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On campus - ASU News - Arizona State University

On campus - ASU News - Arizona State University

4 O c t O b e r 2, 2009

4 O c t O b e r 2, 2009 @ ASU Events are free, unless otherwise noted. Items in the “Exhibitions” section run at exhibit opening and on the first of each month only. Building abbreviations are listed according to the official ASU phone directory. Send information to Judith Smith at jps@asu.edu or fax (480) 965-2159. For information about ASU events, visit the Web at http:// events.asu.edu. Lectures n friday, oct. 2 “The Learning Curve for Southern African Community- Based Wildlife Management: CAMPFIRE in Zimbabwe and Conservancies in Namibia,” 2-3 p.m., Life Sciences Center (LS) E-104. Speaker: Peter Balint, associate professor, Department of Public and International Affairs, george mason University, with a joint appointment in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy. Sponsored by School of Life Sciences. Information: barb.hoffman@asu.edu. “Towards ‘True’ Lab on Chip,” 3:30 p.m., Bateman Physical Sciences Center (PS) h-150. Speaker: Christopher Backhouse, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton. Sponsored by Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Information: (480) 965-2093. n monday, oct. 5 John and Maxine Marshall Distinguished Lecture, 7 p.m., memorial Union (mU) Ventana Room (241). Speaker: heather Rae, a Cherokee film producer and director who was nominated for an oscar for her film “frozen River.” Sponsored by the College of Liberal arts and Sciences. Information: (480) 965-7765. n Tuesday, oct. 6 “Premotor cortex, action control, and language” 12:05 p.m., Psychology Building, room 161 Speaker: Arthur glenberg. “Revival and New Directions?: Jewish Arts in German- Speaking Countries,” 7 p.m., Congregation Beth Israel, 10460 N 56th St., Scottsdale. Sponsored by Jewish Studies. Information: (480) 727-6906 or http://jewishstudies.asu.edu. n Wednesday, oct. 7 “Ligand-receptor Dynamics: From Potential Reconstruction to Viral Entry,” 4-5 p.m., Biodesign Institute room B105. Speaker: Tom Chou, University of California, Los Angeles. Sponsored by Center for Biological Physics. Information: (480) 965-4073. “Exploring the Life Cycle of the Interstellar Medium with Terahertz Spectroscopy,” 4:10-5 p.m., PS f-173. Speaker: Chris groppi, SESE/ASU. Sponsored by the School of Earth and Space Exploration. Refreshments served at 3:45 p.m., in PS f-lobby. Information: (480) 965-5081. “Land-Atmosphere Interactions in the Southwest: It’s a two-way street,” 4:40-5:30 p.m., gIoS 481. Speaker: Dr. francina Dominguez, hydroclimatologist, Dept. of hydrology and Water Resources, Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Arizona. The Ecosystem Engineering seminar series is jointly sponsored by the ASU Center for Environmental fluid Dynamics and the global Institute of Sustainability. Information: http://efd.asu.edu/events/seminars/ecosystem or e-mail Jennifer.mcCulley@asu.edu. n Thursday, oct. 8 Philosophical & Spiritual Questions Concerning Death & Dying, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., La Sala, West campus. Real Life Ethics Seminar on Ethical and Spiritual Dilemmas in the Hospice End-of-Life-Care, 5-8:30 p.m., La Sala, West campus. Dinner banquet. Please RSVP at http://ethicsseminar.asu.edu/ or e-mail pces@asu.edu. By Marshall Terrill Holocaust survivor Bernard Scheer will recount the true stories of great suffering, remarkable determination and acts of heroism at a lecture this week on the Downtown Phoenix campus. Scheer will present, “Personal Reflections on Surviving the Holocaust and Life After” at 7 p.m., Oct. 8, at the College of Nursing and Health Innovation Building Two, 550 N. 3rd St., Innovation Auditorium, Phoenix. The presentation is part of ASU’s School of Letters and Sciences Fall 2009 Humanities Lecture Series. The lecture series is free and open to the public. “Although the horrors of the Holocaust occurred over 65 years ago, the awful effects are still Simon Ortiz and Labriola Center Lecture on Indigenous Land, Culture, and Community, 7 p.m. heard museum Steele Auditorium, 2301 N. Central Ave., Phoenix. Speaker: acclaimed novelist Leslie marmon Silko, author of such books as “Ceremony” and “Storyteller.” Reception and booksigning follows at 8 p.m. Information: http://english.clas.asu. edu/indigenous. n friday, oct. 9 Friday