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A MUSICAL VOYAGE - Royal Australian Navy

A MUSICAL VOYAGE - Royal Australian Navy

- 234 – The TSE role

- 234 – The TSE role is one of boarding, security, holding and steaming and involves small teams (from two to eight) being attached to Navy and Customs vessels temporally. As part of the training, members are instructed in initial boarding techniques and procedures, use of the Browning 9mm pistol and ASP baton, defensive (hand-to-hand) techniques, situation resolution and use-of-force, first aid in field operations and safety equipment usages. The TSE rotation 62 was comprised of Navy members from almost every rate, including combat systems operators, electronic technicians, communicators, marine technicians, boatswain mates, stewards, cooks, musicians, and hydrographical surveyors. During normal sea evolutions, the TSE members participate, where possible, in ship duties including galley assistance, sea-boat bowman, helmsmen watches, watch on decks and other assorted watches. However, it is when an illegal boat is apprehended that TSE members are required to fulfil their specific role, ensuring that the detained people are kept calm, safe and protected. Members of the TSE team hold the apprehended boat after the initial boarding for up to five days, and this can be done by themselves or in conjunction with regular ship’s company, Federal Police or Customs officials. The TSE team are also used in long-haul operations when apprehended persons need to be transported from one location to another on a naval vessel. This role is considered to be ‘front-line’ for the Navy and while generally the situations are kept safe, there is an inherent risk of something going wrong, as was realised with the apprehension of SIEV. 36 when fuel was ignited by an apprehended person. Five people died and a further 51 were injured. There is also a constant risk of attacks on embarked personnel with weapons, of people jumping over-board and of attacks on other apprehended persons. During the force assignment, between us, we were involved in over 20 boardings, which included the apprehension of four SIEVs and one illegal fishing vessel; several long-haul voyages and time patrolling areas of interest at Christmas Island, Ashmore Island, and Broome, and a visit to Bali. It’s hard to say whether musicians will continue to be involved in this deployment due to the staffing nature of TSE rotations and the disbanding of a similar program Enhanced Military Force (EMF) which will see personnel formerly involved in EMF integrated into TSE. Nevertheless the role of TSE will continue to be of vital importance to the success of Operation Resolute. While the rotation of TSE 62 is now complete, Able Seaman Musician Karen Baker is currently undertaking TSE 63 and we wish her all the best and a safe deployment. PRINCE OF WALES AWARD Article by Chief Petty Officer Greg Hince Earlier this year, I was fortunate to receive a Prince of Wales Award to attend the 40 th Relationship Awareness Conference in Carlsbad, California. Relationship Awareness theory is a group of ideas that help people to build productive relationships and manage conflict by providing a window into the motivation that drives behaviour. It was developed by Dr Elias Porter after working extensively with Erich Fromm and Carl Rogers. The conference is a forum for accredited facilitators to exchange experiences and to increase their facilitation qualifications. One of the highlights of attending the conference was my gaining additional accreditation to facilitate the leadership development package The Leaders We Need. This program was developed and delivered by leadership expert and author Dr Michael Maccoby. Dr Maccoby has an extensive list of high profile organisations and individuals he has worked with, and listening to his experience and wisdom was a privilege. Another highlight was presenting a workshop to other facilitators on how we prepare leaders and teams for work in hostile environments such as Antarctica and Macquarie Island. Attendees were also interested in how this applied to our teams in the RAN, and in particular, some of the other advanced techniques we use for developing our music performance. On completion of the conference, I spent two weeks working with the US Royal Australian Navy Band: A Musical Voyage

