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WHO ARE THE HUNS?

WHO ARE THE HUNS?

158 Premiums for Murder,

158 Premiums for Murder, etc. bullets and in order to make it impossible for our troops to fire, led to the following evidence. The Cavalry regiment of Landwehr, No. .., reported as follows to Headquarters on the 31st October: "That the battalion of Landwehr which was to support the cavalry regiment had to take up a position at Tomaszow on the south bank of the Piliza, on the 29th October, during a rear-guard action. The men then observed that the Russians who were coming up from a northerly direction were driving before them numbers of the inhabitants of Tomaszow, among them women and children, along the main road, just as they had already done in Kipanen and Sendrowen, near Willenberg, in East Prussia. This was to shield themselves against the fire of our troops. As strong Russian divisions sought to protect themselves in this manner, and approached to within four hundred metres behind these living shields, our men were at last forced to shoot, whereby it was not possible to avoid wounding some of these civilians." From the Austrian War Press Bureau, Vienna, March 9th, (Wolff's Agency) it is reported: "A Russian parliamentaire appeared this afternoon before the fortified position north of Radworna, who bore word from the Russian commander that to-morrow forenoon some fifteen hundred Jewish families which had been assembled during the day at Kamiona and Tysmieniczany would be transported across the Russian lines into those of the Austrians and Hungarians. As the Jewish families feared that they would be shot at by the Austrians, the parliamentaire had appeared to give due warning. By means of this unheard-of brutal action, the enemy was enabled to drive thousands of non-combatants whom he had deprived of food and shelter, like a herd of cattle before his lines, so that without danger to himself he might approach the Austrian positions. The carrying-out of this villainous intention remained unaccomplished at the last moment, inasmuch as the end in view was so obvious as to be immediately perceived." This shield formed by the bodies of poor women and innocent children may well be stigmatized as one of the primal blots upon the conduct of war. To the same category belongs the alleged trick of the English of protecting themselves and

Premiums for Murder, etc. 159 their fleet against aerial attack by placing German wounded and prisoners, among them some civilians, upon ships in Portsmouth and other places. According to an Amsterdam communication of the 25th January, 1915, Lieutenant Atherstane- Robbs declared that over twelve hundred (including two hundred wounded) were used in this manner as a protective shield. An exact confirmation of the intention, which naturally would be the very apex of dastardliness, is in my opinion, not likely to be forthcoming, serious as the suspicion may be. VI. Concerning the Recruiting Among German Civil Prisoners in France, in Particular for the Foreign Legion: That mockery of all modern social reform, the French Foreign Legion, is an institution which cries for reform at the conclusion of peace. German civil prisoners who have returned to their country from France, have given abundant testimony to the effect that in those concentration camps in which Germans and Austrians of military age were confined, all sorts of attempts were made both by persuasion and by threats to induce the young men to join the Foreign Legion. It is charged that the miserable food, the wretched housing and the brutal treatment were all devoted toward one end, that is to say, to making conditions in the camps so intolerable to the young prisoners that they would choose service in the Foreign Legion as the lesser of two evils. A number of sworn declarations are now available with respect to this recruiting for the Foreign Legion, from which it appears that these efforts of the French authorities have, unfortunately not been entirely in vain. There is not the slightest doubt that both from the standpoint of international law (Articles 4—7 of the Regulations and Laws of the War on Land) as well as from that of ordinary morals, recruiting such as this, carried on under the pressure of force and persuasion, constitutes a peculiarly base violation of the laws of the nations. It is in fact a greater wrong than the violation of the two analogous articles, 44 and 45 of the laws of land warfare which are designed to protect free populations from the oppression of the enemy, since the con-

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    • Copyright 1915 by Georg Reimer

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    IV A Foreword. most brilliant judic

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    VI A Foreword. to do. And I hold th

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    CONTENTS. PART ONE. Page: Rules and

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    PART ONE. Rules and Regulations of

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 3 in fav

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 5 "Gentl

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 7 cellor

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. •9 its

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 11 We th

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 13 nothi

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 15 that

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 17 Belgi

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 19 Grey

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 21 but o

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 23 Omega

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 25 i "Ne

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 27 the d

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 29 "Thro

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 31 "From

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 33 which

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 35 Imper

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 37 3. Th

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 39 divis

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 41 Evide

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 43 There

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    The Neutrality of Belgium. 45 subst

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    Mobilization and the Morality of Na

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    Violation of Congo Acts. Colonial W

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    Violation of Congo Acts. Colonial W

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    Violation of Congo Acts. Colonial W

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    Violation of Congo Acts. Colonial W

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    The Employment of Barbarous and War

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    The Employment of Barbarous and War

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    Violation of the Neutral Suez Canal

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    Violation of the Neutral Suez Canal

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    Violation of the Neutral Suez Canal

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    Chinese Neutrality and Kiao-Chau. "

