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Waikato Business News August/September 2023

Waikato Business News has for a quarter of a century been the voice of the region’s business community, a business community with a very real commitment to innovation and an ethos of cooperation.

Waikato Business News has for a quarter of a century been the voice of the region’s business community, a business community with a very real commitment to innovation and an ethos of cooperation.

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22 PINK WALK<br />

WAIKATO BUSINESS NEWS, AUGUST/SEPTEMBER <strong>2023</strong><br />

Early detection<br />

saves lives<br />

From the Breast Cancer Foundation<br />

National Register we know that if a<br />

woman has a screen detected breast<br />

cancer i.e. diagnosed when small, her<br />

chance of being breast cancer free at<br />

10 years is over 95%. This is for women<br />

from all ethnic groups.<br />

Breast screening<br />

We recommend women start<br />

having mammograms from<br />

age 40 (annually to 50) and<br />

then two yearly. Breast cancers<br />

in women under the age of<br />

50 tend to be more aggressive<br />

hence annual mammograms<br />

from age 40. If a woman has a<br />

strong family history or gene<br />

mutation identified in a close<br />

relative, mammograms may be<br />

recommended to commence at<br />

an even younger age.<br />

Currently free breast screening<br />

mammograms are available<br />

from age 45 – 69 years through<br />

the Breast Screen Aotearoa<br />

programme. In NZ there is<br />

work being done on raising<br />

the screening age to 74 years.<br />

Breast screening in women 70<br />

years and older is very effective<br />

as cancers show up well<br />

on mammography in this age<br />

group.<br />

Mammograms are<br />

important as they;<br />

• Can show changes in the<br />

breast often months or years<br />

before anything can be seen<br />

or felt,<br />

• Can detect breast cancer<br />

early, which means a very<br />

good chance of cure,<br />

• Can detect about 75 percent<br />

of unsuspected cancer<br />

in women under 50 and 85<br />

percent in women over 50,<br />

• Are safe because only very<br />

small amounts of radiation<br />

are used in two-yearly<br />

screening, though may<br />

cause anxiety because some<br />

changes that are detected<br />

are not due to cancer but do<br />

require further work-up to<br />

prove this,<br />

• Early detection and ensures<br />

that treatment is less radical<br />

treatment e.g. breast conserving<br />

surgery and sentinel<br />

node biopsy (removal<br />

of only 2-3 armpit lymph<br />

nodes) versus mastectomy<br />

and axillary node dissection.<br />

BreastScreen Aotearoa is<br />

New Zealand's free two yearly<br />

breast screening programme,<br />

for women aged between<br />

45-69 years.<br />

Please phone 0800<br />

270 200 to enrol in this<br />

programme or online at<br />

www.timetoscreen.nz<br />

We encourage women to<br />

be breast aware:<br />

Some breast cancers may not<br />

be seen on mammogram, so it<br />

is important to be breast aware.<br />

Changes in the breast to<br />

look out for and report to<br />

your doctor;<br />

• A new lump or thickening<br />

• Change in the size or shape<br />

of the breast<br />

• Skin reddening, dimpling<br />

or puckering<br />

• Any change in the nipple,<br />

such as clear or bloody discharge<br />

that occurs without<br />

squeezing, or a turned-in<br />

nipple<br />

• Or a rash or reddening or<br />

scalyness of the nipple<br />

• Breast tenderness or pain<br />

Nine out of 10 symptoms<br />

are not due to cancer, but it’s<br />

important so see a doctor to<br />

be sure. Proper assessment<br />

and referral for appropriate<br />

further work-up is needed<br />

to determine whether breast<br />

changes are benign/innocent or<br />

breast cancer.<br />

What can you do to reduce<br />

breast cancer risk?<br />

All women are at risk of breast<br />

cancer, and risk increases with<br />

age. Understanding breast<br />

cancer risks – those you can<br />

control and those you can’t –<br />

may help you to improve your<br />

breast health;<br />

• Regular exercise – at least<br />

four hours per week; coming<br />

along to the annual<br />

Pink Walk and Run is a<br />

good start!<br />

• Eating a healthy diet<br />

including low fat and<br />

sugar, and lots of fresh fruit<br />

and vegetables,<br />

• Maintaining a healthy<br />

weight, especially after the<br />

menopause,<br />

• Keep alcohol intake to<br />

less than 10 drinks per<br />

week. Ensure you have<br />

alcohol free days,<br />

• Breast-feed if possible.<br />

Breastfeeding for 12 months<br />

or more is associated<br />

with a reduction in breast<br />

cancer risk,<br />

• Know your family history.<br />

Most women who are diagnosed<br />

with breast cancer<br />

have no family history. A<br />

small proportion get breast<br />

cancer because of a heritable<br />

cancer gene mutation.<br />

If you have a number<br />

of relatives affected by<br />

breast cancer on the same<br />

side of the family (mothers<br />

or fathers) your risk may<br />

be increased. Talk to your<br />

doctor about your family<br />

history, you may need to<br />

start breast surveillance at a<br />

younger age.<br />

While the rate of death<br />

from breast cancer is gradually<br />

slowing, the numbers<br />

are still far too high – each<br />

death robs a Kiwi family of<br />

a mother, daughter, wife,<br />

or sister. We still need to<br />

keep getting the message out<br />

about early detection. With<br />

early detection, as well as<br />

better treatments developed<br />

through research, more and<br />

more women will survive<br />

breast cancer. Early detection<br />

also means that those<br />

diagnosed undergo less radical<br />

treatment, for example;<br />

breast conservation surgery<br />

rather than mastectomy; no<br />

chemotherapy versus need<br />

for chemotherapy.<br />

Positioning<br />

Excellence<br />

Prosthesis<br />

and bra fitting<br />

specialists.<br />

For more than 30 years, we’ve been aligning<br />

great candidates with great opportunities, and<br />

‘positioning excellence’ throughout <strong>Waikato</strong>.<br />

We strive for excellence and quality in all we do. As part of our<br />

commitment to excellence, we’re focussed on finding the right fit for<br />

both job-seeker and employer.<br />

So, if you’re currently looking to hire or would like to discuss your<br />

career opportunities, get in touch with our team.<br />

Our friendly staff can help you with:<br />

• Your new prosthesis<br />

• Post surgery bar fitting<br />

• Te Whatu Ora funding<br />

• applications<br />

Proud Supporters of<br />

the Breast Cancer<br />

Research Trust<br />

Ruth<br />

Fleur<br />

Temporary | Permanent | Executive | Industrial<br />

07 839 3685 | www.assetrec.co.nz<br />

Te Awa, The Base, Te Rapa Road, Hamilton<br />

phone 07 849 2662 | globe www.brashop.co.nz<br />

Supporters of the <strong>Waikato</strong> Breast Cancer Research Trust

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