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5 years ago

cover 1999-2002 - SCI

cover 1999-2002 - SCI

Custodian

Custodian Investigations: Corruption Continues Steven McGuire As a result of this office’s November 1992 report, A System Like No Other: Fraud and Misconduct by New York City School Custodians, the BOE established rules requiring custodians to keep their BOE funds separate from personal accounts and incorporated these requirements into its contract with the custodial union. As our investigation into School for the Future custodian Steven McGuire revealed, however, BOE custodial auditing guidelines are still in need of reform. For over three years, McGuire used his BOE budget as a personal interest-free credit line, commingling personal and BOE funds, and regularly using the money to pay his own personal debts. McGuire essentially stole money from the BOE, used it for own purposes, and then put it back to cover his theft. In fact, records show that he returned $60,000 to the account shortly after he learned of our investigation. As detailed in our findings, McGuire’s misuse of the custodial account was able to occur because of a long-standing BOE practice that allows custodians complete control over such accounts. In addition, our investigation uncovered that an audit conducted under the BOE auditing protocols in place at the time would not have revealed that McGuire was commingling BOE and non-BOE funds because the BOE’s Office of the Auditor General (“OAG”) was limited to a review of custodial purchases which did not include an examination of checks written to custodial employees or a custodian’s bank account. Recommendations and Results For over three years, custodian Steven McGuire used his BOE budget as a personal interest-free credit line, commingling personal and BOE funds, and regularly using the money to pay his own personal debts. We recommended that Steven McGuire’s employment be terminated. This office further recommended that the BOE amend its custodial auditing guidelines to include a 8

eview of bank account records and payroll. We also recommended that the current rule barring a City employee from sharing a City funds account with any person become BOE policy. This would be in addition to the rule, adopted following our 1992 report on misconduct by custodians, requiring that the custodial budget be maintained in a separate account containing only those funds which are to be used only for BOE purposes. Despite our recommendation, McGuire was approved for ordinary disability retirement in February 2002. As a result, the administrative case against him was discontinued. McGuire has since been placed on the BOE’s ineligible list. The most recent collective bargaining agreement with the union includes some changes to a custodian’s banking practice. First, all accounts must be with Chase Bank. Moreover, the custodian will no longer receive a budget allocation check; rather, all funds will be deposited electronically. Finally, the custodian must sign an agreement allowing the Board of Education to have access to the account records. Our investigation prompted the OAG to expand its examination of custodial accounts. The OAG has completed a report evaluating the first set of “comprehensive audits” it performed on custodial accounts, encompassing the recommendations we made in McGuire. In addition to the usual documents examined in a standard audit, the OAG thoroughly tracked “money in and money out” through review of canceled checks, ledgers, bank statements, check registers, the petty cash journal, and a payroll audit. The auditor also looked for signs of commingled funds. Gregory Kelly Gregory Kelly, the custodian at PS 70 in District 9 in the Bronx, submitted fraudulent documentation in support of alleged purchases of school supplies he made in 1998 in order to conceal his theft from the BOE of over $9,500 in custodial funds. This investigation began when the OAG informed this office that the 1998 audit of Kelly’s custodial expenditures discovered potentially fraudulent claims submitted by Kelly in his Miscellaneous Expenditure Reports (“PO2s”). Following its initial audit, the OAG disallowed numerous expenditure claims by Kelly in his PO2s. Two of these claims, submitted with supporting invoices in November 9