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726-9600 EGG DONATION EARN $5000 - Daily 49er

726-9600 EGG DONATION EARN $5000 - Daily 49er

2 Tuesday, December 8,

2 Tuesday, December 8, 2009 The Daily 49er- CSULB 1/4 page 3 col. x 10.5” (6“ x 10.5”) EPA will regulate greenhouse gases WASHINGTON (MCT) — The Environmental Protection Agency said Monday that global warming pollution endangered the health and welfare of Americans and must be reduced, a move that seemed timed to signal that the U.S. is serious about joining an international bid to reduce the risks of damaging climate change. Monday’s finding means that the EPA will proceed with preparations to regulate large producers of greenhouse gas emissions. Those rules could take effect if Congress doesn’t pass legislation. Nonetheless, it probably would be years before new EPA rules took effect for existing coal-fired power plants, the main source of heat-trapping gases. The Obama administration prefers to have Congress do that work through a climate and energy law. The EPA’s action follows a 2007 Supreme Court decision that ordered a reluctant Bush administration to determine whether greenhouse gases endanger America’s health and welfare. The court ruled that if the EPA found that the pollution was dangerous, it was required under the Clean Air Act to tackle the problem. Monday’s announcement was the agency’s final decision on this “endangerment finding.” The decision came as 15,000 people from 192 countries gathered in Copenhagen for the first day of talks aimed at reaching a climate agreement. A major part of the agreement is what countries will pledge to do to reduce emissions. U.S. negotiators plan to point to efforts of all parts of the government, including the EPA, Congress and the Energy Department, as evidence that the U.S. will reduce its share of the heat-trapping gases that accumulate in the atmosphere. Some opponents of mandatory emissions reductions said the EPA shouldn’t have made the announcement until a controversy over leaked e-mails by a group of climate scientists is cleared up. Some excerpts have raised questions about whether scien- tists were trying to manipulate data or squelch opposing views. Rep. Darrell Issa of California, the most senior Republican on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, said in a televised interview Monday that the controversy showed “science basically faked in order to get an outcome those individuals wanted.” Issa wrote to EPA chief Lisa Jackson last week saying the EPA should investigate the disclosure of the emails from scientists working through the Climatic Research Unit of the University of East Anglia in England. He argued that the agency shouldn’t make a decision on greenhouse gases until it can “demonstrate that the science ... has not been compromised.” Issa wrote that the e-mails raise questions about the accuracy of the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report. That report found that warming was “unequivocal” and primarily the result of human activities, mostly from the burning of fossil fuels. The Competitive Enterprise Institute said it would sue to get the endangerment finding overturned on the grounds that the EPA ignored issues raised in what it calls Climategate. The institute is a policy group that advocates small government and runs a blog that argues that climate change isn’t a serious problem. Jackson said the large amount of scientific work on climate change over the last three decades was “unassailable” and hundreds of scientists have reviewed the findings that make up this work. Scientists have found an increase of heat-trapping gases in the atmosphere that’s upsetting the natural balance and changing the climate, Jackson said. How quickly future changes will occur isn’t known, “but the overwhelming amount of scientific studies shows the threat is real, as does the evidence before our eyes.” -Renee Schoof, McClatchy Newspapers Need a Job? Apartment? Room for rent? Search 49er classifieds on the Web! Visit Daily49er.com

World in Brief newsd49er@gmail.com www.daily49er.com Tuesday, December 8, 2009 Iranian protestors met with gas Memories CAIRO (MCT) — Iranian authorities fought students with tear gas and batons Monday in violent clashes on university campuses, the biggest anti-government demonstrations in months, according to Iranian news accounts and opposition Web sites. Despite extraordinary measures to prevent news coverage of the events — including banning foreign journalists, locking down campuses and slowing Internet and cell-phone service — eyewitness accounts and Temp hires may signal turnaround WASHINGTON (MCT) — Last January, Rita Ruggles was on the verge of closing her temporary staffing agency in South Beloit, Ill. She had only 25 workers placed with area companies, her billings had tumbled, and she was forced to lay off all four of her office staffers. “I was running the office by myself,” said Ruggles, the president of Trinity Labor Services. “I was really thinking that we would be closing our doors.” Today, however, in the heart of northern Illinois’ hard-hit manufacturing region, Ruggles is experiencing a renaissance of sorts. She’s finding jobs for recycling workers, industrial welders and machine tool operators with increasing frequency. Business is back to