Views
5 years ago

Clicker Resource Guide - cwsei - University of British Columbia

Clicker Resource Guide - cwsei - University of British Columbia

An experienced

An experienced insightful instructor when giving a traditional lecture can tell when many of the students are not engaged and can often tell when students do not understand the material. However, it is more difficult to know why they are disengaged and/or confused, and how to fix these problems. Clickers, when used well, can provide the why and how to fix for experienced instructors. For other instructors, in addition to serving those functions, clickers can also help them know much better when students are disengaged and confused. It is essential to recognize that these benefits do not happen automatically when one introduces clickers to the classroom. These desirable outcomes are only achieved when the instructor thinks carefully about his or her instructional goals and how clicker questions and related discussion can help achieve those goals. In the remainder of this document, we will discuss the use of “clicker-questions” and how they can be used in educationally effective ways. These questions are normally multiple choice questions posed to the class, where each student in the class has their own clicker. Students register their answer by pushing the appropriate button, and a computer records their response. A histogram of responses can be shown to the whole class. It can take some time to tap the full potential of clickers in the classroom. We have commonly seen instructors follow the following progression as they learn to use clickers effectively: - 4 - Seeing [the response from clickers] is often an “aha” moment for the instructor. They realize how they might use clicker questions in a new way to better promote student thinking and learning...Students recognize that they must come to class prepared and must keep up with material throughout the semester, as they must analyze and respond to questions on a daily basis.

Stage 1) Asking simple, primarily factual, questions as a starting point. These questions are often simple quizzes on material just covered in lecture, or questions derived from the textbook or textbook instructor’s guide. Little discussion amongst students about the questions is encouraged or needed, and the great majority (>80%) of the students get the question correct. There is little follow up discussion to the question by the instructor. This type of question often appears to be driven by instructor’s concern that asking more difficult questions would make students feel uncomfortable at missing the answer. The primary impact of the clickers on lecture is improving attendance (assuming students get points if they answer the questions). On our surveys, students indicate they see much less value to this type of use than clickers being used as in Stages 2 or 3 below. We have seen some faculty members who are new to clickers suddenly switch from the simple usage of clickers in Stage 1 to the more effective approach in Stages 2 or 3 after the following experience. Stimulated by unexpectedly poor performance on an exam question or just by accident, the instructor will create a question that is more challenging. This question creates a large split in responses that is followed by a burst of discussion among the students as to which answer is correct and why. Seeing such a response is often an “aha” moment for the instructor. They realize how they might use clicker questions in a new way to better promote student thinking and learning. They then move to the next stage of clicker question use. Stage 2) Asking more challenging conceptual questions, or questions where the answer is not obvious and critical points could be argued. There is a substantial spread in student responses and significant student-student discussion of the question is encouraged, with follow up discussion by the instructor. There are occasional changes in the planned lecture to address student difficulties that are revealed by the clicker question or in response to student questions generated in discussion. Stage 3) Lecture is structured around a set of challenging clicker questions that largely embody the material students are to learn. Students are required to prepare for class by reading or carrying out assignments ahead of time, and little class time is spent in providing information to students that is accessible in the textbook or online notes. Students are organized into 3-4 person discussion groups so that all students must discuss the questions, and student reasoning for their answer choices are elicited and analyzed following the question. A significant portion of the class time is devoted to discussion of students’ thinking and questions that are revealed and raised during this process. Under the best of circumstances, clicker questions are designed so that student questions actually introduce the next intended topic (and may even constitute the next clicker question posed to the class). Students recognize that they must come to class prepared and must keep up with material throughout the semester, as they must analyze and respond to questions on a daily basis. - 5 -

graduate news - English - University of British Columbia
A Guide to Climbing Hiking in Southwestern British Columbia
Concept™HP - UBC Dentistry - University of British Columbia
Disorientation Guide - Columbia University
British Columbia Canadian Rockies Railway Map Guide
Counsellor Folder - you@UBC - University of British Columbia
notes ubc - Music, School of - University of British Columbia
Acknowledgements - Theatre at UBC - University of British Columbia
Aboriginal Studies - UBC Press - University of British Columbia
Pathology and Laboratory Medicine - University of British Columbia
symposium in mathematical biology - University of British Columbia
Far West: The Story of British Columbia - Teacher's - Education
General Practice BILLING GUIDE - British Columbia Medical ...
Study Guide - Theatre at UBC - University of British Columbia
Study Guide - Theatre at UBC - University of British Columbia
Macbeth - Theatre at UBC - University of British Columbia
UBC High Notes - Music, School of - University of British Columbia
Guide Treve - Columbia University
View - University of British Columbia
Globalization - University of British Columbia
Untitled - University of British Columbia
The Carpathians - University of British Columbia
Queer genders.indb - University of British Columbia
Student Life - Columbia College - Columbia University
African-American Resource Guide - Arizona State University
Status of Pacific Salmon Resources in Southern British Columbia ...
british columbia mining, development & exploration - 2009
inside cover.cdr - University of British Columbia
a security - LERSSE - University of British Columbia