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plant genetic resources for food and agriculture - FAO

plant genetic resources for food and agriculture - FAO

THE CONTRIBUTION OF

THE CONTRIBUTION OF PGRFA TO FOOD SECURITY AND SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT FIGURE 8.3 Number of undernourished people in the world, 2003-2005 (millions) Near East and North Africa, 33 Sub-Saharan Africa, 212 Latin America and the Caribbean, 45 Asia and the Pacific (excluding China and India), 189 Source: FAO, 2008, The State of Food Insecurity in the World, Rome do not have access to, or are unable to afford, an adequately diverse diet and have to rely heavily on just a few staple food crops for most of their food. In recognition of this, a number of breeding efforts are underway to improve the nutritional quality of staple crops, for example, by producing rice, maize, cassava and sweet potato with higher levels of beta–carotene (the precursor of Vitamin A), pearl millet and beans with higher levels of available iron and rice, wheat and beans with higher levels of zinc. 24 In addition to the important direct relationship between PGRFA, nutrition and human health, there are various indirect effects. For example, for resource poor populations in countries faced with the problems caused by HIV/AIDS, the consumption of diverse diets represents an important way of boosting human resistance and tolerance. Plants are also an extremely important source of pharmaceutical products and, as for all crops, the current production of medicinal crops as well as their future improvement is dependent on their genetic diversity. In some African and Asian countries, up to 80 percent of the population depends on traditional, mainly herbal, Developed countries, 16 India, 231 China, 123 medicine. In Kenya, for example, a recent World Bank study indicated that 70 percent of the population is not covered by the national healthcare system and depend on traditional forms of medication. 25 Herbal medicines are highly lucrative: annual revenues in Western Europe reached USD 5 billion in 2003-2004, in China sales totalled USD 14 billion in 2005 and revenues of USD 160 million were generated from herbal medicines in Brazil in 2007. 26 8.3.6 Role of underutilized and neglected PGRFA Since the first SoW report was published, many studies have documented the importance of neglected and underutilized species for the food security and income of local communities (see Section 4.9.2). By definition, the area sown to these crops is relatively small worldwide; 27 there are few marketing opportunities and relatively little effort at crop improvement. Nevertheless, country reports from all regions have described the role and uses of different species, ranging from those that are important for dietary diversity or 191

CHAPTER 8 have the potential to make a greater contribution to generating income, to those that are likely to become more important in local farming systems as climate changes. 28 They emphasize the importance of many of these species in the social and cultural fabric of local societies and call for increased efforts to conserve and use them. Many countries have reported efforts made over the past decade to collect, characterize, evaluate and conserve samples of underutilized species in their NPGS 29 as well as efforts to promote and market them. 30 While much has been done in this area, much more still needs to be done, in particular, in developing markets for the products of neglected species. Efforts of institutions such as Crops for the Future (see Section 6.3.3) 31 can make a very valuable contribution to ensuring that neglected and underutilized crops play a greater role in sustainable agriculture and livelihood systems in the future. 8.4 Economic development, poverty and PGRFA The economic health and prosperity of a country depends on a large number of factors of which agricultural productivity and growth is one. The importance of agriculture varies by region, from only 1.9 percent of the population dependent on agriculture in North America to over 50 percent in Africa and Asia. However, taken overall, agricultural production is the main source of income for about half of the world’s population. The choice of crops, varieties, planting materials and associated production methods have a significant influence on productivity and livelihoods. Generally, farmers grow a number of different crops and varieties, each of which provides a set of benefits in the form of income, food and other products. In addition, benefits may arise from the overall portfolio of crops and varieties, including mitigation against the effects of failure of any one crop or variety, spreading production through the year and achieving a greater intensity of land use. Marketed values vary by crop, variety and marketing channel. In many countries the growth of a dynamic food-marketing sector has created high-value po- 192 THE SECOND REPORT ON THE STATE OF THE WORLD’S PGRFA tential market outlets, representing an important means of increasing farm incomes and achieving food security. Several studies have indicated that agricultural productivity growth has had an important effect on poverty reduction 32 and plant breeding has played a predominant role in this. Nonetheless, while this is certainly the case for Asia and Latin America, the relationship is less clear in Sub-Sahara Africa where agricultural yields have generally stagnated, making it more difficult to clearly establish a relationship with poverty reduction (see Figure 8.4). Many small farmers experience difficulties in accessing both input and output markets and several country reports indicated that this is one of the most serious constraints to diversifying crop production. Lack of access to good quality seeds of appropriate varieties can prevent farmers from entering specific markets. Numerous country reports, particularly from Africa, referred to the suboptimal state of seed production and distribution systems, noting widespread problems with insufficient availability of seeds of new and appropriate varieties. Overcoming input and output bottlenecks and inequalities in the value chain is a key strategy for increasing the market value of crops and one that has important implications for the management of PGRFA. While sound crop management (together with land and water management) is critical for success, it is very difficult to place an exact economic value on the underlying genetic resources. Estimating the value of PGRFA by rigorous economic methods summing their direct use, indirect use, option and non-use values underestimates their overall value. 33 This problem hampers efforts to make a case for investing more in PGRFA and is a significant impediment to securing adequate funding. However, some of the most convincing data come from impact studies based on tracing germplasm flows. In one study, 34 for example, it was estimated that conserving 1 000 accessions of rice generates an annual income stream for developing countries that has a direct use value of USD 325 million at a 10 percent discount rate. This calculation also serves to highlight the need for better integration and linkages between conservation, plant breeding and seed delivery for realizing the full potential of PGRFA.

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    The Second Report on THE STATE OF T

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    I hope and trust that the informati

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    Appendix 2 Major germplasm collecti

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    The CGRFA requested that the SoWPGR

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    Chapter 7 - Access to plant genetic

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    Executive summary �his report des

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    documentation and characterization

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    FIGURE 1.1 Global priority genetic

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    14 CHAPTER 1 NEAR EAST effective at

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    CHAPTER 1 comparisons, or use the i

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    98 CHAPTER 4 including rice, maize

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    118 CHAPTER 4 16 Op cit. Endnote 8.

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    MAJOR GERMPLASM COLLECTIONS BY CROP

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    Appendix 4 State of diversity of ma

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    APPENDIX 4 some country reports. 6

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    APPENDIX 4 option for perennial tax

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    APPENDIX 4 Role of crop in sustaina

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    APPENDIX 4 and Myanmar (3 percent).

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    APPENDIX 4 progenitor is the wild s

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    appendiX 4 Ex situ conservation sta

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    APPENDIX 4 Documentation, character

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    APPENDIX 4 in collections, absence

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    APPENDIX 4 FIGURE A4.5 Global yield

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    338 APPENDIX 4 are also conserved.

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    340 APPENDIX 4 WebPDF/Crop percent2

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    342 APPENDIX 4 90 Op cit. Endnote 2

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    344 APPENDIX 4 159 GCDT. 2007. Glob

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    BAAFS Beijing Academy of Agricultur

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    CN Centre Néerlandais (Côte d’I

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    DTRUFC División of Tropical Resear

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    HRIGRU Horticultural Research Inter

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    INIA CARI Centro Regional de Invest

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    IVM Institute of Grape and Wine «M

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    NISM National Information Sharing M

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    REHOVOT Department of Field and Veg

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    SRI Sugar Crop Research Institute,

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    WCMC World Conservation Monitoring

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