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OHS Fall 2022 Magazine

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FALL 2022

Safe At Last

The Arrival of 80 Beagles

New Road Ahead Project

Honor a Pet or Person with a Tribute Gift

Spotlight on Salem

News and Updates from the Salem Campus

Humane Education

A More Humane Society for the Next Generation


Contents

FALL 2022 | Vol. 51 | No. 3

OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

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OHS News Abandoned cats and kittens receive

life-saving care; Rescued French Bulldogs come to OHS;

Young philanthropist makes a big impact; Vaccine and

wellness clinics help the community care for their pets.

Salem Campus Spotlight Ludo the cat reunites

with his family; Church in the Park Vet Clinic preserves the

bond between pets and people.

Beagles Arrive in Oregon The Salem and Portland

campuses work together to assist with a historic case.

New Road Ahead The future of care at the

Community Veterinary Hospital; Construction project

quick facts; and a special way to honor pets and people.

Humane Education Inspiring compassion and

kindness at summer camp and throughout the school year;

Meet the OHS education dogs.

Event Round Up Corgis hit the beach; Look ahead

to Boo Bash.

Workplace Giving Give back to shelter animals

at your workplace.

Happy Tails A gentle Pyrenees finds her place;

Avignon goes from puppy mill to beloved pet; the oddest

of odd couples; Butter and Granola find their place

thanks to one convincing kid.

Planned Giving Meet the pets who started a new

chapter thanks to the Friends Forever program.

Oregon Humane Society is a 501(c)(3) charitable

organization. OHS is an Oregon-based nonprofit that relies

on donor support for its adoption, education, medical and

humane law enforcement programs.

Oregon Humane Society Magazine is published quarterly.

Comments and inquiries should be addressed to the editor.

Moving? Send your change of address to:

Oregon Humane Society Mailing List,

1067 NE Columbia Blvd., Portland, OR 97211, or email it to

amye@oregonhumane.org.

EDITOR Laura Klink • (503) 416-2985

laurak@oregonhumane.org

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Sarah Bradham, Kelsey O’Lea,

Becca Ball, Katie Hamlin, Katie Hovde,

Alex Laskowski, and Kelly Rey.

GRAPHIC DESIGN Todd Saucier, Sheri Thompson,

Lydia Wojack-West.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Marveita Redding,* Chair

City of Portland, Bureau of

Environmental Services

David H. Angeli, Vice-Chair

Angeli Law Group

Dr. John E. Gustavsson, Secretary

Radiology Consultants, Inc

Steven L. Gish, Treasurer

BPM Real Estate Group

Harvey N. Black Jr.*

Retired, Mediation Services

Steve D. Bloom

Portland Japanese Garden

Tracy Crandall

Sterling Asset Management

Group, LLC

Reginald R. Eklund*

Retired, NACCO Materials

Handling Group, Inc.

Lindsay W. Ford

Sprout Tours

John C. Gomez*

KeyBank

Marc F. Grignon

Retired, NW Equity Holdings, Inc.

Dave S. Hansen, Immediate

Past Chair

Columbia State Bank

Peter A. Jensen

Internal Revenue Service

Gordon Keane

Digital Vision, Inc.

Lynn D. Loacker

Community Volunteer

Robert E. Mack, DVM, DACVIM

VCA Northwest

Veterinary Specialists

Elizabeth J. Mehren

Journalist and Author

Patti M. Miles

Walsh Construction Group

Betty B. Norrie*

Retired, Program Director,

NCAA Foundation

Shayna Rogers

Cosgrave Vergeer Kester LLP

Diane Rosenbaum

Former Oregon State Senator &

Majority Leader

April Sanderson

Wealth Management Executive

Mary K. Slayton

Retired, Nike, Inc.

Carolyn M. Vogt

Pine Hill Legal LLC

Nancy Tonkin- Zoucha

Tonkin Family of Dealerships

BOARD OF DIRECTORS EMERITUS

Marilynn Jensen | Dolorosa Margulis

*Past Board Chair

VISIT US ONLINE

oregonhumane.org & @oregonhumane

Get the latest OHS news and cuteness in your inbox.

Sign up at oregonhumane.org/subscribe.

HANDY NUMBERS

Adoptions

(503) 285-7722, ext. 262

Behavior Help Line

(503) 416-2983

Bring in a Pet

(503) 285-7722, ext. 211

Corporate Relations

(503) 416-7084

Editor, OHS Magazine

(503) 416-2985

Estate Giving

(503) 416-2988

Make a Donation

(503) 802-6793

Monthly Giving

(503) 416-7079

Spay/Neuter Assistance

(503) 802-6755

Volunteer Program

(503) 285-7722, ext. 204

Direct Line

from Sharon Harmon, President and CEO

A New Chapter

In my 30+ years at Oregon Humane Society, it is hard to recall a time when we have

embraced so much growth and opportunity.

Our vision of the New Road Ahead expansion project is about to become reality. It is

incredibly exciting to think about the transformational services that OHS is bringing to our

area with the Community Veterinary Hospital, Animal Crimes Forensic Center, and the

Behavior and Rescue Center. You can read about the final phase of this project, including

some interesting construction facts on page 10.

I invite you to join us for a special open house event in October at the Community

Veterinary Hospital. Come for a tour of the facility, meet the staff, and learn about the

services that will become available to all pet owners in our area.

On July 1, our merger with Willamette Humane Society became official - ushering in a

new era as one Oregon Humane Society with two campuses, Portland, and Salem. I have

had the opportunity to witness the incredible compassion and hard work of the staff and

volunteers at the Salem campus over the last few months. Their professionalism and flexibility

have been critical as we continue to navigate the details of fully integrating our

two organizations.

The transfer of 80 beagles to OHS on Aug. 20, gave the teams from both campuses an

opportunity to work together to help even more dogs. Moving 4,000 dogs from a massbreeding

facility is truly an “all hands on deck” moment in animal welfare. I am so grateful

to Humane Society of the United States and Greater Good Charities’ Good Flights program

for the opportunity to assist in this massive rescue effort which captured

national headlines.

