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Y o u r B u s i n e s s & L i f e s t y l e M a g a z i n e<br />

Private Cos.<br />

to Watch in 2011<br />

North Shore<br />

<strong>business</strong>es that<br />

more than just<br />

weathered<br />

the storm<br />

PAGE 14<br />

Window Shopping:<br />

best local finds for fall<br />

Sit down with<br />

St. Tammany<br />

schools<br />

Superintendent<br />

Trey Folse<br />

September/October 2010<br />

Inside<br />

Globalstar’s<br />

Inside<br />

Globalstar’s<br />

move to<br />

Covington<br />

Covington<br />

PAGE 35<br />

Cool<br />

Caribbean<br />

recipes<br />

More <strong>business</strong> <strong>news</strong>:<br />

• Taking a shine to solar power<br />

• SBA lenders in short supply


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4 September/October 2010<br />

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Follow Ochsner<br />

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ochsner.org/northshore<br />

©2010 Ochsner Health System (ochsner.org) is a non-profit, academic, multi-specialty, healthcare delivery system dedicated to patient care, research and education.


52<br />

38<br />

On the cover: Henryk “Heiner” Orlik at the Heiner Brau Microbrewery in Covington<br />

Photo by Frank Aymami<br />

28<br />

NORTH SHORE FACES<br />

Around the Parish<br />

People moving up, events,<br />

ribbon cuttings and<br />

more who’s who . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47<br />

Last Word<br />

John Crosby, local hero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52<br />

What’sInside<br />

S e p t e m b e r / O c t o b e r 2 0 1 0<br />

FEATURES<br />

Taking the Initiative<br />

Quality of life and a lucrative digital media incentive —<br />

inside Globalstar’s big move to Covington and why it may<br />

have left the door open for more companies to follow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35<br />

Success on Tap<br />

How Heiner Brau Microbrewery mastered a new label<br />

and the art of marketing with its Covington Brewhouse line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38<br />

Sunny Outlook<br />

Businesses hope St. Tammany will finally take a shine<br />

to solar power after a partly cloudy courtship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43<br />

NORTH SHORE BUSINESS<br />

Private Companies to Watch in 2011<br />

Donahue Favret Contractors, FARA and Smoothie King —<br />

Find out how these North Shore companies have<br />

more than just weathered the financial storm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15<br />

Who’s Who List: Top Private Companies on the North Shore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18<br />

Banking<br />

Small <strong>business</strong> loans are in demand on the North Shore<br />

but SBA lenders are in short supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19<br />

Education<br />

Superintendent Trey Folse addresses how he plans to keep<br />

St. Tammany Public Schools on top even in the face of budget cuts . . . . . . . . . . . . 22<br />

Who’s Who List: Private Schools, Two- and Four-Year Colleges . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24<br />

NORTH SHORE LIVING<br />

Window Shopping<br />

Return to the routine of fall in style<br />

with these local finds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27<br />

Off the Menu<br />

Make waves with cool, Caribbean flavors in your<br />

own kitchen with these recipes from the pros . . . . . . . . . .28<br />

Favorite Spaces<br />

A crimson-themed nursery reveals a Mandeville couple’s true colors.<br />

Plus, tips for creating a playful nursery your child can grow into . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30<br />

Your Health<br />

Patients don’t always connect vision problems to computer use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32<br />

IN EVERY ISSUE<br />

27<br />

From the Publisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7<br />

From the Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9<br />

Go.See.Do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10<br />

Shorts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12<br />

September/October 2010 5


6 September/October 2010<br />

STAFF QUESTION<br />

How far would you go to show your support<br />

for your favorite sports team?<br />

Christian<br />

Moises:<br />

I already went that<br />

far. I got a tattoo<br />

of a black and<br />

gold fleur de lis.<br />

September/October 2010<br />

Publisher: Lisa Blossman<br />

CityBusiness Publisher and President: D. Mark Singletary<br />

CityBusiness Editor: Greg LaRose<br />

EDITORIAL<br />

Editor: Renee Aragon Dolese<br />

Art Director: Lisa Finnan<br />

Associate Editors: Christian Moises<br />

Jenny Peterson<br />

Staff Writers: Richard A. Webster<br />

Ben Myers<br />

Jennifer Larino<br />

David Muller<br />

Market Researcher: Jennifer Nall<br />

Market Research Intern: Rebecca Giraud<br />

Contributing Writers: <strong>Deborah</strong> <strong>Burst</strong><br />

Diana Chandler<br />

Ariella Cohen<br />

Christine Fontana<br />

Autumn Giusti<br />

Craig Guillot<br />

Suzy Kessenich<br />

Art Assistant: Alex Borges<br />

Photographer: Frank Aymami<br />

Contributing<br />

Photographer: Russell Pintado<br />

ADVERTISING<br />

Advertising Executives: Cassie Foreman,<br />

Jaclyn Raymond<br />

PRODUCTION<br />

Production Manager: Julie Bernard<br />

Pre-press Manager: Shelley Costa<br />

Art and Production Coordinator: Samantha Verges<br />

ADMINISTRATION<br />

Director of Operations: Gina Brignac<br />

Office Coordinator: Marilyn Miller<br />

CIRCULATION<br />

Circulation Manager: Joseph Owens<br />

Circulation Marketing Manager: Maryellen Kanode<br />

Jennifer Larino:<br />

Gallons of face paint,<br />

miles of driving and<br />

maybe a pet stingray<br />

if the Tampa Bay<br />

Rays made it back<br />

to the World Series.<br />

Julie Bernard:<br />

I sat at the bar for<br />

five hours before the<br />

Saints Super Bowl,<br />

without a drink, just<br />

to save my lucky<br />

seat for the game.<br />

The entire contents of this magazine are copyrighted by NOPG, LLC, 2010, with all rights reserved. Reproduction<br />

or use, without permission, of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited.<br />

North Shore Report (USPS #28) is published monthly by NOPG LLC,<br />

1305 Causeway Blvd., Ste. 103., Mandeville LA 70471,<br />

(985) 626-1121.<br />

Subscriptions:<br />

Subscription Services<br />

P.O. Box 1667<br />

Minneapolis, MN 55480-1667<br />

Phone: (800) 451-9998<br />

Fax: (800) 329-8478<br />

It is the policy of this publication to employ people on the basis of their qualifications<br />

and with assurance of equal opportunity and treatment regardless of<br />

race, color, creed, sex, age, sexual orientation, religion, national origin or handicap.<br />

CityBusiness® is a registered trademark of CityBusiness/Twin Cities Inc.<br />

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Subscription Services, 10 Milk Street, Suite 1000, Boston, MA 02108<br />

Customer service: (800) 451-9998. Subscription rates: $12 per year.<br />

New Orleans Publishing Group LLC is an affiliate of Dolan Media Company:<br />

James P. Dolan, president, CEO and chairman; Scott J. Pollei,<br />

executive vice president and chief financial officer; Mark Stodder, vice president <strong>news</strong>papers.


PHYSICIANS<br />

from the publisher<br />

Lisa Blossman<br />

CityBusiness recognizes North Shore Health Care Heroes<br />

Please congratulate the following North Shore health care professionals who were honored at the annual CityBusiness Health Care<br />

Heroes event. To view a copy of the event program, visit www.neworleanscity<strong>business</strong>.com and click on “Events” on the top toolbar.<br />

John Breaux<br />

Position: cardiothoracic surgeon, Louisiana Medical Center and Heart Hospital<br />

Age: 50<br />

Family: wife, Betina; children, Jason, 21, Eric, 21, Elise, 18<br />

Education: bachelor’s degree in zoology, Louisiana State University; doctor of<br />

medicine, LSU School of Medicine<br />

Ravi Kanagala<br />

Position: cardiac electrophysiologist and partner, Tchefuncte Cardiovascular Associates<br />

Age: 40<br />

Family: wife, Anita; children, Abhishek, 10, Nikhita, 5<br />

Education: bachelor’s degree in biology, Earlham College; doctor of medicine,<br />

Indiana University School of Medicine<br />

Thomas Weatherall<br />

Position: medical director of radiation oncology, Slidell Memorial Hospital<br />

Age: 81<br />

Family: wife, Jennifer; daughters, Wendy, 34, Rebecca, 31<br />

Education: bachelor’s degree in journalism, University of Alabama; doctor of medicine,<br />

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine<br />

PROFESSIONALS<br />

VICKI BANNER<br />

Title: certified pharmacy technician, Slidell Memorial Hospital<br />

Age: 39<br />

Family: husband, Louis; sons Jonathon, 17, Quin, 13<br />

Education: graduate, Andrew Jackson High School<br />

Lori Fonte<br />

Position: director of radiation oncology and cancer program coordinator,<br />

Slidell Memorial Hospital<br />

Age: 42<br />

Family: husband, Danny; son, Ethan, 13<br />

Education: bachelor’s degree in allied health, University of St. Francis<br />

Rebecca Stubenrauch<br />

Age: 51<br />

Position: clinical supervisor of cardio pulmonary rehabilitation, Slidell Memorial<br />

Hospital<br />

Family: husband, Steven; children, Rachel, 31, Joseph, 29, Steven, 20, Samantha, 18<br />

Education: bachelor’s degree in nursing, Loyola University<br />

Lisa Blossman, publisher of North Shore Report and associate publisher/senior vice president of CityBusiness, can be reached at (504) 293-9226 or at lisa.blossman@nopg.com.<br />

September/October 2010 7


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8 September/October 2010<br />

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100 Cherokee Rose Lane<br />

(off of Hwy 21)<br />

Covington, La 70433<br />

985.867.8867<br />

504.862.1654<br />

www.firstcastlefcu.org<br />

from the editor<br />

Renee Aragon Dolese<br />

Buying locally is good for more than just a clear conscience<br />

Like most people these days, my husband, Dale,<br />

and I try buy Louisiana seafood whenever possible.<br />

It gives you a sense you’re doing your part to<br />

prop up our local industry after the BP oil spill<br />

clouded our waters and our seafood’s image.<br />

Dale recently went to a local seafood market<br />

to buy some Louisiana crawfish tails to make<br />

etouffee. The owner told him they were all out<br />

of local crawfish, but there were some foreign<br />

crawfish still available. Dale had his heart set on<br />

etouffee for dinner, so he bought the crawfish,<br />

which were imported from China and packaged<br />

in Washington.<br />

Our etouffee didn’t go down very well that<br />

night, and to compound the guilt, the foreign<br />

tails happened to have a strong fishy taste,<br />

almost inedible. I imagined the elite Green<br />

Beret snouts of the FDA seafood sniffers would<br />

have smelled these coming a mile away.<br />

Even though we supported a local seafood<br />

seller by buying the imposter crawfish from<br />

him, we will go Louisiana all the way next time.<br />

�������������������<br />

I’m not usually a xenophobe in my consumer<br />

behavior. My past two cars were a Honda and a<br />

Subaru, because I think they’re superior cars and<br />

a good value. But I really do believe Louisiana<br />

seafood is the freshest, best seafood you can buy<br />

— with the added benefit of supporting local<br />

hardworking people and <strong>business</strong>es.<br />

So why stop at seafood?<br />

There are plenty of superior local products<br />

out there. And as it turns out, there is a growing<br />

appetite for those Louisiana-centric goods<br />

and services.<br />

Covington-based Heiner Brau Microbrewery<br />

launched its Covington Brewhouse line of beer<br />

this spring, and North Shore sales figures for the<br />

new localized label are 400 percent higher than<br />

sales of other Heiner Brau products, which are<br />

also doing quite well, according to marketing<br />

manager Frank LeCourt.<br />

But people are scooping up these locally<br />

made products for more than just a good conscience.<br />

Buying locally keeps the money in the state<br />

and, in some cases, in the parish. Small <strong>business</strong>es<br />

and their employees profit and so do our<br />

governments with a stronger tax base.<br />

Buying locally is green. Whether it’s produce,<br />

beer or building materials, a smaller carbon<br />

footprint is created when items are<br />

shipped shorter distances.<br />

Buying locally makes a statement — that we<br />

can survive a catastrophic hurricane and almost<br />

equally catastrophic oil spill and continue to<br />

produce the highest quality beer, seafood,<br />

smoothies, banks, circuit boards and Who Dat<br />

T-shirts around.<br />

Next time the market is all out of the Louisiana<br />

seafood I’m looking for, I’ll revise the menu on the<br />

spot. Either that or I’ll open a cold bottle of Bayou<br />

Bock and think about it for a while.•<br />

Renee Aragon Dolese is editor of North Shore<br />

Report. Reach her at renee.dolese@nopg.com or<br />

at (504) 293-9211.<br />

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September/October 2010 9


DO YOU PREPARE MORE FOR<br />

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THAN YOU DO FOR COLLEGE?<br />

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For a free, personalized college cost report, call or visit today.<br />

