Views
5 years ago

Chapter Five 1999 Post-Elections Period - Leicester Research ...

Chapter Five 1999 Post-Elections Period - Leicester Research ...

207 In addition, several

207 In addition, several former high ranking cabinet ministers who had left the UDF were in the National Assembly representing other parties or as independents. These included Justin Malewezi, who was Muluzi‟s Vice-President, and Aleke Banda (proprietor of the NPL newspapers), who had served in several prominent cabinet post under Muluzi. These former cabinet members supported Mutharika‟s assertion that there had been widespread fiscal indiscipline and economic mismanagement in the past ten years. For example, Malewezi (2004b, p.42) noted that the economy had been plundered through “. . . over-expenditure and extra budgetary activities, waste, fraud and corruption . . .” with the macro-economic situation wrecked by “. . . a large fiscal deficit and an alarmingly huge domestic debt . . . at K54 billion.” Aleke Banda (2004, p.26) observed, concerning Muluzi‟s administration of which he was part: “. . . . We built up catastrophic levels of domestic debt . . . .” Coming directly from high-ranking members of Muluzi‟s administration, these charges corroborated Mutharika assertions of rampant corruption, fiscal indiscipline and economic mismanagement levelled against the previous government. They also made it difficult for the UDF MPs to reject these charges. 6.4.3.3 Summary As with the Leadership Frame in the press, continuity, conflict and negativity played an important role in the emergence of the Electoral Process Frame. With the press corps already attuned to the election, it was just normal to provide a post-mortem for the just ended election. However, the evident discrepancies in the management of the electoral process, the disputed nature of the presidential outcome coupled with the rioting that followed the announcement ensured that the press could continue to cover the issue for an extended period.

208 The Failed Government Frame was strongly shaped by Mutharika‟s crafting of his economic agenda. By its very nature, the agenda exposed economic mismanagement, fiscal indiscipline and corruption which had blighted the previous administration. These exposures provided fuel for MPs from other parties to provide negative evaluations of the previous ten years under UDF rule. The UDF‟s diminished numbers in the National Assembly meant that they could not subvert or de-emphasize this frame while the combined opposition majority ensured the negative moral evaluations against the UDF‟s previous administration could continue. 6.5 2004: An “Aberration” or a “Taste of Things to Come”? This section draws instances from the data to illustrate how the press had moved away from reflecting the narrow partisan framing of political parties which was evident in the 1994 and 1999 elections. The government journalism and opposition journalism models which characterised the press in 1994 and 1999 seemed to have given way to journalism in the national interest. The section will also argue that, in some ways, the press‟ framing of issues contributed to the frames which emerged from the parliamentary corpus. 6.5.1 An Unfettered Press The 2004 election marked a watershed for electoral reporting among the leading Malawian newspapers. Observers of the elections praised the newspapers for mediating the election in a manner that was balanced as opposed to the biased coverage of the MBC. Even though most election observers noted a general negative thrust against the UDF presidential candidate and eventual winner, Bingu wa Mutharika, they praised the newspapers for being fair, critical and analytical in covering the position of each

Chapter 4 Sexual Content in Soap Operas - Leicester Research ...
iieiiei1eWrkers - Leicester Research Archive - University of Leicester
NOVEL RESVERATROL ANALOGUES - Leicester Research ...
t he display of archaeology - Leicester Research Archive - University ...