At our Portland and Salem campuses, I have been so touched to see the beagles experience

kindness and love while they learn to play, enjoy toys, and discover the comforts of

a warm bed. It took a little more than a week for all 80 dogs to find homes, including a

special dog at our Salem Campus who was adopted by the pilot of the plane that brought

the dogs to Oregon. Learn more about this rescue operation on page 8.

This is also the time of year when young people head back to school and begin a new

chapter in their education. OHS’ Humane Education team hosted summer camp at the

shelter this year and the enthusiasm and energy from the kids was palpable. Our Education

and Outreach teams have exciting plans to reach more young people from diverse

communities this fall. Compassion and kindness are universal values, and we look forward

to fostering the next generation of animal welfare leaders. Read about our commitment to

Humane Education on page 12-13.

Behind every new chapter in OHS’ history is you – our dedicated supporters. There are

so many ways to support the growth of OHS – purchase a pet tag tribute gift for the

Community Veterinary Hospital, donate your car, or become a monthly supporter.

However you chose to participate, I want you to know that you are a critical part of

creating a More Humane Society.

With gratitude,

OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

Sharon M. Harmon, CAWA

President and CEO

ON THE COVER: One of the beagles rescued from a mass breeding facility on

2 the east coast relaxes in the arms of volunteer Lou Chapman during intake.

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Photo by Eleena Fikhman.



OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY NEWS

OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

Young Donor Makes a Big Impact

Abandoned Cats and Kittens Begin a New Chapter

The note on their kennel was heartbreaking. It began with a

simple phrase, “If love was enough.” The note went on

to explain that although this person loved their pets, the situation

had become untenable and adequate care was no longer

feasible for the cats, kittens, and pet owner. Three large kennels

containing 23 neonatal kittens and 13 adult cats were placed

outside OHS with the note and $91.

Luckily, the crates were spotted within a few minutes and the

cats and kittens were quickly moved out of the hot weather and

into the safety of the shelter.

This emergency intake was not on the schedule, but the animals

all needed immediate care. Veterinarians did a quick exam to

triage each pet and the foster team lined up experienced foster

homes within hours so the fragile kittens could be bottle-fed

around the clock.

Although abandoning an animal is a crime, we understand that

this person loved their pets and thought they were doing the

right thing. The OHS Admissions team and our Veterinary Social

Worker are here to help pets and the people who love them.

Dogs from Suspected Puppy Mill Case Arrive at OHS

Dozens of French bulldogs and other bulldog mix breeds from

a suspected puppy mill were transferred to Oregon Humane

Society during two transports this summer. The 43 dogs who

arrived at OHS were among 150 discovered in a home in

Stanislaus County, California when a search warrant was being

served during an unrelated criminal investigation. The dogs

were living in cramped crates filled with waste, and

many needed medical attention.

The staff at Stanislaus Animal Services Agency cared for the

dogs until they were legally able to be transferred. Rescue

groups from around the region mobilized quickly to help move

the dogs to begin a new life. The OHS Second Chance vehicle

made two trips to California to pick up the dogs. Perla Ceh-

Cocom from the Second Chance team drove both groups to

Portland and made extra stops along the way to ensure the

dogs were cool and comfortable.

“We are so grateful to Stanislaus Animal Services

Agency for their work on this case and to all the

other rescues and shelters who have stepped up to

help,” says Brian August, OHS Chief Operating Officer.

You’re never too young to start caring for animals! That’s

certainly been the case for 14-year-old Alina, who recently

raised $1,000 for Oregon Humane Society, becoming OHS’

youngest TLC donor.

When Alina was assigned her eighth grade community

service project last year, her first thought was the animals

she met at OHS seven years earlier when she first visited the

Portland shelter.

Alina started her project strong by hosting a donation drive

in her community earlier this year, collecting food, treats, toys,

and leashes for the animals in our care. But Alina did not

stop there!

As a dedicated young artist, Alina decided she could help

animals in her community by painting 10 of her favorite

OHS Hosts Vaccine and Wellness Clinics

Throughout August, Oregon Humane Society hosted Wellness

and Vaccine Clinics for pets. These clinics are designed to

support pet owners who need routine care for their pets or

are struggling to find a veterinary clinic accepting

new patients.

“Veterinary clinics in our community have been jam-packed,

so it can be difficult to get your pet in for wellness care,”

says Dr. Steve Kochis, OHS Chief Medical Officer. “But

preventative care now can help avoid health problems later.”

Pet owners could choose from packages that included a

wellness exam, vaccines, flea and tick prevention, and

a microchip.

OHS’ Vaccine and Wellness Clinic was held two months

ahead of the opening of the Community Veterinary Hospital,

which will provide a wide range of services.

animals, scanning the paintings onto her computer, and printing

hundreds of greeting cards featuring her work. She sold

the cards to friends and family, with the proceeds benefitting

OHS. By the end of her project, Alina had sold more than

300 cards, generating $1,000 for the animals.

“This was one of my first times seriously painting

using watercolor, and I’m really glad I could put

this learning experience to good use,” says Alina.

Alina is hoping to continue her animal advocacy as she

works towards becoming an exotic animal veterinarian

in the future.

who may be struggling to afford care for their pet. The hospital

is part of the New Road Ahead expansion project, which

broke ground in June 2021 after years of planning.

“We know there are people in our community

who love their pets but cannot afford veterinary

care, especially for emergencies or chronic

conditions,” adds Dr. Kochis. “The Community Veterinary

Hospital will play a key role in keeping pets with the families

who love them.”

Scheduled to open in October 2022, OHS’ Community

Veterinary Hospital will provide subsidized services for those

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OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

SPOTLIGHT ON OHS

SALEM CAMPUS

Reuniting Ludo with his Family

“She doesn’t want to just leave the cats.”

Anyone who’s lived in a neighborhood with roaming, outdoor

cats is familiar with the saying, “If you feed them, they will

come.” The old adage didn’t stop Mrs. Custer from caving in.

She enjoyed the daily ritual and the extra company from the

friendly cats.

When she was ready to retire to a nursing facility, Mrs. Custer

was concerned about her community cats. Who would feed

them? Who would care for them? She asked her son, Tim, to

step in and help out.

Tim knew he couldn’t go to his mom’s

neighborhood daily to tend to the cats. He

realized his best course of action was to

seek help from the pros.

