Views
5 years ago

Adult Literacy and New Technologies - Federation of American ...

Adult Literacy and New Technologies - Federation of American ...

6 |

6 | Adult Literacy and New Technologies: Tools for a Lifetime adults participate in literacy programs voluntar- bring, what skills they may need or want, how ily, their motives for learning vary widely. they use literacy in their lives, how they learn, Getting abetter job is only one goal; others might and what motivates them to want to learn include becoming more independent or being able more. to help one’s children. Addressing the literacy Adults with low literacy skills form a very needs of the Nation must begin, therefore, with diverse group; few fit common stereotypes. For the adults themselves-what resources they example, many adults with low literacy skills are

successful in the workplace, and have found alternative strategies for learning and surviving in a print-based culture. Often their lack of literacy skills is masked by other competencies, so that colleagues and peers remain unaware of their hidden problem. For others, low literacy skills go hand in hand with poverty, unemployment, poor health, and educational failure, creating roadblocks to productive, satisfying lives. People like Eraclia spend much of their lives getting by. But they are survivors, self-reliant and determined to be independent. While society may label them ‘‘ illiterate, each has developed sophisticated coping skills. They are also motivated by a desire to learn and the hope that becoming literate will help them guide their children toward a richer life than they have known. People use literacy in their lives for many different reasons. Moreover, a person’s literacy skills may . vary depending on the context. For example, a carpenter might be able to read and comprehend much more difficult material in a job-related manual than on a reading test. OTA finds that no one set of skills can be used to ‘‘certify ‘‘ a person as literate, and no ‘ b necessary ” amounts can be established. Needs vary and change according to the circumstances people face. These characteristics of adult learners suggest that the Nation needs a system of adult education that provides all adults with opportunities for lifelong learning as the world and their personal circumstances change, and that particularly encourages those whose limited literacy skills pose the greatest challenge. Literacy programs should also recognize that people learn best when they are active participants in the learnin g process, when they are motivated by their own goals and interests, and when knowledge is presented in a context that is meaningful to them. To a large extent the present “system’ of programs and services is designed Chapter l-Summary and Policy Options | 7 In this Los Angeles County jails educational program, inmates work on real literacy tasks designed to increase their chances of success following release. for voluntary learners who come for assistance when they are ready. However, this segment of the population represents a very small proportion of those who could benefit from improved levels of literacy. The growing number of workplace and family literacy programs may be a way to bring more adults into literacy programs, by linking instruction and skills to immediate concerns and real life contexts. There is a trend toward mandating participation of certain populations in literacy services (e.g., programs targeted at mothers on welfare and those in prison). This fundamental change may call for new instructional paradigms, but there is not enough data yet to know how these populations challenge traditional approaches to learning and measures of success. With an even more diverse learner population, research must focus on the learning strategies of adults, motivation and incentives, and development of approaches, learning materials, and technology tools. 7 Adult learners also face special external and internal obstacles. Competing roles and responsibilities, situational barriers such as childcare or transportation, prior negative educational experi- T The newly created National Institute for Literacy is expected to play a major role in research. By taw, the Institute is charged with providing a 66 . . . focal point for rescarchj technical assistance and research disserninatio% poticy anatysis and program evacuation in the area of literacy. . . .“ Public Law 102-73, Title I, Sec. 102, National Institute for Literacy.

  • Page 1 and 2: Adult Literacy and New Technologies
  • Page 3 and 4: A merica’s commitment to the impo
  • Page 5 and 6: John Andelin Assistant Director Sci
  • Page 7 and 8: ■ The Decision to Participate in
  • Page 9 and 10: Access to Technologies for Literacy
  • Page 11 and 12: After working all day in a chicken
  • Page 13 and 14: Siman into programs and keep them e
  • Page 15: Chapter 1-Summary and Policy Option
  • Page 19 and 20: Figure 1-2—Adult Literacy Program
  • Page 21 and 22: Some have also encouraged partnersh
  • Page 23 and 24: many leaders in business, labor, an
  • Page 25 and 26: eading development. 14 Interactive
  • Page 27 and 28: for change and as a resource to ben
  • Page 29 and 30: Provide Direct Funding for Technolo
  • Page 31 and 32: and Information Administration’s
  • Page 33 and 34: ments for adult literacy teachers,
  • Page 35 and 36: ecordkeeping and reporting requirem
  • Page 37 and 38: sessed by various segments of the a
  • Page 39 and 40: 30 I Adult Literacy and New Technol
  • Page 41 and 42: 32 I Adult Literacy and New Technol
  • Page 43 and 44: 34 I Adult Literacy and New Technol
  • Page 45 and 46: 36 I Adult Literacy and New Technol
  • Page 47 and 48: 38 I Adult Literacy and New Technol
  • Page 50 and 51: Literacy is not an on/off character
  • Page 52 and 53: Chapter 2-The Changing Character of
  • Page 54 and 55: outs, academic skill levels also in
  • Page 56 and 57: include writing a brief description
  • Page 58 and 59: 257 255 253 249 221 219 211 196 192
  • Page 60 and 61: Millions of Immigrants per decade 1
  • Page 62 and 63: Chapter 2-The Changing Character of
  • Page 64 and 65: ● ● ● ● ● Chapter 2-The C
  • Page 66 and 67:

    those who remain ‘ ‘uncounted.

  • Page 68 and 69:

    population has remained relatively

  • Page 70 and 71:

    Learning and going to school have m

  • Page 72 and 73:

    Some studies have used ethnographic

  • Page 74:

    ii I New immigrants may often find

  • Page 77 and 78:

    68 I Adult Literacy and New Technol

  • Page 80:

    e-reading the material, and their j

  • Page 83 and 84:

    74 | Adult Literacy and New Technol

  • Page 85 and 86:

    76 I Adult Literacy and New Technol

  • Page 87 and 88:

    78 I Adult Literacy and New Technol

  • Page 89 and 90:

    80 | Adult Literacy and New Technol

  • Page 91 and 92:

    82 I Adult Literacy and New Technol

  • Page 93 and 94:

    84 I Adult Literacy and New Technol

  • Page 95 and 96:

    86 I Adult Literacy and New Technol

  • Page 97 and 98:

    88 I Adult Literacy and New Technol

  • Page 99 and 100:

    90 I Adult Literacy and New Technol

  • Page 101 and 102:

    T he literacy service delivery ‘

  • Page 103 and 104:

    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

  • Page 105 and 106:

    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

  • Page 107 and 108:

    400 350 300 250 20O ‘ >“1 \ I [

  • Page 109 and 110:

    Bell Atlantic Black and Decker Stan

  • Page 111 and 112:

    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

  • Page 113 and 114:

    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

  • Page 115:

    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

  • Page 118 and 119:

    110 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 120 and 121:

    112 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 122 and 123:

    114 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 124 and 125:

    116 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 127 and 128:

    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

  • Page 129 and 130:

    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

  • Page 131 and 132:

    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

  • Page 133 and 134:

    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

  • Page 135 and 136:

    s ince the mid- 1960s, the Federal

  • Page 137 and 138:

    Although promising, these efforts c

  • Page 139 and 140:

    War on Poverty program overseen by

  • Page 141 and 142:

    Chapter &The Federal Role in Adult

  • Page 143 and 144:

    somewhat contemporaneously, so it c

  • Page 145 and 146:

    there is overlap. Both ED and the D

  • Page 147 and 148:

    Chapter &The Federal Role in Adult

  • Page 149 and 150:

    to 70 percent) or Head Start childr

  • Page 151 and 152:

    Chapter 5-The Federal Role in Adult

  • Page 153 and 154:

    Highly defined subcategories of new

  • Page 155 and 156:

    set of service delivery issues: how

  • Page 157 and 158:

    esponding to public concerns about

  • Page 159 and 160:

    Chapter 5-The Federal Role in Adult

  • Page 161 and 162:

    experimental funds to promote use o

  • Page 163 and 164:

    must coordinate or consult; most fr

  • Page 165 and 166:

    eral agencies to undertake joint ve

  • Page 167 and 168:

    in Federal law by providing some in

  • Page 169 and 170:

    162 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 171 and 172:

    164 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 173 and 174:

    166 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 175 and 176:

    168 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 177 and 178:

    170 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 179 and 180:

    172 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 181 and 182:

    174 | Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 183 and 184:

    176 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 185 and 186:

    Educational gains Support services

  • Page 187 and 188:

    180 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 189 and 190:

    182 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 191 and 192:

    184 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 193:

    186 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 196 and 197:

    Advances in technology have “uppe

  • Page 198 and 199:

    Computer-Based Technologies Chapter

  • Page 200 and 201:

    Chapter 7-Technology Today: Practic

  • Page 202 and 203:

