minute walk from

the shop so people can come and

get their organic vegetables very

easily,” said Ceridwen Wolf. The

57-year-old is the Product Manager

at Zenxin Organic Food Singapore

which supplies organic produce

from farms in Malaysia to retailers

island-wide.

And even if you’re not looking

to buy anything, the sights and

sounds of the lively night market

alone will make it worth the trip.

The wholesale centre operates

round the clock, but things at the

auction hall start to heat up after

7pm when the vendors are ready

for business.

Come after 8pm to catch the

auction bustle in full swing. You

can also see how workers on forklifts

weave their way around rows

of crates and baskets of fresh produce.

It is an eye-opening experience

to witness how things are done

here as they have for over twenty

years.

FRESH PRODUCTS ONLY: Zenxin Organic Food Singapore is just one of the many

stalls at Pasir Panjang Wholesale Centre that offers fruits and vegetables at

wholesale prices.

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OBSCURE

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3

LABRADOR PARK

LABRADOR NATURE RESERVE

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LABRADOR Nature Reserve is surrounded

by office buildings and

ports which seem to detach it from

the rest of world.

But the opening of Labrador

Park station will mean that the park

will soon be a short walk away from

the station. Adding to the convenience

is a pathway expected to be

complete in November, which will

link the station and the park.

History buffs will delight in

the area’s rich past. A replica of

the Dragon’s Teeth Gate is all that

remains of the unique rock formation

that Chinese voyager Zheng

He used as a navigational aid

when sailing in the waters round

Singapore. The original rock was

blown up in 1848 to widen the entrance

to the harbour. Though the

area has seen little action of late, the

site of the rock formation provides

a stunning view of Keppel Harbour

and cable cars in the distance.

While you are there, look out

for a nearby tunnel opening. It is

rumoured to be the entrance to

an underwater link between Fort

Pasir Panjang and neighbouring

Fort Siloso on Sentosa. The narrow

opening is carved out of the side of

the hill and is blocked by bricks and

rubble, but in the daylight, you can

see a few metres into the tunnel.

Visitors can also climb the

Coastal Path, a steep flight of steps

to the top of the hill. On the way

up, you might catch a glimpse of

resident squirrels and other birds

that forage for food in the area.

If you decide to visit, bring your

picnic basket as affordable food

and drink options are limited, save

for a few vending machines and

water coolers scattered throughout

the park.

HAW PAR VILLA

HUA SONG MUSEUM

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A FORGOTTEN PAST: Experience the rich history of Singapore’s early Chinese immigrants at Hua Song Museum.

HUA SONG means ‘in praise of the

Chinese’, and the Hua Song Museum

is one of the few places which casts

a spotlight on the colourful culture

of the seven Chinese dialect groups

in Singapore. It is located within

Haw Par Villa, a theme park on

mythical Chinese characters, which

has seen better days.

Opened five years ago, the former

cinema houses eight galleries

which chronicle the journey of

Chinese immigrants from China to

Chinatown in Singapore.

The area is mostly quiet, save

for a handful of tourists and three

local tours per month. A free guiding

tour is conducted by the lone

guide, Richard.

The museum begins with the

portraits of Li Yanbai and Madam

Tian, the founding ancestors of the

Lee families in Guangdong, China.

Mr Lee Kuan Yew, who belongs to

the Hakka dialect group, is a ninth

generation descendant.

A noteworthy find in the Food

Hall is little-known cuisine from

the minor dialect group, Foochow,

featuring dishes like the red wine

chicken.

The spacious Survivor Hall

bears an unspoken aura of spookiness

with realistic-looking wax

figurines. They depict the various

jobs, from Samsui women

to fortune-tellers that Chinese

immigrants took up in their new

homeland.

While galleries mostly consist

of word-based exhibits, some

provide realistic visualisations of

Chinese immigrant’s life in the past.

One such exhibit shows a gloomy

kitchen in the 1960s, which features

a cupboard for leftover food, and

its sides are made of wire gauze to

prevent insects from entering.

The Clan Hall is filled with

memorabilia from the yesteryears,

which are on loan from clan associations.

Some artifacts showcased

now-extinct social practices.

One of them is a silk cloth

depicting names of newlyweds in

mass wedding ceremonies organised

by clan associations.

