Views
5 years ago

A MUSICAL VOYAGE - Royal Australian Navy

A MUSICAL VOYAGE - Royal Australian Navy

- 112 – …”we are

- 112 – …”we are sitting in a dark compartment with only one emergency escape light. The ship has been “hit” and is drifting aimlessly in the ocean. No communications are working in a situation which would normally call for frequent, fast, detailed sit reps. The silence of the engines leaves only the shuddering sounds of the ship creaking and rocking, and of the waves crashing about outside… very eerie.” It wasn’t till later we found out the extent of damage to the ship. The superstructure and all of “Aft Repair” had been wiped out. This included us. We were for exercise, dead. We could only imagine what this would have been like for real. A ‘Medical Evacuation’…. (Chris) It was the big one, the ORE (Operational Readiness Examination), the culmination of our intense ‘O Loc’ work-up. We were an hour into the DCX (Damage Control Exercise) when we the ship came under simulated attack from enemy fighter jets. Our repair base suffered major damage and to make it as real as possible a member of ‘The Green Team’ came into our compartment and handed out injury/fatality cards. For the ones ‘lucky’ enough to be ‘killed’ it was the end of the exercise. My card, complete with a real photograph of the injury, stated that I had sustained a massive compound fracture to the right leg. After initial treatment by the medics I was moved to the ships hospital. There it was decided that due to the serious nature of my injuries I would have to be airlifted off the ship. A nervous stretcher ride out to the helicopter followed (I was sure they were going to drop me!). There the realism of the exercise was relaxed a bit and instead of going into the helicopter on the stretcher I was able to sit in one of the seats. We then took off and flew around for 20 mins to simulate the journey to a hospital before landing back on the ship. Since I was theoretically off the ship at that point I was not allowed to take part in the rest of the exercise, which went on for another couple of hours, lucky me! Desert Duck (Chris) “Hands stand to flying stations, prepare to receive Desert Duck aft”. This was one of the most eagerly anticipated pipes made during our time in The Gulf. Desert Duck is the nickname given to the fleet of Sea King helicopters that transport stores, passengers and more importantly mail to and from naval ships in the area. They would land on Kanimbla once or twice a week but we never knew if they were carrying mail until we actually started unloading. The other interesting thing about ‘The Duck’ is how their aircrew painted yellow prints across our flight deck. We had been pre-warned that this was the habit of theirs, kind of like a calling card to say that they had landed on the ship. It took about a month but sure enough one day they got us. Just before the aircraft was due to take off one of the aircrew men jumped out and stamped the deck with a line of yellow duck prints. Royal Australian Navy Band: A Musical Voyage

- 113 – Sand Storm (Sonya) One night before the war, our flight deck team was psyched up for five deck landings of which most would be hot refuels. During the twilight we had landed a helicopter with no problems, and now at 23:00 we stepped outside with a cylume stick each in our sleeve pockets and our cranials on ready to receive our next land on. We waited on the aft flight deck, and waited,… and waited. There was a strange substance in the air. Visibility waning so that we could no longer see any lights on the water or in the sky. Like mist or fog- yet neither, we concluded that it was dust! We were tasting the little gritty bits in our mouths. Very strange! We were in the middle of a sand storm, which from Kuwait, had blown itself out to sea. Bad news for the visiting helo that spent fifty minutes trying to find us! In an effort to help them our ship’s searchlights shone at full beam from the main mast into the dust blanket hovering over the ship. Though at one stage we distinctly heard the helo, we could see only dust and darkness. Even the idea of a trail of smoke flares from the pyrotechnics locker seemed futile. An hour later they radioed us to say they were safely on US ship Valley Forge. They would otherwise have had to ditch in the ocean. Back inside the hanger the dust filled the air and looking up the breezeway you could barely see the roller door at the other end. Our faces (bar a patch around our eyes from the goggles), were caked with sand as were our cranials, overalls and boots. It was so dusty. I can only imagine how it would have been to experience this dust storm ashore. (Chris, Meredith and Sonya) We have now left the Northern Arabian Gulf and have begun our journey home. As we write this we are pulling into Muscat, the port city of Oman. We also look forward to stopovers in Colombo and Singapore before we finish our deployment with a family cruise from Cairns to Sydney. As we begin sailing for home we can reflect on how lucky we have been. Although we faced numerous threats and at times ‘sailed close to the wind’, we are relieved that we have come through the experience unscathed. It’s been an amazing five months and a chapter in our lives that we will never forget. MUSICIANS ONBOARD HMAS ADELAIDE Article by Petty Officer Gabe Kicsak After all the gear had been freighted from Sydney to Perth, the eight members that were nominated for sea were ready. All NBCD and Advanced NBCD courses were completed, medicals done. After collecting medical and dental documents, our post-out was complete. Monday, 26 May 2003, all our bags are packed and we are waiting at the airport. Usual story; hurry up and wait as our plane was delayed by 90 minutes. The flight over was smooth and transport at the other end was waiting for us. We went via Irwin Barracks to be greeted by Chief Petty Officer Bekendam who had all our gear waiting for us. We loaded it into the trailer and were on our final destination to HMAS Adelaide at Fleet Base West. We arrived at the gangway, met the Officer of the Day and were told that they weren’t expecting us until Thursday. Lucky we got there on Monday, as power for the amps was hard to get. We finally had power for everything by Wednesday afternoon. The ships program had changed at the last moment. We were now going to sail on Saturday morning instead of Friday. First day out at sea was great. No one in the band got seasick. Rehearsals had already begun whilst we were alongside and now rehearsing at sea. Our first gig was for Replenishment at Sea with United States Naval Ship Yukon. After six days at sea, we finally saw land. We were going to refuel at Christmas Island. The Ships Company were granted a SWIMEX for about an hour in crystal clear blue water. We weighed anchor and finally en route to Chennai, India. Monday morning came and we pulled into Chennai (formerly known as Madras). Final rehearsals happened for Ceremonial Sunset and the Cocktail party. About 150 guests were present for the evening function. Royal Australian Navy Band: A Musical Voyage

Royal Australian Navy Band Hands Across The Sea Music Program
Download - Royal Australian Navy
Sydney - Royal Australian Navy
Royal Australian Navy band All Hands on Deck Music Program
Download - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
ENGINE - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
ENGINEERING - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
The Trade by Rudyard Kipling - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
Engineering - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
THE NAVY RESERVIST - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
Navy Leadership Framework - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy
Download - Royal Australian Navy