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A MUSICAL VOYAGE - Royal Australian Navy

A MUSICAL VOYAGE - Royal Australian Navy

- 186 – We also

- 186 – We also released two new recordings, A Flagship Recital (Mark II) and Classic Marches. Each of these recordings demonstrates very clearly, the impressive capability of the Wind Orchestra; but the music also shows the skill and collective ability of the group. These recordings will shortly be distributed to schools and libraries across the nation and add significant value to the story of the Navy Band. There are a number of people moving on to new positions next year. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Chief Petty Officer Mike Vaughan for his work with the Queensland detachment and Chief Petty Officer Andrew Stapleton for his work with the New South Wales detachment. Each of them has made a sterling contribution to their individual detachments. They will be leaving their detachments in much better shape due, in large measure, to their personal commitment and the professional mentoring that they provided their people. Also moving on next year, after three and a half years as the Central Band Stores Controller, is Chief Petty Officer Camille Martin who has been an exceedingly productive member of my team. Camille undertook much additional work in my office and I very much appreciate her dedication to duty and willingness to take up other roles when needed. Camille was recently promoted and is the first female Chief Petty Officer Musician; next year she will become the first female to take up a role as Bandmaster. Leading Seaman Esa Douglas is moving back to the Sydney detachment after setting the standard as the band’s National Manager for Marketing and Public Relations. Lieutenant Michelle Coleman is also moving on next year. Michelle was the first female to be appointed as a Band Officer and made her mark firstly as a champion euphonium player and then as the Assistant Director of Music and the Music Director of the Sydney detachment. I know that Michelle and her husband, Dean, leave the Navy family with our thanks and best wishes. There are many people within the band who make a very significant and ongoing contribution; but space doesn’t permit me to acknowledge everyone on this occasion. Collectively though, we are a very productive and credible military music organisation. I would argue that we are in fact the most effective military band in the nation. Listening to the recent broadcasts and recordings leads me to state with much confidence that our produce demonstrates a world-class military band. I want to thank each of you for your effort and contribution towards achieving such good results. HANDS ACROSS THE SEA Article by Leading Seaman Esa Douglas During August, in support of the Great White Fleet 100 th Anniversary Celebrations, American and Australian ships re-enacted the Australian visit to Sydney, Melbourne and Albany. In 1908, the Band of the Victorian Naval Brigade performed for the fleet as it steamed into Port Philip Bay. One hundred years later, the Royal Australian Navy Band in company with musicians from the United States Pacific Fleet Band, greeted USS John S McCain, and HMA Ships Sirius and Darwin as they berthed at Fleet Base East. The ships were greeted by the Melbourne detachment on arrival at Princess Pier in Melbourne, and a combination of the Western Australian and Sydney detachments were in Albany to welcome USS Shoup, and HMA Ships Darwin, Sirius and Manoora, and also to support the Freedom of Entry through Albany. From the 16 December 1907 to the 22 February 1909, United States President Theodore Roosevelt dispatched the fleet on a voyage to circumnavigate the world making 26 port calls on six continents. The fleet consisted of 16 American battleships, all of which were painted white to denote peace, hence the term “Great White Fleet” being adopted. The visit to Australia was the fleet’s third leg, its travels taking it from San Francisco to Manila, which covered 30,254km’s. They arrived in Sydney on 20 August 1908, and the subsequent visits saw the fleet in Melbourne from 29 August to 5 September, and 11 September until 17 September in Albany. The sailors arrived with a tremendous welcome and crowds of between 400,000 and 600,000 turning out to greet the fleet. Royal Australian Navy Band: A Musical Voyage

- 187 – As part of the celebrations, a number of functions and events were held in each of the ports. In Sydney, two major concerts and a ball hosted by the American Australian Association were supported by elements of the Royal Australian Navy Band and US Pacific Fleet Band. The first concert, Hands Across the Sea, was held at City Recital Hall in Angel Place to an audience of approximately 900 people. The audience was treated to a night of seafaring music, a precision drill team, the ‘Sophisticated Sounds’ with the Admiral’s Own Big band, and a Naval Occasion with the Ceremonial Ensemble. The evening began with each nation's respective colours being raised by the Royal Australian Navy Colour Guard and Flag Party provided by Training Ship Sirius. The concert opened with Nick Clark’s The Alert March, followed by a major work that took the audience on a journey of the ocean through calm and stormy seas with Francis McBeth’s The Sea Treaders. A ship’s bell also featured throughout the piece giving a real feel of a ship at sea. The first soloist for the evening was flautist Able Seaman Svetlana Yaroslavskaya. She performed Phil Coulter’s Home Away from Home, which had been arranged by Leading Seaman Martyn Hancock. After such a calming and beautiful interlude, it was back into march mode with John Phillip Sousa’s Hands Across the Sea. This march had been composed in 1899 and dedicated to all of America’s allied countries abroad. What better way to get in the mood for some sea shanties with Clare Grundman’s Fantasy on American Sailing Songs. The piece used four familiar American sea songs, ‘Hornet & Peacock’, ‘Lowlands’, ‘What Shall We Do With a Drunken Sailor’, and ‘Bound for the Rio Grande’. Brass players, especially trumpet players, are often known for their extroverted personalities and loud approach to life. So when you combine that fact, with their mouthpieces attached to .303 weapons to produce a louder than usual trumpet sound, you come up with some humorous results. Able Seaman Andrew Bryce, Musician Third Class Ivan Boshkovich, Able Seaman Chris Ellis, Able Seaman Andrew Hansch, Able Seaman Stuart Malcolm and Able Seaman Cameron McAllister took to the choir balcony to perform the Gunnery Officer’s Gallop better known as Coach Horn Gallop. This unusual and highly entertaining piece had the audience in fits of laughter. To end the ‘First Watch’, the tone was calmed considerably with Michael McDermott’s Hymn to the Sea and Eternal Father. Featuring during this finale to the first half were Leading Seaman Christopher Palamountain on Saxophone and Able Seaman Marcus Salone on Trumpet. The Sea Chanters Chorus accompanied the Wind Orchestra and seafaring images were shown throughout: the first half concluded with a rousing standing ovation. The Admiral’s Own Big Band commenced the ‘Second Watch’ with ‘Sophisticated Sounds’. Taking to the stage during this jazzy set were two vocalists; Able Seaman Belinda Marks, and from the Pacific Fleet Band Musician Anton Dupreez. The big entertainment feature for the second half was ‘A Naval Occasion’ beginning with Alex Lithgow’s Royal Australian Navy. The Drum Corps then performed a traditional Beat to Quarters, followed by three cheers led by the Director, Lieutenant Commander Phillip Anderson. The climax of the evening came with patriotic songs of each nation. Leading Seaman Tracy Burke sang a beautiful rendition of God Bless America, and Able Seaman Bryony Dwyer followed with a moving version of My Country. The evening concluded with Advance Australia Fair and Star Spangled Banner. The colour guard from USS John S McCain joined the Royal Australian Navy Colour Party in retiring their respective colours to Anchors Aweigh with the final march of the evening, Waltzing Matilda, getting toes tapping for one last time. Saturday evening saw some members from both bands supporting the America Australia Association Gala Ball with a small ceremonial ensemble, chamber group and a rock ensemble. On Sunday, the combined band presented a ‘direct to air’ broadcast on ABC Classic FM from the Eugene Goossens Hall in Ultimo to a live audience of 200 people, and a radio audience of approximately 700,000. Another program had been prepared for this concert, with a number of marches, serious concert band works, big band repertoire and choral selections filling the afternoon’s broadcast time slot. Royal Australian Navy Band: A Musical Voyage

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