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Covington, LA 70433<br />

985-875-0400<br />

Matt Gardner<br />

3701 Hwy 59, Ste. C<br />

Mandeville, LA 70471<br />

985-898-2468<br />

10 September/October 2010<br />

Tammy P Earles<br />

18539 Hwy 22, Ste. J<br />

Ponchatoula, LA 70454<br />

985-370-0646<br />

Debbie P Stuart, AAMS ®<br />

3979 Hwy 190, Ste. D<br />

Covington, LA 70433<br />

985-892-6154<br />

Jerrold A Rabalais<br />

209 West Hwy 22, Ste. H<br />

Madisonville, LA 70447<br />

985-845-1072<br />

Danny Boudreaux, AAMS ® , CFP ®<br />

2395 Gause Blvd East, Ste. 4<br />

Slidell, LA 70461<br />

985-646-2078<br />

Chad W Elter<br />

255 West Florida Street<br />

Mandeville, LA 70448<br />

985-674-0888<br />

Lee R Cosgrove, AAMS ®<br />

2051 E Gause Blvd, Ste. 60<br />

Slidell, LA 70461<br />

985-661-8139<br />

Evan F Gremillion<br />

1200 Bus Hwy 190 Ste. 21<br />

Covington, LA 70433<br />

985-893-4742<br />

Robert H. McCullough, Jr<br />

AAMS ® , CLU ®<br />

2625 North Causeway Blvd<br />

Mandeville, LA 70471<br />

985-809-0854<br />

Jeanette M Sanford<br />

2170 Hwy 190, Ste. 135<br />

Slidell, LA 70460<br />

985-781-7683<br />

September/<br />

October<br />

TOUR … The St. Tammany<br />

Fire District and the<br />

Commission on Cultural Affairs<br />

will host its Firehouse Tour concert<br />

at noon Sept. 18 at Fire<br />

District No. 12 Covington. The<br />

event will feature live entertainment<br />

from Christian Serpas, fire<br />

safety demonstrations and activities<br />

for children. Admission is free. For<br />

more information, call 898-3011.<br />

SHOP … Art for Madisonville will host<br />

the Madisonville Art Market from 10 a.m.<br />

to 4 p.m. Sept. 18 on the Tchefuncte<br />

Riverfront in Madisonville. Artwork from<br />

local artists will be available to purchase.<br />

Admission is free. For more information,<br />

visit www.artformadisonville.org.<br />

ENJOY …<br />

The second<br />

annual Louisiana Gator<br />

Fest will be held from 10 a.m. to 10<br />

p.m. Sept. 18 and noon to 8 p.m. Sept. 19<br />

at Tammany Trace in Mandeville. The<br />

event will feature live entertainment, a gator<br />

cook-off competition, food, beverages and a<br />

Miss Louisiana Gator Fest beauty pageant.<br />

For more information, visit www.louisianagatorfest.com.<br />

STRUT … St. Tammany Parish<br />

Hospital will host its second annual Heart of<br />

Fashion benefit for the hospital’s pediatric<br />

care department at 11:30 a.m. Sept. 23 at<br />

Tchefuncta Country Club in Covington.<br />

The event will feature a New York-style runway<br />

show by Saks Fifth Avenue, a cocktail<br />

luncheon, a silent auction, surprise giveaways<br />

and gifts. For more information, call<br />

898-4171 or visit www.stph.org.<br />

TEE OFF … The East St. Tammany<br />

Chamber of Commerce will host its 12th<br />

annual golf tournament at noon Oct. 8 at<br />

Oak Harbor Golf Club in<br />

Slidell. Registration begins at<br />

10:30 a.m. The cost is $125<br />

per player and includes lunch,<br />

a putting contest and dinner.<br />

For more information and to<br />

register, call 643-5678 or email<br />

jobeth@estchamber.com.<br />

DRINK … The Heiner Brau


Microbrewery will host its sixth annual<br />

Oktoberfest from 5-9 p.m. Oct. 8 and<br />

from 2-7 p.m. Oct. 9 at the Heiner Brau<br />

Microbrewery in Covington. The event<br />

will feature food, live music and beer on<br />

tap. Admission is free. For more information,<br />

visit www.heinerbrau.com.<br />

RUN … Varsity Sports will host its<br />

inaugural Gulf Coast Half Marathon at 7<br />

a.m. Oct. 10 at the Mandeville Lakefront.<br />

There will be a post-race party including<br />

food, beverages and an awards ceremony.<br />

The cost is $40 for the first 500 registrants<br />

and increases until the day of the race. For<br />

more information and to register, call 377-<br />

9563, e-mail joerelaxo@gmail.com or visit<br />

www.louisianahalf.com.<br />

MINGLE … The Junior Auxiliary of<br />

Slidell will host its 39th annual Charity Gala<br />

from 7-11 p.m. Oct. 23 at the Le Grande<br />

Maison in Slidell. The event will feature an<br />

open bar, live and silent auctions, and live<br />

entertainment. Tickets are $75 per person.<br />

For more information and to purchase tickets,<br />

call 701-7341.<br />

TRICK OR TREAT …<br />

St. Tammany Parish<br />

Hospital’s Parenting Center<br />

and Capital One Bank will<br />

host its annual Monster Mash<br />

fundraiser from 10 a.m. to 4<br />

p.m. Oct. 23 at Bogue Falaya<br />

Park in Covington. The event will include a<br />

trick-or-treat village, games and arts and<br />

crafts. Tickets are $4 a person in advance,<br />

$6 a person at the gate and $15 a person for<br />

activity wristbands. For more information<br />

and to buy tickets, visit www.stph.org.<br />

SAIL AWAY … The Lake<br />

Pontchartrain Basin Maritime Museum will<br />

host its 21st annual Madisonville Wooden<br />

Boat Festival from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Oct.<br />

23-24 at the museum in Madisonville. The<br />

event will feature more than 100 classic<br />

boats, live entertainment, food, arts and<br />

crafts, and a boat-building contest. Tickets<br />

are $10 per person and children 12 and<br />

younger and uniformed military enter free.<br />

For more information, call 845-9200 or<br />

visit www.lpbmm.org.<br />

JAM … The city of Slidell will hold its<br />

Bayou Jam Halloween Bash featuring Vince<br />

Vance and the Valients from 5:30-7:30 p.m.<br />

Oct. 24 at Heritage Park in Slidell.<br />

Admission is free and children are encouraged<br />

to attend in Halloween costumes. For<br />

more information, call 646-4375 or visit<br />

www.slidell.la.us.<br />

NETWORK … The East St. Tammany<br />

Chamber of Commerce will host its<br />

fourth Friday breakfast at 8 a.m. Oct. 29<br />

at The Gallery in Slidell. Mayors repre-<br />

senting St. Tammany Parish will be at the<br />

event. Doors open at 7:30 a.m. for networking.<br />

Admission is $25 for members<br />

and $30 for nonmembers. Pre-paid reservations<br />

are required. For more information<br />

and to make reservations, call 643-<br />

5678 or e-mail kay@estchamber.com.<br />

FEAST … St. Joseph Abbey will host its<br />

Deo Gratias celebration to benefit the<br />

Seminary College from 6-11:30 p.m. Oct.<br />

30 at St. Joseph Abbey in Covington. The<br />

event will include dinner by Chef John<br />

Folse and silent and live auctions. Tickets<br />

are $75 a person. For more information, call<br />

NEAR YOUR HOME<br />

HOME<br />

FOR MORE CONVENIENT<br />

WORK<br />

Bou<br />

rge<br />

ois<br />

Benn<br />

e t tt<br />

867-2242, e-mail vcrouere@sjasc.edu or<br />

visit www.sjasc.edu.<br />

COOK OFF … The<br />

third annual Abita River<br />

Chili Cook-off will be held<br />

from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct.<br />

30 at the Abita Trailhead<br />

Plaza in Abita Springs. The<br />

event will feature live entertainment,<br />

arts and crafts, and a Halloween costume<br />

contest for children and adults. Admission<br />

is $5 per person. For more information, email<br />

info09@abitariverchilicookoff.com or<br />

visit www.abitariverchilicookoff.com.<br />

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NORTH SHORE 985.246.3022<br />

1070-B WEST CAUSEWAY APPROACH, MANDEVILLE, LA<br />

NEW ORLEANS | HOUMA | THIBODAUX<br />

September/October 2010 11


12 September/October 2010<br />

N e w s , n o t e s a n d<br />

o t h e r m e n t i o n a b l e s<br />

Market trends in<br />

St. Tammany a mixed bag<br />

Economic trends in the first quarter of this year suggest<br />

the local economy is sustainable but not expanding on a<br />

large scale, according to the St. Tammany Economic<br />

Development Foundation in its quarterly Trends Report<br />

that tracks key economic data and indicators in St.<br />

Tammany Parish for the first three months of the year.<br />

Unemployment was up to 5.3 percent, up from 4.9<br />

percent the same time last year. Louisiana’s unemployment<br />

rate was 6.9 percent and the national rate was<br />

10.4 percent.<br />

Single-family residential building permits were up<br />

7.7 percent to 140 compared with 130 last year. The<br />

number of housing units sold fell 6.9 percent to 407<br />

compared with this time last year. Average sale prices of<br />

housing units declined 5.9 percent to $224,196. Average<br />

rent cost fell 11 percent to $1,078.<br />

Commercial permits fell 30 percent,<br />

with 84 issued in the first quarter.<br />

Retail sales fell 7.4 percent from<br />

this time last year. Hotel receipts rose<br />

1.4 percent. There were 550 new<br />

<strong>business</strong> starts, a 3.1 percent decline.<br />

New projects in the first quarter<br />

of this year totaled $4.8 million, and<br />

are expected to bring nearly 1,100<br />

permanent jobs to St. Tammany.<br />

St. Tammany posts<br />

highest foreclosure rate<br />

in metro area<br />

The New Orleans metro area saw an increase in<br />

foreclosure filings in July, with St. Tammany Parish<br />

posting the highest foreclosure rate, according to<br />

figures released by Irvine-Calif.-based RealtyTrac.<br />

St. Tammany, with 415 filings, had the highest<br />

rate in the New Orleans metro area at one in every<br />

233 housing units receiving a filing. That marked a<br />

55.43 percent increase over June and a 234.68<br />

percent surge from a year ago. Filings include<br />

default notices, auction sale notices and bank<br />

repossessions.<br />

Here's how the other parishes fared:<br />

• Orleans: 346 filings for a rate at one in every<br />

331 housing units, up 13.82 percent from June<br />

and 37.85 percent from July 2009;<br />

• Jefferson: 389 filings for a rate of one in<br />

every 466 housing units, up 35.07 percent from<br />

June and 112.57 percent from last year;<br />

• St. Bernard: nine filings for a rate of one in<br />

every 956 housing units, up 200 percent from<br />

June. RealtyTrac did not list a percentage change<br />

from July 2009.<br />

• St. Charles: six filings for a rate of one in<br />

every 3,342 housing units, down 77.78 percent<br />

from June but up 500 percent over a year ago.<br />

• St. John: six filings for a rate of one in every<br />

2,924 housing units, down 33.33 percent from<br />

June. RealtyTrac did not list a percentage change<br />

from July 2009.<br />

Plaquemines Parish had no filings.<br />

Louisiana's 2,201 filings in July produced a<br />

foreclosure rate of one in every 856 housing units,<br />

a 35.11 percent increase over June and a 97.05<br />

percent surge over a year ago. That put Louisiana<br />

32nd out of 50.<br />

Construction begins on new<br />

forensic center in Lacombe<br />

A new apartment complex will be going up to complement recent commercial<br />

development along one of the North Shore’s fast growing commercial<br />

corridors.<br />

Developers Pratt Provosty and Paul and Quentin Dastugue expect to<br />

start construction in September on a 240-unit complex on the Ochsner<br />

Boulevard extension in Covington. The project will be built on a 14-acre<br />

site about midway between state highways 21 and 1085.<br />

“There are no apartment developments of any size on the west side<br />

of the Tchefuncte River,” said Quentin Dastugue. “We need work force<br />

housing there.”<br />

Working under the PPQ Northshore LLC partnership, the developers<br />

Groundbreaking ceremonies<br />

were held July 21 for the new<br />

$8 million St. Tammany<br />

Coroner Forensic Center, to be<br />

built on 40 acres adjacent to<br />

Highway 434 in Lacombe.<br />

The one-story, 23,200square-foot<br />

center, designed<br />

by New Orleans-based<br />

Sizeler Thompson Brown<br />

Architects, is expected to be<br />

completed in September<br />

2011. General contractor for<br />

the building is VCC<br />

Construction of Irving, Texas.<br />

The facility will consolidate<br />

all of the coroner’s functions,<br />

including offices, laboratories and examining centers into one location.<br />

The center will also house a toxicology lab providing blood/alcohol analysis<br />

for DUI/DWI cases, a function now being handled by the Louisiana State Police.<br />

“Ground breaking for our new forensic center is the culmination of extensive<br />

planning and insightful decisions by parish leaders to benefit St. Tammany<br />

Parish residents,” stated Dr. Peter Galvan, St. Tammany Parish coroner.<br />

Apartment complex planned for North Shore’s Ochsner Boulevard<br />

have filed $3.3 million in permits for the apartment complex. The same<br />

team developed Stone Creek Health Club and LLOG Exploration Co.<br />

headquarters on Ochsner Boulevard, which is anchored by its namesake’s<br />

medical clinic.<br />

In addition to the medical and engineering professionals who work<br />

nearby, Dastugue said the complex will draw tenants from other<br />

employers in western St. Tammany, including the city of Covington.<br />

The complex is scheduled to be complete next year by late spring or<br />

early summer, said Dastugue, who did not provide rent range projections.<br />

Obtaining financing for new construction was the most difficult part<br />

of bringing the development to light, he said.<br />

North Shore monks suing<br />

to sell hand-made caskets<br />

In the past, monks have set themselves on fire to protest injustice.<br />

The monks at St. Joseph Abbey of Covington are choosing a subtler<br />

route, through America's legal system.<br />

The 121-year-old Catholic monastery filed a lawsuit in a New<br />

Orleans federal courtroom in August challenging the constitutionality<br />

of the state's requirement that they have a license to sell their handcrafted<br />

wooden caskets. Members of the state Board of Embalmers<br />

and Funeral Directors are named as defendants.<br />

They are being backed by the libertarian Institute for Justice, which<br />

also represented florists last spring who sued the state for being<br />

required to have a flower-arranging license. A law was passed in the<br />

ensuing legislative session that eliminated hands-on arrangement tests<br />

— and the lawsuit was dropped — but a license is still required.<br />

Monks at St. Joseph Abbey had been furnishing caskets for its<br />

deceased abbots for years, but in the 1990s its handmade burial boxes<br />

started getting more interest from the public.<br />

They launched St. Joseph Woodworks on Nov. 1, 2007 — All<br />

Saints Day. The state Board of Embalmers and Funeral Directors<br />

caught wind of the <strong>business</strong> and about a month later, before any caskets<br />

had been sold, informed the monks that selling caskets would<br />

result in a possible injunction, fines and jail time.<br />

The Institute for Justice says the license requirement does<br />

nothing to protect public health, as the people using the caskets<br />

are dead anyway. Further, it notes that caskets aren't legally<br />

required for burial in Louisiana.<br />

The Institute argues that the law is on the books "because the cartel<br />

of licensed funeral directors wants the lucrative funeral market to itself."<br />

The monks would have to apprentice for a year at a licensed<br />

funeral director for a year learning needless skills before being<br />

required to take an industry test, according to the Institute for Justice.<br />

In Louisiana, the application fee to open a funeral <strong>business</strong> is<br />

$1,500. To be an embalmer or funeral director, the application cost is<br />

$250 and $100 for funeral director apprentices.