Up to 60 weddings can be

solemnized in such events, which

were seen as a means to cut wedding

costs. Other exhibits include

uniforms and floral displays of

clan-based funeral rites.


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04

4

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CHRONICLE

ONE NORTH

VERVE PIZZERIA

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THIS Italian restaurant recently

shifted from its original premises in

Gilman Village, but fans of Verve

Pizzeria should rejoice. The new

Vespa-themed restaurant’s chic

décor showcases restored vintage

scooter parts and a glassed wine

cellar.

I suggest you go in the daytime

because you would be able to

bask in the sunlight streaming in

through the full-length windows,

which also offers a fantastic view

of the lush greenery surrounding it.

Large enough to hold 120 customers,

this place is perfect for events

as they also provide a screen projector

on request.

But the real show-stealers

are their cocktails. Try the “Blue

Bikini”, a well-balanced blend of

Lychee, Bombay Sapphire gin and

other secret brews the management

declined to reveal. The best part is

that patrons can order a cocktail

NO MORE

6

during happy hour and be entitled

to a free slice of pizza every 20

minutes.

The F&B manager, Jason,

stressed that everything on the

menu is made from scratch. He

recommended the Alto Bello pizza

baked with spicy minced beef, bell

peppers and topped with mozzarella.

Also on the menu are their

Enzo or Peking Duck Pizza; a simple

topping of roasted duck, spring onions,

Japanese cucumber and Hoisin

sauce. And don’t worry if you and

your friends are split on which topping

to choose - just ask for a pizza

with two different toppings.

It is a tad pricey for students

though. An 8-inch costs $19 and a

12-inch will put you back $26. But

go with friends and share a pizza, as

a 12-inch is good for two to three.

Get 10% off when you flash

your NTU Alumni Club membership

card.

BOTANIC GARDENS

IMPRESSIONS ART STUDIO

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EXPERIMENT WITH ART: Amateurs can now get their hands dirty with ceramic painting and batik painting.

GET an invigorating dose of art

therapy by expressing your creativity

on canvas, ceramics and cloths.

The bare industrial-like palette of

the art studio allows vibrant shelves

of acrylic paint bottles, scrapbook

accessories, pottery sculptures and

paintings to stand out.

Co-owner Ms Anna Peterson,

45, wanted to create a space for

people to walk in and do art. “Most

people need to set aside time to do a

whole course on art forms like ceramic

and Batik painting,” she said.

Most popular among walk-in

customers is ceramic bisque painting.

These palm-sized pieces come

in various shapes, such as dragonfly

and soccer ball. For something more

challenging, choose from a buffet of

ceramic sculptures to splash some

colours on. They include practical

accessories like trinket boxes,

mugs, and piggy banks.

But don’t get too excited about

bringing home and showing off

your artistic works after painting

them in underglaze (ceramic paint).

There is a two-week wait for the

staff to fire the ceramics and add a

glossy layer. Prices range from $9

for a dog figurine to $45 for a plate.

Batik painting is another popular

option. Customers colour the

cotton canvas bearing waxed outlines

of designs with batik dyes.

The artwork can be transferred onto

pillowcases, bags, and placemats.

For those starved of artistic inspirations,

you can turn to folders of

5

LIFESTYLE

11

A PAMPERING TREAT: The tasty but pricey Alto Bello pizza, which features spicy beef, bell peppers, and mozzarella, is

highly recommended at Verve Pizzeria.

images categorised by themes such

as animals and flowers for ideas.

Besides do-it-yourself art services,

the one-year-old art studio

offers art workshops from animation

drawing to pottery, which is

taught by acclaimed ceramicist

Winnie Go. With the opening of

Botanic Gardens MRT station,

Ms Peterson expects a 20 percent

increase in walk-in customers.

“Hopefully, more people will drop

by this area, and it is also a good

place for parents to drop their kids

off before grocery shopping,” she

said.

It is advisable to call beforehand

to check if there are spaces available

if you are coming in a group

larger than six.

FARRER ROAD

WESTLAKE

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INNOCUOUSLY Innocuously nestled

within a typical public housing

estate at Queen’s Road is one of the

pioneering eateries which brought

braised pork buns to Singapore in

1976.