On July 26, Tim arrived at Oregon Humane Society Salem

Campus with the one cat who was friendly enough to trap.

He handed the trap to our intake team and said, “He’s friendly,

allows you to pick him up and give head scratches.” We

admitted him, did a routine microchip check, and were happy

to discover he was microchipped.

Jamie, OHS Salem’s Admissions Lead, called the phone number

linked to the microchip. When Ariel answered the call, she

was stunned. Ludo, her beloved cat, had been missing since

May 2021.

Ariel and her partner, Bob, had briefly moved from Eugene to

Salem. Ludo had grown used to being an indoor/outdoor kitty

in Eugene, so they wanted to give him that same choice when

they moved to Salem. Unfortunately, within a week,

Ludo disappeared.

Despite doing all the right things: canvassing their neighborhood,

putting up lost cat signs around their city, and posting

on social media boards, they weren't able to find him. Eventually,

Ariel and Bob moved back to Eugene in

November 2021—without their beloved Ludo.

SUMMER 2022

Little did they know, Mrs. Custer had been taking good care

of him all along.

Within a few hours of the call, Ariel and Bob arrived at OHS

Salem to retrieve Ludo. They were both in shock as they

waited for him to be released.

Bob recalls, “It was so strange. We were

out on the river, and I could hear Ariel

say Ludo’s name. I thought, ‘Wait. Did you

just say Ludo? Why are you talking about

Ludo?’ Then she told me you guys had him.

It was surreal.”

Today, Ludo is happy to be right back where he belongs. And

what do Ariel and Bob say about letting him be an indoor/

outdoor kitty now?

“Never again!”

PRESERVING THE BOND BETWEEN

PEOPLE & PETS

OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY SALEM CAMPUS RECEIVED A GRANT TO FUND

SEVERAL VET CLINICS THIS YEAR. WE PARTNERED WITH CHURCH AT THE PARK,

AN ORGANIZATION BASED IN SALEM THAT SERVES PEOPLE WHO ARE EXPERIENC-

ING HOUSELESSNESS. WE HELD SEVERAL VET CLINICS THROUGHOUT THE SPRING,

PROVIDING CRITICAL SERVICES FOR THE PETS AND PEOPLE LIVING IN THE MICRO

SHELTERS AT CHURCH AT THE PARK.

OHS Salem’s medical team administered vaccines, flea

treatment, and dewormer for dozens of pets, and scheduled

several spay and neuter surgeries. Every pet was sent home

with plenty of goodies, from new collars and leashes to food,

toys, and extra flea treatments.

One resident arrived with their very pregnant mama cat, who

we brought back to the shelter to ensure a safe delivery. The

mama cat stayed at the shelter until her kittens were weaned,

and once the litter was adopted, she was returned to

her owner.

Our team went above and beyond to help these pets and their

people. We passed out information on dog licensing, low-cost

vaccine booster options, where to go for future spay/neuter

services, and who to call if a pet needed to be rehomed at

any point.

When approached by a resident who’d lost their pet, our

clinic intake specialist helped them contact their pet’s microchip

company to update the contact information. The specialist also

provided information about where to look and post as the

resident searched for their pet.

Every community member we saw was thrilled that their pet

was able to receive such thorough care. Our on-site vet

commented, “No matter the condition of the person, nearly

all the pets were well-fed and groomed.”

OHS acknowledges that low-cost veterinary care is challenging

for many Oregonians, which is why we are so excited for

the grand opening of our Community Veterinary Hospital this

October. Learn more about this new facility and sign up for

updates at oregonhumane.org/care.

In the meantime, we aim to continue getting out into our

community to provide essential medical services for pets

in need.

OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

SUMMER 2022

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OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

The

Oregon Humane Society

Receives Beagles from

Historic Operation

Applause and cheers broke out as a plane full of beagles

rescued from a mass breeding facility touched down in

Oregon on August 20. Close to 150 dogs were on the

flight with 80 destined for OHS. Four other shelters and

rescue groups in the Northwest assisted with the effort,

taking in the remaining 70 dogs.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) is leading

the effort to place 4,000 beagles into safe shelters

and reached out to OHS for help. OHS’ Second Chance

program has a history of collaborating with HSUS to

receive pets from shelters affected by natural disasters.

A New Life

The day after arriving in Oregon, the beagles showed

remarkable resilience, and delighted in their walks, belly

rubs, soft beds, and love.

After spay/neuter surgery and having any other needs

addressed, the beagles were ready for the final stop on

their journey—a loving home. In just one week, all the

dogs were adopted, thanks to the support of our

OHS community.

To follow the story of the beagles and their new life in

Oregon, go to oregonhumane.org/beagles

Beagles

Have

Landed!

Spurring this historic operation is a Department of Justice

lawsuit against the breeding facility, Envigo, over alleged

Animal Welfare Act violations. HSUS was given 60 days

to move all 4,000 beagles out of the facility and they are

a little more than halfway there. Greater Good Charities’

Good Flights program coordinated the flight to Oregon,

and their staff flew with the dogs and directed the

unloading process.

“Moving this many dogs is an all-hands-on-deck moment in

animal welfare,” says Brian August, OHS Chief Operating

Officer. “As one Oregon Humane Society with two

campuses in Portland and Salem, we can help even more

dogs from this case.”

OHS’ Salem Campus received 21 beagles, while 59

arrived at the Portland campus.

PLANE AND QUICKLY LOAD THEM INTO

They are now known at OHS as Allison, Arthur, Cheddar,

NEARBY TRANSPORT VEHICLES.

and other endearing names submitted by young people

who attended OHS’ summer camp.

THE DOGS’ JOURNEY TO OREGON

In Salem, shortly after their arrival, the beagles went for

BEGAN ON THE EAST COAST LONG

slow and gentle walks with volunteers. It was the first time

their paws had touched grass, and it was heartwarming

BEFORE SUNRISE, SO GETTING THEM

to see the beagles start learning to be dogs.

MOVED TO THE SHELTER AND SETTLED

As the 59 beagles went through the intake process at the

IN WAS THE TOP PRIORITY.

Portland campus, several dogs fell asleep in the arms of

Second Chance volunteers. They were finally safe and

could relax. Once they were in their kennels, some dogs

ran around and played with their roommates while others

put their noses to the ground to check out their

new surroundings.