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September/October 2010 13


Smoothie King Executive Vice President<br />

Richard Leveille will gamely indulge some<br />

straightforward <strong>business</strong> talk. He readily discusses<br />

how the Covington-based smoothie<br />

giant has surpassed 600 franchises, including<br />

dozens of shops in South Korea and Egypt. But<br />

there’s more on his mind than dollars and cents,<br />

and he bides time until the questions end and<br />

14 September/October 2010<br />

Business<br />

P R I V A T E<br />

C O M P A N I E S<br />

3 Private Companies<br />

to Watch in 2011<br />

Donahue Favret Contractors, FARA and Smoothie King —<br />

Find out how these North Shore companies have more than<br />

just weathered the financial storm<br />

SMOOTHIE KING<br />

A HEALTHY INTERNATIONAL PRESENCE AND<br />

A STRONG NEW ORLEANS CONNECTION YIELD<br />

SUCCESS IN A DIMINISHED LENDING CLIMATE<br />

By Ben Myers<br />

Staff Writer<br />

ben.myers@nopg.com<br />

he’s asked if he’d like to add anything.<br />

Then he gets philosophical.<br />

“We really feel there is a social purpose for<br />

our being,” Leveille says.<br />

That purpose, in Leveille’s telling,<br />

sounds like any ad campaign you might<br />

imagine for a smoothie franchise concept:<br />

providing a distinctly healthy product that is<br />

Adam Payne assists<br />

customer Maggie<br />

Miller at the Covington<br />

Smoothie King.<br />

Headquarters: Covington<br />

President and CEO: Steve Kuhnau<br />

Principal <strong>business</strong>: nutritional smoothie franchise<br />

Founded: 1973<br />

Employees: 60 in corporate office; 600 franchises worldwide<br />

Why this company matters: Smoothies are a global phenomenon<br />

and Smoothie King claims to have invented them.<br />

2009 2008<br />

Revenue $162 million $148 million<br />

Employees 57 60<br />

Source: North Shore Report staff research<br />

enjoyable in its own right.<br />

But Smoothie King’s history reveals some<br />

genuine health food credentials. Founder<br />

Steve Kuhnau devised a nutritional fruit drink<br />

in the 1960s to contend with his low blood<br />

sugar, and Smoothie King claims that’s the<br />

origin of the smoothie. In any case, the invention<br />

was beneficial enough that Kuhnau


opened the first store in 1973.<br />

Smoothie King is now global. Beyond<br />

South Korea and Egypt, new franchises are<br />

expected in Japan and Turkey.<br />

That international presence is helping to<br />

buoy Smoothie King in a lending environment<br />

that almost seems designed to hurt a<br />

franchise corporation. Smoothie King caters<br />

to first-time <strong>business</strong> owners looking for solid,<br />

straightforward opportunities, Leveille says.<br />

That means the pool of potential Smoothie<br />

King franchisees tends to evaporate along<br />

with small <strong>business</strong> loans.<br />

“It’s a challenge for the small <strong>business</strong><br />

owner,” Leveille says, referring to the current<br />

The national economic crisis of 2008 and<br />

2009 spared no victims, especially in the<br />

credit-dependent construction industry. The<br />

legions of sufferers included Mandevillebased<br />

Donahue Favret Contractors, which<br />

saw its volume plummet from $82.5 million<br />

to $44 million from 2008 to 2009. But contractors<br />

throughout the country are counting<br />

their blessings if they’ve emerged like<br />

Donahue Favret.<br />

climate. “The small <strong>business</strong> lenders have created<br />

a criteria that only allows lending to people<br />

that have been established in <strong>business</strong> for<br />

many years.”<br />

But Smoothie King also has a wild card in<br />

its pocket, and the company has played the<br />

card successfully throughout its existence: the<br />

familial culture of the New Orleans area.<br />

Leveille reasons that migration from the New<br />

Orleans area is the biggest reason for Smoothie<br />

King’s proliferation to Houston, Atlanta, the<br />

northeastern United States and elsewhere.<br />

As Smoothie King expanded to Houston<br />

in the 1990s, Leveille remembers ushering<br />

a franchisee around that city, trying to con-<br />

DONAHUE FAVRET CONTRACTORS<br />

2011 COULD MARK A RETURN TO PRE-RECESSION<br />

VOLUME, THANKS TO A BALANCE OF PUBLIC AND<br />

PRIVATE PORTFOLIOS AND A CERTAIN $108M PROJECT<br />

For one thing, there were no layoffs,<br />

says vice president Maura Donahue.<br />

Sure, there was obligatory fat trimming, but<br />

Donahue Favret managed to keep its 45- to<br />

60-member work force in tact.<br />

Secondly, the family-owned company,<br />

along with Florida-based Welbro Building<br />

Corp., just landed a very big deal: the renovation<br />

of the Hyatt Regency New Orleans.<br />

Completion of the $108 million project is<br />

vince bankers to take a chance. But no one<br />

knew what a smoothie was, and they were<br />

rejected nine times. Then the president of<br />

the 10th bank happened to be from New<br />

Orleans, and he went with it.<br />

Now there are 70 Smoothie Kings in<br />

Houston, dwarfing the 40 in the New Orleans<br />

market.<br />

“Many of our franchisees have come<br />

from New Orleans. They have been longtime<br />

guests of stores in New Orleans all<br />

over this marketplace, and then they’ve<br />

been transferred or moved, or they told a<br />

brother about it,” Leveille says. “That has<br />

helped our growth.”<br />

Donahue Favret Contractors continues work on the J.B. Lancaster<br />

Elementary School in Madisonville, to be completed in the spring. The<br />

company has found stability in balancing public and private portfolios.<br />

Headquarters: Mandeville<br />

President and CEO: John Donahue III<br />

Principal <strong>business</strong>: construction<br />

Founded: 1979<br />

Employees: 48<br />

Why this company matters: Donahue Favret will renovate<br />

the Hyatt Regency in New Orleans, another feather in the<br />

cap for the local company in an uber-competitive market.<br />

2009 2008<br />

Revenue $44 million $85 million<br />

Employees 48 60<br />

Source: North Shore Report staff research<br />

expected by the fall of 2011.<br />

The Hyatt Regency is important not only<br />

as a high-profile milestone, but as a buoy<br />

heading into next year, Donahue says.<br />

But the crisis isn’t over.<br />

Katrina-related projects aren’t as abundant,<br />

and the halting financial market con-<br />

See PRIVATE COMPANIES, page 16<br />

September/October 2010 15


Member<br />

FDIC<br />

16 September/October 2010<br />

Business<br />

Private Companies<br />

continued from page 15<br />

tinues to muzzle private-sector work. That<br />

contributes to tremendous competition<br />

for public-sector work.<br />

“It allows for a lot of people who would<br />

typically not be able to bid on perhaps some<br />

of the private work,” Donahue says.<br />

Donahue says her company traditionally<br />

works to balance its public and private<br />

portfolios. It’s a “healthy blend,” Donahue<br />

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Citizens Bank & Trust Co.<br />

Serving St. Tammany Since 1945<br />

Main Office<br />

222 N. New Hampshire St.<br />

Covington, LA<br />

(985) 892-3776<br />

Covington<br />

73021 Hwy. 25<br />

Covington, LA<br />

(985) 898-4749<br />

www.cbtbanking.com<br />

says, and it’s part of the company’s overall<br />

approach to growth.<br />

“We have not been about fast growth,”<br />

Donahue says. “We have been about steady<br />

growth, steady controllable growth in the<br />

right direction, and we have been able to<br />

maintain that over the years.”<br />

And that, perhaps, is why Donahue<br />

Favret expects this year to return to its<br />

prerecession volumes.<br />

Mandeville-City Hall<br />

3100 E. Causeway Approach Rd.<br />

Mandeville, LA<br />

(985) 626-8114<br />

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79030 Hwy. 437<br />

Covington, LA<br />

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Francis Richard, founder of Mandevillebased<br />

F.A. Richard & Associates, faced<br />

a defining moment in the late 1980s.<br />

Louisiana’s oil and gas industry was going<br />

kaput and Richard believed his company,<br />

which provided independent insurance<br />

adjustments to the industry, needed to transform<br />

itself. Richard steered FARA toward<br />

larger self-insured corporations and public<br />

entities. It was a risky move that caused<br />

internal consternation.<br />

“We went from our clients being insurance<br />

companies exclusively to larger corporations<br />

who could self-insure,” says<br />

Richard’s son, Todd Richard, who is now<br />

president and CEO. “It was painful. Not<br />

everyone agreed with the strategy.”<br />

But it paid off. By the early 1990s,<br />

Richard says the company acquired a critical<br />

mass of new, self-insured clients. Now the<br />

company provides an array of services, from<br />

claims administration to health care management,<br />

to hundreds of public and private<br />

clients throughout the country.<br />

And FARA just scored perhaps the<br />

biggest coup in its history. The company<br />

will now handle all claims made to the<br />

Louisiana Office of Risk Management on a<br />

five-year, $60 million contract. The company<br />

is adding 90 new employees and opening<br />

two new offices — a second one in<br />

Baton Rouge and a new one in Alexandria<br />

— to manage the new project.<br />

“It’s huge,” Richard says. “It will probably<br />

be our single largest account.”•<br />

Headquarters: Mandeville<br />

President and CEO: Todd Richard<br />

Principal <strong>business</strong>: risk management<br />

Employees: 385<br />

Founded: 1978<br />

Why this company matters: FARA is handling<br />

all claims made to the Louisiana Office of Risk<br />

Management<br />

2009 2008<br />

Revenue $40 million $43 million<br />

Employees 348 349<br />

Source: North Shore Report staff research


Business<br />

Top private companies on the North Shore<br />

(locally based companies ranked by latest-year revenue)<br />

Company<br />

Phone<br />

Fax Address Principal <strong>business</strong><br />

Smoothie King<br />

Franchises<br />

635-6973<br />

635-6987<br />

DonahueFavret<br />

Contractors Inc.<br />

626-4431<br />

626-3572<br />

F.A. Richard and<br />

Associates (FARA)<br />

624-8383<br />

624-8489<br />

Gilsbar Inc.<br />

892-3520<br />

898-1500<br />

Southern Homes<br />

LLC<br />

643-0123<br />

643-6364<br />

Central<br />

Progressive Bank<br />

882-2269<br />

882-6701<br />

Abita Brewing Co.<br />

LLC<br />

893-3143<br />

898-3546<br />

Rotolo<br />

Consultants Inc.<br />

(RCI)<br />

643-2427<br />

643-2691<br />

Gulf Coast Office<br />

Products Inc.<br />

249-6081<br />

249-6082<br />

Pontchartrain<br />

Foods Inc.<br />

892-6173<br />

892-6281<br />

CCTV Imports<br />

809-2778<br />

809-2725<br />

PMOLink LLC<br />

674-5968<br />

674-5995<br />

Mele Printing Co.<br />

893-9522<br />

893-2679<br />

Environmental<br />

Business<br />

Specialists LLC<br />

674-0660<br />

674-3483<br />

Fabre Smith and<br />

Co.<br />

626-1690<br />

(888) 840-7311<br />

121 Park Place<br />

Covington<br />

70433<br />

3030 E.<br />

Causeway<br />

Approach<br />

Mandeville<br />

70448<br />

1625 W.<br />

Causeway<br />

Approach<br />

Mandeville<br />

70471<br />

2100 Covington<br />

Centre<br />

Covington<br />

70433<br />

2053 Gause<br />

Blvd. E., Suite<br />

200<br />

Slidell 70461<br />

29092 Krentel<br />

Road<br />

Lacombe<br />

70445<br />

P.O. Box 1510<br />

Abita Springs<br />

70420<br />

894 Robert<br />

Blvd.<br />

Slidell 70458<br />

68443 Highway<br />

59<br />

Mandeville<br />

70471<br />

P.O. Box 3727<br />

Covington<br />

70434<br />

600 Deer Cross<br />

Court E.<br />

Madisonville<br />

70447<br />

2001<br />

Lakeshore<br />

Drive<br />

Mandeville<br />

70448<br />

619 N. Tyler St.<br />

Covington<br />

70433<br />

1930 Surgi<br />

Drive<br />

Mandeville<br />

70448<br />

1164 Rue<br />

Chinon<br />

Mandeville<br />

70471<br />

smoothies, supplements, healthy<br />

snacks<br />

Top executive<br />

Title<br />

Web site<br />

Steve Kuhnau<br />

co-founder and CEO<br />

www.smoothieking.com<br />

general contractors John "Jack" Donahue Jr. /<br />

John Donahue III<br />

chairman / president and<br />

CEO<br />

www.donahuefavret.com<br />

insurance services, third-party<br />

administration<br />

insurance services provider, thirdparty<br />

administrator<br />

M. Todd Richard<br />

president and CEO<br />

www.fara.com<br />

Hank Miltenberger<br />

president<br />

www.gilsbar.com<br />

homebuilder Adrian Kornman<br />

CEO<br />

www.southernhomes.com<br />

full-service financial institution Brandon Faciane<br />

president and CEO<br />

www.cpb.com<br />

brewery David Blossman<br />

president<br />

www.abita.com<br />

landscape construction, pool<br />

construction, landscape<br />

maintenance<br />

Joe Rotolo<br />

president<br />

www.rotoloconsultants.com<br />

copy machines/document storage Bob Walsh<br />

chairman of the board<br />

www.gcopnet.com<br />

fast-food franchise Glenn Jacob<br />

vice president<br />

NA<br />

surveillance product<br />

manufacturer/wholesaler<br />

project and process management<br />

consulting<br />

Kevin Lazaroe<br />

president<br />

www.cctvimports.com<br />

Geoff Hingle<br />

CEO and president<br />

www.pmolink.com<br />

printing and mailing Mallery Mele<br />

president and CEO<br />

www.meleprinting.com<br />

environmental consulting in the<br />

area of wastewater treatment,<br />

stormwater runoff and wetlands<br />

delineation<br />

marketing and communication<br />

strategies<br />

Michael H. Foster<br />

principal consultant and<br />

owner<br />

www.ebsbiowizard.com<br />

Janet Fabre Smith<br />

principal<br />

www.fabresmith.com<br />

No. of<br />

employees<br />

Year founded<br />

locally<br />

57<br />

1973<br />

48<br />

1979<br />

348<br />

1978<br />

324<br />

1959<br />

30<br />

1990<br />

166<br />

1967<br />

65<br />

1986<br />

178<br />

1978<br />

80<br />

1977<br />

249<br />

1977<br />

12<br />

1999<br />

32<br />

2000<br />

Revenue<br />

(millions)<br />

2009<br />

Revenue<br />

(millions)<br />

2008<br />

$162<br />

$148<br />

The above information was provided by the companies, with the exception of the banks' revenues and employee figures, which are provided by the FDIC. All revenue figures are rounded.<br />

There may be companies that do not appear on this list because they chose not to disclose their revenues. Additions and corrections should be sent on company letterhead to Research,<br />

New Orleans CityBusiness, 111 Veterans Blvd., Suite 1440, Metairie 70005<br />

50<br />

1985<br />

24<br />

1998<br />

1<br />

2009<br />

$44<br />

$85<br />

$40<br />

$43<br />

$32<br />

$28<br />

$30<br />

$26<br />

$26<br />

$33<br />

$21<br />

$18<br />

$18<br />

$15<br />

$18<br />

$17<br />

$14<br />

$14<br />

$11<br />

$13<br />

$10<br />

$11<br />

$7<br />

$8<br />

$6<br />

$6<br />

$1<br />

$0<br />

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PHOTOS BY FRANK AYMAMI<br />

Liz Munson sits in her restaurant, Liz's Where Y'at Diner,<br />

with Ron Coulonge, vice president of SBA lending at<br />

Gulf Coast Bank & Trust, and Thomas Sheldon, vice<br />

president of commercial lending. Munson acquired<br />

her SBA loan for the restaurant through the bank.<br />

Small <strong>business</strong> lending is in demand on the<br />

North Shore, with activity up almost 26 percent<br />

for the first nine months of the fiscal year.<br />

But experts say the busy cycle might be more<br />

than some banks can handle.<br />

Not enough banks are certified to offer Small<br />

Business Administration loans, and more<br />

underwriters need to undergo the necessary<br />

Business<br />

B A N K I N G<br />

Loan Rangers<br />

Small <strong>business</strong> loans are in demand on the North Shore but SBA lenders are in short supply<br />

