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Chapter Five 1999 Post-Elections Period - Leicester Research ...

Chapter Five 1999 Post-Elections Period - Leicester Research ...

177 The last frame in

177 The last frame in the newspapers‟ corpus was the Electoral Process Frame which claimed 36 paragraphs representing 16.1% of the total 224 coded paragraphs in the newspapers corpus. This frame was drawn from 11 articles representing 14.7% of the 75 in this corpus (See Table 6.1). The parliamentary corpus in 2004 case study had 123 coded paragraphs from 66 speeches. The Leadership Frame was comprised of 31 coded paragraphs representing 25.2% of the 123 coded paragraphs drawn from 16 speeches. The 16 speeches represented 24.2% of the 66 speeches in the 2004 parliamentary corpus. These figures make the Leadership Frame in the parliamentary corpus the second largest (See Table 6.2 above). The Challenges Frame in the parliamentary corpus claimed 50 of the 123 coded paragraphs in the corpus representing 40.7%. These were drawn from 26 of the total 66 speeches in the corpus representing 39.4%. These figures make the parliamentary Challenges Frame the largest frame in the parliamentary corpus ahead of the Leadership Frame (See Table 6.2). The Failed Government Frame in the parliamentary corpus had 24 of the 123 coded paragraphs in the parliamentary corpus representing 34.1%. These were drawn from 24 of the total 66 speeches in the corpus representing 36.3% (See Table 6.2). 6.3 Overarching Frames There were two types of frames overarching both corpora (See Tables 6.1 and 6.2). The first pair was the Leadership Frames which were basically assessments of the leadership provided by the new president, Bingu wa Mutharika. In addition, the Leadership Frames tended to look forward with hope in anticipation of things to come based on Mutharika‟s stated agenda. In contrast to Mutharika, who was positively

178 framed, his party, the UDF and former president Bakili Muluzi, received negative portrayal because of what was perceived as their negative influence on the new president. The second pair of overarching frames was the Challenges Frames. Both frames tended to focus on the challenges facing the new government of President Mutharika. Issues of corruption and fiscal management took centre stage. This is especially true in light of Mutharika‟s stated anti-corruption drive. 6.3.1 Leadership Frame The obvious difference between the Leadership Frame in the editorials corpus and the Leadership Frame in the parliamentary corpus relates to the fact that the parliamentary frame only had a moral evaluation component. In this respect, the parliamentary Leadership Frame was mainly laudatory of the new president, Bingu wa Mutharika, and condemnatory of the former president and his administration. However, the editorial Leadership Frame was more analytic of the issues surrounding the new president and the political dynamics at work between the new president and his party, the UDF. In the newspapers corpus, the Leadership Frame had 21 coded paragraphs in its problem definition out of 111 representing 18.9% of coded paragraphs in the frame coded from the 34 articles in the frame. The causal interpretation component consisted of 24 (21.6%) coded paragraphs. There were 35 coded paragraphs representing 31.5% of the total coded paragraphs to the frame. The treatment recommendation of the frame had 31 (27.9%) of the total coded paragraphs to the frame (See Table 6.1). The main problem definition stemmed from a widespread perception that the former president, Bakili Muluzi, was still ruling the country by proxy. A number of factors led to this perception. First, Bakili Muluzi was the Chairman of the UDF, the

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