Views
5 years ago

Adult Literacy and New Technologies - Federation of American ...

Adult Literacy and New Technologies - Federation of American ...

population has remained

population has remained relatively constant over the last two decades, their proportion of the population has declined dramatically and should continue to do so. In 1960, children under age 18 accounted for 36 percent of all Americans; by 2010, they are expected to comprise only 23 percent. Thus the pool of new entrants to the future workforce will grow smaller. Minorities, particularly Hispanic and Asian children, are expected to make up an increasing proportion of the population under age 18. 76 The number of children living in homes where a language other than English is spoken is also increasing dramatically; while the 1980 census reported that 9 percent of 5- to 17-year-olds fell in this category, the 1990 figures have risen to 14 percent—an increase of almost 1.8 million schoolage children over the previous decade. These and related demographic trends suggest the following educational consequences: 77 ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ — The number of children entering school from poverty-level households is expected to increase. The number and proportion of minority school children will increase. More children will enter school from singleparent households. A larger number of children who were premature babies will enter school; these children are more likely to experience learning difficulties in school. There will be more school children who were born to teenage mothers and mothers who have not completed high school. More children will enter school from homes where a language other than English is spoken. Chapter 2–The Changing Character of Literacy | 59 Education has important intergenerational effects. When parents are assisted by literacy programs, they not only improve their own skills but also increase the chances of school success for their children. Taken together, these projections suggest that the number of children entering school with one or more factors that put them at risk for educational difficulties will rise. The chances of any one child experiencing multiple risk factors is likely to increase as well. 78 Thus, the burden on an already resource-depleted school system is growing, not declining. Programs focused on optimizing early development, promoting schoolreadiness, and preventing school failure and school dropouts are extremely important interventions. 79 Research findings have suggested another fruitful policy avenue for improving the future educational attainment of today’s children. One of the most consistent findings of the research on positive educational outcomes for children is the influence of mothers’ education level. This suggests the potential effectiveness of educational 76 Natlo@ Co~SSion on ~l~em Beyond Rhetoric: A New American Agen& for children and Fam”lies ~&Shhl@OQ ~: U.S. Government Printing Oftlce, 1991). 77 H~Km op. cit., footnok 33; and Aaron M. paum etal., “~e~“ Nature of the Disadvantaged Popu.latiorx Current Dimensions and Future Trends, ” Educationcd Researcher, vol. 18, No. 5, June-July 1989, pp. 16-22. 78 For a di~~sion of educational risk factors, see Pallaa et al., Op. tit., fOOtnOte 77, pp. 1G22. w S=, for ~~ple, R.E, Slavin et aI. (eds.), Eflective Programs for Students At Risk (Boston, MA: AflYII and BXOU 1989).

60 I Adult Literacy and New Technologies: Tools for a Lifetime interventions focused on mothers (or primary caretakers). One study, for example, found that: . . . having a mother who completed high school was a significantly more important determinant of the school enrollment of sixteen- to seventeenyear old youth than whether the mother was married or whether she had an additional $10,000 in family income per year, although both of these factors were also important. . . . Similarly . . . [another group of researchers] used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Market Experience to predict young people’s test scores on the basis of their mothers’ and fathers’ education and other variables. They found that an extra grade of attainment for the mother-when father’s education, race and region of the nation were constant-was associated with an extra half-grade equivalent of achievement for her children. Because of this intergenerational effect of the parent’s education on the child’s, it is unlikely that we will be able to make a major difference for the child unless we place equal priority on education and academic remediation for the parent. 80 so Ber~ ad s- op. cit., fooblote ~, p. 36. Educational efforts aimed at adults with low literacy skills today are likely to have two important outcomes: improving the skills and the life outcomes for adults, and at the same time increasing the likelihood of positive educational outcomes for those adults’ children or future children. 81 As yet very little research evidence is available to document the direct effects on children of raising a parent’s education level. Research in this area is needed in order to design programs that can optimize the direct benefits for children as well as parents. Existing evidence is compelling enough, however, to recommend that parents (especially mothers) of small children receive high priority in literacy policy and planning. A comprehensive literacy policy must consider the changing needs of people throughout the life cycle. The challenge of adult literacy is to develop a long-range policy that anticipates the literacy needs of tomorrow while addressing what is already a large and demanding problem today. 81 See, for example, Catherine E. Snow et al., Unfu@ledExpectations: HomeandSchoolInjluences on L“teracy (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991); and Thomas G. Sticht et al., The Intergenerational Transfer of Cogru”tive Skills, vols. 1 and 2 (lYorwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing Corp., 1992).

Adult Learning Centres in Manitoba - Education and Literacy
Summit on Educational Games - Federation of American Scientists
Digital Literacy - Ccaecalifornia Council for Adult Education
Changing the Odds: - American Institutes for Research
Work-related Informal Learning - National Adult Literacy Database
New Literacies and 21st-Century Technologies position statement
Transatlantic Armaments Cooperation - Federation of American ...
Adult Literacy in America - National Center for Education Statistics ...
The Air Force Handbook 2007 - Federation of American Scientists
Technological Literacy for All - International Technology and ...
adult literacy and life skills survey adult literacy and life skills ... - ISEA
Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin - Federation of American ...
Managing the Intelligence Function - Federation of American Scientists
Standards for Technological Literacy - International Technology and ...
Adult Education and Literacy at the Texas Workforce Commission
Adult Literacy Core Curriculum - Nationally developed Skills for Life ...
the financial literacy of young american adults - Get Out of Debt Guy
CUI Task Force Report - Federation of American Scientists
Advancing Excellence in Technological Literacy - International ...
Working Together: The American Federation of Teachers and the ...
Mission Statement - American Culinary Federation
Non Strategic Nuclear Weapons - Federation of American Scientists
National Summit on Intelligence - Federation of American Scientists
Standards for Technological Literacy - International Technology and ...
The Literacy Review - Gallatin School of Individualized Study - New ...
Adult Education Literacy Instruction - LINCS - U.S. Department of ...
Educational Opportunities - American Culinary Federation
Diana Coben, National Centre of Literacy and Numeracy for Adults ...
Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word - Monoskop