By Autumn C. Giusti<br />

Contributing Writer<br />

training, says Ron Coulonge, vice president for<br />

SBA Lending with Gulf Coast Bank & Trust.<br />

There are 19 banks with branches in St.<br />

Tammany Parish. Of those, three are certified<br />

SBA lenders, according to research by sister<br />

publication New Orleans CityBusiness:<br />

Chase Bank, Gulf Coast Bank and Trust, and<br />

Regions Financial Corp.<br />

“With the growth of the North Shore,<br />

there’s so much demand for small <strong>business</strong><br />

loans it’s unbelievable,” says Coulonge, who<br />

works out of Mandeville. “That’s why we’re<br />

getting loan (applicants) from other area banks<br />

that don’t provide (SBA) loans.”<br />

Gulf Coast Bank’s SBA lending levels have<br />

more than doubled in the past three years. In<br />

2007, the bank was lending $13 million a year;<br />

today, it’s between $30 million and $35 million,<br />

Coulonge says.<br />

As of late June, the North Shore had pro-<br />

See LOAN RANGERS, page 20<br />

September/October 2010 19


Business<br />

Loan Rangers<br />

continued from page 19<br />

duced $17.6 million in loans with three<br />

months of fiscal 2010 remaining, according to<br />

the SBA. During the same period in 2009,<br />

there were nearly $14 million in SBA loans on<br />

the North Shore, which the SBA considers St.<br />

Tammany and parts of Tangipahoa and<br />

Livingston parishes. SBA’s fiscal year runs<br />

from Oct. 1 through Sept. 30.<br />

Bill Joubert, director of the Louisiana Small<br />

20 September/October 2010<br />

Business Development Center at Southeastern<br />

Louisiana University, backs up Coulonge’s<br />

claim that the North Shore could use more SBA<br />

lenders. The center helps small <strong>business</strong>es put<br />

together <strong>business</strong> plans and SBA loan proposals.<br />

About half of the <strong>business</strong>es that consult<br />

with the center are from St. Tammany, he says.<br />

“You have a lot of <strong>business</strong>es that are<br />

switching banks simply to get credit through<br />

the SBA program,” he says. “What we’re hear-<br />

BY THE NUMBERS<br />

Here’s a look at small <strong>business</strong> loans on the North<br />

Shore, which the SBA considers St. Tammany and<br />

parts of Tangipahoa and Livingston parishes.<br />

Year Loans Total<br />

2007 121 $16.6 million<br />

2008 152 $26.2 million<br />

2009 118 $25 million<br />

2010 (through late June) 92 $17.5 million<br />

Source: U.S. Small Business Administration<br />

ing is that banks that are participating with<br />

SBA have a significant amount of loan activity<br />

compared to those that are not.”<br />

Extra paperwork<br />

One reason why SBA lenders are in short supply<br />

is because the process can be complex and<br />

requires extra time and documentation,<br />

experts say.<br />

“SBA loans do require paperwork, but<br />

those lenders need to assist with that paperwork,”<br />

Joubert says. “Hence, those banks that<br />

are making SBA loans have people trained in<br />

the program to facilitate the loan process.”<br />

Kurt Bozant, vice president and <strong>business</strong><br />

banking officer for Regions Bank in Slidell,<br />

says there’s been little interest in SBA loans at<br />

his branch because of the extra steps involved.<br />

“A lot of the time with SBA, there’s more<br />

paperwork and fees involved (for the borrower),<br />

and it’s a little more cumbersome to<br />

process. A lot of customers I come in contact<br />

with don’t even want to do SBA loans,” he says.<br />

For that reason, Bozant says more of his<br />

clients turn to conventional loans before taking<br />

the SBA route. He says he hasn’t written<br />

an SBA loan in about two years.<br />

“Every now and then, I do have a customer<br />

who will come in and want to talk about an<br />

SBA loan. Then when I give them the documentation<br />

they need to do, we don’t hear back<br />

from them.”<br />

Michael Ricks, director of SBA’s Louisiana<br />

District office, acknowledges that some banks<br />

may be put off by the extra paperwork but says<br />

the SBA is willing to work with prospective<br />

lenders on the North Shore.<br />

“We do have staff here in the New Orleans<br />

district office that will go to lenders and conduct<br />

training sessions,” he says.<br />

The SBA has also been granted authority to<br />

hire a new lender relations specialist to assist<br />

with outreach efforts to the banks, Ricks says.<br />

“When I hear banks are reluctant to use<br />

SBA because they believe the process is too<br />

arduous, I take that as a failure on my part<br />

because I believe it’s my job to make sure that<br />

the lenders feel comfortable,” he says. “The


“When I hear banks<br />

are reluctant to use<br />

SBA because they believe<br />

the process is too arduous,<br />

I take that as a failure<br />

on my part because<br />

I believe it’s my<br />

job to make sure<br />

that the lenders<br />

feel comfortable.”<br />

MICHAEL RICKS<br />

director of SBA’s Louisiana District office<br />

North Shore is not really one of those areas<br />

where we’re seeing significant (lender) deficiency,<br />

but we do need to do a better job of marketing<br />

and training in the North Shore region.”<br />

Stimulus boost<br />

The increase in SBA loan demand on the<br />

North Shore is largely because of the federal<br />

stimulus plan, which took effect as the<br />

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in<br />

early 2009, Ricks says.<br />

The act allowed the SBA to waive borrower<br />

fees, which can cost up to $50,000 in some<br />

cases. Although as of June, the SBA had run<br />

out of money for the fee waivers.<br />

The act also allows the SBA to increase its<br />

guarantee rate from 75 percent to 90 percent.<br />

That means if a $1 million loan goes into<br />

default, the borrower can request $900,000<br />

back from the SBA.<br />

“Without those provisions, I don’t suspect<br />

we would be doing nearly this well this fiscal<br />

year,” Ricks says.<br />

A $125,000 SBA loan was what brought<br />

Liz’s Where Y’at Diner to Old Mandeville last<br />

summer. The restaurant was a lifelong dream<br />

for Liz Munson, 46, who paid her dues as a<br />

waitress and restaurant manager for years<br />

before taking the leap.<br />

Until then, the most she’d ever borrowed<br />

was about $6,000. Now, the restaurant is taking<br />

on high-profile catering gigs and celebrated<br />

its one-year anniversary in July.<br />

“It’s growing very fast,” Munson says of her<br />

<strong>business</strong>. “And I couldn’t have done this without<br />

my loan. I don’t have that kind of money. I<br />

was a waitress. I was saving some money, but I<br />

wasn’t saving the way I should have.”•<br />

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September/October 2010 21


PHOTO BY FRANK AYMAMI<br />

22 September/October 2010<br />

Business<br />

E D U C A T I O N<br />

Staying ahead of the curve<br />

By Richard A Webster<br />

Staff Writer<br />

richard.webster@nopg.com<br />

Superintendent Trey Folse addresses how he plans to keep<br />

St. Tammany Public Schools on top even in the face of budget cuts<br />

William “Trey” Folse III is the new superintendent<br />

of St. Tammany Public Schools,<br />

taking over for Gayle Sloan, who retired in<br />

July. Folse, deputy superintendent for the past seven<br />

years, has worked in the school system for 25 years,<br />

during which time St. Tammany schools have led the<br />

state in the quality of education they provide.<br />

But as Folse assumes control, he faces a variety of challenges<br />

that may force him to make some hard decisions.<br />

Q: St. Tammany Parish schools consistently rank near the top<br />

statewide, but what are some of the challenges you’re facing?<br />

A: We pay a percentage of each employee’s health insurance, and we’re seeing<br />

more unfunded state mandates that have increased the cost of health insurance.<br />

So there’s an extra expense that comes from that. We also have challenges with<br />

tax revenues being down somewhat.<br />

Q: How are you cutting costs to meet those additional<br />

expenses? Are you considering layoffs?<br />

A: Most school systems are having to do layoffs, but we’ve been very fortunate<br />

we’ve not had to do any. Through attrition and not replacing people, we’ve<br />

closed 120 positions across the parish. When somebody moved, retired or


esigned, those positions have not been filled.<br />

Every time a position opens, we look to see if<br />

someone else can pick up their workload or if<br />

it needs to be filled. We’re trying to look at ways<br />

to cut back on the budget wherever possible<br />

without having to lay off anyone.<br />

Q: How has attrition affected the<br />

classroom?<br />

A: It hasn’t impacted the classroom. Most of it<br />

has happened in our central office and support<br />

facilities. There’s been a 2 percent reduction of<br />

staff in schools and a more than 7 percent reduction<br />

at our central office, which includes supervisory<br />

positions. This accounted for $5 million<br />

in savings in next year’s budget, which started<br />

July 1. When you have to tighten your belt, I’d<br />

rather tighten it up here in the central office and<br />

not in the classroom with the teachers.<br />

Q: Can you continue to trim your<br />

budget through attrition while<br />

avoiding tougher choices?<br />

A: You get to a point once you do these types<br />

of things, you have to look at the next step. It<br />

will be interesting to see what the state does<br />

with us as far as funding. It will be interesting<br />

to see what sales taxes look like because, come<br />

December and January, you have to start looking<br />

at next school year.<br />

St. Tammany Parish Public Schools<br />

Superintendent Trey Folse and Assistant<br />

Superintendent Cheryl Arabie.<br />

I’ve been saying our class size is very good<br />

and something we’re very proud of. Our student-to-teacher<br />

ratio in the elementary schools<br />

is 19-to-1 and the state allows up to 25-to-1. I<br />

hope we don’t have to look at that as an area to<br />

save money but we may have to down the road<br />

if finances don’t improve.<br />

Q: You have several major projects<br />

in progress along with the opening<br />

of the new $52 million Salmen High<br />

School. While schools in New<br />

Orleans have languished for<br />

decades, how has St. Tammany<br />

managed to improve education and<br />

infrastructure every year?<br />

A: St. Tammany has constantly been at the top<br />

and it goes back to how much the community<br />

values and supports education, whether it’s<br />

teacher salaries, construction projects or millage<br />

renewals. Our PTA has the highest mem-<br />

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bership by far out of any parish in Louisiana.<br />

We have an unbelievably supportive community<br />

with parents who value education.<br />

But with that come high demands. When<br />

they pass your bond issue with 80 percent<br />

approval and they continue to give you the<br />

money, you need to make sure the schools are<br />

top of the line. In five years, when we go back<br />

to the public and ask for money to renovate<br />

and remodel, we want them to have confidence<br />

that we have spent their money well and we are<br />

deserving to continue to build what they need<br />

and what’s best for the kids in the parish.<br />

Q: People are always saying that<br />

the younger generation of students<br />

is more problematic than the older<br />

generation. This is your 25th year<br />

working in the St. Tammany school<br />

system. Do you see a difference?<br />

A: I really don’t. I have a son who just graduated<br />

from LSU and a daughter who will be a<br />

junior at LSU. The technology and instant<br />

access to everything is different, but I think<br />

kids are still kids. They want to be loved, they<br />

want to be disciplined, they want to have rules<br />

and standards to live up to, and I think we<br />

need to challenge them with that. The goal is<br />

to keep the bar high because I believe anyone<br />

will rise to the expectations you set for them.•<br />

LaPort LaPort Sehrt Romig Romig<br />

Hand Hand is Southeast Southeast<br />

Louisiana’s Louisiana’s exclusive exclusive<br />

member member of the RSM<br />

McGladrey McGladrey Network, Network, a<br />

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McGladrey McGladrey & Pullen, Pullen,<br />

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accounting accounting firms. firms.<br />