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    Chinese Neutrality and Kiao-Chau. 6

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    Chinese Neutrality and Kiao-Chau. 7

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    Chinese Neutrality and Kiao-Chau. 7

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    The Use of Dum-Dum Bullets. 75 empi

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    The Use of Dum-Dum Bullets. 77' aga

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    The Use of Dum-Dum Bullets. 79 to m

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    The Use of Dum-Dum Bullets. 81 inte

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    Treatment of Diplomatic Representat

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    Treatment of Diplomatic Representat

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 87 l

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 89 5

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 91 u

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 93 a

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 95 t

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 97 s

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 99 t

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 101

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 103

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    Violations of Red Cross Rules. 105

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  • Page 181 and 182: Pogroms and Other Russian Atrocitie
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  • Page 191 and 192: Private Property in War. 179 perty,
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  • Page 199 and 200: Plundering and Destruction of Prope
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  • Page 209 and 210: Ruses of War and Official Lies. 197
  • Page 211 and 212: Ruses of War and Official Lies. 199
  • Page 213 and 214: Ruses of War and Official Lies. 201
  • Page 215 and 216: The Destruction of Telegraph Cables
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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    + Add. — Subtract The Triple Ente

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    The Triple Entente's Vendetta of Li

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    CHAPTER XXI. 229 A Few Remarks upon

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    French and Belgian "Atrocity Books.

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    French and Belgian "Atrocity Books.

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    French and Belgian "Atrocity Books.

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    French and Belgian "Atrocity Books.

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    German Refutations and Investigatio

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    German Refutations and Investigatio

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    German Refutations and Investigatio

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    German Refutations and Investigatio

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    Art and Warfare. 247 by the French

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    Art and Warfare. 249 On the 28th of

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    Art and Warfare. 251 pressly forbid

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    Bombardments by Aeroplanes. 253 the

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    Bombardments by Aeroplanes. 255 the

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    Bombardments by Aeroplanes. 257 bee

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    English Business Morals. 259 Contin

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    English Business Morals. 261 means

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    English Business Morals. 263 While

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    Economie War in the English Colonie

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    Economie War in the English Colonie

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    Violations of Neutral States. 269 w

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    Violations of Neutral States. 271 A

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    PART TWO. Questions of Legality in

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    England, Naval Laws and Ourselves.

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    England, Naval Laws and Ourselves.

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    England, Naval Laws and Ourselves.

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    Starvation as a Weapon. 281 take pl

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    Breaches of Sea-Law by England. 283

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    Breaches of Sea-Law by England. 285

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    Breaches of Sea-Law by England. 287

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    Breaches of Sea-Law by England. 289

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    Breaches of Sea-Law by England. 291

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    Breaches of Sea-Law by England. 293

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    Breaches of Sea-Law by England. 295

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    The North Sea as a Zone of War. 297

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    The North Sea as a Zone of War. 299

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    American "Neutrality." 301 logical

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    American "Neutrality." 303 press (f

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    American "Neutrality." 305 of to-da

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    American "Neutrality." 307 •natio

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    American "Neutrality." 309 We are,

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    American "Neutrality." 311 its weak

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    American "Neutrality." 313 IL i. Th

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    American "Neutrality." 315. knows t

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    American "Neutrality." 317 III. In

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    American "Neutrality." 319 Prussian

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    The Americans and Ourselves. 321 pa

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    The Americans and Ourselves. 323 wi

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    The Monroe Doctrine and Neutrality.

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 327 for t

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 329 of Lo

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 331 misus

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 333 right

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 335 proce

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 337 cease

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 339, the

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 341 accre

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 343 of co

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 345 consi

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 347 "Germ

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 349 of in

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 351 IV. T

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 353 or wh

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 355 misun

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    The "Submarine Blockade." 357 VI. I

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    False Colors and Ruses of War. 359

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    False Colors and Ruses of War. 361

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    False Colors and Ruses of War. 363

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    False Colors and Ruses of War. 365

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    CHAPTER XXXI. 367 Aggravation of th

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    The Case of the ' Lusitania." 369 t

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    The Case of the "Lusitania." 371 we

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    The Case of the "Lusitania." 373 "T

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    The Case of the "Lusitania." 375 mi

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    Exchange of German-American Notes.

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    Exchange of German-American Notes.

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    Exchange of German-American Notes.

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    Exchange ôf German-American Notes.

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    Exchange of German-American Notes.

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    Exchange of German-American Notes.

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    Exchange of German-American Notes.

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    Exchange of German-American Notes.

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    Italy's Betrayal of her Allies. 393

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    Italy's Betrayal of her Allies. 395

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    Italy's Betrayal of her Allies. 397

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    CHAPTER XXXII. A Final Political Su

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    A Final Political Survey. 401 arran

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    A Final Political Survey. 403 For t

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    A Final Political Survey. 405 This