Conversations @11, 11 a.m., ASU Art museum. Jillian mcDonald speaks on “Alone Together in the Dark”; John Spiak speaks on “The Start.” Information: (480) 965-2787. Biotic nativeness: a historical look at a “simply negative” idea, 2 p.m., LS E–Wing, room 104. Speaker: matthew Chew, assistant research professor, ASU Center for Biology & Society, School of Life Sciences. Information: barb.hoffman@ asu.edu “Fluorescent Probe Molecules Targeting Zinc In Biological Systems With Both High Sensitivity and Large Dynamic Ranges,” 3:30 p.m., PS h-150. Speaker: Lei Zhu, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, florida State University. Sponsored by Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Information: 480) 965-2093. n Tuesday, oct. 13 Karsten Short-Talks Luncheon, 1-2:30 p.m., Karsten golf Course Clubhouse Trophy Den. Lunch is ordered individually from the menu, and usually costs approximately $15, for an entrée, beverage, tax and tip. (Please bring cash to pay for your lunch, change will be made available.) Please contact the Emeritus College offices to make a reservation. Spouses, partners and friends of the College are cordially invited. Information: (480) 965-0002. Feldt/Barbanell Women of the World Lecture, time TBA, memorial Union (mU) Arizona Room (221), Tempe campus. The series brings to ASU prominent individuals to address issues of a global nature and their effects on women. Sponsored by College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Information: http://wgs.asu.edu/wow. n Wednesday, oct. 14 “Experimental Research on Cultural Transmission,” time and location TBA. Speaker: Peter Richerson, Department of Environmental Science & Policy, University of California, Davis. Part of the origins of human Uniqueness speaker series. Sponsored by ASU’s School of human Evolution and Social Change, the Center for Social Dynamics and Complexity and the Institute of human origins. Tempe campus. Information: (480) 965-6213. “Noise-optimized Speciation in an Evolutionary Model,” 4-5 p.m., Biodesign Institute room B105. Speaker: Sonya Bahar, University of missouri at St. Louis. Sponsored by Center for Biological Physics. Information: (480) 965-4073. “Volcanic Ash in Antarctic Ice Sheets and Ice Cores: Chronology and Correlations,” 4:10-5 p.m., PS f-173. Speaker: Nelia Dunbar, New mexico Institute of mining and Technology. Sponsored by the School of Earth and Space Exploration. Refreshments served at 3:45 p.m. in PS f-lobby. Information: (480) 965-5081. “Urban Vulnerability to Climate Change,” 4:40-5:30 p.m., gIoS 481. Speaker: Dr. Sharon harlan, Assoc. Professor, Sociology, School of human Evolution and Social Change. The Ecosystem Engineering seminar series is jointly sponsored by the ASU Center for Environmental fluid Dynamics and the global Institute of Sustainability. Information: http://efd.asu. edu/events/seminars/ecosystem or email Jennifer.mcCulley@ asu.edu. n Thursday, oct. 15 “Religion, Conflict and Politics in the Middle East,” 4:30 p.m., Evelyn Smith music Theatre. Speaker: Rami Khouri, editor-at-large, Beirut Daily Star. Khouri is a Palestinian-Jordanian and U.S. citizen whose family resides in Beirut, Amman, and Nazareth. he is also director of the Issam fares Institute of Public Policy and International Affairs at the American University of Beirut. Sponsored by Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict. Information: (480) 727-6736 or csrc.asu.edu. n friday, oct. 16 “Nowhere to Hide: Three Artists in the Desert,” 11 a.m., with us,” says Mirna Lattouf, a senior lecturer with the School of Letters and Sciences and the coordinator of the lecture series. “Passing on these personal histories is an opportunity for future generations to recognize the danger of apathy.” Scheer was living an idyllic family life in Podhace, Poland, when Adolph Hitler’s Nazi soldiers invaded his native country in April of 1941. Scheer recalls executions in the streets, destroyed synagogues and cemeteries, and rationed food and water for all local residents. Scheer’s family was later shipped to Auschwitz, the most infamous and brutal concentration camp of the Holocaust era. Twelve of Scheer’s family members were eventually killed at the hands of the Nazis, including his parents and brother. Scheer escaped and hid in a nearby forest, where he spent the next several years of his life until he was liberated by the American Army in May of 1945. He immigrated to New York