September/October 2010 23


North Shore private schools<br />

(ranked by annual tuition)<br />

School<br />

Address<br />

Christ<br />

Episcopal<br />

School<br />

80 Christwood<br />

Blvd.<br />

Covington<br />

70433<br />

Cedarwood<br />

School<br />

607 Heavens<br />

Drive<br />

Mandeville<br />

70471<br />

St. Paul's<br />

School<br />

917 S. Jahncke<br />

Ave.<br />

Covington<br />

70434<br />

St.<br />

Scholastica<br />

Academy<br />

122 S.<br />

Massachusetts<br />

St.<br />

Covington<br />

70433<br />

Northlake<br />

Christian<br />

School<br />

70104<br />

Wolverine<br />

Drive<br />

Covington<br />

70433<br />

Pope John<br />

Paul ll High<br />

School<br />

1901 Jaguar<br />

Drive<br />

Slidell 70461<br />

Archbishop<br />

Hannan High<br />

School<br />

71324 Highway<br />

1077<br />

Covington<br />

70433<br />

Kehoe-France<br />

Northshore<br />

25 Patricia<br />

Drive<br />

Covington<br />

70433<br />

Our Lady of<br />

the Lake<br />

Roman<br />

Catholic<br />

School<br />

316 Lafitte St.<br />

Mandeville<br />

70448<br />

Holy Trinity<br />

Lutheran<br />

School<br />

1 N. Marigold<br />

Drive<br />

Covington<br />

70433<br />

24 September/October 2010<br />

Phone<br />

Fax<br />

Tuition<br />

Fees<br />

871-9902<br />

871-9912 $7,700<br />

$400 per<br />

family<br />

building fee<br />

845-7111<br />

845-0669 $6,585<br />

$695<br />

892-3200<br />

892-4048 $6,450<br />

$300<br />

registration,<br />

$150<br />

building<br />

maintance<br />

892-2540<br />

893-5921<br />

635-0400<br />

893-4363<br />

649-0914<br />

649-5494<br />

249-6363<br />

249-6370<br />

$6,425<br />

registration<br />

- $400;<br />

tuition<br />

deposit -<br />

$300<br />

$6,300<br />

$650<br />

$6,200<br />

9th and<br />

10th:<br />

$1,060;<br />

11th:<br />

$1,260;<br />

12th:<br />

$1,410<br />

$5,800<br />

$200<br />

Total<br />

enrollment<br />

No. faculty Grades<br />

taught<br />

515<br />

65<br />

350<br />

42<br />

850<br />

70<br />

725<br />

56<br />

800<br />

100<br />

345<br />

26<br />

280<br />

23<br />

892-4415<br />

875-7636 $5,800<br />

$600-$975 386<br />

50<br />

626-5678<br />

626-4337 $4,219<br />

$165<br />

892-6146<br />

892-3012<br />

$3,800<br />

$400<br />

800<br />

55<br />

77<br />

15<br />

Pre-K<br />

through<br />

10<br />

2 year<br />

olds<br />

through<br />

7<br />

8<br />

through<br />

12<br />

8<br />

through<br />

12<br />

Pre-K<br />

through<br />

12<br />

9<br />

through<br />

12<br />

8<br />

through<br />

12<br />

Pre-K 2<br />

through<br />

7<br />

3 year<br />

olds<br />

through<br />

7<br />

18<br />

months<br />

to 4<br />

years<br />

Average<br />

class<br />

size<br />

Business<br />

Affiliation<br />

Student mix<br />

18 Episcopal<br />

coed<br />

17 nondenominational<br />

coed<br />

23 Catholic, Christian<br />

Brothers<br />

all male<br />

22 Catholic<br />

all female<br />

18 nondenominational<br />

coed<br />

25 Catholic<br />

coed<br />

20 Catholic<br />

coed<br />

16 nondenominational<br />

coed<br />

25 Catholic<br />

coed<br />

12 Lutheran<br />

coed<br />

Year<br />

founded<br />

Top administrator<br />

Title<br />

Web site<br />

1984 John Morvant<br />

headmaster<br />

www.christepiscopalschool.org<br />

1983 Kathryn LeBlanc<br />

president<br />

www.cedarwoodschool.com<br />

1911 Brother Raymond Bulliard<br />

principal<br />

www.stpauls.com<br />

1903 Marguerite Celestin<br />

president<br />

www.ssacad.com<br />

1978 L. Joe Shorter<br />

head of school<br />

www.northlakechristian.org<br />

1980 Richard Berkowitz<br />

principal<br />

www.pjp.org<br />

1987 Fr. Charles Latour<br />

principal<br />

www.hannanhigh.org<br />

1996 Kyle France<br />

director<br />

www.kehoe-francens.com<br />

1890 Frank Smith<br />

headmaster<br />

www.ourladyofthelakeschool.org<br />

1992 Debby Nelson<br />

director<br />

www.myholytrinity.org/<br />

school_main.htm


North Shore private schools<br />

(ranked by annual tuition)<br />

School<br />

Address<br />

St. Peter Catholic<br />

School<br />

130 E.<br />

Temperance St.<br />

Covington 70433<br />

St. Margaret Mary<br />

1050-A Robert<br />

Blvd.<br />

Slidell 70458<br />

Our Lady of<br />

Lourdes School<br />

345 Westchester<br />

Blvd.<br />

Slidell 70458<br />

First Baptist<br />

Christian School<br />

4141 Pontchartrain<br />

Drive<br />

Slidell 70458<br />

Lake Castle<br />

Private School<br />

235 Highway 21<br />

Madisonville 70447<br />

Phone<br />

Fax<br />

Tuition<br />

Fees<br />

892-1831<br />

898-2185 $3,685<br />

$465<br />

643-4612<br />

643-4659 $3,475<br />

$465<br />

643-3230<br />

645-0648 $3,350<br />

registration<br />

$150; Clarion<br />

Herald $15;<br />

nonsupport<br />

$300<br />

643-3725<br />

641-9205 $3,280<br />

$425<br />

845-3559<br />

845-3537<br />

$3,000<br />

$610-$710<br />

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504-734-5155<br />

Total<br />

enrollment<br />

No. faculty Grades<br />

taught<br />

735<br />

55<br />

750<br />

40<br />

555<br />

33<br />

255<br />

17<br />

600<br />

42<br />

The Zephyrs offer<br />

several ticket<br />

packages:<br />

The Zephyrs offer<br />

several ticket<br />

packages:<br />

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FULL SEASON TICKETS<br />

FIREWORKS<br />

WEEKEND WARRIOR<br />

CORPORATE<br />

GROUP RATES<br />

Come for yourself!<br />

www.zephyrsbaseball.com<br />

504-734-5155<br />

6000 Airline Dr.<br />

Metairie, La. 70003<br />

Pre-K 4<br />

through<br />

7<br />

Pre-K 4<br />

through<br />

8<br />

Pre-K<br />

through<br />

8<br />

1<br />

through<br />

12<br />

Pre-K<br />

through<br />

8<br />

Average<br />

class<br />

size<br />

Business<br />

• Tax Planning & Preparation<br />

• Business Valuations<br />

• IRS Representation<br />

• Business Planning & Consultation<br />

• Financial Statement Preparation<br />

“<br />

Affiliation<br />

Student mix<br />

WND Catholic<br />

coed<br />

26 Catholic<br />

coed<br />

25 Roman Catholic<br />

coed<br />

23 Southern Baptist<br />

coed<br />

24 nondenominational<br />

coed<br />

Year<br />

founded<br />

Let’s get started now! Give us a<br />

call to schedule an appointment<br />

for your initial review... and<br />

enjoy the confidence of<br />

tax preparation that’s both<br />

professional and personal.<br />

“<br />

Top administrator<br />

Title<br />

Web site<br />

1843 Melody Barousse<br />

principal<br />

stpetercov.org<br />

1966 Bobby Ohler<br />

principal<br />

www.saintmm.org<br />

1929 Robert Kiefer<br />

principal<br />

www.ollonline.com<br />

1989 Mona Nelson<br />

administrator<br />

www.fbcslidell.org<br />

1995 Barry Butera<br />

principal<br />

www.lakecastle.com<br />

The above information was provided by the schools. Any additions or corrections should be mailed on school letterhead to Research, North Shore Report, 111 Veterans Blvd., Suite 1440,<br />

Metairie LA, 70005.<br />

Toni McCord, CPA, CVA<br />

3925 N. I-10 Service Road • Suite 215 • Metairie, LA • 504.888.8333<br />

#4 Sanctuary Boulevard • Suite 304 • Mandeville, LA • 985.727.7797<br />

www.tmccordcpa.com<br />

September/October 2010 25


985-727-7275 • 235 St. Ann Dr. • Suite 2 • Mandeville<br />

26 September/October 2010<br />

You Can Live Pain Free!<br />

SOUTHERN PAIN CENTER<br />

MARK S. DENNIS, M.D.<br />

Diplomate, American Board of Anesthesiology<br />

We Treat Many Different<br />

Types of Pain<br />

including but not limited to<br />

• Neck & Arm Pain<br />

• Backaches & Headaches<br />

• Arthritis & Bursitis<br />

• Leg & Foot Pain<br />

• Nerve Pain<br />

• Fibromyalgia<br />

Business<br />

North Shore two-year colleges and four-year<br />

universities<br />

(listed in order of enrollment)<br />

Name<br />

Address<br />

Southeastern Louisiana<br />

University<br />

SLU P.O. Box 10752<br />

Hammond 70402<br />

University of Phoenix,<br />

Louisiana Campus<br />

1001 Ochsner Blvd., Suite<br />

100<br />

Covington 70433<br />

Northshore Technical<br />

College<br />

1710 Sullivan Drive<br />

Bogalusa 70427<br />

Delgado Community<br />

College<br />

207 E. Lockwood St.,<br />

Covington 70433;<br />

320 Howze Beach Road<br />

I-10 Service Road, Slidell<br />

70461<br />

Saint Joseph Seminary<br />

College<br />

75376 River Road<br />

St. Benedict 70457<br />

Top administrator<br />

Title<br />

John L. Crain<br />

president<br />

Brent S. Lyons<br />

state vice president<br />

and director<br />

William S.<br />

Wainwright<br />

regional director/<br />

dean<br />

Ron D. Wright<br />

chancellor<br />

Rev. Gregory Boquet<br />

Jude Lupinetti<br />

president and rector<br />

Total<br />

enrollment Annual<br />

tuition Internet address Academic specialties<br />

15,160 $2,546 www.selu.edu biological science, <strong>business</strong>,<br />

education, engineering technology,<br />

nursing and health sciences, global<br />

development, computer sciences,<br />

supply chain management, liberal<br />

arts<br />

6,800 $8,280 www.phoenix.edu/<br />

louisiana<br />

arts and sciences, <strong>business</strong> and<br />

management, criminal justice and<br />

security, education, human<br />

services, nursing and health care,<br />

psychology, technology<br />

3,744 $1,068 NorthshoreCollege.edu health occupations, drafting and<br />

design, transportation, construction<br />

trades, manufacturing trades,<br />

mining industry, human services,<br />

corrections, <strong>business</strong> and<br />

information technology<br />

2,370 $1,690 www.dcc.edu allied health, <strong>business</strong>, computer<br />

technology, education, fine arts,<br />

general education, horticulture<br />

83 $12,250 www.sjasc.com philosophy, theology, liberal arts<br />

Enrollment and tuition information is provided by the Louisiana Board of Regents and the colleges and universities themselves. Any additions or corrections should be sent on school<br />

letterhead to Research, New Orleans CityBusiness, 111 Veterans Blvd., Suite 1440, Metairie 70005


Window Shopping<br />

Layers of Fall<br />

Return to the routine of fall in style. Adjust to<br />

earlier waking hours and cooler evenings with<br />

simple monochrome basics that easily layer<br />

By Ariella Cohen<br />

Contributing Writer<br />

ZIP IT!<br />

The crawfish zip-up is a perennial classic for<br />

the whole family. This lightweight zip-up will<br />

keep you comfortable as temperatures drop.<br />

Perlis Clothing, Mandeville<br />

$70<br />

674-1711<br />

AT EASE<br />

Go military with this distressed<br />

denim skirt. Wear with bare<br />

legs in those steamy September<br />

days and pair with bright<br />

leggings as the weather cools.<br />

Blue Roof Denim, Mandeville<br />

$135<br />

624-4680<br />

FOOTLOOSE<br />

Be green this school year with organic cotton Sidewalk<br />

Surfers. Slip-ons make for easy style on the run.<br />

Massey’s Professional Outfitters, Covington<br />

$34.99<br />

809-7544 CLIP ART<br />

Make school special with ultra-adorable handmade hair<br />

barrettes — different pairs to match your little girl’s mood.<br />

Sugar Cane Kids, Mandeville<br />

$7 a pair<br />

674-5590<br />

MIGHT AS<br />

WELL JUMP<br />

For that date night when the kids are<br />

with the babysitter. Sporty, sassy<br />

jumpsuits are in again this season.<br />

Pair with heels and call it a night.<br />

Eros, Mandeville<br />

$94<br />

727-0034<br />

September/October 2010 27


By Christine Fontana<br />

Contributing Writer<br />

For diners desiring a tropical twist in<br />

their kitchens, Caribbean flavors<br />

can transport those thoughts of<br />

sunny, breezy days in the sun and<br />

sand with palm trees swaying and<br />

cold drinks in hand. Jeff Vincent,<br />

co-owner of Jerk’s Island Grill in Covington,<br />

offers a perfect island experience right at home<br />

with these Caribbean-inspired recipes.<br />

“Iggy’s Pirate Punch will instantly give you<br />

that Ahhh feeling you want with a rum drink,”<br />

Vincent says of Jerk’s quintessential Caribbean<br />

drink, developed with a mixologist and named<br />

for the restaurant’s iguana mascot. “This is<br />

truly for people who love visiting the Caribbean<br />

and Gulf Shores and that area. The coconut<br />

rum really delivers that desired tropical flavor.”<br />

A signature cocktail at Jerk’s, this rum punch<br />

28 September/October 2010<br />

Off the Menu<br />

gets its blue hue from a Blue Curacao floater.<br />

“And making this drink with real juices<br />

gives it great fruit flavor without being cloyingly<br />

sweet,” Vincent adds.<br />

For more tropical flair, garnish the cocktail<br />

with a wet bamboo skewer laced with an<br />

orange slice, a piece of pineapple and a<br />

maraschino cherry.<br />

Jerk’s version of guacamole is a totally<br />

refreshing dish, made with ripe mangoes and<br />

velvety avocados, and Vincent has heard many<br />

a patron rave about it.<br />

“Habanero sauce gives it some bite and<br />

heat, and the avocados pair well with the sweet<br />

mango,” Vincent says.<br />

The avocado meat is scooped out and a<br />

good level of chunkiness is the desired consistency<br />

for this guacamole.<br />

“Be careful to not overblend it, Vincent<br />

says. “You want to fold together, not puree, the<br />

ingredients.”<br />

PHOTO BY FRANK AYMAMI<br />

Tropical blast<br />

Make waves with cool, Caribbean flavor in your own kitchen<br />

And not only does this scrumptious snack<br />

rightfully belong on chips, it’s fantastic on sandwiches,<br />

wraps and roti (flat Indian bread).<br />

Montego Bay Shrimp makes a nice presentation<br />

on skewers and the assembly prep<br />

work can be done in advance. Vincent suggests<br />

using large, deveined shrimp with tails<br />

on for this recipe.<br />

“Seafood picks up flavor fast when marinated<br />

for an hour, but marinate the shrimp between<br />

three and four hours for a more intense, garlicky<br />

flavor,” says Vincent, who recommends using<br />

raw, not blanched garlic for a robust taste.<br />

“The challenge and caution with grilling<br />

shrimp is not to overcook them,” he says.<br />

“Turn shrimp once on the grill and look for a<br />

pink color and they’re done.”<br />

The finishing touch is a coat of vibrant<br />

mango chili glaze on the shrimp during<br />

grilling, another coat before serving and a side<br />

of the glaze for dipping.•


MONTEGO BAY SHRIMP<br />

Serves 3-4<br />

Chipotle marinade:<br />

5/8 pound garlic, raw not blanched<br />

16 ounces peanut oil<br />

1/4 cup canned chipotle peppers in adobo liquid included<br />

Combine the oil and the chipotle peppers in a food processor until pieces are 1/8inch<br />

to 1/4-inch in size. Add garlic and mix well. Place in a slow cooker set on low<br />

and cook overnight. Makes about three cups of marinade and can be refrigerated<br />

for up to five days.<br />

Mango Chili Glaze:<br />

1 habanero pepper, stem and seeds removed and minced<br />

1 cup mango juice<br />

1 tablespoon rice with vinegar<br />

1/4 teaspoon red chili flakes<br />

1/4 cup fish or shrimp stock<br />

1/4 cup honey<br />

Combine habanero, mango juice, vinegar, chili flakes and fish sauce in a small<br />

saucepot. Let reduce and thicken over medium heat. Remove from heat and<br />

whisk in honey.<br />

Montego Bay Shrimp:<br />

Large tail-on shrimp 21-25 count<br />

1/2 cup chipotle marinade per pound of shrimp<br />

Salt and pepper<br />

Place shrimp in mixing bowl. Salt and pepper shrimp. Stir chipotle marinade well and<br />

add to the bowl. Tumble shrimp with chipotle marinade to coat the shrimp thoroughly.<br />

Skewer shrimp and allow marinade to season shrimp for one hour before grilling.<br />

Place on hot grill and cover for about two minutes; look for dark scores and the tails<br />

to turn pink. Flip skewers and generously coat shrimp with mango chili glaze. Finish<br />

cooking. Coat both side of shrimp with mango chili glaze once more before serving.<br />

Serve with side of mango chili glaze for additional dipping and a lime wedge.<br />

IGGY’S PIRATE PUNCH<br />

Serves 1<br />

1 1/4 ounces Cruzan light rum<br />

1 1/4 ounces Cruzan coconut rum<br />

2 ounces orange juice<br />

2 ounces pineapple juice<br />

Blue Curacao floater<br />

Combine all ingredients except the Blue Curacao in a 16-ounce glass filled with<br />

ice. Shake and top with a splash of Blue Curacao. Garnish with fresh pineapple<br />

and a cherry.<br />

TROPICAL GUACAMOLE<br />

Serves 2 (appetizer)<br />

2 avocados<br />

1/2 tablespoon lime juice<br />

1 1/2 tablespoons Jerk’s Island Grill habanero sauce<br />

1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil<br />

1/2 cup diced mango<br />

1/2 cup diced tomato<br />

1/4 cup diced onion<br />

1/4 cup chopped cilantro<br />

1/2 teaspoon salt<br />

1/2 teaspoon pepper<br />

Place all ingredients except the avocado into a mixing bowl. Using a pastry cutter,<br />

stir the ingredients in the bowl to evenly distribute. Add the avocado (Haas<br />

avocados preferred) and chop roughly with the cutter. Fold the avocado in with<br />

the other ingredients until blended but not pureed. Refrigerate until ready to<br />

serve. Serve with your favorite tortilla chips.<br />

— Recipes courtesy of Jerk’s Island Grill<br />

September/October 2010 29


By Suzy Kessenich<br />

Contributing Writer<br />

Five-month-old William Estop rolls with the tide in his nursery<br />

put together cleverly by his mother, Julie Estop. Both parents,<br />

Julie and Chris, are avid fans of University of Alabama in<br />

Tuscaloosa, and they are letting their true colors show in their<br />

infant son’s Mandeville nursery.<br />

“I thought it would be fun to see how crimson red and<br />

houndstooth would come together as a theme for our son’s<br />

30 September/October 2010<br />

Julie Estop and baby<br />

William relax in the slider<br />

rocker surrounded by a<br />

playful theme of elephants,<br />

crimson and houndstooth.<br />

Favorite Spaces<br />

Baby Bama Booster<br />

A crimson-themed nursery reveals<br />

a Mandeville couple’s true colors<br />

nursery,” Julie says. “I am quite pleased with the results for<br />

William’s room. The elephants and houndstooth actually<br />

worked pretty well in the scheme of things.”<br />

Julie was inventive with her application of red gingham and<br />

houndstooth-print fabrics for a grouping of framed elephant cutouts<br />

and finished with crimson red frames. Carrying on the fabric element,<br />

a fabric cutout of “WILL” is anchored over the crib with red<br />

ribbon bows. The addition of red and white toile fabric used as a<br />

valance and a black and white gingham dust ruffle mixed with black<br />

and white houndstooth turned out to be a precious combination.<br />

PHOTOS BY RUSSELL PINTADO


Home<br />

T r e n d s<br />

5 tips for creating a playful, designer<br />

nursery your child can grow into<br />

1. Get more value and longevity from your baby’s furniture with a crib that converts to a toddler bed then to a day bed.<br />

