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A MUSICAL VOYAGE - Royal Australian Navy

A MUSICAL VOYAGE - Royal Australian Navy

- 196 – Knowing the

- 196 – Knowing the story of seagulls representing the souls of sailors, Joan designed the dome to incorporate 645 stainless steel seagulls to represent each of the men who lost their lives. The seven pillars holding the dome represent each of the states and one territory. Hanging from the top of the dome is an anchor, which is Sydney’s crest, with port and starboard lights. An honour roll of all 645 names is written across two walls, and a wavy line on the top of the wall represents the sailors laying to rest under the ‘sea’. The stele represents the bow of the ship, and a waiting woman, with an anchor on her necklace and dressed in the clothes of the 40s, looks out to the ocean. She represents all of the wives, mothers and daughters waiting for their men to return from sea. The garden beds surrounding the site have been planted with rosemary, for remembrance, and red roses representing blood. Even bollards on the path leading to the dome have significance as they were the last ones at the old Geraldton wharf Sydney tied up to before her fatal end. The Commemorative Sunset Service attended by thousands of people was made up of family members of the crew, dignitaries and state and federal politicians. Amongst the attendees were Governor General Quentin Bryce, and Glenys McDonald who both gave moving speeches. On the command for the Catafalque Party to take post, the slow march to the dome was accompanied by drums and bugle call performed by Chief Petty Officer Andrew Stapleton. This new bugle call was conceived at rehearsals the day before between both the Director of Music and Chief Stapleton. The bugle call, only consisting of three notes, was created as a dedication to those who had lost their lives on Sydney. The bugle that was performed on by Chief Stapleton has been engraved with the name of Vincent Warren, one of 12 band members who lost their lives on 19 November 1941. It is highly likely that the musicians would have been deep below the decks in the operations room if the ship was closed up for action stations. The moving call set the solemn mood for the rest of the ceremony which included the laying of the wreaths, with all 645 names being read out, performance of the Naval hymn and the Last Post and Reveille, finally finishing with the National Anthem and a fly past by RAAF aircraft. Also on Wednesday, a group of 280 family members attended an at-sea service held at the wreckage site on board HMAS Manoora. Also present during the ceremony was the guided missile frigate, HMAS Sydney, the fourth Australian ship to carry the Sydney name. Band member Able Seaman Ashley Markey had the honour of playing the Last Post and Reveille for the service. This significant event in naval history is one that will always be remembered. The subsequent memorial services to recognise the resting place of Sydney to not only remember but also honour all those who bravely served on her, is an occasion that members of the Royal Australian Navy Band can be proud of being apart of. Research compiled from: www.findingsydney.com www.navy.gov.au/HMAS_SYDNEY_(II) www.museum.wa.gov.au www.2australia.gov.au Royal Australian Navy Band: A Musical Voyage

- 197 – RAN BAND NEWS EDITION NUMBER 14 31 JULY 2009 MELBOURNE, SYDNEY AND QUEENSLAND DETACHMENTS COMBINE FOR THE FLEET REVIEW FROM THE DIRECTOR’S DESK As I have stated in previous editions of RAN Band News, ‘the history of the Navy Band develops at full pace’, and its record of service continues to be told in this edition. Over the past six months we conducted a ‘direct to air’ broadcast, supported the Navy Freedom of Entry through Sydney with more than 120 musicians, released our chamber recording The Commodores, deployed eight musicians to sea in HMAS Sydney, and supported a number of Ship Farewell and Welcome Home Ceremonies. We also deployed a small technical team to the Solomon Islands, and two of our people were selected for LONGLOOK exchange with Her Majesty’s Royal Marine Band Service. Throughout all of this activity we still managed to do our usual business within and around the Nation. The ‘direct to air’ broadcast on 1 March on ABC Classic FM reached more than 700,000 people and inspired the musicians with an exciting and challenging music program. The band’s contribution to Ship Farewell and Welcome Home Ceremonies continues to deliver a strong sense of national and naval pride to those occasions: it’s hard to imagine what those important ceremonies would be like without the Navy Band. We regularly bring volumes of good news stories to Navy and our people are, without exception, very positive ambassadors. The level of goodwill generated within Navy towards the Navy Band has been significant; however, Navy faces significant financial and structural challenges. Let’s hope that we will be able to continue to generate many more ‘good news’ stories under the New Generation Navy banner. I will be doing my best on your behalf to secure the best outcome possible in the current and future environment. Royal Australian Navy Band: A Musical Voyage

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