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SUMMER 2022

MORE THAN A DOZEN OHS STAFF AND

VOLUNTEERS ASSEMBLED AT THE AIR-

PORT TO MOVE THE BEAGLES OFF THE

Not An Average Intake

The 80 dogs who arrived at both OHS campuses didn’t

have names. Their only identification was a tattoo inside

one of their long, floppy ears—a stark reminder of the

future they would have faced.



OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

COMMUNITY VETERINARY HOSPITAL

Care for Your Pet. Care for Your Community.

OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

New Road Ahead—Race to the Finish

The final stages of the New Road Ahead Expansion

project are underway. If you’ve driven down Columbia

Boulevard recently, you’ve likely noticed that the exteriors

of the buildings are starting to look a lot like the

architect’s rendering.

New Road Ahead Construction - Quick Facts

By now, you probably know that the New Road Ahead

is the biggest expansion project in OHS’ history.

But how big is it?

Every time you visit the Community Veterinary

Hospital, your pet will receive the highest-quality

care—and you will help provide life-saving care

for pets in your community.

We are excited to welcome pets and the

people who love them to the Community

Veterinary Hospital in mid-October.

Our Services

• Preventative Care

• Spay & Neuter

• Dentistry

• Urgent Care

Get updates and details on scheduling an

appointment at oregonhumane.org/care.

The New Road Ahead includes two new buildings that

will house the Community Veterinary Hospital, Animal

Crimes Forensic Center, and a Behavior and

Rescue Center.

Lease Crutcher Lewis is leading the construction phase of

the project and provided these eye-popping stats to give

you an idea of its scale.

• Data Cabling: 80,000 feet (more than 15 miles!)

of data cabling installed

• Concrete: 615 total yards poured so far, the equivalent

of 62 full concrete trucks and weighing more

than 251,100 pounds

• Soil: 45,000 tons of soil hauled off the site—

approximately 3,200 dump truck loads

• Bricks: 20,000 bricks installed in the interior lobby

and exterior façade of the Community

Veterinary Hospital

SAVE THE DATE

The community is invited to celebrate the completion

of the construction of the Community Veterinary

Hospital by attending an open house event on

Saturday, Oct. 22.

Tour the facility, meet the veterinary team, and learn

about the services that will help keep pets and

people together.

Honor a special person or pet

with a tribute gift and support

the New Road Ahead

expansion project.

Tribute gifts ensure that OHS can

continue to save lives and create

a More Humane Society.

Donate today to recognize a pet or

person who loves animals.

Your dedication tag will hang on a

new dedication wall within our

Community Veterinary Hospital,

opening in October 2022.

The New Road Ahead aims to provide solutions for the

problems we are facing now now, paving the way for a

bright future for animals and people in the years to come.

SUMMER 2022

You can help us close out this campaign and ensure

these new programs are ready to go when the

buildings open.

USE THE QR CODE

TO MAKE A

DONATION NOW!

$500 Bronze 2-inch Bronze Dedication Tag

50-character count, including spaces

$1,000 Silver 3-inch Silver Dedication Tag

45-character count, including spaces

SUMMER 2022

10

$2,500 Gold 4-inch Gold Dedication Tag

60-character count, including spaces

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OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

Meet the OHS Humane Education Dogs

Ramona Willow Odin Peter

SUMMER 2022

OHS Summer Camp resumed in person this year after a twoyear

hiatus. Although last year’s virtual camp was a blast, and

the Zoom tours and socially-distanced crafts provided us with

much-needed emotional sunshine, nothing can compare with the

pleasure of seeing eager young animal advocates back in the

shelter. Imagine the look on their faces when the llamas showed

up! Or looking in the cattery to see campers sitting, covered

head to toe in kittens and grinning from ear to ear.

This year we returned to our pre-COVID program by welcoming

long-time Youth Volunteers and previous OHS campers to fill

leadership positions. While we worked to keep some things the

same, we mixed it up a little, too, by inviting wildlife experts as

guest speakers.

While summer camp is full of light-hearted moments, we also got

a little more serious, introducing a special leadership camp to

inspire the animal advocates of tomorrow. These two teams

of 12 campers received next-level animal handling and safety

training. They also put their brilliant, creative and compassionate

young minds together to create a public service campaign to educate

our community about keeping pets at a healthy weight. Look

for their educational posters in the adoption rooms! One of these

shelter stewards said something that elegantly summarizes why

education is still at the core of OHS’ mission after more than 150

years. When asked how we could make effective changes in animals’

lives, she answered, “First, we have to educate ourselves.”

Meanwhile, elsewhere in Portland, other summer programs were

in full swing, and our team was also out serving the greater

community. Our outreach focus was on SUN Community Schools,

and we visited as many as possible—with a humane education

dog, or ambassa-dog, in tow.

Here’s Ramona! She’s an OHS

Second Chance pup-from

Oklahoma. Rumor has it she was

nearly denied entrance on the flight

since they already had a full manifest,

but the woman in charge took

one look at that face and let her in.

She had some famous company on

her way here—flying alongside

Fetch Fido a Flight board member

Alan Hewitt, keyboardist for the

Moody Blues. She looooves children,

the itty bitties especially!

This glamor girl wasn’t at OHS for

long before she was adopted by

a staff member. But, she didn’t

entirely escape the shelter. Not

only does she come to the office

most days, but she also gets to go

out and visit schools, her favorite

hobby. Like the other ambassadogs,

Willow has passed a “Good

Canine Citizen” test given by our

Training & Behavior team to ensure

she can safely spend time around

small, loud and very

affectionate children.

Looking Ahead

As always, we’ll bring our free programs

into the classroom this year.

Grateful teacher feedback suggests

that now more than ever is a good

time to sow the seeds of compassion in

young minds. COVID-induced solitude

and persistent violence in our society

have had an ill effect on normal socialization

processes. Pets often help us

Now here’s a good-looking guy.

He stuns the kids when he walks

in. He’s got that David Bowie

heterochromia, and a cool arsenal

of tricks—sit, down, shake, spin,

bump, and sing. And you should

hear him sing! Typical Husky. But

don’t look for any Husky aloofness

here; you won’t find it. This Second

Chance guy from California gets

down with the kids, and he won’t

stop kissing and canoodling and

cuddling until they’re all on the

floor giggling and screaming.