2. Animals are natural in a baby’s room, but college mascots can really make a fun statement. Plus, a child can grow<br />

into the theme past infancy.<br />

3. Get a personalized designer look for less by creating decoupage and cutout framed pieces using the child’s name.<br />

4. Mix classic elements with the unexpected. Toile is a an elegant fabric design that adds flair and sophistication to<br />

any room, but is especially interesting when incorporated with masculine themes such as sports teams.<br />

5. Create a cohesive look by using different fabrics and prints with an ongoing color scheme, such as mixing gingham<br />

with houndstooth in black and white.<br />

Julie and baby William spend quiet moments seated in the<br />

slider rocker with a throw pillow in red piped houndstooth and<br />

matching comforter. The room is accented with red shag area<br />

rugs over wood floors. A carved wooden elephant and lamp<br />

with a red shade on the night table adds to the theme. Animal<br />

themes are a natural fit for a baby room’s décor, and college<br />

mascots often are a fun way to incorporate them.<br />

DESIGN TIP<br />

Create a cohesive look by combining<br />

different fabrics and prints in the same<br />

color scheme, such as mixing toile<br />

with houndstooth in black and white.<br />

The nursery furniture by Munier is solid cherry wood built so<br />

William can grow into it with a toddler bed then later a day bed.<br />

The changing table is a chest of drawers topped with creamy dotted<br />

Swiss fabric covering the changing pad.<br />

“We are delighted with the outcome of Will’s room, surrounding<br />

him with the crimson tide motif,” Julie beams. “We<br />

hope a new Bama fan has been born. Roll tide!”•<br />

September/October 2010 31


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Glaring Error<br />

Patients don’t always connect<br />

vision problems to computer use<br />

By Diana Chandler<br />

Contributing Writer<br />

It’s not unusual to spend the morning connecting<br />

with Facebook friends, tweeting<br />

about the latest craze and reading the headlines<br />

online, all before going to the office and<br />

checking e-mails and typing on the computer<br />

most of the day.<br />

All this technological connectivity can have<br />

unwanted physical side effects: trouble focusing<br />

on the words on the screen, dry and tired<br />

eyes, headaches, neck aches and backaches.<br />

There’s a term for all that — computer<br />

vision syndrome — and you may have it. But<br />

don’t panic. CVS can be corrected and it<br />

won’t permanently harm your vision,<br />

optometrists say.<br />

Up to 90 percent of people who work on<br />

computers have a corresponding vision complaint,<br />

says Dr. Patrick Adema of Adema Vision<br />

Clinic in Mandeville. CVS symptoms include<br />

eye strain, headaches, blurred near vision, dry<br />

eyes and poor posture as a result of spending<br />

long hours staring at the computer screen.<br />

The best way to prevent CVS, Adema<br />

says, is a thorough eye examination to check<br />

for eye refraction errors, muscle balance,<br />

focusing problems and eye health issues such<br />

as dry eyes.<br />

“Then, having the doctor prescribe the<br />

best glasses for the computer, vision therapy,<br />

artificial tears if needed,” Adema says. “And<br />

discuss ergonomic issues."<br />

Using computer screens causes problems<br />

unrelated to reading from a printed page<br />

because the letters on a screen are not as precisely<br />

defined, we stare and blink less, and<br />

workstations, if not properly positioned, alter<br />

our vision and posture, according to the<br />

American Optometric Association.<br />

Adema treats CVS with vision therapy and<br />

computer glasses when needed. But not everyone<br />

who walks in the office with computerrelated<br />

complaints needs such a fix, he says.<br />

“Most patients walking in who work on the<br />

computer probably have some form of complaint,”<br />

Adema says. “It’s just a matter of how<br />

much of a complaint does it create for you. It<br />

does no permanent damage to the eye.”<br />

Most patients don’t automatically connect<br />

their vision problems to the computer,<br />

Adema has found. If the problem is severe


SCREEN TEST<br />

Doctors recommend<br />

these techniques for<br />

preventing computer<br />

vision syndrome:<br />

• Have your vision<br />

checked regularly.<br />

• Look away from the computer<br />

screen for 20 seconds every 20 minutes.<br />

• Place the computer screen 4 inches to 5 inches<br />

below eye level and 20 to 28 inches from your eyes.<br />

• Adjust your desk to prevent glare from windows<br />

or other light sources.<br />

• Reduce room lighting to match the computer<br />

screen.<br />

• Blink frequently to moisten the front surface of<br />

the eyes.<br />

Source: The American Optometric Association<br />

enough for patients to make the connection,<br />

he says, patients usually have an underlying<br />

vision problem that has gone untreated.<br />

Adema says that while working on computers<br />

won’t worsen the far-sightedness that<br />

comes with normal aging of the eyes, known<br />

as presbyopia, there is evidence that daily<br />

computer use can speed the onset of nearsightedness<br />

among children if they’re already<br />

predisposed to the condition.<br />

Allowing children to use computers two and<br />

three hours at a time can cause them to develop<br />

nearsightedness sooner, Adema says. He recommends<br />

parents protect their children by getting<br />

them regular eye exams, limiting them to<br />

30-minute to one-hour intervals on the computer<br />

and placing the screen between 16 inches<br />

and 24 inches away from the child’s eyes.<br />

“The main problem,” Adema says, “is our<br />

way of life is dealing with computers. You<br />

can’t avoid it.”<br />

CVS treatment is often determined by the<br />

patient’s age and vision problems. People<br />

younger than 40 with normal vision may need<br />

therapeutic exercises to condition the eyes for<br />

computer use. People older than 40 who already<br />

use reading glasses for presbyopia may be dealing<br />

with a range of vision problems, Adema says.<br />

While their current glasses may help them read<br />

everything within a 16-inch vision range, their<br />

computer may actually be 20 inches away and<br />

outside their range of clear vision.<br />

Doctors might prescribe computer glasses,<br />

which essentially are reading glasses with a<br />

different vision range, tints and coatings, to<br />

patients with bi-focal problems because they<br />

have a shorter range of vision.<br />

Contact lens wearers of all ages will experience<br />

dry eyes and blurred vision with computer<br />

use and should use artificial tears and<br />

rewetting wipes, Adema says.<br />

He recommends preventing CVS by having<br />

regular eye exams, using better lighting and<br />

glare reduction screen covers, and adjusting the<br />

depth of the computer screen from the eye.<br />

“The biggest thing is taking a rest break,”<br />

Adema says.•<br />

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September/October 2010 33


By Jennifer Larino<br />

Staff Writer<br />

jennifer.larino@nopg.com<br />

PHOTOS BY FRANK AYMAMI<br />

Taking the<br />

Electronic Technician Craig<br />

Wilde inspects printed circuit<br />

boards in the prototype lab at<br />

Globalstar Inc. in Covington.<br />

Initiative<br />

QUALITY OF LIFE AND A LUCRATIVE DIGITAL MEDIA<br />

QUALITY OF LIFE AND A LUCRATIVE DIGITAL MEDIA<br />

INCENTIVE — INSIDE GLOBALSTAR’S BIG MOVE<br />

TO COVINGTON AND WHY IT MAY HAVE LEFT THE<br />

DOOR OPEN FOR MORE COMPANIES TO FOLLOW<br />

September/October 2010 35


Taking the<br />

Initiative<br />

As CEO of Silicon Valley communications<br />

technology firm Globalstar Inc., Peter<br />

Dalton has visited much of the United<br />

States and worked with <strong>business</strong>es across the<br />

world. But he’s always kept a slice of southeast<br />

Louisiana close to home.<br />

Though Dalton is originally from New<br />

Jersey and has lived in California for decades,<br />

it was a 1997 trip along the Mississippi River<br />

that he says inspired the Antebellum-style<br />

porches and columns that he designed for his<br />

California ranch home.<br />

“You don’t find that very much in<br />

California,” Dalton says.<br />

But it wasn’t until a December 2009 acquisition<br />

that his penchant for Louisiana resurfaced<br />

in his <strong>business</strong> decisions at Globalstar.<br />

At the time, Dalton says, the company was<br />

wrapping up an $18 million deal to buy<br />

Covington-based Axonn, a satellite asset-tracking<br />

and messaging products developer and a<br />

key supplier for Globalstar for 10 years. After<br />

the acquisition, Dalton and Globalstar leadership<br />

had to decide how and where to expand<br />

the company while keeping a team of about 30<br />

highly skilled Axonn engineers who were root-<br />

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36 September/October 2010<br />

ed in Covington, he says.<br />

Though it has been a hub<br />

of engineering talent long<br />

before Globalstar was founded<br />

there in 2003, Silicon<br />

Valley was becoming a costly<br />

place of doing <strong>business</strong> and<br />

distant from project hubs in<br />

New York and Washington,<br />

D.C., Dalton says.<br />

The company considered<br />

moves to cities such as Dallas<br />

and Atlanta before Louisiana<br />

economic development leaders<br />

stepped in and started<br />

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selling the North Shore’s quality of life,<br />

expansive commercial space and fertile economic<br />

tax incentives in January. After a few<br />

months of talks, the state’s lucrative digital<br />

interactive media tax credit and the quality of<br />

the local work force sealed the deal, he says.<br />

“We learned the North Shore and pretty<br />

much the entire New Orleans area had, not only<br />

with (Axonn) but elsewhere, a very high-caliber<br />

resident engineering talent and that the schools<br />

were focusing on engineering in both computer<br />

�������������<br />

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TOUCHING<br />

DOWN<br />

Communications technology<br />

firm Globalstar Inc. announced<br />

July 13 that it will move its<br />

headquarters from Silicon<br />

Valley to the former Wink Cos.<br />

building in Covington at the<br />

intersection of Interstate 12<br />

and U.S. Highway 190.<br />

490<br />

Jobs Globalstar Inc. expects<br />

to create at its Covington<br />

headquarters by 2018<br />

$26.1 million<br />

Amount Globalstar will<br />

generate in new state tax<br />

revenue once it relocates<br />

Source: North Shore Report<br />

staff research<br />

science and program engineering,”<br />

Dalton says.<br />

Globalstar will relocate its<br />

headquarters from Milipitas,<br />

Calif. to Covington by the<br />

end of the year, moving 30<br />

employees with them and<br />

creating more than 150 new<br />

jobs by the end of 2011.<br />

The company expects to<br />

employ more than 450 people<br />

at the Covington headquarters<br />

by 2018.<br />

For North Shore economic<br />

development leaders,<br />

the numbers are just starting to sink in.<br />

“This is the quickest economic development<br />

deal we’ve ever been involved in,” says<br />

Brenda Reine-Bertus, executive director of<br />

the St. Tammany Economic Development<br />

Foundation.<br />

STEDF toured North Shore office parks<br />

with the company for much of this year, leading<br />

to its selection of the former Wink Cos.<br />

building near the intersection of Interstate 12<br />

and U.S. Highway 190. The perks of living<br />

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outside of the costly Silicon Valley area were<br />

quickly realized, Reine-Bertus says.<br />

“We had great school systems and coming<br />

from California you can only imagine the<br />

type of homes we had available were impressive,”<br />

Reine-Bertus says.<br />

On top of lifestyle perks, Louisiana<br />

Economic Development Secretary Stephen<br />

Moret says targeted economic development<br />

initiatives introduced throughout the courting<br />

process drove Globalstar’s decision.<br />

Original talks centered on keeping Axonn<br />

jobs on the North Shore by encouraging the<br />

company to base research and development<br />

operations in Covington.<br />

“We were talking about the addition of 50<br />

to 60 jobs and we were excited about that at<br />

the time,” Moret says. “Then we found out<br />

that it was conducting a confidential site<br />

selection to consider relocation.”<br />

Moret says Louisiana edged ahead of sites<br />

in six states and Canada with its digital media<br />

incentive program. The program offers a 25<br />

percent tax credit for production expenditures<br />

related to software development.<br />

Brian Beck, Globalstar vice president and<br />

general manager, talks with Brenda Reine-Bertus,<br />

executive director of St. Tammany Economic<br />

Development Foundation, in front of a map<br />

showing the company’s projects worldwide.<br />

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For Globalstar, which designs its own<br />

satellite communications software, the tax<br />

credit alone was a large plus.<br />

“The benefits of the digital media credit fall<br />

right to our bottom line,” Dalton says. “For any<br />

company, that’s a significant statement.”<br />

But for many companies, even lucrative<br />

tax credits are overshadowed by millions of<br />

dollars in moving expenses needed to locate<br />

here, Moret says.<br />

“In general, companies can quickly grasp<br />

the long-term opportunity for cost advantages<br />

but sometimes the cost to make the<br />

move represents the obstacles,” he says.<br />

On top of offering work force development<br />

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and recruitment services, LED will shell out<br />

$4.4 million in relocation costs for the company<br />

to move equipment and personnel. The<br />

money will come from a state fund that maintains<br />

about $15 million specifically for site<br />

selection deals, Moret says.<br />

“And we’ll earn that back and more over<br />

time,” Moret says. “In this case, this project in<br />

the first 10 years will generate $26.1 million<br />

in new (state) tax revenue. That doesn’t<br />

include another $8.2 million locally.”<br />

Matt Rookard, senior vice president of <strong>business</strong><br />

development at Greater New Orleans<br />

Inc., says without proactive legislation such as<br />

tax incentives, recruitment and retention funding,<br />

the Globalstars of the world<br />

would overlook what Louisiana<br />

has to offer.<br />

“It just kind of shows how<br />

some of that bubbles up to the<br />

top,” Rookard says.<br />

He adds that the move is likely<br />

to feed increased interest in<br />

the North Shore and southeast<br />

Louisiana as a prime location to<br />

do <strong>business</strong> as they survey<br />

Globalstar’s experience.<br />

“They don’t have to dip their<br />

toe anymore because someone’s<br />

already done it,” Rookard says.•<br />

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September/October 2010 37


SUCCESS<br />

ON TAP<br />

HOW HEINER BRAU MICROBREWERY MASTERED<br />

A NEW LABEL AND THE ART OF MARKETING<br />

WITH THE NORTH SHORE-CENTRIC<br />

COVINGTON BREWHOUSE LINE<br />

PHOTOS BY FRANK AYMAMI<br />

By <strong>Deborah</strong> <strong>Burst</strong><br />

Contributing Writer<br />

New Orleans once was home to a rich<br />

heritage of German brewmasters, working<br />

with names such as Fabacher, Dixie,<br />

Falstaff and Jax. Many have disappeared along<br />

with their German brewers.<br />

Today, only 1 percent of the country’s brewmasters<br />

are German, including Henryk<br />

“Heiner” Orlik, who has returned the art of<br />

German brewing to Covington’s historic district<br />

with the Heiner Brau Microbrewery.<br />

Inside a late 19th century hardware store on<br />

Lockwood Street, Orlik has mastered a new<br />

label, Covington Brewhouse, dedicated to the<br />

local brewing traditions of craft beer. As it turns<br />

out, the craft brewer also seems to have mastered<br />

the art of marketing.<br />

When Heiner Brau Microbrewery opened in the summer of 2005, nine copper tanks were set<br />

among an assortment of brewery artifacts fashioned in a museum format. Today, the artifacts are<br />

more of a backdrop for the brewing operation, making room for six additional tanks that are part<br />

of an operation that brews 10 different beers.<br />

Under the Heiner Brau label, the microbrewery produces three year-round beers — Kölsch,<br />