City two years later and subsequently met Lillian, his wife of 50 years. They had two children. “I try hard not to think about those days which were my life so many years ago,” Scheer says. “My survival is tempered with feelings of guilt, which is difficult to overcome. It is hard to accept one has survived, when one’s family and friends are dead. There is so much to remember and so much to tell.” Approximately six million European Jews were ASU Art museum, Speaker: Artist Julie Anand. Information: (480) 965-2787. “A Lifetime of Hard Labor: Mechanisms, Capacity and Aging of Honey Bee Flight,” 2-3 p.m., LS E-104. Speaker: Stephen P. Roberts, School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Sponsored by School of Life Sciences. Information: barb.hoffman@asu.edu. “Deciphering and Modulating Cellular Signaling with Combinatorial Biology,” 3:30 p.m., PS h-150. Speaker: Sachdev Sidhu, Institute for Cancer Research, University of Toronto. Sponsored by Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Information: 480) 965-2093. miscellaneous n friday, oct. 2 Resume Writing I: Identifying and Building Your Professional Skills, 3-4 p.m., Student Services Building (SSV) room 329. Sponsored by ASU Career Services. Information: (480) 965-2350. n Saturday, oct. 3 First Saturdays for Families, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., ASU Art museum. Art projects for children ages 4 to 12. Kids get to keep their artwork! Information: (480) 965-2787 or www.ASUArtmuseum.wordpress.com. n Tuesday, oct. 6 University Club Colloquium, noon-1:30 p.m., University Club. Speaker: Sandra Day o’Connor, former Supreme Court Justice, members only, plus one guest. Chef’s choice buffet, $15. R.S.V.P.: (480) 965-0701. Reading by Austrian-Jewish author Doron Rabinovici, 2-3:30 p.m., Institute for humanities Research Conference Room, Social Sciences (SS) room 109. Rabinovici will read, in german, from his latest novel “ohnehin,” a collection of short stories, and an unpublished manuscript. Discussion will follow in English about his work. Rabinovici became a spokesman for the anti-racist protest movement in Austria in 1999 as a government presence of the extreme-right fPÖ party emerged. Sponsored by the School of International Letters and Cultures and the Center for Jewish Studies. Information: (480) 965-8245 or dgilfil@asu.edu. n Wednesday, oct. 7 Staff Appreciation BBQ, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., old main Lawn, Tempe campus. Bring reservation confirmation page to participate in prize drawing. Information: http://usc.asu.edu. n Thursday, oct. 8 STAR in the Employment Interview, 4:30-5:30 p.m., SSV room 329. Sponsored by ASU Career Services. Information: (480) 965-2350. n friday, oct. 9 Ollie’s Storybook Adventures, 10 a.m., Deer Valley Rock Art Center, 3711 W. Deer Valley Road, Phoenix. Children ages 3 to 6 and their parents are invited. Today’s theme is “Introduction to the Sonoran Desert.” Information and reservations: (623) 582-8007. n Tuesday, oct. 13 “Beyond Your Major: Understanding Personality and Career Choices,” 1:30-4 p.m., SSV room 329. Recommended for juniors and seniors and includes the myers-Briggs Type Indicator. Sponsored by ASU Career Services. Information: (480) 965-2350. n Wednesday, oct. 14 Distinguished Visiting Writers Series guests discuss their craft, noon-1 p.m. (Schechter) and 1:30-2:30 p.m. (hahn), Piper Writers house. Sponsored by the Piper Center for Creative Writing. Information: (480) 965-6018 or www.asu.edu/ piper. Resume Writing I: Identifying and Building Your Professional Skills, 2:30-3:30 p.m., SSV room 329. Sponsored by ASU Career Services. Information: (480) 965-2350. Holocaust survivor to speak at Downtown Phoenix campus killed during World War II under the state-sponsored extermination by Nazi Germany. Some scholars maintain that the definition of the Holocaust also should include the Nazi murders of ethnic Poles, Romanians, Soviet civilians, Soviet prisoners of war, people with disabilities, homosexuals, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and other political and religious opponents. With this expanded definition, the total number of Holocaust victims is estimated between 11 and 17 million people. For more information, visit the Web site http:// sls.asu.edu/news.html or call (602) 496-0638. Terrill, with the Office of Public Affairs, can be reached at (602) 496-1005 or marshall.terrill@asu.edu.