    Chapter 7-Technology Today: Practic

  • Page 204 and 205:

    Chapter 7-Technology Today: Practic

  • Page 206 and 207:

    ecorders (VCRS), 27 and61 percent h

  • Page 208 and 209:

    Many adults use computers in the LA

  • Page 210 and 211:

    Chapter 7-Technology Today: Practic

  • Page 212 and 213:

    specialized personnel to evaluate h

  • Page 214 and 215:

    Chapter 7-Technology Today: Practic

  • Page 216 and 217:

    — that provides information criti

  • Page 218 and 219:

    Chapter 7-Technology Today: Practic

  • Page 220:

    notes, sounds, graphics, movies, an

  • Page 223 and 224:

    216 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 225 and 226:

    218 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 227 and 228:

    220 I Adult Literacy and New Techno

  • Page 229 and 230:

    T oday’s literacy programs are un

  • Page 231 and 232:

    verify the owner’s request, relay

  • Page 233 and 234:

    charge, Dave’s mother refused to

  • Page 235 and 236:

    Guatemala to marry Eduardo when she

  • Page 237 and 238:

    Through her ESL, parenting, job pre

  • Page 239 and 240:

    Chapter 8-Looking Ahead to a Future

  • Page 241 and 242:

    Chapter 8-Looking Ahead to a Future

  • Page 243 and 244:

    munications capabilities. Ultimatel

  • Page 245 and 246:

    Issues of Access and Equity These t

  • Page 247 and 248:

    Chapter 8-Looking Ahead to a Future

  • Page 249 and 250:

    Boxes Appendix A: List of Boxes, Fi

  • Page 251 and 252:

    Appendix A-List of Boxes, Figures,

  • Page 253 and 254:

    Appendix B-Major Federal Adult Lite

  • Page 255 and 256:

    R = required; E = encouraged; O = o

  • Page 257 and 258:

    Appendix C-Key Coordination Provisi

  • Page 259 and 260:

    only discs, new data cannot be stor

  • Page 261 and 262:

    Tablet or graphics tablet: A comput

  • Page 263 and 264:

    PBS PIC PLUS R&D SBIR SCANS SDA SEA

  • Page 265 and 266:

    Appendix F—Workshop Participants,

  • Page 267 and 268:

    Rob Foshay TRO barring, Inc. Michae

  • Page 269 and 270:

    Dennis Poe U.S. Department of Healt

  • Page 271 and 272:

    Appendix G: Contributing Sites Thro

  • Page 273 and 274:

    Northwest Tri-County Intermediate U

  • Page 275 and 276:

    ABE. See Adult basic education ACCE

  • Page 277 and 278:

    technological applications, 120-121

  • Page 279 and 280:

    National Workplace Literacy Partner

  • Page 281:

    workplace literacy, 102, 117-119 Te

Adult Learning Centres in Manitoba - Education and Literacy
Summit on Educational Games - Federation of American Scientists
Digital Literacy - Ccaecalifornia Council for Adult Education
Changing the Odds: - American Institutes for Research
Work-related Informal Learning - National Adult Literacy Database
Adult Literacy in America - National Center for Education Statistics ...
Standards for Technological Literacy - International Technology and ...
New Literacies and 21st-Century Technologies position statement
Adult Literacy Core Curriculum - Nationally developed Skills for Life ...
Transatlantic Armaments Cooperation - Federation of American ...
Non Strategic Nuclear Weapons - Federation of American Scientists
National Summit on Intelligence - Federation of American Scientists
Standards for Technological Literacy - International Technology and ...
Diana Coben, National Centre of Literacy and Numeracy for Adults ...
The Air Force Handbook 2007 - Federation of American Scientists
Technology in Today's ABE Classroom - Adult Literacy and ...
adult literacy and life skills survey adult literacy and life skills ... - ISEA
Technological Literacy for All - International Technology and ...
Managing the Intelligence Function - Federation of American Scientists
Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin - Federation of American ...
Adult Education - New York Botanical Garden
CUI Task Force Report - Federation of American Scientists
Advancing Excellence in Technological Literacy - International ...
12 I Federal Technology Transfer and the Human Genome Project
The Literacy Review - Gallatin School of Individualized Study - New ...
Adult Education and Literacy at the Texas Workforce Commission
connection - American Culinary Federation
Maryland Adult Technology Plan - Literacynet.org
the financial literacy of young american adults - Get Out of Debt Guy