Maerzen and the popular Strawberry Ale — along with four seasonal brews, including a special<br />

38 September/October 2010<br />

See SUCCESS ON TAP, page 40


Inset: German brewmaster<br />

Henryk Orlik stands amid<br />

cases of Festbier, Heiner<br />

Brau’s popular Octoberfest<br />

beer, in the historic downtown<br />

Covington microbrewery.<br />

September/October 2010 39


SUCCESS<br />

ON TAP<br />

continued from page 38<br />

Octoberfest beer between September and<br />

November. The brewery also has worked with<br />

some New Orleans-area chefs to develop custom<br />

brews that are available on their menus and<br />

used in some of their food preparations.<br />

Covington Brewhouse was introduced in<br />

March in what the brewery calls a rebirth of<br />

old-style German brewing, its contribution to<br />

the nationwide craft beer renaissance.<br />

The Covington collection features the<br />

Pontchartrain Pilsner, a lighter beer that<br />

complements local flavors, such as seafood<br />

dishes, and, as the tag line says, is as<br />

“refreshing as a gentle lake breeze.” Bayou<br />

Bock, a more full-bodied lager, boasts a<br />

sweet, malty aroma in a golden color styled<br />

against the Bavarian Heller Maibock, one of<br />

Orlik’s favorite European brews.<br />

Sales figures throughout the North Shore<br />

for the Covington Brewhouse label are 400<br />

percent higher than sales of other Heiner Brau<br />

products, says marketing manager Frank<br />

LeCourt, but the Covington collection has not<br />

tapped sales of original Heiner Brau products.<br />

“We’re on track for 2010 to increase production<br />

by 65 (percent) to 75 percent compared<br />

to 2009,” LaCourt says.<br />

The Covington Brewhouse label was the<br />

brainchild of Rob Mingo, principal owner of<br />

the microbrewery, while LeCourt developed<br />

the names. LeCourt uses sales numbers to<br />

determine what to brew, how much and<br />

when. Orlik manages the creative and technical<br />

side of the brewery.<br />

The introduction of the North Shore-centric<br />

Covington Brewhouse has proved to be<br />

key to introducing the microbrewery and its<br />

products to the local audience.<br />

LeCourt, who’s been in the food and bev-<br />

Henryk Orlik holds<br />

a foaming glass of Kolsch,<br />

one of Heiner Brau’s original<br />

year-round brews.<br />

erage industry for 30 years, says Louisianans go out of their way to support local products.<br />

Orlik sees that firsthand at beer tastings, where<br />

people ask for the local brews.<br />

“They are surprised at how good it tastes,”<br />

Orlik says. “You can have the greatest name<br />

and best package, but if the product’s not<br />

good, they’re not going to buy it again.”<br />

OKTOBERFEST 2010!<br />

The Heiner Brau Oktoberfest will move this<br />

year from the microbrewery grounds to the<br />

Covington Trailhead across the street. The<br />

festival will take place Oct. 8-9 and the menu<br />

will include German-style food with four draft<br />

beers: Pontchartrain Pilsner, Bayou Boch,<br />

Festbier and Strawberry Ale.<br />

Heiner Brau Brewery<br />

226 Lockwood St.<br />

Covington<br />

www.heinerbrau.com<br />

Another significant move for the microbrewery<br />

that influenced sales was a new distribution<br />

partner, Champagne Beverage, headquartered<br />

in Covington. Chris Russo, brand<br />

development manager, says the Pontchartrain<br />

Pilsner and Bayou Bock are an easy sell because<br />

of a three-tiered plan for success.<br />

“Henryk brewed a good beer, people enjoy<br />

it and you have a great distribution plan,” Russo<br />

says, adding that more than 25 draft taps of the<br />

new brews had been sold as of June. “The local<br />

niche is what people are looking for; they want<br />

to keep their money in this area.”<br />

Russo notes that craft brands in general<br />

have doubled in growth over the past three<br />

years. That trend combined with a locally<br />

brewed and branded label, and the growth of<br />

St. Tammany Parish, creates a greater demand<br />

PHOTO BY DEBORAH BURST


Hudson Folse, warehouse/packaging manager,<br />

stacks cases of freshly bottled Festbier.<br />

for the Covington Brewhouse beers. He said<br />

Champagne responds with placement in local<br />

and nationally owned supermarkets such as<br />

Winn-Dixie and Albertsons.<br />

“Managers are so willing to put it on their<br />

floor because it’s from their backyard,” Russo<br />

says. “I’ve been putting it up in local produce<br />

and seafood sections.”<br />

Launching the Covington Brewhouse label<br />

is like starting a new <strong>business</strong> for the five-yearold<br />

Heiner Brau Microbrewery, says LaCourt,<br />

and although the potential for growth is there,<br />

it’s hard to develop a timeline.<br />

“We know where we want to go, we have<br />

hopes for future expansion and there’s the possibility<br />

we will outgrow our current site,” he says.<br />

“We have visions of moving to a more commercial<br />

location and possibly taking it into a brewpub<br />

type thing. At this point, it’s just dreams.”•<br />

PILSNER PALATE<br />

In developing the Covington Brewhouse<br />

recipe, the Heiner Brau Microbewery team<br />

was looking for something lighter and more<br />

appealing to the American palate.<br />

“A creation between a European-style pilsner<br />

and an American premium pilsner,” says<br />

German brewmaster Henryk Orlik.<br />

“Something easier for a person coming from<br />

Miller or Coors to a craft beer.”<br />

Pilsner is lighter than the Kölsch, but<br />

bolder than most of the American beers.<br />

However, Orlik admits color plays a prominent<br />

role when Americans choose a beer.<br />

“The pilsner has a lighter golden color, so<br />

you automatically think it’s a light beer, so<br />

you try it,” Orlik explains. “You discover it has<br />

a body, a taste … more than water … so<br />

easy to fall in love with the beer.”<br />

— <strong>Deborah</strong> <strong>Burst</strong><br />

��������������������������<br />

Phyllis Montalbano, Loan Originator - Northshore<br />

Phone: 985-624-7085<br />

Fax: 985-624-7095<br />

Email: pmontalbano@guarantysb.com<br />

Pamela Buchtel-Hussey, Loan Originator - Southshore<br />

Phone: 504-841-6108<br />

Fax: 504-841-6118<br />

Email: pbuchtel@guarantysb.com<br />

Angele Belk, Loan Originator - Northshore<br />

Phone: 985-624-7082<br />

Fax: 985-624-7092<br />

Email: abelk@guarantysb.com<br />

��������������������������������<br />

Main Office:<br />

3798 Veterans Blvd.<br />

Metairie, LA 70002<br />

Phone: (504) 457-6220<br />

Fax: (504) 457-6227<br />

Mandeville Office:<br />

2111 N. Causeway Blvd.<br />

Mandeville, LA 70471<br />

Phone: (985) 626-6229<br />

Fax: (985) 624-5032<br />

���� ����� ��� ������� ��������� �������� ����� ���� ����������� ����<br />

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����������������������������������<br />

Mid City Office:<br />

3915 Canal St.<br />

New Orleans, LA 70119<br />

Phone: (504) 483-7146<br />

Fax: (504) 483-8097<br />

Elmwood Office:<br />

5700 Citrus Blvd., Suite K<br />

Harahan, LA 70123<br />

Phone: (504) 736-5140<br />

Fax: (504) 733-8176<br />

Westbank Office:<br />

1800 Manhattan Blvd.<br />

Harvey, LA 70058<br />

Phone: (504) 361-3391<br />

Fax: (504) 361-7480<br />

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September/October 2010 41


Sunny Outlook<br />

After a partly cloudy courtship<br />

<strong>business</strong>es hope St. Tammany will<br />

finally take a shine to solar power<br />

By David Muller<br />

Staff Writer<br />

david.muller@nopg.com<br />

PHOTOS BY FRANK AYMAMI<br />

Solar N Stuff office manager<br />

Dianne Falgout Long discusses<br />

the solar-based products the<br />

Covington store sells and installs.<br />

September/October 2010 43


Sunny Outlook<br />

Solar power has been arriving in St.<br />

Tammany Parish over the past few<br />

years, but at a rate far slower than<br />

the speed of light.<br />

A few local <strong>business</strong>es are trying to<br />

change this in the face of barriers that include<br />

funding, forests and the age of homes.<br />

“The biggest hold back in St. Tammany<br />

Parish is money, and another thing is the trees,”<br />

says Robert Farbe, owner of Farbe’s Electric.<br />

CHILDREN’S C H I L D R E N’S HOSPITAL H O S P I TA L NNEONATAL E O N ATA L IINTENSIVE N T E N S I V E CCARE A R E UUNIT N I T<br />

ESKEW+DUMEZ+RIPPLE, E S K E W+D U M E Z+R I P P L E, DESIGN D E S I G N<br />

44 September/October 2010<br />

“They don’t want to get rid of their trees.”<br />

Farbe, whose Lacombe-based <strong>business</strong><br />

installs solar panel power-generating systems,<br />

says there are alternatives to tapping<br />

into solar power through roof-mounted systems<br />

but they are usually much costlier.<br />

A basic system is a big investment in the<br />

first place. They cost about $25,000, but<br />

federal and state tax credits can put 80 percent<br />

of the investment back in the home-<br />

construction<br />

design<br />

engineering<br />

steel<br />

millwork<br />

service<br />

owner’s hands.<br />

Fabre says installing a solar power system<br />

doesn’t pay off immediately — it can<br />

take up to three to five years — but there is<br />

a payoff.<br />

“Generally you’re going to be saving<br />

20,000 watts a day no matter what you use<br />

on the 4,000-watt system,” Fabre says, citing<br />

a typical setup.<br />

There are cheaper, less sophisticated<br />

ways to benefit from the sun’s energy, and<br />

one-year-old Solar N Stuff has set up shop<br />

on U.S. Highway 190 in Covington to capitalize<br />

on them.<br />

Tina Thomas, a bio-psychologist and<br />

bed and breakfast owner in Abita Springs,<br />

launched the <strong>business</strong> after taking a trip to<br />

California a few years back to visit a relative,<br />

where she immediately took a shine to the<br />

solar tube lighting used in the home. The<br />

tubular fixtures use reflection to send direct<br />

sunlight down a cylinder and into a home.<br />

It was a priority upon returning to<br />

Louisiana to install one at her own house.<br />

At the time, there were no solar tube light<br />

distributors in the state, so she had to order<br />

one from Vista, Calif.-based Solatube.<br />

She liked it, so she ordered another. And<br />

then another.<br />

“I ended up putting in seven solar<br />

tubes,” she says.<br />

Louisiana gets plenty of warmth, but<br />

contrary to what some believe, it is nowhere<br />

near the sunniest state in the union.<br />

According to the National Atmospheric and<br />

Oceanic Administration’s climate data,<br />

New Orleans has 57 percent of possible<br />

sunshine per year, putting it on par with<br />

Baltimore and Portland, Maine.<br />

The two other cities cited in the NAOA<br />

data were Lake Charles, which fared better at<br />

72 percent, and Shreveport, which registered<br />

a 63 percent of annual possible sunshine.<br />

“The biggest hold back in<br />

St. Tammany Parish is<br />

money, and another thing is<br />

the trees. They don’t want to<br />

get rid of their trees.”<br />

ROBERT FARBE<br />

owner of Farbe’s Electric<br />

on why solar power is not more<br />

prevalent on the North Shore


The Solatube Daylighting System features tubular<br />

fixtures that reflect sunlight through a cylinder<br />

into a home.<br />

By comparison, Western and desert towns<br />

such as Las Vegas, Phoenix and Yuma, Ariz.,<br />

are the sunniest places; they are all in the mid-<br />

80s-to-90-percent range.<br />

Still, St. Tammany Parish’s woods and<br />

ample land area are reasons Thomas<br />

expects Solar N Stuff to do well here.<br />

“I think people are more environmentally<br />

aware on the North Shore,” Thomas says.<br />

“People move to the North Shore to be a<br />

part of the nature.”<br />

Aside from tubular lights, the company<br />

also sells solar-powered attic fans and hot<br />

water heaters. Price tags of these products<br />

range in the high hundreds to low thousands<br />

of dollars.<br />

Despite what some contractors say, the<br />

smaller tube lights, attic fans and water<br />

heaters do not qualify for tax credits, says<br />

Patrick Kelly, a spokesman for the federal<br />

government’s Energy Star program.<br />

“They would have to integrate into the<br />

house’s electric system, and they don’t do<br />

that,” he says.<br />

Solar N Stuff has no immediate desire to<br />

move into the large solar electrical systems,<br />

which generate power.<br />

“We’d rather be experts in what we do<br />

now,” Thomas says.<br />

C&S Supply appears to have been slightly<br />

ahead of the curve on the North Shore, becoming<br />

a distributor of Solatube products in 2006.<br />

But sales to the North Shore have been spotty,<br />

while demand seems to be greater on the<br />

South Shore, says owner Carl Conforto. He<br />

suspects this may have to do more with the age<br />

of homes on each side of the lake.<br />

“The North Shore is relatively new,”<br />

Conforto says. “Construction is new, and<br />

these houses emit a lot of light. Windows<br />

that go floor to ceiling are more common.”<br />

Conversely, he says, “that’s why there’s a<br />

draw over in New Orleans, in the Metairie<br />

area, houses are older.”<br />

Conforto says he has installed a few singular<br />

solar panels, not entire systems, in St.<br />

Tammany Parish and trees were not much of<br />

an issue beyond some minor cosmetic work.<br />

investing in america.<br />

At AT&T, we strive to strengthen our<br />

communities by providing good jobs,<br />

donating our time and talents, supporting<br />

the underserved and promoting educational<br />

programs and organizations that create<br />

opportunities for all.<br />

“We usually just tell people, ‘Cut that<br />

branch right there and you’re good to go,’ ”<br />

Conforto says.<br />

As a roofer, he says he sees his solar<br />

panel <strong>business</strong> as an ideal complement to<br />

what he does, and one that will only become<br />

more profitable in the future.<br />

“You got to go with the trend, and I<br />

think that’s going to be the thing of the<br />

future,” he says.•<br />

© 2010 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T and the AT&T logo are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property.<br />

att.com<br />

September/October 2010 45


46 September/October 2010<br />

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T h e p e o p l e o f S t . T a m m a n y<br />

Community shots<br />

COURTESY OF CHAPEL CREEK<br />

Chapel Creek, a new residential development, held its ribbon cutting ceremony May 13 at<br />

200 Chapel Creek Place, Mandeville. From left: (front row) Christian Gautreaux, <strong>Deborah</strong><br />

Trahan, Mandeville Mayor Donald J. Villere, Kristi Clark, Paige Graham, Stephanie Bedford<br />

and Laura Meyers. (back row) Jaclyn Raymond, Dani Mattek, Debbie Bornello, Debbie<br />

Younger and Brian Zoerner.<br />

COURTESY OF HABITAT FOR HUMANITY ST. TAMMANY WEST<br />

Florida Marine Transporters donated $50,000 from its annual golf tournament to Habitat for<br />

Humanity. From left: Jason Belcher, chief financial officer of Florida Marine Transporters,<br />

and Jeffery St. Romain, president and CEO of Habitat for Humanity St. Tammany West.<br />