O c t O b e r 2, 2009 Developing Your Professional Image: Business Etiquette, 4-5 p.m., SSV room 329. Sponsored by ASU Career Services. Information: (480) 965-2350. Reading and book-signing, 7:30 p.m., Recital hall. featuring poet Kimiko hahn and author harold Schechter. Sponsored by the Piper Center for Creative Writing. Information: (480) 965-6018 or www.asu.edu/piper. n Thursday, oct. 15 Resume Writing II: Selling Your Professional Skills, 1:30-2:30 p.m., SSV room 329. Sponsored by ASU Career Services. Information: (480) 965-2350. “Locating Funding,” 3-4:45 p.m., Academic Center (CNTR) room 152, Polytechnic campus. Sponsored by office of Research and Sponsored Projects Administration. Information and registration: http://researchadmin.asu.edu/node/3954. n friday, oct. 16 STAR in the Employment Interview, noon-1 p.m., SSV room 329. Sponsored by ASU Career Services. Information: (480) 965-2350. Science Café, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Arizona Science Center, 600 E. Washington St., Phoenix. An informal discussion of timely issues of science and society sponsored by Center for Nanotechnology in Society. Information: http://cns.asu.edu/. Events and Performances *Indicates tickets are available at Herberger College of Fine Arts Box Office, Nelson Fine Arts Center, (480) 965-6447. **Indicates tickets are available at ASU Gammage, Mill Avenue and Apache Boulevard, (480) 965-3434; ASU Kerr Cultural Center, 6110 N. Scottsdale Road, Scottsdale, (480) 596-2660. n friday, oct. 2 “Will Eno’s Tragedy,” 7:30 p.m., Lyceum Theatre. A satirical look at the power of the media in which the setting sun incites panic in a seasoned team of television news reporters. Continues at 7:30 p.m., oct. 3, 8-10, 15-17; 2 p.m., oct. 11, 18.* “Turn of the Screw,” 7:30 p.m., Evelyn Smith music Theatre. Lyric opera Theatre presents this English opera based on a ghost story. Continues at 7:30 p.m., oct. 3, 9-10.* n Sunday, oct. 4 Elizabeth Buck, associate professor of flute, 2:30 p.m., Katzin Concert hall.* n monday, oct. 5 Sinfonietta, 7:30 p.m., ASU gammage. n Wednesday, oct. 7 Coffee at Kerr, 10:30 a.m., ASU Kerr Culture Center, Scottsdale. Arizona opera presents ”Intro to Cosi fan tutte.” Coffee provided by Alasta Catering. free but R.S.V.P. required: (480) 596-2660. Bring a can of food or sealed personal item to be donated to Vista del Camino food Bank. Charles Lewis & Friends, 7:30 p.m., ASU Kerr Cultural Center, Scottsdale.** n Thursday, oct. 8 Guitarist Michael Lorimer, 7:30 p.m., Katzin Concert hall. Lorimer, a protégé of Andrés Segovia, performs music of many periods and styles.* EMPLOYMENT The following positions are available as of Oct. 2 and are subject to change. All positions will be advertised in Insight only once. The staff requisition or job order number for each position is indicated by the (#) sign. ASU is an equal opportunity-affirmative action employer. ASU poSitionS A complete job announcement for classified, administrative and service professional positions at the Downtown Phoenix, Polytechnic, Tempe and West campuses is available on the Human Resources Web page at www.asu.edu/asujobs, or the Telecommunication Devise for the Deaf at (480) 965-3002. For complete position descriptions and application requirements for academic positions, contact the appropriate department listed below. Faculty, academic professional and graduate assistant positions are also listed on the Human Resources Web sites and details must be obtained from the hiring department. Application deadlines are listed. Dates listed are application deadlines, and application material is due by 11:59 p.m. on that date. Positions are 100 percent, full-time employment (FTE) unless otherwise noted. Code below is: (O) – position is open to the public. StAff poSitionS tempe cAmpUS Executive and Management Assistant Director-Fiscal Accountability and External Funds Management #23186 (O) – W. P. Carey School of Business-Development and External Affairs (Oct. 9). Director, International Students and Scholars Office #23077 (O) – Executive VP and Provost of the University (Oct. 9; if not filled, then every week thereafter until search is closed). Professional Alumni Relations-Manager #23185 (O) – W.P. Carey School of Business/Development and External Affairs (Oct. 12). Communications Specialist #23127 (O) – College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (Oct. 9). Coordinator #23174 (O) – College of Liberal Arts and Sciences-Justice and Social Inquiry, a unity within the School of Social Transformation (Oct. 7). Indie filmmaker brings her perspective to ASU By Danielle Kuffler Heather Rae, an independent film producer and director recently named by Variety as one of the industry’s “10 producers to watch,” promotes a wide view of American culture through films concerned with racial identity, contemporary social concerns and human connection through the arts. Rae will be at Arizona State University to deliver the Jonathan and Maxine Marshall Distinguished Lecture at 7 p.m., Oct. 5, in the Memorial Union Ventana Ballroom on the Tempe campus. Sponsored by ASU’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the lecture is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required. A question-and-answer session with Rae will take place from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., Oct. 5, in the Memorial Union Pima Auditorium. Reservations are required for both student events and are available online at http://clas.asu. edu/MarshallLectureFilm. With 20 years experience in the film industry, Rae is the producer of more than a dozen documentaries and several features. The well-known “Frozen River” premiered and won the grand jury prize at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival. It also won the Gotham Award for best picture and best actress, and was nominated for seven Spirit Awards, including one she won for producer of the year. Rae, who is Cherokee, cultivated the work of more than 50 Native American filmmakers and screenwriters as director of the Native n friday, oct. 9 Arizona Contemporary Music Ensembles, 7:30 p.m., Katzin Concert hall. Quetzal Guerrero, 8 p.m., ASU Kerr Cultural Center, Scottsdale. guerrero will perform his own compositions with their blend of soul, jazz and Brazilian music on violin.** n Saturday, oct. 10 Faculty Chamber Music Ensemble, 7:30 p.m., Katzin Concert hall.* ASU Vocal Jazz Ensemble, 7:30 p.m., Recital hall. Program is “Straight, No Chaser.” n Sunday, oct. 11 “3 Great B’s of Improv,” 2:30 p.m., organ hall. organist Stef Tuinstra (groningen, The Netherlands), opens the fabulous fritts season. Tuinstra, who lives among the old Dutch organs and is a specialist in historical performance, will play works by the famous composer trio Buxtehude, Böhm and Bach.* Financial Aid Specialist #23175 (O) – Executive VP and Provost of the University (Oct. 16). Program Coordinator Senior #23068 (O) – VP University Student Initiatives (Oct. 7). Program Evaluation Coordinator FTF #23181 (O) – College of Education (Oct. 7; if not filled, then every week thereafter until search is closed). Psychologist #23172 (O) – Counseling and Consultation (Oct. 16). Research Advancement Manager #23123 (O) – College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (Oct. 9). Research Technician #23169 (O) – Global Institute of Sustainability (Oct. 8). Research Technician #23170 (O) – Global Institute of Sustainability (Oct. 12). Specialist Senior-Graduate Programs #23148 (O) – W. P. Carey School of Business/School of Accountancy (Oct. 7). Systems Analyst Associate #23176 (O) – VP-Research and Economic Affairs (Oct. 9). Technical and Computer Office Specialist Senior #23165 (O) – Graduate College (Oct. 9). Service/ Field Craft/Maintenance Energy Management Specialist (Building Automation Systems) #23166 (O) – University Services (Oct. 9). General Maintenance Mechanic-Maintenance & Repair Team 2nd Shift (Facilities Management) #23133 (O) University Services (Oct. 7). HVAC Refrigeration Technician-Maintenance & Repair Team 2nd Shift (Facilities Management) #23161 (O) – University Services (Oct. 9). Dow n tow n phoenix cAmpUS Professional Coordinator Senior #23163 (Part-Time) (O) – College of Nursing (Oct. 7). Research Technician #23153 (Part-Time) (O) – College of Nursing (Oct. 7). Administrative Support Office Assistant/Reception #23155 (Part-Time) (O) – College of Nursing (Oct 7). American Program at the Sundance Institute, a post she held for six years. Among her often-cited works is “Trudell,” a 2005 documentary she directed and produced about renowned Native American activist and poet John Trudell. The film was nominated for the Sundance grand jury prize and won several awards, including the special jury prize at the Seattle Film Fes- Heather Rae tival and the best documentary from the American