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chapter 2 - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies

chapter 2 - National Federation of Voluntary Bodies

5.3.7. Information

5.3.7. Information Sharing and Liaison Informing Families Consultation and Research Report Given the importance of the team approach when disclosing the news of a child’s disability, as indicated in the focus group findings, the following questions were added to the professional questionnaire to explore information sharing and liaison between professionals involved in the communicating with the family. In two thirds of cases (66%) the respondent or another staff member recorded details of the consultation with the family.These were recorded in a variety of formats, the most common being file notes (15.0%) and on the child’s chart (9.7%). The respondents were then asked whether written details were sent to the family’s G.P., Public Health Nurse and/or the family. While the GP was sent details of the child’s diagnosis in almost half of the cases, it was less common for the Public Health Nurse to receive this information. This may be attributable to the Public Health Nurse being more involved with those children who are diagnosed before or shortly after birth. Written confirmation of the diagnosis was sent to families in less than one third of cases. Table 5.65 - Written information-sharing between professionals Information Sharing n= Yes No Don’t know Missing Were written details of the diagnosis sent to the… Family’s G.P. 179 47.1% 13.9% 14.3% 59 Public Health Nurse 178 29.8% 31.9% 13.0% 60 Family 182 27.7% 34.0% 14.7% 56 It is important to note that five respondents to this question indicated that they were the family’s G.P. and one noted that they were a Public Health Nurse. Other disciplines involved The diagnosis of a disability can sometimes be given to parents in stages or evolve over time. For this reason the professional respondents were asked to indicate if they were aware of other professionals involved in telling the parents about the child’s disability on previous occasions and on occasions after the consultation being described through the questionnaire. In almost a third of cases (31.1%) the respondents were aware of other professionals involved in telling the news on occasions prior to the consultation. Over a third of professional respondents (35.3%) indicated that they were aware of professionals involved in disclosing aspects of the news on occasions after the consultation being described. Table 5.66 below shows that where respondents were aware of other professionals there were over 10% of cases where liaison had not taken place. Table 5.66 - Liaison between professionals n= Yes No Not Aware of other Not Missing Professionals being involved applicable If you were aware of other professionals involved in telling the parents, did liaison take place between the parties to ensure consistent communication? 129 30.3% 11.3% 5.0% 7.6% 109 125 5. NATIONAL QUESTIONNAIRE SURVEY OF PARENTS AND PROFESSIONALS

Informing Families Consultation and Research Report Professional respondents listed the disciplines involved on previous occasions and on occasions subsequent to the consultation described in the questionnaire. They also listed the relevant service types. These findings are presented in Tables 5.67 to 5.70 below. The value of this information is that it shows the patterns of professional disciplines that may be involved at the early stages and at later stages of diagnoses. Table 5.67 - Disciplines involved on previous occasions Other Disciplines Involved n= Percentage Area Medical Officer 3 4.0% Audiologist 5 6.8% Cardiologist 2 2.7% Child & Adolescent Mental Health Services 1 1.4% Community Nurse 1 1.4% Consultant 2 2.7% Consultant ENT 3 4.0% Consultant Gastroenterologist 1 1.4% Dermatologist 1 1.4% Dietitian 1 1.4% GP 6 8.1% Genetic Specialist 1 1.4% Midwife 4 5.4% Neonatologist 1 1.4% Neurologist 5 6.8% Neurosurgeon 1 1.4% Nurse 2 2.7% Obstetrician/Gynaecologist 8 10.8% Occupational Therapist 6 8.1% Paediatric Link Worker 1 1.4% Paediatric Nurse 2 2.7% Paediatrician 36 48.6% Physiotherapist 7 9.5% Psychiatrist 6 8.1% Psychologist 10 13.5% Public Health Nurse 6 8.1% School Principal 1 0.4% Social Worker 4 5.4% Specialist Nurse 1 0.4% Speech and Language Therapist 6 8.1% Trainee Doctor 4 5.4% Trainee Paediatrician 1 0.4% Ultrasonographer 1 0.4% 126

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