pre-recession levels, nearly 100 of her temps are working and her office is fully staffed again. Ruggles’ good fortune is part of a national turnaround in the temporary-help service sector, which has added 117,000 jobs since July, including 52,400 in November, according to new government figures released Friday. That’s not exactly a hiring boom. After losing an average of 44,000 temporary help jobs each month from January 2008 through July 2009, however, the recent surge reflects an increased demand for labor, the kind that often precedes an expansion of the permanent work force. WALNUT CREEK, Calif. (MCT) — On Black Friday, Michele Pred joined the throngs at the Emeryville, Calif., IKEA, but she wasn’t exactly shopping. Instead, the Berkeley artist slipped into the wallart section and covertly placed copies of signed prints she had designed into the racks. By the time the store closed Saturday, all 10 prints had been picked up ei- amateur videos flooded the Web from early morning. Official news agencies, which initially didn’t mention the protests, were forced to acknowledging the unrest by late afternoon, when most major international TV news channels were broadcasting studentshot footage. The footage showed protestors burning posters of the Iranian leadership, waving Iranian tricolor flags without the emblem of the Islamic Republic and “Employers will hire temporary-help workers to sort of test the waters of a recovery before they make a commitment to fulltime workers. And we are clearly starting to see that now,” said Heidi Shierholz, an economist at the Economic Policy Institute, a liberal policy-research organization. After the 1990 recession, the broader labor market added jobs about nine months after the temporary-help services sector began edging upward, Shierholz said. It took about 19 months after the 2000 recession, she said. “Based on recent past experience from this indicator, we can expect to start adding jobs in the larger labor market at the end of next summer,” Shierholz estimated. Nigel Gault, the chief U.S. economist with IHS Global Insight, said the lag time between rising temporary hires and increased permanent hires would be shorter this time, however, because jobs and workers’ hours have been cut much more severely than they were in 1990 or 2000. As a result, employers will realize that higher productivity can’t be sustained without new hires. “The existing work force is being worked much harder and perhaps being worked beyond what will be sustain- Michelle Pred uses her iPhone to show a photo of the original art print that she “shopdropped” at the IKEA in Emeryville, California, as seen in her Berkeley, California studio, Nov. 30. (D. Ross Cameron/Contra Costa Times/MCT) able in the long run,” Gault said, adding that employers “will find that they can’t keep stretching the workers that are left, and therefore need to add more people to give them help.” The rise in temporary jobs also has meant more business for Bibby Financial Services Inc., an international accounts receivable-financing firm that works with many staffing agencies. Staffing firms often use accounts-receivable financing because they don’t have the collateral to get money from traditional banks, said Bob Jaskiewicz, an executive vice president in Bibby’s Chicago office. “A bank wants to see real estate, machinery and equipment or inventory. ther by IKEA shoppers or a few happy fans of her work who learned about the opportunity on Pred’s Facebook page. Pred, 44, was “shopdropping,” a practice that has a storied history with artists in the Bay Area and beyond. Sort of the opposite of shoplifting, shopdropping involves leaving goods in unsuspecting stores to sell to unsuspecting customers to make a statement in the name of art. In Pred’s case, the statement is “You Are What You Buy,” which also happens to be the title of the prints she shopdropped, a commentary on excessive consumerism on a day where excessive consumerism practically is celebrated. It’s not a thematic stretch for Pred, a graduate of California College of the Arts in Oakland, whose large body of work explores themes with “cultural/ political concepts,” she says, such as consumerism and fear. Pred gained national attention in 2002 when she made art out of knives and nail-cutters snagged by security at local airports. In 2006 she attempted to demystify the cannabis plant by growing one in a San Francisco gallery. Prints of an American flag that Pred fashioned from airport-confiscated pocket knives sell for $500. If you fancied one of the 10 pieces she dropped enough to buy one at IKEA, for a mere $8 you got a limited-edition, hand-signed print that sells in galleries for $200. “One part of this piece was that I wanted to make art accessible and affordable,” she says, explaining that she copied the sales bar code of another $8 chanting “Death to the dictator” as they marched at Tehran University. Pro-government students held a smaller counterprotest on the campus, waving pictures of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and chanting “Death to the hypocrites,” news agencies reported. Skirmishes broke out between the camps, according to the reports. -Hannah Allam, McClatchy Newspapers Temporary staffing firms don’t have that,” he said. “They have an office, a phone and employees.” In