Longtime volunteer Bobbi

Waggoner was working a Second

Chance transfer when she opened

a crate and out popped Peter. It

was love at first sight. You may

already have seen him because

Bobbi brings Peter to many OHS

events, not just schools. This guy

loves to party! It doesn’t matter

how big the party is, as long as

he’s at the center of it.

doing so, and we see this every time

we go into a classroom with one of our

ambassa-dogs.

We’ll also be offering a variety of

on-site programs and clubs throughout

the school year, so be sure to check out

our website for upcoming opportunities:

oregonhumane.org/humane-education.

We dove into myth and history to question our assumptions

about wolves with Kem from Wolf Haven, a sanctuary in

Washington for captive-born wolves. Ranger Laura Jackson led

a search party through our own forested dog path, finding interesting

specimens of regional flora and fauna, including mosses,

herons, and butterflies.

open up when we’re having difficulty

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Corgis Take Over Cannon Beach!

We’ll

fetch

your

Highways along Oregon’s Coast are dotted

with signs instructing residents and

visitors where to evacuate in the event

of a tsunami or rogue wave. On Saturday,

July 30, Cannon Beach was hit by a

furry and adorable flood as thousands

of Corgi lovers and their canines took

over the beach for the return of Cannon

Beach Corgi Day. The event, featuring

a costume contest, the famous Corgi

Races, and dozens of raffles and auction

prizes, celebrated all things Corgi

while still welcoming dogs of all sizes.

Cannon Beach Corgi Day is a benefit

for Oregon Humane Society, raising

more than $12,000 to help pets in need.

Started in 2013 by Corgi-lover Jennifer

Robison of Oregon City, a few dozen

people and their dogs attended the

inaugural event in Cannon Beach. By

2019, the event had swelled in popularity,

drawing over 1,300 people, 500

corgis, and other dogs from all over

the Pacific Northwest and California.

After a two-year hiatus, people were

thrilled to be back on the beach. Cannon

Beach’s population nearly doubled

in a single day with returning guests

and newcomers descending on one of

Oregon’s most iconic beaches. In the

morning, a light fog obscured Haystack

Rock but cleared by early afternoon as

temperatures on the Oregon Coast hit

the mid-70s, creating a perfect environment

for costumed Corgis to strut

their stuff. “Lords of Mischief” was

the theme this year, and Corgis came

dressed up in everything from Marvel’s

Loki and Captain America to David and

Moira Rose from the television show

Schitt’s Creek.

“We could not have asked for a better

day or event! OHS is so thankful to

Jennifer and all the Corgi lovers who

showed up to have fun and help pets

in need,” said Sarah Yusavitz, OHS

Corporate Relations Officer.

car.

Photo by Phido Photography

Bowser’s Boo Bash

Donating your car to help animals

is easier than you think.

oregonhumane.org/autos or

(503) 802-6766

Saturday, October 29, 2022

5:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Willamette Heritage Center Spinning Room

Dust off your cloaks, wands and broomsticks. OHS Salem’s

most anticipated event is back–and Lincoln the cat predicts

this will be our most successful fundraiser of the year! Enjoy a

gourmet feast and wine by the chalice. This event features a

live and silent auction with a range of delightful items ranging

from trips to treats. All proceeds go back to helping OHS

shelter pets in need. Tickets will go on sale soon.

Visit oregonhumane.org/events to learn more.

Presented by:



OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

WORKPLACE GIVING PROFILE

Profiles in Compassion: Premiere Property Group

The team at Premiere Property Group (PPG) love their furry

friends. With animals at the center of their second quarter

2022 Circle of Giving Fund, they were excited to come

together to support Oregon Humane Society’s mission of

making our community a More Humane Society.

Working side-by-side with OHS, PPG employees clocked

in roughly 60 hours of volunteer time at multiple shelter

events throughout the quarter. At OHS animal socialization

sessions, PPG employees gave the animals all their love

and attention and helped them develop the social skills they

need to find new, loving homes. Another volunteer activity

included a landscaping project to improve the dog walking

paths. The PPG team spread bark chips, pulled weeds and

removed dangerous debris to help make our walking path

a safe place for dogs to decompress.

Their compassion and support went beyond volunteering at

the shelter. PPG employees also hosted a donation drive

at their seven Portland metro offices for pet food, treats,

toys and other needed items at the shelter. The result was

a large bin of donated supplies at the end of the quarter.

They also participated in Doggie Dash!

Beyond dedicating their time and resources to enrich the

communities we both serve, over $10,000 was raised by

PPG employees through their Circle of Giving Fund to help

the animals in need.

Thank you, Premiere Property Group, for being a friend to

the animals!

Get Involved

Does your workplace have a giving campaign?

Many employers sponsor annual workplace

giving campaigns where employees can elect

to make payroll deductions to selected charities,

band together to host a donation drive, volunteer

their time, or a combination of these efforts.

Encourage your employer to participate and

select OHS.

For more information on workplace giving,

please get in touch with Kelly Rey at

503-802-6766 or kellyr@oregonhumane.org.

FOCUS ON:

Medical Services

& Foster Care

Reese

Reese was an otherwise healthy one-year-old cat when

he was surrendered to OHS in need of an urgent

procedure his owner couldn’t afford—a life-threatening

urethral blockage. OHS veterinarians were able to

perform the unblocking surgery in time, but when he

went up for adoption after recovery, he waited …

and waited.

With his steady purr and huge polydactyl paws, Reese

charmed everyone who stopped by his kennel. But it

takes time to find a home for a cat suffering from Feline

Idiopathic Cystitis—once a cat experiences a blockage,

it’s likely to happen again. Reese went home to

an adoring foster home to more comfortably await

adoption, but after several weeks, Reese experienced

another blockage, and this time it required urgent

surgery.

Our medical team decided it was time to perform a

procedure to widen his urethra to prevent future blockage.

The surgery went well and the patient

remained cheerful!

After several weeks of recovery in his foster home, he

became available on the website again. This time it

wasn’t long before he was adopted by an excited

young couple who have now made Reese the center

of their world.

