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chapter 5 turbulent diffusion flames - FedOA

chapter 5 turbulent diffusion flames - FedOA

Extinction and laser

Extinction and laser induced fluorescence spectra are measured along the axis of the flame. Close to the burner exit, there is strong interference of mono-ring aromatics, benzene molecule and its intermediate oxidized species, with the spectroscopic signatures of combustion-formed compounds. The contribution of mono-ring aromatics to the measured signals is estimated from their concentration by kinetic modelling of the flame [17] and by the extinction and fluorescence spectra measured in the first flame location at 1 mm above the burner where the contribution of mono-ring aromatics to the detected spectra is dominant. The slightly-sooting benzene flame with C/O=0.72 shows three characteristic flame zones. The first location in the flame (2 mm) is well below the maximum flame temperature (maximum temperature is about 1750 K at 3-4 mm) and is in the main oxidation region. Here, both extinction and fluorescence spectra show the typical signature of mono-ring aromatic molecules. Two absorption bands, the first at 205 nm and the second broader one at 250 nm are characteristics of the extinction spectrum while the scattering at 266 nm and a broadband emission peak at around 290 nm are the most prominent feature in the fluorescence spectrum. After subtracting the contribution of mono-ring aromatics from both extinction and fluorescence, the extinction coefficient does not presents peaks typical of PAHs but it sharply decreases from 200 nm to about 350 nm where it becomes negligible. A broadband emission peak around 310 nm becomes the most prominent feature of the fluorescence spectrum. Figure 3.17 shows the extinction and fluorescence spectra in excess of mono-ring aromatic contribution measure at different heights above the burner. The second location examined is across the maximum temperature region of the flame at 5 mm. The extinction spectrum detected in this region exhibits a very rapid fall-off around 200 nm followed by a more gradual decrease at longer wavelengths where extinction is measurable up to 400 nm. The fluorescence spectrum shows two broad emission bands; the first one peaks around 310 nm, and a second broader one around 450 nm. Both spectral behaviors seem to indicate an aromatization process of the compounds formed in the main oxidation region. Indeed the 74

fluorescence peak in the near UV-visible region of the spectrum has been previously attributed to aromatic functionalities with two-rings formed within the flame while the emission in the visible at 450 nm has been attributed to three or more ring aromatics [22]. The third flame location is in the post-oxidation zone of the flame at 10 mm. The extinction spectrum extends down toward the infrared and exhibits a stronger absorption between 250 and 500 nm, typical of soot particles, whereas in the fluorescence spectrum the peak at 450nm is the most prominent feature. Monochromatic extinction coefficients measured at 266 nm and 400 nm are reported in Fig.3.18. The extinction coefficient at 266 nm detected in the flame zone below 3 mm is very high and decreases by more than one order of magnitude with increasing height up to about 5 mm. Kext, a.u. LIF, a.u. 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 wavelength, nm 0.0 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 wavelength, nm Fig. 3.17 Normalized extinction (a) and fluorescence (b) spectra in excess of mono-ring aromatic contribution measured at 2mm (heavy line), 5mm (light line) and 10mm (dashed line) from the burner in the C/O=0.72 benzene-air flame. 75 a b

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