- 235 – Navy Band Southwest in San Diego. This band has approximately 45 members and spends most of the year performing in smaller groups, covering up to 600 performances a year. As a result, it was rare for all musicians to be in’ the office’ at the same time. During the first week, I accompanied some of the small groups to official functions and ceremonies such as a ‘change of command’ held on board the USS Midway (museum). At the end of the first week, we travelled to San Francisco to participate in the Fleet Week Parade and associated celebrations. The parade wound through some of the typical San Francisco streets and the response from onlookers was amazing. The American citizens I spoke with are intensely proud of their military personnel, and were always keen to speak to someone in an Australian Navy uniform. While in San Francisco, I experienced more of life with the US Navy and US Marine Corps while living on board the USS Bonhomme Richard. The highlight of the second week was performing with the rock band and stage band. The first of these events was a performance for the Space Warfare leadership conference. The second event was the 100 th anniversary of the City of Chula Vista. This event was held at the Chula Vista Olympic training centre – one of the largest in the United States. The sound and light stage for the event took up a large section of the Olympic soccer training field, and was complete with giant video screens. What impressed me most about the US Navy Band was their professionalism, musicality and flexibility. Their hospitality was humbling, and they all spoke with exceptional regard for the musicians of the RAN. It was clear that their interactions with RAN musicians had left a positive impression and good memories, as indeed I will have of them. On the final day, I presented a collection of Royal Australian Navy Band recordings, a copy of the programme from the RAN Centenary Concert and a framed copy of the indigenous artwork ‘The Salute’ to the Director, Lieutenant Mark Corbliss. Thank you to the Cadet, Reserve and Employer Support Division for enabling the trip, the Australian Antarctic Division for allowing me to attend and to the Director of Music - Navy for endorsing my work with the US Navy Band Southwest. CDF LEADERSHIP FORUM Article by Leading Seaman Paul Parnell The Chief of Defence Force, (CDF) Warrant Officer and Non-commissioned Officer Leadership Forum was held over two days in October at the Australian Defence College, Weston Creek Canberra. Approximately 100 personnel from across Navy, Army and Air Force were selected to participate in two days of presentations, syndicate discussions, and open floor discussions with senior defence leaders. Hosted by the Centre for Defence Leadership and Ethics, this year’s theme was based on General Sir John Hackett’s book The Profession of Arms, and CDFs interpretation of this book given at King’s College, London in 2010. Upon arrival I was presented with a room key and a 300 page compilation of readings to be studied for the next morning! In addition to The Profession of Arms, topics included everything from ‘Stoic Philosophy’ to current professional and ethical thinking of comparative defence forces. The opening address by Warrant Officer of the Navy Mark Tandy, enabled us to link the readings to how we could start thinking about current and future challenges of the ADF. Importantly, what do the strategic and operating demands of the next two decades demand of us as professionals? Many of the guest speakers clearly emphasised that, regardless of rank or job description, we need to shun ‘followerism’ and mediocrity, to become a creative-thinking modern fighting force. Importantly, the speakers highlighted that the three service model of the ADF is bedrock to how we do business. While many new platforms will be operated by more tri-service components in the near future, we risk the trap of becoming ‘purple’ and losing the individual service character that has forged us to be a great fighting force over the last century. The level of cooperation needed to conduct amphibious operations and fourth generation warfare platforms, for example, will necessitate us being very analytical about how we see ourselves and our organisations, and how we will establish new ways of working together to achieve Defence objectives. Royal Australian Navy Band: A Musical Voyage

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    A MUSICAL VOYAGE REPORT OF PROCEEDI

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    - 1 - CONTENTS Royal Australian Nav

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    - 3 - SELECTED ARTICLES: RAN BAND N

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    - 5 - SELECTED ARTICLES: RAN BAND N

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    - 7 - COMMANDER PHILLIP CHARLES AND

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    - 9 - REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS ON CESS

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    - 11 - RAN Band Business Plan (2003

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    - 13 - CHAPTER 2 ASHORE AND AFLOAT

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    - 15 - On 5 August 1914, after war

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    - 17 - The 2005 deployment to the S

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    - 19 - RAN BAND BUSINESS PLAN (2003

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    - 21 - Strengths, Weaknesses, Oppor

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    - 23 - • Situational factors. Shi

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    - 25 - The current organisational s

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    - 27 - Recommendation No 12: Contin

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    Bibliography - 29 - • Review the

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    - 31 - INTRODUCTION Background 6. T

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    - 33 - • Stage Four. Relocate the

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    • RAN Band-Melbourne (35); - 35 -

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    - 37 - Reunion and Recreational Lea

