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Chapter Five 1999 Post-Elections Period - Leicester Research ...

Chapter Five 1999 Post-Elections Period - Leicester Research ...

95 issue of governance,

95 issue of governance, and how this could impact on governance in the coming five years. Similar to the Governance Frame detected in the newspapers‟ corpus, this frame was also labelled as the Governance Frame (See Table 4.2). It was derived from 35 speeches coded from the 80 speeches in the parliamentary speeches corpus. Of the 151 paragraphs coded in the parliamentary corpus, 30 paragraphs were categorised as mainly addressing the reasons why the MCP lost at the elections. These coded paragraphs were drawn from 14 speeches representing 17.5% of the 80 speeches in the parliamentary corpus. The UDF framed this as reflective of the people‟s rejection of a failing government (See Table 4.2). These paragraphs formed the Failed Government Frame. This frame was unique to the National Assembly corpus. 4.3 Overarching Frames As noted above, the newspapers‟ corpus has a Unity Frame which has a counterpart in the parliamentary corpus (See Tables 4.1 and 4.2). Further, the newspapers‟ corpus has a Governance Frame which is similar to a Governance Frame appearing in the parliamentary corpus (See Tables 4.1 and 4.2). This section discusses these four frames from both corpora. First, it will discuss the two Unity Frames and then it will discuss the two Governance Frames. In light of the ideological positions of the newspapers under study, the discussion is organised by the newspapers and their allied political parties. Thus, the BNL newspapers‟ construction of the frames will be discussed together with the MCP/AFORD alliance‟s construction of the same. The Nation and the Chronicle‟s structuring of the frames will be discussed together with that of the UDF.

4.3.1 Unity Frames 96 The first part of this sub-section lays out the case for unity as presented by the BNL newspapers and the MCP/AFORD Alliance. The second part discusses the Nation and the Chronicle, and the UDF‟s response to the unity concerns raised by the BNL newspapers and the MCP/AFORD Alliance. It is worth noting that of the 39 articles from which the newspapers‟ Unity Frame was coded, 29 were published in the BNL newspapers while 10 were published in the Nation and the Chronicle. 4.3.1.1 The BNL Newspapers and the MCP/AFORD Alliance As noted earlier, the mainstay of the Unity Frames in both the National Assembly and the newspapers corpus was an assertion by the MCP/AFORD alliance that the advent of the Second Republic had caused regional fissures in the nation. Variously, the MCP/AFORD alliance and their associated BNL newspapers claimed that the problem was either in the advent of multiparty politics or the just concluded elections. For the BNL newspapers, the main problem was to be found in the conduct of multiparty politics and its propensity to divide people politically. The writer of an editorial in the Daily Times (1994a) argued: Although multipartyism is here to stay . . . it is not an ideology that is endemic to our society, because it has already divided us since we refer to the new regime as the UDF government, and not the Malawi government. This argument was advanced 18 times making it the most coded argument in the newspapers corpus (See Table 4.3). While this was the main argument in the BNL newspapers definition of the problem, there were other arguments which served not only to buttress the BNL newspapers‟ argument but also revealed the BNL newspapers‟ antipathy towards the new government and the ruling party. For example, five paragraphs out of the 36

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