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A MUSICAL VOYAGE - Royal Australian Navy

A MUSICAL VOYAGE - Royal Australian Navy

- 150 – That evening

- 150 – That evening we performed another concert to a capacity audience. As the crowd was so responsive, it was a great night and all of the audience and performers thoroughly enjoyed themselves. Following a quick pack down and a short wait, it was time for another night helicopter flight, this time on a couple of Black Hawks. So for the first time since Christmas Day, the entire group was once again in the same location, at Camp Victory. It was here that we felt the cold the most—the two evening concerts saw most of us wearing multiple layers of clothing to help stave off the chill. We were, once again, lucky enough to be hosted on a couple of tours, getting the chance to see some of the former dictator’s homes and locations where many atrocities took place. I think surreal is the best word to describe our few days in Baghdad. We stayed within the camp lines for the entire visit, which made us feel safe, yet there was so much damage and pain close by. Most of us did not feel as though we were in a “war zone” yet it was all so close. Time to move on again; so back onto the Hercules with a short stop over to return our weapons, ammo and combat gear (a lot less kilos to wear from here on in). The second leg on the Hercules saw us arrive in our next location, Al Udeid. It was the venue for our New Year’s Eve concert. And what a concert it was. We started at about 1700 with the Jazz group. Beccy Cole played for an extra half an hour or so, as did the Navy Band—a great chance to perform all those extra charts that had to be cut to slim down the main show to two hours. The main show started at 2200 finishing just after midnight. It was a great night. The large crowd was very responsive and the band excelled. This show was definitely the musical highlight of the tour. Early New Year’s Day and time for another Hercules trip to our final destination. On arrival we had a very short time to get organised and then travel in to the Port (it was great to see water again!) to do a New Year’s Day concert onboard HMAS Parramatta. After the preceding night, the crowd was very small and quiet, but they seemed to enjoy it none the less. It was quite hard for us to believe that it was almost over, but at the same time it seemed so long ago since those initial brass quintet jobs just three weeks earlier. The last show went well with, once again, a very appreciative crowd. Our last day in the MEAO, and we were lucky to have a shopping day. Some people gave their bank balances a real beating and had to buy new bags to get all their gear home. Top marks go to Bessie and Geoff who came in 100 grams under the upper weight limit for the plane ride home. Throughout the tour, in every location, we were amazingly well looked after. All of our hosts were extremely gracious, and helpful with finding what we required, especially when our equipment didn’t want to play the game. Thanks to everyone who gave us such a warm reception and so much help along the way. During our tour we played for Australian and Coalition Forces, including personnel from the United States of America, United Kingdom, Japan, South Korea, Canada, Italy and Iraq. A tiring, but fantastic experience that I am sure will live with all of us for a very long time. LEST WE FORGET BUGLES ENGRAVED TO COMMEMORATE OPERATION RIMAU Article by Leading Seaman Cassandra Mohapp In September 1944, when Singapore was under Japanese occupation, 23 British and Australian members of Services Reconnaissance Department / Z Special Unit travelled from Australia by submarine to the outskirts of Singapore Harbour. Their mission was to attack and destroy enemy shipping from small submersible boats using magnetic limpet mines. The party included six former member of the highly successful raid launched against the Japanese shipping Operation JAYWICH. Unfortunately, the raiding party was intercepted by Japanese Forces and in the actions that followed, thirteen were either killed in action or died of wounds. The remaining ten were captured and subsequently executed on 7 July 1945. The place of their execution is approximately 580 metres eat of the Junction of Clement and Dover Roads. After an approach from Major Tom Hall (rtd) and author of The Forgotten Heroes of Rimau, the Director offered to purchase four bugles in memory of the members of this operation. Royal Australian Navy Band: A Musical Voyage

- 151 – On Monday 5 December 2005 the four bugles were presented to members of the Royal Australian Navy Band in the presence of the Maritime Commander and relatives of two of the servicemen who participated in Operation RIMAU. Three bugles were inscribed with the names of the three Naval Reserve members of the operation, and the forth bugle was inscribed with a tribute Commanding Officer and Crew of the submarine that transported the team to the outskirts of Singapore Harbour. Able Seaman Frederick Walter Lota Marsh was born in Brisbane in 1923 and joined the Royal Australian Navy in 1941. He took part in Operation JAYWICK and was awarded a “Mentioned in Dispatches” for his actions during this raid. A member of Operation RIMAU, Frederick was wounded at the same time as his mate Able Seaman Andrew Houston was killed. Able Seaman Marsh was captured and transported from the Dabo Police Station to Singapore by the Tengku in January 1945. He was tortured to death in the Kempei Tai establishment located at the YMCA Building, Stamford Road, Singapore. It is believed the ashes of Able Seaman Marsh were spread on a Special Garden at the Kranji War Memorial Cemetery, Singapore. Able Seaman Andrew William George Huston was born in Brisbane on 25 December 1923. In 1941, at the age of 18 he volunteered for service in the Royal Australian Navy. He was a member of Operation JAYWICH and was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal for Gallantry on this Operation. In 1944, he returned to Singapore Harbour as a member of Operation RIMAU and lost his life in the Lingga Archipelago whilst escaping Japanese Forces. A body washed up on Boeaja Island and was buried on 16 December 1944. This body was thought to be that of Able Seaman Huston but was later identified to be someone else. He remains the only member of Operation RIMAU whose body has not been recovered. Lieutenant Bruno Philip Reymond joined the Royal Australian Naval Reserve (Seagoing) in July 1942 and went to Pearl Harbour to serve in the US Pacific Fleet as a Pilot in a Naval rather than in a Flying capacity, and assisted in the landing preparations for Tarawa. For the Rimau Operation Bruno was named as the Navigator. Along with the other members, he sailed out of Fremantle in the British Submarine, HMS Porpoise, on 11 September and reached the Rhio Archipelago two weeks later. Operation RIMAU was aborted following detection of the commandos who were then forces to flee in canoes. They paddled 3900 kilometres to Romang Island before they were captured and returned to Singapore. The eleven survivors were charged with murder and espionage and sentenced to ceremonial execution. This was carried out on 7 July 1945, only thirty nine days before the end of the war. Lieutenant Reymond, age 31, was killed on Pelapis Island on 23 December 1944. The Royal Australian Navy Band salutes their daring and bravery by inscribing their names on Ceremonial Bugles, which will be used at various Remembrance Services around the nation and abroad. May these brave men Rest in Peace: Commander Hubert Anthony Lucius Marsham and crew of HMS Porpoise Lieutenant Bruno Philip Reymond RANR (1914–1944) Able Seaman Frederick Walter Lota Marsh RANR (1924–1945) Able Seaman Andrew William George Huston RANR (1923–1944) SEA RIDE IN HMAS KANIMBLA Article by Petty Officer Matt Klohs In October of 2005, ten musicians from the Melbourne detachment embarked in HMAS Kanimbla in Sydney for a three week visit to Broome and back. The group had a mixture of sea experience with five embarking on their first sea deployment and another five contributing to the recent trend of musicians successfully making their mark within the Fleet. The personnel involved were myself, Leading Seaman (LS) Daniel Blackmore, LS Brett Douglas, Able Seaman (AB) Bruce McIntyre, AB Iain Fisher, AB Jeff McGann, AB Jennifer Monk, AB Ben Hughes, AB Ross Chapman, and AB Yoshi Izumi. Royal Australian Navy Band: A Musical Voyage

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