Lulu

In April 2021, Lulu was transferred to OHS from

Marion County Dog Services. She’d been picked up

as a stray and was never claimed, so she came to

OHS to find a new home. Her coat was sparse, her

skin was raw, and at roughly 8 years of age, it was

clear that she’d had a rough life. Lulu was very stressed

in the shelter environment, so she was moved into foster

care for a month to decompress.

But Lulu faced another daunting challenge. She needed

complex knee surgery, tibial plateau leveling osteotomy

(TPLO) to restore her mobility and relieve her pain. This

specialized procedure is not performed at OHS, so the

medical team worked with VCA Northwest Veterinary

Specialists to ensure Lulu got the surgery she needed.

Lulu’s road to recovery was long and challenging, and

several setbacks required additional surgeries and

treatments. But Lulu never returned to the shelter during

this time because of the incredible dedication of her

foster parent, Lee.

Lulu was Lee’s third foster assignment for OHS and it

turned into a bigger project than anyone ever anticipated.

But Lee took it in stride and became a “foster

hero” among OHS staff, who were so grateful that Lulu

did not have to be in the shelter through all her medical

ups and downs. Lee’s compassion and commitment

ensured that Lulu made a full recovery.

It took 51 weeks, but Lulu finally found the perfect

adopter. Her wait was finally over and she could begin

the rest of her life.

Join PAWS

Monthly donors help pets like Lulu and Reese get all

the time and care they need to be ready for adoption.

Become a PAWS monthly donor and be a hero to pets

in need every single day. oregonhumane.org/paws

16

17



HAPPY

TAILS

FINDING

OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

HOMES FOR ANIMALS IS ONE OF

THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS WE DO AT

OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY.

WHEN ADOPTERS KEEP IN TOUCH, THEIR

STORIES AND PHOTOS INSPIRE US.

Does it get much cuter than a dog and cat becoming best

friends? Harlequin, now known as Kala, came to OHS through

the Second Chance Program. This sweet and gentle 7-yearold

German Shepherd was looking for the right adopter who

could help her lose weight and manage chronic ear infections

and routine dental cleanings due to her age.

OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

Bisu, fondly known as the OHS polar bear, was surrendered to the

shelter when her owner could no longer afford to care for her. At 11

years old, Bisu hit the jackpot when Amy Terzich and her family came

into her life.

“I have always wanted to adopt older dogs. They have such sweet

souls and deserve to live out their golden years in comfort. We were

looking for quite a while for the right fit when Bisu came along. With

a toddler and middle-aged dog, we felt like an older dog would fit

perfectly with our family,” says Amy.

After a few months together, the family thinks Bisu is the sweetest

dog ever. She nudges them endlessly for pets and loves to cuddle.

She is a favorite with their toddler and friends. Bisu enjoys patrolling

the yard and playing with their Boston Terrier Frank when she’s

feeling spry!

After a couple of months of bliss in her new home with Alexandra

and her partner, Sean, the family decided to expand.

That is when they found Molly, now Meka. This sweet feline

had a positive history of living with living with a large, calm

dog. Kala is polite and indifferent around cats, so the

match was a natural fit.

“They get along wonderfully. We are both so happy to

have them in our lives and enjoy our little fur family,”

says Alexandra.

“We feel like she has been here forever and is 100% worth all the

white hair everywhere,” says Amy.

Avignon came from a suspected puppy mill case in Modesto,

California where she, along with 150 other dogs, were discovered

living in cramped, unsanitary conditions. Avignon and 41

dogs from the case were welcomed to OHS in May 2022.

Read more about this on page 4.

She began her recovery journey in a foster home to heal

from her traumatic experience and learn how to be a dog.

Many things were new and, at times, frightening for Avignon,

like how to walk up and down stairs, so she required

a family who would show her patience and kindness.

Butter and Granola were a bonded pair looking for their

next adventure. They arrived at OHS in March 2022 and

were adopted in July. Little did they know, that while they

waited patiently for their home, an 11-year old human

was learning all about guinea pigs in preparation to

adopt this dynamic duo.

“My 11-year-old has been begging us for a guinea pig,

and I told her she had to do research before we would

consider it. She doubled down with a report and

pictures of these sweet boys. We were impressed with

her dedication, knowledge, and most importantly, her

passion for adopting an animal - or two, in need of a

home. They have been a great addition to our

family,” says Erin, Butter and Granola’s adopter.

SUMMER 2022

Now, Avignon lives with her adopter Jason and two tiny

dog siblings, who have helped ease her into playing and

continue to teach her Dog 101.

"Our baby is doing so well. She conquered the stairs in a

day on her own terms! She loves napping on the patio,”

her adopter Jason says.

Now known as Yogurt and Granola, these two

have their special guinea pig habitat, complete

with artwork. Granola is the first to greet everyone

in the morning with snuggles, and Yogurt is

the more curious of the two, and not afraid

to explore.

SUMMER 2022

18

19



OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

SUMMER 2022

PEACE OF MIND FOR PETS:

Friends Forever TM

Eight special pets settled into their new homes last year,

thanks to the Friends Forever TM program.

Planning for the care of our pets if they outlive us can

be an emotional process. The Friends Forever TM program

provides peace of mind knowing that your beloved

family member will be cared for by OHS and placed in a

new, loving home.

These pets were enrolled in OHS’ Friends Forever TM

program after their owners included OHS in their

estate plan. Last year, OHS was able to help eight

pets receive the care they needed and begin their next

chapter in a new home. Below are a few of the pets

helped through this program.

If you would like to learn

more about using

Friends Forever to ensure

the welfare of your pets,

call Kathryn Karr

(503)802-6743 or email

legacyteam@oregonhumane.org.

MURPHY

Betty inquired about Friends Forever TM in

2018 knowing that if she was ever unable

to care for her seven-year-old Australian

Silky Terrier, Murphy, she wanted to

ensure his future. Betty made a provision

for OHS in her will and submitted a

pet profile form to enroll Murphy in the

Friends Forever TM program.