People<br />

Accounting<br />

LaPorte Sehrt Romig Hand CPAs in Covington announced Melissa<br />

Stanga was promoted from staff auditor to senior auditor.<br />

Awards<br />

Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz PC recognized<br />

Mark Mercante as its Mandeville Pro Bono Attorney of the Year.<br />

The United Way named St. Tammany Parish<br />

President Kevin Davis the 2009 United Way<br />

Hidden Hero for St. Tammany Parish.<br />

LeAnne Cantrell, Gary Fayard, Melissa<br />

Hodgson and Dorothy Maloney are among 61<br />

Louisianians nominated for the 2010 Angel<br />

Award sponsored by Blue Cross and Blue<br />

Shield of Louisiana.<br />

Banking<br />

Metairie Bank promoted<br />

Charlene Forshee to assistant<br />

vice president of loan operations<br />

and James McBride to banking<br />

officer and assistant collection<br />

manager.<br />

First Bank and Trust named<br />

Chris Blossman vice president<br />

and <strong>business</strong> development offi-<br />

cer of the North Park Branch in Covington and<br />

Peter Link executive vice president and loan<br />

portfolio manager.<br />

The Louisiana Bankers Association named<br />

Reginald Smith Jr., president and CEO of<br />

Metairie Bank and Trust, chairman-elect to its<br />

2010-11 board of directors. W. David Crumhorn,<br />

president of St. Tammany Homestead Association,<br />

and Michael Nolan, chairman, president and CEO<br />

of Fifth District Savings Bank, will serve as the southeast region representatives.<br />

Education<br />

The Chris Duhon Stand Tall Foundation awarded scholarships to Adam Beasley<br />

of Fontainebleau High School, Michael Edward Braud of Slidell<br />

High School, Brittany Anna Bruhl of Covington High School, Bradley Thomas<br />

Hewitt of Northshore High School and Mary Ann Zar of Salmen High School.<br />

Health care<br />

Slidell Memorial Hospital named<br />

Dr. Ratnaker Pernenkil chief of<br />

staff, Dr. Janine Parker chief of<br />

staff-elect and Dr. Richelle<br />

Legnon secretary and treasurer<br />

as its 2010 medical staff officers.<br />

Dr. Daniel Tveit was named a<br />

member-at-large and Dr. Clinton<br />

Sharp the hospital’s board repre-<br />

Charlene<br />

Forshee<br />

Peter Link<br />

Melissa Stanga<br />

sentative. Department chairs are Dr. H. Elizabeth Stevenson, pediatrics; Dr. Ingrid<br />

Roskos, OB/GYN; Dr. Robert Shafor, surgery; and Dr. Marie Mahoney, medicine.<br />

Department vice chairs are Dr. Madhuri Dixit, pediatrics; Dr. Melissa Smith, OB/GYN;<br />

Dr. Heather Bronaugh, surgery; and Dr. James Griffee, medicine. Committee workgroup/chairs<br />

are Dr. M. Faith Joubert, P&T/IP workgroup; Dr. Agustin Suarez, cancer<br />

activities; Dr. H. Patrick Ragland, ethics; Dr. Elizabeth McBurney, library/CME; Dr.<br />

Kraig deLanzac, medical staff QA; and Dr. Janine Parker, critical care.<br />

St. Tammany Parish Hospital employees Mandie Head and Barbara Myers<br />

Oakes earned the certified professional coder designation and Amanda Walsh<br />

Send us your people <strong>news</strong><br />

Mark Mercante Kevin Davis<br />

James McBride Chris Blossman<br />

Reginald Smith<br />

Jr.<br />

Mandie Head Barbara<br />

Myers Oakes<br />

Amanda Walsh<br />

See AROUND THE PARISH, page 48<br />

North Shore Report welcomes submissions for Around the Parish. To be considered for<br />

inclusion in a coming issue, information must be received six weeks to the anticipated<br />

publication date, which is the first day of the issue month. Submissions, including<br />

photographs, are published subject to space availability. Photos submitted by e-mail<br />

should be in color and in .jpg format. Black-and-white photos will not be published.<br />

Please e-mail all submissions to Jennifer Nall at jennifer.nall@nopg.com,<br />

or call (504) 293-9203 for more information.<br />

All photo attachments and submissions must include the subject’s name.<br />

September/October 2010 47


AROUND THE PARISH, continued from page 47<br />

People cotinued<br />

earned the certified professional coder-apprentice designation. Employee Luis Marquez<br />

maintained certification as a critical care registered nurse for 20 years.<br />

Law<br />

The Louisiana Bar<br />

Foundation named<br />

Page McClendon,<br />

judge in the 1st<br />

Circuit Court of<br />

Appeals, a fellow.<br />

The Louisiana Lacrecia Cade<br />

Association of<br />

Black Women Attorneys named<br />

Lacrecia Cade president, Tara<br />

Mason president-elect, Arlene<br />

Knighten vice president, Eboni<br />

Townsend vice president for technology,<br />

Michelle Beaty Gullage<br />

secretary, Adrejia Boutte historian,<br />

Raashand Hamilton treasurer and<br />

Chauntis Jenkins parliamentarian<br />

to its board of directors.<br />

Maritime<br />

Tidewater Inc. named <strong>Deborah</strong> Willingham vice president and chief human<br />

resources officer.<br />

Marketing<br />

The Louisiana Society for Hospital<br />

Public Relations and Marketing<br />

named Rhonda Alfred president,<br />

Christine Albert president-elect<br />

and Nicole Hidalgo past-president<br />

of its 2010-11 board of directors.<br />

Members at large include Kelli<br />

Broocks, Kathy DeRouen, Charla<br />

Ducote, Jon Hirsch, Terri<br />

McNorton and Melanie Zaffuto.<br />

The New Orleans Chapter of the American Marketing<br />

Association named Kelley Troia vice president of programming for<br />

the North Shore.<br />

Nonprofits<br />

Habitat for Humanity St. Tammany West named Jeffery St. Romain<br />

president and CEO.<br />

The West St. Tammany YMCA named Amanda McInnis senior<br />

program director.<br />

FYI<br />

Openings<br />

Bistro de la Reine, 2306 Front St., Suite 21, Slidell.<br />

The Abita Springs Park & Ride facility, Highway 36, Abita Springs.<br />

Shakes Frozen Custard, 1331 N. Highway 190, Covington.<br />

Chapel Creek, a new residential development, 200 Chapel Creek Place, Mandeville.<br />

Olivier Couture bridal boutique, The Shops at Chenier, 1901 Highway 190, Mandeville.<br />

The CCC Miramon Center, 2515 Carey St., Slidell.<br />

Northshore Church, 310 Kensington Blvd., Slidell.<br />

The Slidell Animal Shelter, 2700 Terrace Ave., Slidell.<br />

Lagniappe Food & Spirits, 1503 Gause Blvd., Suite 105, Slidell.<br />

48 September/October 2010<br />

Tara Mason<br />

Michelle Beaty<br />

Gullage<br />

Rhonda Alfred<br />

Arlene Knighten<br />

Adrejia Boutte<br />

Christine<br />

Albert<br />

Eboni Townsend<br />

Chauntis<br />

Jenkins<br />

Melanie Zaffuto<br />

Jeffery<br />

St. Romain<br />

Real estate<br />

Danny Lyons, ERA Stirling<br />

Properties sales associate in<br />

the Mandeville office, earned<br />

the Certified Distressed<br />

Property Expert designation.<br />

Restaurants<br />

The Louisiana Restaurant<br />

Danny Lyons Sean Malone<br />

Association named Sean Malone, chief operating officer of<br />

Serranos Salsa Company, and Nick Deluzain, owner of Benedict’s<br />

Restaurant and Catering, to the LRA’s state board of directors.<br />

Transportation<br />

The New Orleans Aviation Board named Iftikar Ahmad director of<br />

aviation for Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport.<br />

Community shots<br />

Nick Deluzain<br />

Iftikar Ahmad<br />

COURTESY OF ST. TAMMANY WEST CHAMBER OF COMMERCE<br />

The St. Tammany West Chamber of Commerce participated in a four-parish “North Shore<br />

Focus” event. Representatives from Livingston, St. Tammany, Tangipahoa and Washington<br />

chambers and the Southeastern Louisiana University Alumni Association gathered at the<br />

state Capitol in April to bring a unified voice to legislators. From left: Lacey Toledano, St.<br />

Tammany West Chamber; Michele Aycock, Hammond Chamber; Brian Abels, Livingston<br />

Chamber; Kathy Pittman, Southeastern University Alumni Association; Linda Crain, Franklinton<br />

Chamber; April Wehrs, Ponchatoula Chamber; and Jack Stewart, Livingston Chamber.<br />

Moving<br />

North Oaks Neurology Clinic relocated to 16033 Doctors’ Blvd. across from North Oaks<br />

Medical Center in Hammond.<br />

Re/Max Real Estate Partners relocated to 710 Brownswitch Road, Suite 3, Slidell.<br />

Business notables<br />

St. Tammany Parish Hospital earned the Gold Level Louisiana Hospital Quality Award for<br />

2009 at the annual Louisiana Health Care Quality Summit.<br />

A groundbreaking ceremony was held June 29 for the Greenbriar Community Care<br />

Center at 505 Robert Blvd., Slidell.<br />

Miscellaneous<br />

The St. Tammany West Chamber of Commerce is accepting nominations for the Small<br />

Business Advisory Council’s 9th Annual Business Appreciation Awards. To download a<br />

form, visit www.sttammanychamber.org. All nominations must be received by Oct. 8.


Stirling performance<br />

Stirling Properties honored its top commercial<br />

agents from the New Orleans and Covington<br />

teams March 24 at its Commercial Division<br />

Award Ceremony.<br />

Emerald Award: Adjusted Gross<br />

Commission of $500,000+<br />

and Most Transactions<br />

Rhonda Sharkawy –New Orleans<br />

Platinum Award: Adjusted<br />

Gross Commission of<br />

$200,000-$349,999<br />

Beezie Landry – Covington<br />

Will Barrois – Covington<br />

Chris Abadie – New Orleans<br />

John Arthurs – New Orleans<br />

Gold Award: Adjusted<br />

Gross Commission of<br />

$150,000-$249,999<br />

Lee de la Houssaye – Covington<br />

Bronze Award: Adjusted<br />

Gross Commission<br />

of $75,000-$99,999<br />

Amy Farnsworth – New Orleans<br />

Gaines Seaman – New Orleans<br />

Rick Skelding – New Orleans<br />

Well-deserved recognition<br />

St. Tammany Parish Hospital honored St.<br />

Tammany Hospital Guild, Hospice, Meals at<br />

Home and independent volunteers for their<br />

dedicated service at its annual Volunteer<br />

Awards Luncheon April 29. A total of 160<br />

volunteers were recognized with service<br />

awards for hours volunteered in 2009.<br />

Guild volunteers:<br />

500 to 599 Hours: Ruth Anthon, Henry Deist and<br />

Jewell Lorio<br />

400 to 499 Hours: John Copeland, Clare Drinkard,<br />

Michael Elliott, Betty McCormick, Juan Ortiz, Elliot<br />

Peralta, Phyllis Peralta and Maxine Resweber<br />

300 to 399 Hours: Gail Achary, Claire Bauer,<br />

Audrey Cooper, Ann Copeland, Patricia Reno and<br />

Lucille Thompson<br />

Top three Hospice volunteers:<br />

Ella Rose Carden for 669 hours, Kim Favaloro<br />

with 147 hours and Lucy Keefe with 215 hours<br />

Hospice volunteers giving 50<br />

or more hours:<br />

Charlotte Binnings, Mary Ann Brannon, Bill Gallop,<br />

Marisol Garcia, Dannie Goodwin, Bonnie Johnson,<br />

Joyce McHenry, Roselyn Rush, May Sammons,<br />

Barbara Stamps, Ann Torcson and Yvonne Whitson<br />

Arriving daily on your computer!<br />

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Daily Update<br />

Register today<br />

www.neworleanscity<strong>business</strong>.com/dailyupdate.cfm<br />

September/October 2010 49


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(Investors, previously approved for<br />

29 lot subdivision, no wetlands.)<br />

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September/October 2010 51


PHOTO BY FRANK AYMAMI<br />

52 September/October 2010<br />

w o r d<br />

with John Crosby, Crosby Development president, local hero<br />

By Craig Guillot<br />

Contributing Writer<br />

Age: 58<br />

Family: wife, Cathy; adult children, John III, Andrew, Christine<br />

Education: bachelor’s degree in civil engineering, Tulane University<br />

Hometown: New Orleans<br />

M<br />

andeville resident John Crosby became a local<br />

hero April 19 when he jumped into Lake<br />

Pontchartrain to help a despondent man who<br />

had jumped from the Causeway Bridge near mile marker<br />

13. Crosby treaded water with the jumper for more than<br />

seven minutes before police arrived to lift them both from<br />

the lake. Crosby, president of Crosby Development, took<br />

a few moments to tell North Shore Report readers more<br />

about what happened that day.<br />

How did you come upon the scene?<br />

I normally don’t even travel the Causeway but I brought a<br />

friend to the airport that morning. I was about halfway<br />

over the bridge when I saw a car stopped in the left lane.<br />

I slowed down and as I got close, a guy ran out the passenger<br />

side door and jumped off the bridge.<br />

What was going through your head<br />

at the time?<br />

Your first thought is that it isn’t even happening. I pulled<br />

in front of the car, walked to the side and saw him. He<br />

really wasn’t moving around much and his head kept<br />

going underwater. I couldn’t just sit there and watch this<br />

guy go down. It would have haunted me forever.<br />

So you jumped in?<br />

Yeah, I took my shoes off, put my phone down and jumped<br />

in about 10 feet on the side of him. I swam up behind him,<br />

put him in a headlock and treaded water for about seven<br />

minutes until the police got there. My father had done a<br />

similar thing in 1953 when he saved a man in the river.<br />

You must be a good swimmer.<br />

Yes, I knew I was in shape to do it and could tread water<br />

for a long time. I cycle about 100 to 150 miles per week.<br />

We were at mile 13 so there was no land or anything to<br />

swim to. I knew we’d have to wait to be hoisted out.<br />

Were you scared or concerned<br />

at any point?<br />

Not really. He was pretty much out of it so holding him<br />

wasn’t a concern. I was trying to talk to him but he just<br />

didn’t respond or say anything. The water was very<br />

cold and towards the end I started to shiver uncontrollably.<br />

When they got me out, they took off all my<br />

clothes and put me in the back of a police car with the<br />

heater on to warm me up.<br />

Would you do it again?<br />

I think so, depending on the circumstances. If it would<br />

have been at night in high winds, I’m not sure, but it was<br />

a calm day. Or, if he had been making an effort to help<br />

himself, I might not have jumped in. The guy needed help<br />

and I knew I could help him.<br />

Have you since had any contact<br />

with the man?<br />

No. His mother and sister did call me a couple days later to<br />

thank me. They gave me a little background on what he<br />

was dealing with. I just said to tell him that he has a second<br />

chance and not to waste it. You feel like you’ve really done<br />

something to help someone and I hope that if someone in<br />

my family needs help someday, someone will be there.<br />

Some people asked why I risked myself to help a<br />

man who (presumably) wanted to kill himself. I’ve actually<br />

had two friends that have had suicides in their family<br />

and they said they wish someone would have been there<br />

when they made that decision. That meant more to me<br />

than anything.•


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