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Chapter Five 1999 Post-Elections Period - Leicester Research ...

Chapter Five 1999 Post-Elections Period - Leicester Research ...

183 Table 6.6). For

183 Table 6.6). For example, Rob Jamieson (2004a) urged the new president to undo the damage done by his predecessor and to restore political rights: Is Malawi on the right track, at long last? I think so, especially if Mutharika reverses the damage that his predecessor has created for us all . . . . The Daily Times (2004a) urged the new president to avoiding the desire to plunder the economy for his personal good as his predecessor had done. The Weekend Nation (2004a) urged the new president to rise above partisan interests, and to appoint to his cabinet people who were capable rather than to reward those who helped him during the campaign. Table 6.6: Treatment Recommendation in the newspapers‟ Leadership Frame Treatment Recommendations Presenters Paragraphs Articles Mutharika must govern better than the previous BNL 7 (22.6%) 6 Chronicle 4 (12.9%) 4 NPL 3 (9.7%) 3 Total 14 (45.2%) 14 Mutharika must wean himself from Muluzi BNL 4 (12.9%) 4 Chronicle 3 (9.7%) 3 NPL 3 (9.7%) 3 Total 10 (32.3%) 10 Mutharik must strengthen anticorruption institutions Chronicle 3 (9.7%) 3 NPL 4 (12.9%) 4 Total 7 (22.6%) 7 Totals 31 (100%) 31 In 10 coded paragraphs, the second recommendation from the newspapers was for the president to distance himself from the former president Bakili Muluzi (See Table 6.6). In this respect, Rob Jamieson (2004b) observed in his column in the Chronicle that: “Mutharika must de-link himself from the UDF national chair Bakili Muluzi and

184 the party and cut his own swathe.” It was a process that Nsapato (2004a) observed was already taking place: “It would seem he is severing the umbilical cord . . . with the UDF.” In this respect, the UDF and the former president were cast in the role of the dark alter ego of the new administration which had to be removed for the good of the people. The last aspect in this component dealt with the question of corruption. The newspapers painted a picture of corruption as rife in the country (See Table 6.6). The president‟s economic agenda, no matter how good, could not succeed as long as the corruption tolerated under the previous administration continued to prevail. Consequently, the newspapers not only viewed with approval the president‟s fight against corruption, but they urged him to dedicate himself more to that cause and to strengthen anti-corruption institutions. They also asked him to prosecute those accused of corruption as the Daily Times (2004b) urged: We should be grateful to President Bingu wa Mutharika if he were to push these investigations to their logical end and let those who cheated the nation make amends. Clearly, from initial distrust of the new president, all newspapers including the BNL stable, the NPL stable and the Chronicle had developed admiration of the new president by the end of his third month in office. The same was reflected in the Leadership Frame detected from the National Assembly corpus. The perceived antagonism emanating from the UDF and former president Bakili Muluzi against Mutharika only fuelled calls for the new president to distance himself from them. 6.3.2 Challenges Frames The Challenges Frames in the newspapers corpus closely mirrored the Challenges Frame in the parliamentary corpus. The Challenges Frame in the newspapers corpus

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