Views
5 years ago

chapter 2 - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies

chapter 2 - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies

5.3.4. Communication

5.3.4. Communication Informing Families Consultation and Research Report The following section explores how the diagnosis of the child’s disability was first communicated to parents, as detailed in the cases described by professionals who responded to the questionnaire survey. From Figure 5.18 below we can see that the discussion of diagnosis was most commonly initiated by staff members (in 32.8% of cases), followed by the initiation through concerns of both staff and parents (23.1%). Initiation by parents alone occurred less frequently (5.9%). Don’t Know 7 Concern was identified through routine screening 22 Missing 62 Figure 5.18 – Initiation of disclosure discussion Initiated by parent 14 Initiated by staff member 78 Both the staff and parents had concerns 55 The table below shows the assessment by the professional respondents of the communication skills used during the consultation. Over two thirds of respondents felt that the family was treated with empathy and that the child was referred to respectfully. These results largely reflect the results of the parent questionnaire. However there was a 20% higher estimation by parents that the professional giving the news was direct, while professionals were 15% more confident that the person giving the news understood what it would mean for the family. Less than 10% of professionals felt that the news was not given with hope and positive messages, in contrast with the 48.1% of parents who made this assessment. The ‘Don’t know’ category was added in the professional questionnaire to take account of the fact that many professionals indicate that it is difficult to objectively critique one’s own skills, and since others were not present at the initial disclosure as detailed above. Table 5.50 - Communication of the diagnosis Communication During the consultation did you feel that... n= Yes No Don’t Know Missing The family were treated with empathy 172 68.1% 0.4% 3.8% 66 The child was referred to respectfully 169 66.8% 0.4% 3.8% 69 The news was given with hope, and positive messages The person giving the news had a good 168 52.5% 8.8% 9.2% 70 understanding of disability 167 63.0% 2.5% 4.6% 71 The person giving the news was approachable 170 65.1% 1.3% 5.0% 68 The person giving the news was understanding 169 66.4% – 4.6% 69 The person giving the news was direct 169 64.3% 1.3% 5.5% 69 The person giving the news a good communicator The person giving the news understood what 167 61.3% 1.3% 7.6% 71 it would mean for the family The reactions of the family were acknowledged 169 60.9% 1.3% 8.8% 69 and taken into account 168 65.1% – 5.5% 70 119 Initiated by staff member Both the staff and parents had concerns Concern was identified through routine screening Don’t know Missing Initiated by parent 5. NATIONAL QUESTIONNAIRE SURVEY OF PARENTS AND PROFESSIONALS

Informing Families Consultation and Research Report Comprehension of the diagnosis The results in Table 5.51 below, report that nearly two thirds of professional respondents felt that the parents understood what they had been told during the diagnosis, which is slightly higher than the 56.5% of parent respondents who indicated that they had understood. In two thirds of cases professionals report that a member of the staff team checked to ensure parental comprehension, which contrasts with the 45.1% of parents who felt this had happened. A significant majority of both parents and professionals indicated that parents had an opportunity to ask questions. Table 5.51 - Parental comprehension of the diagnosis Parental comprehension of the diagnosis Did you feel that the parents understood what n= Yes No Don’t Know Missing they had been told about the diagnosis? Did you or another member of the staff team check if 167 62.6% 7.6% n/a 71 the parents had understood what they had been told? 175 62.2% 7.1% 4.2% 63 Did the parents have an opportunity to ask questions? 177 71.0% – 3.4% 61 The results in Table 5.52 below also indicate that the majority of professional respondents felt they themselves had a good understanding of disability and a clear idea of the consequences for the family. Table 5.52 - Professional comprehension of the diagnosis Professional Comprehension of the diagnosis Do you feel that you have a good n= Yes No Missing understanding of disability? Did you feel you had a clear concept of the 174 68.1% 5.0% 64 consequences of the diagnosis for the family? 176 66.8% 7.1% 62 5.3.5. Provision of Information and Support As has been seen from the focus groups and the results of the parent questionnaire, communicating the news to a family that their child has a disability can be seen as a process rather than a one off event. In order to assess the quality and level of information provided to families in the following section, the professional questionnaire asked first respondents if this was the first time that the parents in the cases described had received information that their child has/may have a disability, and the results are tabulated below. Table 5.53 - First information received by parents of possible disability Disclosure of Diagnosis Was this the first time that the parents had received n= Yes No Don’t Know Missing information that their child has/may have a disability? 179 37.4% 31.5% 6.3% 59 120

Best Practice Guidelines - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
here - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
presentation - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
here - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
here - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
Next Steps Project - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
Open hearts - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
friendships and taboos - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
Annual Report 2011 - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
Annual Report 2008 - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
Annual Report 2005 - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
Questions re final document - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
Toward Having a Good Life - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
Achieve More 2 - National Council for Voluntary Organisations
annual report 2006 annual report 2006 - National Federation of ...
Fish friers Review - Mar / Apr 2012 - Issue 2 - National Federation of ...
here - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
Programme - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
Programme - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
here - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
here - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
Information document - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
People Connecting - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
plain english Cover2 - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
co-researcher handbook - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
Reading list - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
Community Participation - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
NEXT STEPS PROJECT - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
Reading list - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies
Easy to read programme - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies