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Adult Literacy and New Technologies - Federation of American ...

Adult Literacy and New Technologies - Federation of American ...

254 |

254 | Adult Literacy and New Technologies: Tools for a Lifetime needed to enable one device to communicate with another or to enable a person to communicate with computers and related devices. A user interface can be a keyboard, a mouse, commands, icons, or menus that facilitate communication between the user and computer. ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network): A protocol for high-speed digital transmission. ISDN provides simultaneous voice and high-speed data transmission along a single conduit to users’ premises. Two ISDN protocols have been standardized: narrowband ISDN-two 64 Kbps channels carry voice or data messages and one 16 Kbps data channel is used for signaling; and broadband ISDN—twenty-three 64 Kbps channels carry voice or data messages and one 64 Kbps channel is used for signaling. Kbps: See bit. Laserdisc: See videodisc. LEOS (low-Earth orbiting satellites): Small satellites with a lower orbit (hundreds of miles) than geosynchronous satellites (22,300 miles). In the future, LEOS could be used to provide data and voice communications to portable computers, telephones, and other devices without the use of wires. Local area networks (LANs): Data communication networks that are relatively limited in their reach. They generally cover the premises of a building or a school. Like all networking technologies, LANs facilitate communication and sharing of information and computer resources by the members of a group. Mbps: See bit. Microwave: High-frequency radio waves used for point-to-point and omnidirectional communication of data, video, and voice. Modem: A device that allows two computers to communicate over telephone lines. It converts digital computer signals into analog format for transmission. A similar device at the other end converts the analog signal back into a digital format that the computer can understand. The name is an abbreviated form of “modulator-demodulator.” Mouse: A pointing device that connects to a computer. With a mouse, users can control pointer movements on a computer screen by rolling the mouse over a flat surface and clicking a button on the device. The mouse is also commonly used to define and move blocks of text; open or close windows, documents, or applications; and draw or paint graphics. Optical storage: High-density disc storage that uses a laser to ‘write’ information on the surface. Erasable or rewritable optical storage enables written information to be erased and new information written. Pen: See stylus. PSTN (Public Switched Telephone Network): The public telephone network that allows point-to-point connections anywhere in the system. RAM (random access memory): Computer memory where any location can be read from, or written to, in a random access fashion. Information in RAM is destroyed when the computer is turned off. ROM (read only memory): Once information has been entered into this memory, it can be read as often as required, but cannot normally be changed. Satellite dish: See downlink. Scanner: An input device that attaches to a computer that makes a digital image of a hard-copy document such as a photograph. Scanned pictures, graphs, maps, and other graphical data are often used in desktop publishing. Simulation: Software that enables the user to experience a realistic reproduction of an actual situation. Computer-based simulations often involve situations that are very costly or high risk (e.g., flight simulation training for pilots). Smart Card: A small plastic card containing information that can be read by a computer reader. For example, a smart card can be used to keep track of Food Stamp eligibility and qualify the holder for other social services that use the same criteria. Software: Programming that controls computer, video, or electronic hardware. Software takes many forms including application tools, operating systems, instructional drills, and games. Storyboard: A board or panel containing small drawings or pictures that show the sequence of action for a script of a video or computer software. Stylus: A tool similar to a pen with no ink used for marking or drawing on a touch-sensitive surface. In pen-based computing, a stylus, rather than a keyboard, is used as the primary input device. Synchronous communication: See asynchronous communication.