Last summer when Betty unexpectedly

suffered a stroke, Betty’s daughter Rene,

called OHS right away to inquire about

the details. Her mother had informed

her of the plan she had previously made,

enrolling Murphy in the Friends Forever TM

program. Betty was working diligently to

regain the strength and independence

needed to return home to her happy life

with Murphy. As determined as she was,

it was not to be. With Betty’s approval,

Rene arranged for OHS to

receive Murphy.

When Murphy became available for

adoption at OHS, he quickly caught

Penny’s eye, who had experience with

Australian terriers. She was looking for

a friend for her dog, Sally, and Murphy

was a dream come true!

LILLY

Lilly was one of four cats who lived with

Hugh and Linda in Phoenix, Arizona.

As they aged, they worried about the day

they wouldn’t be able to care properly

for their four cats, Lilly, Garfield, Mitt,

and Junior. Linda heard about OHS and

the Friends Forever TM program from her

sister, who lives in Portland. So, Linda

and Hugh made OHS the beneficiary

of a retirement account and submitted

the simple paperwork to enroll their cats.

Linda knew her sister would transport her

beloved cats to OHS and that distance is

not a barrier for enrollment in the Friends

Forever TM program.

When Linda’s health started declining,

they decided to surrender the cats. Junior,

Mitt, and Garfield were quickly adopted

into new, loving homes. But Lilly was

nervous about her new surroundings and

had difficulty connecting with potential

adopters. Fortunately, B. Gail, who had

been looking for a cat for a few months,

had plenty of patience and gave Lilly all

the time and space she needed.

It took a few months, but Lilly began to

blossom and now enjoys jumping up for

a snuggle on the couch with B. Gail.

Bequests Received

Oregon Humane Society acknowledges the following persons whose estate bequests were received since January 1, 2022.

Marvin M. Adams

Leona Ambrose

James & Patricia Carlton

Cheryl Cooper

Rita DelRey

Margaret Ellis

Stacia Gabriel

Marie Givens

Thomas Louis Gross

Raymond Hayden

Clarence Hoefling

Kathryn Holt

Z. Joyce Hopps

Donna Howard

The James Family Trust

Join Us!

Rex & Betty Johnston Trust

P. Jayne Lebsack

Carol Luscher

Malcolm M. Marquis

Joan K. McCracken

Jean McKinney

Melba Means

Mary Joan Ogden Living Trust

Virginia Lee Dowdy Rooney

John F. Rose

Elizabeth Siegel

Diane Solomon

Carol Sorenson

Elaine Tanzer Trust

Robert & Vivian Wood

ESTATE PLANNING DOESN’T HAVE TO BE SCARY.

Join us for an informative and engaging luncheon.

Attorney Gregory Harris returns to OHS with his humorous

and succinct pointers for effective estate planning.

Tuesday, Oct. 25

Noon to 1 p.m.

For more information about including OHS

in your plan, please contact Gary Kish,

Vice President of Legacy Gifts and Strategic

Initiatives, at (503) 416-2988.

Presenter: Gregory E. Harris, Esq.

Attorney with Harris & Bowker, LLP

Murphy settled in beautifully at his new

home. He enjoys adventures at the beach,

Doors open at 11:30 a.m.

RSVP 503-802-6799 or

and snuggles on the couch.

20 Lunch will be provided.

legacyteam@oregonhumane.org 21

OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY



OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

OREGON HUMANE SOCIETY

While Oregon Humane Society partners with numerous

amazing businesses who support our mission, nearest

(literally!) and dearest to us is Best Friends’ Corner, which has

been operating within OHS since 1986. Conveniently located

in the lobby of the main shelter building in Portland, Best

Friends’ Corner is a full-service pet store carrying quality pet

foods, treats, toys and other pet accessories for all the dogs,

cats and small animals in your life. In addition to providing a

wide range of pet supplies, Best Friends’ Corner is truly where

best friends come together, as all adoptions from the Portland

shelter are finalized at the store register.

Best Friends’ Corner is not just open to OHS adopters! The

store is open to the public during shelter operating hours, 10

a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. Best of all, 100% of all proceeds go to

the animals in our care at OHS and in the community.

SUMMER 2022

22

Thomas Lamb Eliot Circle Business Partners

The following businesses have made significant financial contributions ($2,500+) to OHS and/or in-kind donations over the past 12

months. A complete list of TLC Business Partners can be found online at oregonhumane.org/support-our-partners.

New members in bold.

DIAMOND

Alaska Naturals

Boehringer Ingelheim

Fetch by The Dodo

Google Ad Grants

IDEXX Laboratories, Inc.

Intel

KOIN

Nike

OnPoint Community Credit Union

Subaru of America

The Standard

PLATINUM

Angeli Law Group

C.O.A.T Flagging

iHeartMedia

Lease Crutcher Lewis

Lithia Subaru of Oregon City

MetLife

Mud Bay

Portland General Electric

Slalom Consulting

Subaru of Portland

Western Partitions Inc.

GOLD

Bennington Properties LLC

Brooks Greenhouse Construction

Central Pet

Columbia Bank

Comcast

Delta Fire, Inc

Hallmark Inns and Resorts

Horizon Air Airlines

Matrix Partners LTD

Microsoft Corporation

Mike’s Hard Lemonade

Moda Health

Nissan of Portland

Oracle America, Inc.

Phillips Pet Food & Supplies

Premiere Property Group

Ruffwear

Scott | Edwards Architecture

Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits

Stella & Chewy’s

Tito's Handmade Vodka

The Kroger Co.

Vetsource

Wag Brands

Walsh Construction Co.

Washman USA

Zoetis Petcare

SILVER

14 Hands Winery

All Natural Pet Supply

Allied Cloud Solutions

Amazon.com

APR Staffing

Arm the Animals

Avangrid Renewables

Berkshire Hathaway Energy

Bora Architects

Bridgetown Emergency

Veterinary and Referral

Bristol Urban Apartments

Caldera International Inc.

Cambia Health Solutions

Clean Affinity

Cumming Management Group, Inc.

Direct Marketing Solutions

JP Morgan Chase & Co.

LexiDog Boutique & Social Club

Lowe’s Home Improvement Salem

Netflix

Nintendo of America

NW Wine Company

Petco

Republic Services

Rex Hill Masonry, Inc.