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    - 39 - COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS COSTS

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    - 41 - RAN BAND DEPLOYMENT TO WASHI

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    - 43 - BAND DEPLOYMENT TO WASHINGTO

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    - 45 - 11. A draft music program is

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    - 47 - ITINERARY— STAGES TWO AND

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    STAGE ONE 90th Anniversary and ANZA

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    Incidentals Equipment - 51 - Royal

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    - 53 - BRIEF FOR DEPUTY CHIEF OF NA

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    - 55 - 13. In addition to the Execu

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    - 57 - Benefits 31. The total cost

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    Event Manager (Front of House) Mana

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    Scene 1 - 61 - DRAFT NAVY TATTOO (P

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    - 63 - DRAFT NAVY TATTOO (SEQUENCE

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    - 65 - DRAFT TATTOO-STYLED CONCERT

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    RAN BAND - 67 - PROJECT BUDGET (NAV

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    RAN BAND - 69 - PROJECT BUDGET (TAT

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    - 71 - 7. The Navy Strategic Plan 2

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    - 73 - • This option will enable

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    Position Number Rank Billet Descrip

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    - 77 - RAN BAND FUNDED RESERVE COMM

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    - 79 - Royal Australian Navy Band:

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    - 81 - HOD Posn No Rank Description

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    - 83 - LEADERSHIP ESSAY BY THE DIRE

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    - 85 - The one band model created a

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    - 87 - In reviewing the band’s qu

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    - 89 - LEADERSHIP STYLE Core Charac

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    - 91 - Source: J. Katzenbach, Teams

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    - 93 - MUSIC LEADERSHIP ESSAY BY TH

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    - 95 - It has often been said that

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    - 97 - REMEMBRANCE DAY SPEECH BY TH

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    - 99 - And now the torch and poppy

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    - 101 - Today’s Navy Band continu

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    - 103 - TF44 arrived off the Jomard

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    - 105 - RAN BAND NEWS EDITION NUMBE

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    - 107 - Our mission was called “O

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    - 109 - A large transit accommodati

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    - 111 - The text is included in ful

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    - 113 - Sand Storm (Sonya) One nigh

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    - 115 - RAN BAND NEWS EDITION NUMBE

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    - 117 - Singapore was a stop for re

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    - 119 - The Aussie’s again were g

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    - 121 - On the second morning at se

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    - 123 - After two days of sight see

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    - 125 - RAN BAND NEWS EDITION NUMBE

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    - 127 - ANZAC DAY 2004 IN BAGHDAD A

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    - 129 - It was just as well a heart

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    - 131 - We arrived at Anzac Cove at

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    - 133 - RAN BAND NEWS EDITION NUMBE

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    - 135 - There were a couple of spec

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    - 137 - We took part in café party

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    - 139 - The location of the school

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    - 141 - However, our role in the Re

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    - 143 - Everyone is enjoying the mu

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    - 145 - HMAS Anzac detachment of mu

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    - 147 - The highlight of the deploy

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    - 149 - With our combat body armour

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    - 151 - On Monday 5 December 2005 t

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    - 153 - The AFL Grand Final was wat

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    - 155 - In March we embarked 11 mus

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    - 157 - RAN BAND NEWS EDITION NUMBE

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    - 159 - The BIT 2006 debut show, at

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    - 161 - RAN BAND NEWS EDITION NUMBE

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    - 163 - We headed up the back of th

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    - 165 - I remember looking up at th

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    - 167 - RAN BAND NEWS EDITION NUMBE

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    - 169 - The first official function

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    - 171 - Prior to meals the tables a

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    - 173 - The Prison itself is situat

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    - 175 - On 26 August our final memb

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    - 177 - “My job has also taken me

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    - 179 - Two of our people, Lieutena

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    - 181 - Our first concert at Camp V

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  • Page 225 and 226: - 223 - The evening was indeed over
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  • Page 241 and 242: - 239 - HANDS ACROSS THE SEA NICK C
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  • Page 253 and 254: Woodwind Quintet Able Seaman Svetla
  • Page 255 and 256: Disc One Serving Australia With Pri
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