Also known as Kong Bak Pau,

it is a stalwart on the restaurant’s

menu, with nine out of 10 customers

ordering the dish on average.

Consisting of five luscious

pieces of pork belly served with

piping hot steamed buns on a bed of

lettuce leaves, this yummy delicacy

costs $12.

The key to making a good Kong

Bak Pau is to ensure that it is not

a greasy overkill, said Mr Robert

Lim, 62, Westlake’s manager. He is

a second-generation member in the

family business.

An eight-hour process painstakingly

shaves some of the fat

content. The pork belly is first

boiled, then deep-fried, and finally

marinated with dark soy sauce

before getting steamed to remove

excess oil. The result is a deliciously

soft slab of pork belly.

More than 200kg of pork is

used for each batch which is made

every two days to ensure freshness.

The tender piece of meat is perfectly

sandwiched between springy

steamed buns, together with lettuce

leaves and parsley to give it a

crunchy juxtaposition next to the

well-marbled pork. The fluffiness of

the buns is achieved by using Lye

water, instead of baking powder.

Westlake also serves an assortment

of Zi Char dishes. Popular

choices include the spicy Sze Chuan

hot and sour soup ($8) and yam

basket ($16).

The Circle Line’s seven-year

long construction has caused

business to drop by 40 percent.

Construction block-ups and massive

traffic jams along Farrer Road

made it inconvenient for diners to

visit the restaurant.

Although Mr Lim noted most

customers come by car, he is optimistic

about being near the new

Farrer Road MRT station. “We hope

that business will increase, as the

Circle Line will provide another

means of public transport for our

customers,” he said.

SINFULLY DELICIOUS: Since 1976, Westlake is well-known for their Kong Bak

Pau, which is pork belly sandwiched between steamed buns and lettuce.

PHOTOS| RONALD LOH AND LIM WEI TING


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SPORTS 35

Volleyball team does it again

THEIR first opponents were also

their toughest.

However, it did not stop NTU’s

men’s volleyball team from beating

rivals Singapore Institute of

Management (SIM) in their first

round-robin match.

The team eventually emerged

as Singapore University Games

(SUniG) champions in the men’s

volleyball event, that was held

at NTU’s Sports and Recreation

Centre from September 5th to

19th.

The win marks the fourth

consecutive year that NTU has

come in first for men’s volleyball

at SUniG. The men’s win against

SIM was no easy feat.

Competition was fierce between

both sides as veteran NTU

players had already graduated,

and new experienced players had

joined the the SIM team.

The rivals were deadlocked

at 2-2 by the end of the fourth

set.

The stalemate was finally broken

after NTU won the final set

with a 15-11 scoreline.

Irish training brings new dynamism to NTU

LAI JUNJIE

SPORTS EDITOR

BARELY a week after finishing

a disappointing third for the

Rugby 7s event at the Singapore

University Games (SUniG), the

NTU men’s rugby team were back

on the pitch—with a twist in their

training regime.

Showing up at the team’s usual

training session on September

22nd were three new faces—

Micheal O’Leary, John McLaughlin

and Mark Hogan, students of the

MBA programme at Nanyang

Business School.

The trio are Irish athletes from

the Gaelic Athletic Association

(GAA), introducing Gaelic football

to the NTU team as part of a cultural

exchange program.

GAA is an Irish international

sporting organisation that promotes

Gaelic sports, like hurling

and rounders.

NTU’s rugby team hopes that

exposure to the foreign sport, best

described as a mixture of soccer

and rugby, will boost their own

rugby skills.

O’Leary, 25, who is also a GAAcertified

Gaelic football coach, was

confident that introducing aspects

of the game to NTU’s rugby team

would be beneficial.

He said: “Most Irish athletes

play Gaelic football as they grow

up and this has given the Irish

rugby team a distinct advantage

over other teams. In fact, the Irish

team is known for their great ball-

Despite the win, coach Tan

Paul Loong expressed dissatisfaction

with his charges’ performance.

“We won but I don’t think it’s

a great victory because we lost

two sets to SIM,” the 33-yearold

said.

Last year, NTU conceded just

one set to SIM.

Tan added: “(As defending

champions) we’re not really satisfied

with this and we’re going to

work even harder.”