Stoller Wine Group

Tanasbourne Veterinary Emergency

Thede Culpepper Moore Munro & Silliman LLP

VCA Animal Hospitals

Wisdom Health

Xplane

Young's Market Company of Oregon

BRONZE

2 Towns Cider House

Animal Supply Company

Apple

Aquilini Brands

Beaverton Toyota

Birch Community Services

Bluebird Botanicals

Bow Wow Film Fest

Broadleaf Studio

CBRE

Columbia River Surgery Center

Columbia Sportswear

Comcast Corporation

Constellation Brands

Costco

Deutsch Family Wine & Spirits

Dick Hannah Dealerships

Duck Pond Cellars

eBay

Fear Free, LLC

Goodwick Creative Services, LLC

Green Pet Compost Company

Hollywood Grocery Outlet

Hyster-Yale Group

Johnstone Supply Inc.

Kent Pet Group

Kuni Lexus of Portland

Lam Research

Liberty Mutual

Lucky Dog

McKinsey & Company

Midland National Life Insurance Company

Migration Brewing

Morel Ink

Mt. Hood Vacation Rentals

Northwest Engineering Service

Porkbun.com

Precision Images

Republic National Distributing Company

ResQ Animal Massage

Rose City Veterinary Hospital

Second Growth Counseling

Sky Window Clean & Maintenance

Sniff Dog Hotel

Stewart Sokol & Larkin LLC

Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated

Swinerton

United Healthcare

VCA Northwest Veterinary Specialists

Western Pet Supply

Wildfang Co.

BUSINESS PARTNER PROFILE: BEST FRIENDS’ CORNER

SERVICES DIRECTORY

ANIMAL ADOPTIONS

Cats, dogs, birds, rodents and rabbits

are available for adoption.

oregonhumane.org/adopt

ANIMAL RESCUE

OHS responds to situations where an

animal is trapped and needs human

help (in case of emergency, call your

local police). (503) 802-6724

ANIMAL SHELTER ASSISTANCE

Food, supplies and training are offered

to animal agencies throughout Oregon.

(503) 416-2993

BEHAVIOR HELP-LINE

& ONLINE LIBRARY

Consult our online resources, or call

the free OHS telephone help-line with

questions about problem pet behavior.

(503) 416-2983;

oregonhumane.org/training

WAYS TO HELP

AUTOS FOR ANIMALS

Donate your car, motorcycle or boat to

help the animals. Contact Kelly Rey,

(503) 802-6766;

kellyr@oregonhumane.org

CHARITABLE GIFT ANNUITIES

Lifetime income plus a tax deduction.

Contact Gary Kish, (503) 416-2988;

garyk@oregonhumane.org

CORPORATE PARTNERSHIPS

Sponsor an OHS event or organize

a benefit. Contact Sarah Yusavitz,

(503) 416-7084;

sarahy@oregonhumane.org

ESTATE GIFTS

Include OHS in your will, trust or

with a beneficiary designation.

Contact Gary Kish, (503) 416-2988;

garyk@oregonhumane.org

FRIENDS FOREVER

Ensure the welfare of pets who may

outlive you. Contact Kathryn Karr, (503)

802-6743;

LegacyTeam@oregonhumane.org

FIND A HOME FOR YOUR PET

If you are unable to keep your pet,

OHS may be able to place your pet in

a new home. Call first to schedule an

appointment. (503) 285-7722, ext. 211

HUMANE EDUCATION

OHS offers classroom presentations,

after-school clubs, summer camps and

more. education@oregonhumane.org

LOST & FOUND PETS

OHS is not able to accept stray

animals, except stray cats from

Clackamas County. Please contact

your local animal control agency for

assistance. More resources available

at oregonhumane.org/lostpets

REPORT ANIMAL CRUELTY

OHS Humane Law Enforcement team

follows up on every tip and phone call.

(503) 802-6707 or

oregonhumane.org/report-cruelty/

To learn more about opportunities

to help animals, call (503) 802-6793

or visit us at oregonhumane.org

GIFTS OF STOCK

To make a gift of securities contact

Shelah Hanson, (503) 802-6776;

shelahh@oregonhumane.org

IN-KIND SUPPLIES, MATERIAL

See our wish list online at

oregonhumane.org/donate/wish-list

SUPPORT

Your donation includes a 10% discount

at the OHS retail store, subscription

to the OHS magazine and more. Call

(503) 802-6793 or visit

oregonhumane.org/donate

ONE COOL THING

Donate fine art, jewelry, popular

electronics or memorabilia. Contact

Kelly Rey, (503) 802-6766;

kellyr@oregonhumane.org

PAWS

Monthly gifts through the Planned

Account Withdrawal System (PAWS)

support OHS throughout the year.

Contact Marsha Chrest, (503) 416-7079;

marshac@oregonhumane.org

OHS is dedicated to making our community a

better place. Call (503) 285-7722 for more

information or visit us at oregonhumane.org

PET MEMORIALS

OHS provides private cremation

services. Euthanasia services are

offered if no other options

are available.

(503) 285-7722, ext. 217

PET SUPPLIES

Best Friends Corner inside the shelter

offers a variety of supplies.

(503) 285-7722, ext. 201

PET TRAINING

OHS offers classes and consultations.

More information at

oregonhumane.org/training

SPAY & NEUTER FINANCIAL AID

OHS offers discount coupons and

participates in the Spay & Save

program. (800) 345-SPAY;

asapmetro.org

TLC

The Thomas Lamb Eliot Circle (TLC)

honors donors contributing $1,000 or

more annually. Contact Kelly Jo

McCaughey, (503) 278-9110;

kellym@oregonhumane.org

TRIBUTE GIFTS

Tribute gifts can be made in memory

of, or in honor of, a pet or loved one.

A card will be sent to your loved one.

Contact Kelly Rey, (503) 802-6766;

kellyr@oregonhumane.org

VOLUNTEER

OHS volunteer programs are available

for youths, adults, groups and

companies. Contact Kim Hudson,

(503) 285-7722, ext. 204;

volunteer@oregonhumane.org

WORKPLACE GIVING CAMPAIGNS

To learn more about workplace giving

campaigns, contact Marsha Chrest,

(503) 416-7079;

marshac@oregonhumane.org



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