Tablet or graphics tablet: A computer input device resembling a normal pad of paper on which images are drawn with a pointing instrument such as a stylus. The tablet converts hand-drawn images into digital information that can be processed and displayed on a computer monitor. Teleconferencing: A general term for any conferencing system using telecommunications links to connect remote sites. There are many types of teleconferencing including: videoconferencing, computer conferencing, and audioconferencing. Touch window: A computer screen that allows data to be entered by using a specialized stylus to write on the screen, or by making direct physical contact between the finger and the screen. Uplink: A satellite dish that transmits signals up to a satellite, Videoconference: A form of teleconferencing where participants see, as well as hear, other participants in remote locations. Video cameras, monitors, codecs, and networks allow synchronous communication between sites. Videodisc: An optical disc that contains recorded still images, motion video, and sounds that can be played back through a television monitor. Videodiscs can be used alone or as a part of a computerbased application. Voice mail: An electronic system for transmitting and storing voice messages, which can be accessed later Appendix D–Glossary | 255 by the person to whom they are addressed. Voice mail operates like an electronic-mail system. Voice recognition: Computer hardware and software systems that recognize spoken words and convert them to digital signals that can be used for input. Wide area networks (WANs): Data communication networks that provide long-haul connectivity among separate networks located in different geographic areas. WANs make use of a variety of transmission media, which can be provided on a leased or dial-up basis. Window: A part of the computer screen that is given over to a different display from the rest of the screen (e.g., a text window in a graphics screen). It can also be a portion of a file or image currently on the screen, when multiple windows are displayed simultaneously. Wireless: Voice, data, or video communications without the use of connecting wires. In wireless communications, radio signals make use of microwave towers or satellites. Cellular telephones and pagers are examples of wireless communications. Workstation: A computer that is intended for individual use, but is generally more powerful than a personal computer. A workstation may also act as a terminal for a central mainframe.

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    Adult Literacy and New Technologies

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    A merica’s commitment to the impo

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    John Andelin Assistant Director Sci

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    ■ The Decision to Participate in

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    Access to Technologies for Literacy

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    After working all day in a chicken

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    Siman into programs and keep them e

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    Chapter 1-Summary and Policy Option

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    successful in the workplace, and ha

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    Figure 1-2—Adult Literacy Program

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    Some have also encouraged partnersh

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    many leaders in business, labor, an

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    eading development. 14 Interactive

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    for change and as a resource to ben

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    Provide Direct Funding for Technolo

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    and Information Administration’s

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    ments for adult literacy teachers,

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    ecordkeeping and reporting requirem

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    sessed by various segments of the a

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    38 I Adult Literacy and New Technol

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    Literacy is not an on/off character

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    Chapter 2-The Changing Character of

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    outs, academic skill levels also in

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    include writing a brief description

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    257 255 253 249 221 219 211 196 192

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    Millions of Immigrants per decade 1

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    Chapter 2-The Changing Character of

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    ● ● ● ● ● Chapter 2-The C

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    those who remain ‘ ‘uncounted.

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    population has remained relatively

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    Learning and going to school have m

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    Some studies have used ethnographic

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    ii I New immigrants may often find

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    e-reading the material, and their j

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    T he literacy service delivery ‘

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    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

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    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

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    400 350 300 250 20O ‘ >“1 \ I [

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    Bell Atlantic Black and Decker Stan

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    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

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    Chapter 4-The Literacy System: A Pa

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    s ince the mid- 1960s, the Federal

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    Although promising, these efforts c

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    War on Poverty program overseen by

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    Chapter &The Federal Role in Adult

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    somewhat contemporaneously, so it c

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    there is overlap. Both ED and the D

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    Chapter &The Federal Role in Adult

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    to 70 percent) or Head Start childr

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    Chapter 5-The Federal Role in Adult

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    Highly defined subcategories of new

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    set of service delivery issues: how

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    esponding to public concerns about

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    Chapter 5-The Federal Role in Adult

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    experimental funds to promote use o

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    must coordinate or consult; most fr

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    eral agencies to undertake joint ve

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    in Federal law by providing some in

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    Educational gains Support services

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    Advances in technology have “uppe

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    Computer-Based Technologies Chapter

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    Chapter 7-Technology Today: Practic

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    Chapter 7-Technology Today: Practic

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    Chapter 7-Technology Today: Practic

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    ecorders (VCRS), 27 and61 percent h

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    Many adults use computers in the LA

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  • Page 243 and 244: munications capabilities. Ultimatel
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  • Page 279 and 280: National Workplace Literacy Partner
  • Page 281: workplace literacy, 102, 117-119 Te
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