September, as the industry began to turn around, Bibby loaned $2.5 million to a Texas staffing company that provides geoscientists, engineers, designers and information technology specialists for the energy industry. Another temporary-staffing company, which saw its monthly billings fall from nearly $9 million to less than $4 million during the recession, likewise has rebounded, with monthly billings at more than $13 million, Jaskiewicz said. -Tony Pugh, McClatchy Newspapers Artist sells prints at IKEA without permission print and placed it on her print so employees at the checkout counter were none the wiser. “For $8, you have a signed, limited-edition print.” IKEA, by the way, unknowingly pocketed the money on the sale. Mona Liss, IKEA’s U.S. spokeswoman, said in a statement that “IKEA only sells IKEA products through our global distribution process. IKEA has not endorsed the sale of this product. Nor are we aware of this artist and her ‘staged’ presence.” Pred, a teacher at California College of the Arts, received no compensation. She says that as a conceptual artist, she valued the opportunity to make a statement about society over the chance to make money. The shopdrop itself, in fact, is part of the piece. However, the story is more layered and complicated than just a pretty picture being secretly sold at a chain store. The print itself is a yellow-and-blue 2-D bar code image that, when scanned by cutting-edge technology, reads “You Are What You Buy.” Popular in Japan and Europe, 2-D bar codes are physical hyperlinks that can be read by special programs such as Upcode on Internet-connected cell phones like iPhones. Users take a picture of the blocky bar code on, say, a magazine page and their cell phone will pull up a Web site that gives the user more information. The December issue of Esquire magazine has a 2-D bar code on the box that actor Robert Downey Jr. is sitting on. It takes you to online interactive videos and links. In Pred’s case, taking a picture of her IKEAdropped work sends users to www.youarewhatyoubuy.us, a Web page with that same simple statement centered on the screen. The image is yellow and blue because Pred is of Swedish heritage and grew up in an IKEA-furnished home near one of the stores. So buyer beware, and perhaps be happy: That $8 poster you took home last week could have more of a story to it than you imagined. -Laura Casey, Contra Costa Times 3 of Pearl Harbor still vivid SEATTLE (MCT) — He’s 91 and the story he’s telling took place 68 years ago, but Don Raleigh doesn’t hesitate or search for words as he recounts the events of Dec. 7, 1941. He remembers. Raleigh, a retired U.S. Navy lieutenant commander who lives in Edmonds, Wash., was on board the USS Maryland in Pearl Harbor the morning the Japanese attacked. At about five minutes to 8, he had just relieved the officer on watch when he looked up and saw a flight of single-engine planes approaching from the south. He didn’t think anything of it, he said, until “little black things” started dropping out of them and exploded on Ford Island. “There was no warning whatsoever,” he remembered. “Beautiful Sunday morning and all hell breaks loose.” Raleigh remembers some frustrating moments as the attack began: He had to saw through padlocks on the boxes of ammunition, and the anti-aircraft gun didn’t fire at first. Still, he said, there was no panic on the Maryland that he saw. “I’ve been asked many times, ‘Were you scared?’ And the answer is, there wasn’t time to be scared,” he said. “You’re so busy doing the things you were trained to do that being afraid or being scared never enters into your consciousness. You just do your job.” Raleigh and the other seamen would have been justified in being afraid. Bombs were exploding on all sides of them, and several nearby ships caught fire. “To see these wonderful ships sunk, and guys killed, floating around in the water, all these fires, and having your own ship damaged ... ,” Raleigh said. “It’s a blow to your consciousness. We didn’t think we were that vulnerable.” The crew stayed at general quarters all day, Raleigh said, expecting another attack. The morning’s attack lasted about an hour and a half and came in two waves: first the high-level bombers and torpedoes, and then the dive bombers. The Maryland was struck by two bombs and lost three men but didn’t sink. After Pearl Harbor, Raleigh went on to the Pacific campaign. But his memory of those days covers more than just the war. When he was stationed in San Francisco, the woman who would later become his wife was living in the East Bay. The pair dated quite a bit, Raleigh said, and then he went off to sea for 18 months. “She wrote every day. I had this packet of pink letters. I got a little ribbing out of that onboard ship,” he said. They were married in 1944, before Raleigh went back for a final stint in the South Pacific. When he returned, he enrolled in the new University of Washington School of Dentistry, and was No. 2 in the first graduating class in 1950. He spent the next 42 years practicing in downtown Seattle. Despite the decades separating him from Pearl Harbor, the lessons learned that day are still fresh in Raleigh’s mind. “Be prepared! Be a Boy Scout!” he said. “I like Teddy Roosevelt — ‘Speak softly and carry a big stick.’” -Molly Rosbach, The Seattle Times