After trumping National

University of Singapore (NUS),

the team’s next challenge

was Singapore Management

University (SMU).

At the match, NTU came back

from a 26-28 loss to SMU, by

winning the the next two sets.

Captain Lin Tinglong, 24,

later sealed the victory with a

well-executed spike in the fourth

and final set to secure a 3-1 win.

Lin, a final-year student

from the School of Civil and

Environmental Engineering said:

“We never harboured thoughts

of losing.

“We knew we could win and

we knew we were going to win,

handling skills.

“It’s very natural for an Irish

player to carry and catch the ball

over his head, which is something

very difficult for most rugby

players.”

During the two-hour session,

NTU’s rugby players were trained

in basic Gaelic football skills, like

catching high balls and executing

hand passes.

The new training regime was a

welcome breath of fresh air.

NTU captain Fadzil Wahed,

24, was concerned that the team’s

training programme had become

stagnant over the years.

“For years, our way of training

has been to train our players

according to specialised skills

and that has been a problem

in some of our matches,” said

that was what kept us going.”

“The team was close friends

to start off with. We really fight

for each other when we come

together,” said Lin.

He added that their success

came from having a strong team

with a good fighting spirit.

Coach Tan agreed: “The players

are very determined to fight.

They have very strong fighting

spirit.

“The bonds that we have built

over the years, not only as coach

and players, but also as friends

helped.”

Tan anticipates a good showing

at future competitions as the

team’s height was an advantage.

The average height of the team

is 180 cm and their tallest player

stands at 197 cm.

“We have the advantage of

height and this would be a good

team to send to the ASEAN

University games next year,”

said Tan.

Sadly, there was no repeat of

the men’s performance for the

women’s team.

They secured a SUniG silverafter

losing to NUS with a 3-0

scoreline.

BALL OF A TIME: NTU’s rugby team were trained in basic Gaelic football skills by Micheal

O’Leary (centre in blue shorts), a certified coach. PHOTO | WAN ZHONG HAO

the final-year student from the

School of Humanities and Social

Sciences.

He added: “By training in

Gaelic football, each player on

the team has become more robust

and dynamic. This allows them

to contribute in more ways on

the field.”

The team will face stiff competition

from teams like NUS

and SIM in the upcoming Quad-

University Rugby Championships

in February next year, where NTU

are the defending champions.

“(Gaelic football) is a fresh

and new concept (in Singapore),

so hopefully this training will

give us an edge over the other

teams,” Fadzil said. Perhaps with

more than a little reliance on the

fabled luck of the Irish.

TOWERING PRESENCE: The height of NTU players was an advantage.

PHOTO | LAM ZHAO YAO

What is

Gaelic football?

GAELIC football is an amateur sport which originated from, and

is still being played mainly in, Ireland. It is a form of football best

described as a mixture of soccer and rugby.

Each team consists of 15 players: One goalkeeper, three fullbacks,

three half-backs, two midfielders, three half-forwards and

three full-forwards.

The objective is to score goals by kicking or striking the ball

by hand through the opposing team’s goalposts. The team with

the highest score at the end of a match wins.

Players advance the ball up the field with a combination of

carrying, soloing (dropping and then toe-kicking the ball back

into the hands), kicking, and hand-passing the ball to their teammates.

The game is played on a pitch up to 145m long and 90m

wide. The goalposts are the same shape as its rugby counterpart,

although the crossbar is

lower than a rugby one

and slightly higher than

a soccer one.

Matches last for

60 minutes, with two

halves of 30 minutes

each. Senior

inter-county games

last for 70 minutes,

with two halves of

35 minutes.

Draws are decided

by 20 minutes of

extra time (two halves

of 10 minutes).


Sports Playing

football with your hands? – Page 35

Long awaited victory

ANNABELLE LIANG

SPORTS EDITOR

IT TOOK seven years, but the

NTU Aquathlon men's team finally

emerged champions in the

Singapore University Games

(SUniG) held on September 17th

at East Coast Park.

The annual competition, into

its second year, replaced the previous

Institute-Varsity-Polytechnic

Games that was open to local

universities, polytechnics and

Institute of Technical Education

colleges. SUniG is open to local

universitiets only.

