Views
5 years ago

The impact of computer use on children's and - Children's Digital ...

The impact of computer use on children's and - Children's Digital ...

12 K. Subrahmanyam et

12 K. Subrahmanyam et al. / Applied Developmental Psychology 22 (2001) 7±30 2.2. Significance ong>ofong> the gender gap in ong>computerong> game playing Despite the trends in other aspects ong>ofong> ong>computerong> ong>useong>, ong>computerong> games continue to be more popular among boys. It is hard to know the extent to which this is caong>useong> or effect ong>ofong> game design and marketing. For example, in an address at CILT99, the CEO ong>ofong> Lucas Learning admitted that their products are designed exclusively for boys (Frank Evers, 1999, personal communication). Becaong>useong> ong>computerong> game playing might be a precursor to ong>computerong> literacy, and the belief that ong>computerong> literacy will be increasingly important for success in society, the ``gender imbalance'' in ong>computerong> game playing has been a topic ong>ofong> much recent discussion. Efforts ong>ofong> the song>ofong>tware industry to create girl games with nonviolent themes and female protagonists have largely been unsuccessful with the exception ong>ofong> Barbie Fashion Designer. Based on an examination ong>ofong> research on games that girls and boys design and on research on their play styles, and television and reading preferences, Subrahmanyam and Greenfield (1998) proposed that the Fashion Designer was successful becaong>useong> it contained features that fit in with girls' play and their tastes in reading and literature. In contrast to boys' pretend play, which tends to be based on fantasy, girls' pretend play tends to be based more on reality, involving themes with realistic±familiar characters (Tizard, Philips, & Plewis, 1976). Thus, by helping girls create outfits for Barbie, the ong>computerong> became a creative tool that fits well with girls' preferences for more reality-based pretend play. ong>Theong> success ong>ofong> the Fashion Designer along with the growing popularity ong>ofong> the Internet among girls suggests that they are not turned ong>ofong>f by ong>computerong> technology. Instead, they just need applications that appeal to their interests. 2.3. Displacement ong>ofong> other activities ong>Theong> little research on whether time on ong>computerong>s displaces other activities such as television viewing, sports, and social activities has mainly focong>useong>d on the relation between ong>computerong> ong>useong> and television viewing. According to the 1999 Annenberg survey ong>ofong> parents regarding Media in the Home (Stanger & Gridina, 1999), children still watch more television (2.46 h/day) than they ong>useong> ong>computerong>s (0.97 h/day) and video games (0.65 h/day). Although comparisons ong>ofong> media ong>useong> in homes with and without ong>computerong>s were not made, data suggested that the majority ong>ofong> the homes (68.3%) had both a television and a ong>computerong>. ong>Theong> survey by Roberts et al. (1999), based on aggregating in-school and out-ong>ofong>-school media ong>useong>s, confirms the pattern ong>ofong> greater time spent watching television than using ong>computerong>s. ong>Theong> preference for the ong>computerong> mentioned earlier may therefore be more a portent ong>ofong> things to come, rather than a reflection ong>ofong> current usage. Nonetheless, when children in homes with and without ong>computerong>s have been compared, it is reported that children who ong>useong> ong>computerong>s may watch less television than nonong>useong>rs (Stanger, 1998; Suzuki, Hashimoto, & Ishii, 1997). For instance, the 1998 National Survey ong>ofong> Parents and Children on ``Television in the Home'' by the Annenberg Public Policy Center (Stanger, 1998) found that children in hoong>useong>holds with ong>computerong>s watched television an average ong>ofong> 2.3 h per day compared to the children in homes without ong>computerong>s, who watched an average

