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Adult Literacy and New Technologies - Federation of American ...

Adult Literacy and New Technologies - Federation of American ...

12 I

12 I Adult Literacy and New Technologies: Tools for a Lifetime many State and local efforts. Still the Federal large-scale, coordinated Federal offensive that literacy expenditure is small in comparison with overall State expenditures for literacy and for other major Federal education programs (see figure 1-3), meager in terms of the total population in need, and low as a national priority (see figure 1-4). There has been a proliferation of categorical grant programs with literacy-related missions. All this is at odds with the sort of some feel is necessary to address the literacy challenge. Among the new Federal emphases since 1991 is a focus on workplace literacy programs for employed adults. These programs are intended to meet the literacy demands of the job market and create new workplace/education partnerships that stimulate private sector literacy efforts. While

many leaders in business, labor, and local and State government support this direction for literacy, current efforts (both public and private) reach a very small number of workers. Thus far, Federal dollars have supported demonstration projects and limited ‘‘seed’ development. Further expansion of the system of education and training has been proposed; how to accomplish the expansion is controversial, ll Another important emphasis has been on creating intergenerational family literacy programs. With their focus on prevention and remediation, they represent a small but significant shift in the Federal approach to the problem of literacy. Congress has begun to link family literacy initiatives with Federal Head Start and Even Start programs, as well as Chapter I. Effective parenting strategies that foster young children’s language development and school readiness are common concerns of all these programs. Similarly, expertise in adult learning is something that Figure 1-3-Funding for Adult Education Compared With Other Federal Education Initiatives, Fiscal Year 1992 $ billions 8 7 — 6 4 2 o--z/’/zA 1.2 2.9 — ,--7 u./ 6.9 0.27 m Adult Vocational Special Chapter 1 Student ~ Education education education Act SOURCE: Office of Technology Assessment, 1993. Chapter l-Summary and Policy Options | 13 Figure 1-4-Funding for Select Federal Domestic Priorities, Fiscal Year 1992 $ bllions 2’~ 22 Adult Substance Highway Food literacy abuse aid stamps SOURCE: Office of Technology Assessment, 1993. teachers need whether they are in Head Start or adult education programs. Targeted Federal programs have encouraged States and local providers to reach out to groups of adults, such as the homeless and welfare mothers, whose access to basic education has been limited. By channeling more funding through programs with restricted eligibility, however, the Federal Government may be limiting opportunities for the millions of adult learners, including many limited English proficient adults who do not meet special criteria but have the potential to quickly become functionally literate, self-supporting citizens. New Federal requirements and policies are shaping State and local responses. For example mandatory participation and minimum hours of instruction in the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS) training program and the literacy program for Federal prisoners represent a marked shift away from the traditional model of voluntary, open-entry, open-exit programs. Other pol- 1 I F~eral and State tax incentives to business, a national levy for education and trtig, md otiti mec~ could be utilized. See U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessmen4 Worker Training: Competing in the New International Economy, OTA-1TE457 (WaSbingtOIL DC: U.S. Government Printing Offke, September 1990).

  • Page 1 and 2: Adult Literacy and New Technologies
  • Page 3 and 4: A merica’s commitment to the impo
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  • Page 11 and 12: After working all day in a chicken
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  • Page 21: Some have also encouraged partnersh
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    Some studies have used ethnographic

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    ii I New immigrants may often find

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    68 I Adult Literacy and New Technol

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    e-reading the material, and their j

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    T he literacy service delivery ‘

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    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

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    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

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    400 350 300 250 20O ‘ >“1 \ I [

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    Bell Atlantic Black and Decker Stan

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    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

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    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

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    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

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    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

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    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

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    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

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    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

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    s ince the mid- 1960s, the Federal

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    Although promising, these efforts c

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    War on Poverty program overseen by

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    Chapter &The Federal Role in Adult

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    somewhat contemporaneously, so it c

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    there is overlap. Both ED and the D

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    Chapter &The Federal Role in Adult

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    to 70 percent) or Head Start childr

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    Chapter 5-The Federal Role in Adult

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    Highly defined subcategories of new

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    set of service delivery issues: how

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    esponding to public concerns about

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    Chapter 5-The Federal Role in Adult

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    experimental funds to promote use o

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    must coordinate or consult; most fr

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    eral agencies to undertake joint ve

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    in Federal law by providing some in

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    Educational gains Support services

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    Advances in technology have “uppe

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    Computer-Based Technologies Chapter

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    Chapter 7-Technology Today: Practic

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    Chapter 7-Technology Today: Practic

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    Chapter 7-Technology Today: Practic

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    ecorders (VCRS), 27 and61 percent h

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    Many adults use computers in the LA

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    Chapter 7-Technology Today: Practic

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    specialized personnel to evaluate h

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    Chapter 7-Technology Today: Practic

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    — that provides information criti

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    Chapter 7-Technology Today: Practic

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    notes, sounds, graphics, movies, an

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    T oday’s literacy programs are un

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    verify the owner’s request, relay

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    charge, Dave’s mother refused to

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    Guatemala to marry Eduardo when she

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    Through her ESL, parenting, job pre

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    Chapter 8-Looking Ahead to a Future

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    Chapter 8-Looking Ahead to a Future

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    munications capabilities. Ultimatel

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    Issues of Access and Equity These t

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    Chapter 8-Looking Ahead to a Future

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    Boxes Appendix A: List of Boxes, Fi

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    Appendix A-List of Boxes, Figures,

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    Appendix B-Major Federal Adult Lite

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    R = required; E = encouraged; O = o

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    Appendix C-Key Coordination Provisi

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    only discs, new data cannot be stor

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    Tablet or graphics tablet: A comput

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    PBS PIC PLUS R&D SBIR SCANS SDA SEA

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    Appendix F—Workshop Participants,

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    Rob Foshay TRO barring, Inc. Michae

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    Dennis Poe U.S. Department of Healt

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    Appendix G: Contributing Sites Thro

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    Northwest Tri-County Intermediate U

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    ABE. See Adult basic education ACCE

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    technological applications, 120-121

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    National Workplace Literacy Partner

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    workplace literacy, 102, 117-119 Te

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