Indian Film Festival. Rae is the director and producer of “Family: The First Circle,” a documentary in post-production that explores the foster care system and the American family. In 2008, the project received the Sundance documentary grant and was selected for Tribeca All Access from the Tribeca Film Institute in New York. She also is producing “American Tragic,” which will be financed and distributed by the newly formed Maya Entertainment. In addition to her film credits as a director and producer, Rae also has appeared in a number of films, including “Ibid” and “Disappearances.” Rae lives in Idaho and owns The Muse Building, a downtown Boise arts collective where arts, business “Symphonies of Winds,” 7:30 p.m., ASU gammage. featuring ASU Wind Bands. n monday, oct. 12 Student Jazz Combo, 7:30 p.m., Recital hall. n Tuesday, oct. 13 Tuesday Morning Music & Tea, 10:30 a.m., ASU Kerr Cultural Center, Scottsdale. Saxophonist Timothy mcAllister is featured. free but R.S.V.P. required: (480) 596-2660. Bring a can of food or sealed personal item for Vista del Camino food Bank. n Thursday, oct. 15 and culture converge. The collective offers space for artists and smallbusiness owners to contribute to developing the downtown district while advancing the arts. She also is an adjunct instructor at Boise State University. The Jonathan and Maxine Marshall Distinguished Lecture Series brings to ASU nationally recognized scholars concerned with promoting culture through the humanities and a better understanding of the problems of democracy. The annual lecture series was established in 1993 with support from Jonathan Marshall (deceased) and Maxine Marshall, retired publishers of the Scottsdale Daily Progress. The lecture series has featured notable journalists, authors and commentators, including Calvin Trillin, Jon Meacham, Robin Wright, Seymour Hersh, Paul Krugman, Arthur Schlesinger Jr., Daniel Goldhagen, Doris Kearns Goodwin and Robert F. Kennedy Jr. Further event information is available online at http://clas.asu.edu/ MarshallLecture, by e-mail at clasevents@asu.edu or by calling (480) 965-0051. Online maps of Tempe campus parking are available online at www.asu.edu/map. Carol Hughes, with the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, can be reached at (480) 965-6375 or carol. hughes@asu.edu. Chamber Music Showcase Recital, 7:30 p.m., Katzin Concert hall. “It’s Only Life,” 7:30 p.m., Second Stage West, West campus. The New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Science presents the Arizona premiere of John Bucchino’s powerful and uplifting new musical revue. Continues at 7:30 p.m., oct. 17-8, 22-25. *** polytechnic cAmpUS Administrative Support Office Specialist #23132 (L) – Polytechnic Campus (Oct. 7). Ac A De m i c poSitionS 5 tempe cAmpUS Faculty Professor #9306 – W.P. Carey School of Business-Morrison School of Management & Agribusiness (Oct. 15). Assistant/Associate Professor #9351 – W.P. Carey School of Business-School of Accountancy (Nov. 13; if not filled, then every two weeks thereafter until search is closed). Assistant/Associate Professor #9353 – College of Teacher Education & Leadership (Nov. 15; if not filled, then every week thereafter until search is closed). Assistant/Associate Professor #9354 – College of Teacher Education & Leadership (Nov. 15; if not filled, then every week thereafter until search is closed). Assistant/Associate Professor #9355 – College of Teacher Education & Leadership (Nov. 15; if not filled, then every week thereafter until search is closed). Assistant/Associate Professor #9356 – College of Teacher Education & Leadership (Nov. 15; if not filled, then every week thereafter until search is closed). Assistant/Associate Professor #9357 – College of Teacher Education & Leadership (Nov. 15; if not filled, then every week thereafter until search is closed). Assistant/Associate Professor #9358 – College of Teacher Education & Leadership (Nov. 15; if not filled, then every week thereafter until search is closed). Associate/Full Professor #9352 – College of Teacher Education & Leadership (Nov. 15; if not filled, then every week thereafter until search is closed). Faculty Associate #9325 – ASU Online and Extended Campus-American English and Culture Program (Oct. 2) Research Scientist #9359 – Biodesign Institute-Center for Personal Diagnostics (Oct. 10).

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