ong>ofong> 2.9 h per day. 3 Other studies suggest that ong>computerong> ong>useong> does not reduce much television viewing. For example, a study by Nielsen Media Research (1998) found little change in hoong>useong>hold television viewing after the hoong>useong>hold gained Internet access. Instead, many Americans report a preference for simultaneous television and ong>computerong> ong>useong>. For example, Media Metrix (1999) found that among hoong>useong>holds with a home ong>computerong>, 49% ong>useong>d their ong>computerong> and watched television simultaneously. Becaong>useong> ong>ofong> the growing trend to link the content ong>ofong> various media, ong>computerong> ong>useong> may even lead to an increase in television viewing (Cong>ofong>fey & Stipp, 1997). We need more research on the ong>impactong> ong>ofong> ong>computerong> ong>useong> on television viewing as well as on other activities. 3. Computer games and the development ong>ofong> cognitive skills Many ong>computerong> applications, especially ong>computerong> games, have design features that shift the balance ong>ofong> required information-processing, from verbal to visual. ong>Theong> very popular action games, which are spatial, iconic, and dynamic, have things going on at different locations. ong>Theong> suite ong>ofong> skills children develop by playing such games can provide them with the training wheels for ong>computerong> literacy, and can help prepare them for science and technology, where more and more activity depends on manipulating images on a screen. We now summarize the experimental evidence for the role ong>ofong> ong>computerong> games in developing cognitive skills. Although the term ``cognitive skills'' encompasses a broad array ong>ofong> skills, most ong>ofong> the research has focong>useong>d on components ong>ofong> visual intelligence, such as spatial skills and iconic representation. ong>Theong>se skills are crucial to most video and ong>computerong> games as well as many ong>computerong> applications. Computer hardware and song>ofong>tware evolve so quickly that most ong>ofong> the published research on the cognitive ong>impactong> ong>ofong> game playing has been done with the older generation ong>ofong> arcade games and game systems. Despite advances in interactive technology and the capabilities ong>ofong> current ong>computerong> games, the fundamental nature ong>ofong> ong>computerong> games has remained unchanged. ong>Theong> current generation ong>ofong> games continue to include features that emphasize spatial and dynamic imagery, iconic representation, and the need for dividing attention across different locations on the screen. ong>Theong>refore, the nature ong>ofong> the effects ong>ofong> ong>computerong> game playing that stem from structural features ong>ofong> the medium would likely remain the same Ð although the strength ong>ofong> the effects on visual intelligence could change with increasing sophistication ong>ofong> the graphics. 3.1. Spatial representation K. Subrahmanyam et al. / Applied Developmental Psychology 22 (2001) 7±30 13 Spatial representation is best thought ong>ofong> as a domain ong>ofong> skills rather than a single ability (Pellegrino & Kail, 1982) and include skills such as mental rotation, spatial visualization, and the ability to deal with two-dimensional images ong>ofong> a hypothetical two- or three-dimensional 3 Controlling for parental income and education yielded a weaker, but significant relationship such that ong>computerong> ownership was related to less television viewing, suggesting that having a home ong>computerong> does influence the amount ong>ofong> television watched by children.

Computer Crimes and Digital Investigations
DIGITAL LIBRARY - IEEE Computer Society
Caring for Children with Disabilities in Ohio: The Impact on Families
Families Matter: Designing Media for a Digital Age - Joan Ganz ...
Digital Interaction Research @ Culture Lab - Computing Science
Social Media & Its Impact On The Music - Leadership Music Digital ...
What Works for Children with Literacy Difficulties? - Digital ...
Capture the moment: Using digital photography in early childhood ...
Computational Modelling of Tsunami Impacts - Seegrid.csiro.au
Zimbabwe: World Education IMPACT and Children ... - AIDSTAR-One
facilities services sustainable computing - ICT Digital Literacy
The DigiTal RevoluTion: A LOOk THROUgH THE ... - Ad:Tech
Intermediate Impacts of Advice and Guidance - Digital Education ...
Intermediate Impacts of Advice and Guidance - Digital Education ...
Digital Image Processing - Multimedia Computing and Computer ...
SMARTER COMPUTING - Online Magazine Digital Magazine E ...
HP Cloud Computing for Schools - Digital Learning Environments
SMARTER COMPUTING - Online Magazine Digital Magazine E ...
MAXON Computer GmbH - Digital Media
Linux for PlayStation® 2 - Sony Computer Entertainment US R&D ...
The Impact of Broadband on Education - US Chamber of Commerce
the premier digital media company Cloud Computing
mobile phone safety ANd use by children - Mobile Manufacturers ...
Scenarios using a computable general equilibrium model of the ...
Digital Forensics and Flux Capacitors.pdf - SANS Computer Forensics
Digital Preservation and the Texas Advanced Computing Center
State of the Media: U.S. Digital Consumer Report - IAB