NTU had previously won both

the men’s and women’s team gold

medals in 2004.

This year’s Aquathlon event

comprised of a 750m swim and a

7.2km run. All participants ran the

race once and the team that took

the fastest combined time won the

team gold.

Also, the fastest male and female

participants, regardless of

their team's performance, were

awarded the individual gold.

This was NTU's first team gold

medal for its team sports this

SUniG season.

The women’s team came in third

in their event, behind champions

SIM and runners-up NUS.

NTU Aquathlon also won the

individual male and female gold

awards.

Team captain Danson Cheong,

22, felt the men’s team win was

unexpected as the NTU team had

always played second fiddle to

former champions NUS, who had

beaten them by a margin of more

FLASH AND SPLASH: Men's individual

gold medalist Lim Lu Kai emerging from

the water after the swim.

BLAZING A TRAIL: The NTU Aquathlon men's team taking off for a 750 m swim and 7.2 km run. PHOTOS | COURTESY OF CAINE NG & CHIA CHIN YEH

than five minutes last year.

This year, the NTU men's team

came in with a combined timing

of 3 hours and 27 mins, more

than two mins ahead of runnersup

NUS.

Cheong, a second-year student

from the Wee Kim Wee School of

Communication and Information,

described SUniG as a “goliath's

match-up" for the NTU team.

He added: “Right until the results

were tallied, I thought it would have

been a very close fight and did not

expect such a big winning margin.

“But at the end of the day, we

deserved to win as we fought like

lions.”

The team's performance did not

come easy. In addition to official

training sessions that took place

three times a week, Cheong said

that most members also swam and

ran on a daily basis.

He added: “Many of our SUniG

team members didn’t compete in

SUniG last year, so there was also a

big question mark on whether they

could cope with the challenge.”

One such member was Chua

Khai Leng, 20, a first-year Sports

Science and Management student.

Chua did not disappoint, winning

the women’s individual gold

with a timing of 45 mins and 6 secs.

The former track and field

runner competed after training

with the team for only six

weeks.

She said: “I really enjoyed

the experience as it was my

first aquathlon. Competition

was strong but I managed to

use the running segment to my

advantage.

“I would love to take part

in future SUniG events.”

It was also vice-captain

Heng Zhi Feng’s first time

competing in the SUniG, as he

had failed to qualify through

NTU’s internal trials last year.

The second-year student

from the School of Computer

Engineering felt that good

attendance during trainings,

including that of non-SUniG

squad members, had helped

boost team morale.

The 23-year-old said:

“Everyone’s effort and commitment

played a big part.

“Danson and I coordinated

well too. He conducted trainings

and talked to the team,

while I handled administrative

matters and held trainings

when he couldn’t make it."

Coach Poon Pek Ya, who

has been with the team for

two years, said the aquathlon

team was more systematic and

organised than in previous

years.

“But at the end

of the day, we

deserved to win

as we fought like

lions."

Danson Cheong

Aquathlon captain

She said: “The team trained

together a lot more this time

round. We had talented new

athletes who were willing to

work hard, and key athletes

who were team-focused. Some

even sacrificed other race plans

to focus on SUniG.

“We did not only have individuals

that were very good,

but a strong team overall.”

A stroke of luck may also

have played a part.

The NTU team found out on

race day that national triathlete

Mok Ying Ren would not be

competing for NUS.

Mok, a former Southeast

Asian Games gold medalist, was

the individual men’s champion

and part of the winning NUS

team at the SUniG aquathlon

men's event last year.

Cheong said: “This relieved

some pressure, and provided

the extra motivation to push on

harder. It left the race open.”

Mok's absence also allowed

Lim Lu Kai, 23, a third-year student

from the School of Electrical

and Electronic Engineering,

to clinch the men’s individual

champion with a timing of 38

mins and 21 secs.

He had finished individual

second in SUniG last year.

Lim said: “If Mok had competed,

the race would have been

a tougher fight.”

In spite of the win, the race

was a humbling experience for

Cheong, who came in last among

the men’s team on race day because

of stomach discomforts.

He said: “I didn’t have a very

good race but the rest of the guys

managed to pull up the flag.

Every race is an experience and

this was certainly one for me.

“As with each year, we hope

to learn from our mistakes and

get better.”

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