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Madison Messenger - October 29th, 2023

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<strong>October</strong> 29, <strong>2023</strong> www.columbusmessenger.com Vol. XXXVIII No. 44<br />

PC fall<br />

festival<br />

(AT RIGHT) At<br />

Plain City’s Fall<br />

Festival on Oct. 21,<br />

Gus “Squashcarver”<br />

Smithhisler<br />

takes a break from<br />

carving an homage<br />

to Jonathan Alder<br />

Local Schools,<br />

home of the Pioneers.<br />

Local farmer<br />

Wayne Kleiber<br />

grew the 783-<br />

pound pumpkin.<br />

(BOTTOM LEFT)<br />

Theresa Weese<br />

and her co-workers<br />

at Marathon were<br />

among the 40 local<br />

businesses, civic<br />

organizations, and<br />

individuals who<br />

passed out candy<br />

at Trick-or-Treat<br />

Alley.<br />

<strong>Messenger</strong> photos<br />

by Dedra Cordle<br />

PRSRT STD<br />

ECRWSS<br />

US POSTAGE<br />

PAID<br />

COLUMBUS, OHIO<br />

PERMIT NO. 1516<br />

EDDM<br />

Income tax<br />

increase on<br />

ballot for<br />

fire & EMS<br />

By Kristy Zurbrick<br />

<strong>Madison</strong> Editor<br />

The city of London is asking for a 0.25<br />

percent income tax increase for fire and<br />

EMS services. The issue appears on the<br />

Nov. 7 general election ballot.<br />

The city’s previous attempt at an increase,<br />

which appeared on the May 2 ballot,<br />

failed by eight votes. At that time, the request<br />

was for a permanent increase. This<br />

time, the request is limited to a term of<br />

seven years.<br />

“One of the reasons for the limit is that<br />

we have some pretty large housing projects<br />

in the queue right now. Income will go up<br />

with more people which would bring more<br />

money to the fire department. Hopefully,<br />

that will be enough to sustain us,” said London<br />

Fire/EMS Chief Todd Eades.<br />

If passed, the increase would allow the<br />

department to maintain current staffing<br />

levels, current facilities, and current equipment.<br />

Eades said he has heard concerns<br />

from residents that the department plans to<br />

build a new facility.<br />

“That is not anything that’s in the plans.<br />

We’re not thinking about that right now,” he<br />

said. “We’re just trying to maintain what we<br />

See FIRE/EMS page 2<br />

POSTAL PATRON<br />

Construction vehicle Marcus Dionisio has a good time<br />

at the photo station.<br />

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PAGE 2 - MADISON MESSENGER - <strong>October</strong> 29, <strong>2023</strong><br />

www.madisonmessengernews.com<br />

Apartment/townhome project seeks zoning change<br />

By Kristy Zurbrick<br />

<strong>Madison</strong> Editor<br />

Plans are in the works for two new housing<br />

projects on Keny Boulevard in London, west<br />

of Lafayette Street (State Route 142). One of<br />

the projects aims to build apartments for rent<br />

and townhomes for purchase. The other will<br />

see condominiums built for purchase.<br />

These projects are among several housing<br />

developments around the city that are<br />

in various states of progress, from approval<br />

and planning to active construction.<br />

On Oct. 19, city council held a second<br />

reading on a zoning change request for the<br />

proposed apartment and townhome project.<br />

The applicant, Al Coughlin of Pataskala,<br />

has asked that a total of 26.5 acres be rezoned<br />

from residential to multi-family<br />

planned unit development (PUD). The 26.5<br />

acres surround existing apartment complexes<br />

located along Keny Boulevard.<br />

Coughlin is looking to build 80 townhomes<br />

on 9.24 acres between Keny Boulevard<br />

Estates and Daines Village<br />

Apartments. He also is looking to build a<br />

total of 309 apartment units in multi-story<br />

buildings on 5.4 acres between the back side<br />

of Coughlin Automotive and Charter Club<br />

Apartments and on 12 acres behind Charter<br />

Club and Keny Boulevard Estates.<br />

London’s planning commission approved<br />

Coughlin’s application on Sept. 14 and forwarded<br />

it to city council. Council will hold a<br />

public hearing on the rezoning request at its<br />

Nov. 16 meeting. After the hearing, the legislation<br />

will be up for a third reading and<br />

potential vote by council.<br />

Coughlin’s other housing venture involves<br />

The latest proposal for new housing in London involves a total of 26.5 acres (shown here<br />

in green, blue, and orange) surrounding existing apartments along Keny Boulevard. The<br />

developer is proposing construction of townhomes for purchase and apartments for rent.<br />

A rezoning request is under review by city council. A public hearing is set for Nov. 16.<br />

Elect Jimmy Little For Council at Large<br />

Hello - My name is Jimmy Little and I am running for West Jefferson Village Council at Large so I would like to<br />

share with you a little about myself.<br />

I grew up on the West Side of Columbus graduated from Briggs High School in 1981 as a National Honor Society<br />

member (with honors) and a Battelle Memorial Institute Scholarship Recipient to Franklin University.<br />

I’m a father/stepfather to six children and grandfather to seven (so far). My family moved from the Galloway area in<br />

2008 to West Jefferson. I knew we were going to participate in a great community that I could invest my time and care for all families<br />

in our community.<br />

I was once asked “What do I want to change if elected”. This is a great question because it’s more about working on issues that the<br />

community wants to change. I plan to join a “TEAM” that works for the city of West Jefferson, not individual objectives or agendas.<br />

These are some issues that I want to assure you I will work on:<br />

1: Treat our community funds as though they were my own (Fiscal Responsibility).<br />

2: Work to improve the relationship between the Village Council and the School Board.<br />

3: Be an advocate for Smart & Strategic Housing Growth.<br />

4: Improve /preserve relationships between the village and business owners both in-town and in the Tax Abatement areas (Retention<br />

of businesses after abatement periods).<br />

Activities I’m currently involved with and how they relate to the position I am seeking….<br />

• Community Service: (Demonstrated community involvement)<br />

• West Jefferson Village Zoning (Currently Vice Chairman)<br />

• Vice President of FMCPT (Friends of <strong>Madison</strong> County Parks & Trails)<br />

• West Jefferson Middle & High School Cross Country Coach<br />

• Darby Creek Buffalos Cross Country and Multisport Coach<br />

• For fun facts about Jimmy Little, see other side<br />

• West Jefferson Middle School Track Coach<br />

Fun Facts about Jimmy Little:<br />

27.5 years for Honda of America - Engineering Coordinator Marysville Auto Plant Stamping. New Model Lead for the Stamping Equipment<br />

Section. Relevance: Problem Solving, Project Management, Negotiating, Manpower Management and Budgeting.<br />

Now partially retired to devote time to Community Service and Coaching<br />

Hobbies include: Honda Insight Restoration, Multisport (Triathlon & Duathlon), Running & Biking.<br />

Accolades: (Tenacity to accomplish goals)<br />

14 time All American Duathlete (And counting), Team USA Member, Ranked #2 60 – 64 A/G Duathlete in 2022. Ohio Elite Grand Master<br />

Duathlon Champion, 2024 Team USA Australia World Championship Qualifier. Coaching 4 Youths to All American Status in 2022.<br />

Questions or comments? Contact me at: jimmylittleforcouncil@gmail.com<br />

Paid for by Friends of Jimmy Little<br />

FIRE/EMS<br />

Continued from page 1<br />

currently have. We have done renovations<br />

and maintenance that will keep us sustainable<br />

for the future. There are no plans for a<br />

new building.”<br />

Currently, the fire/EMS department is<br />

funded by a 0.5 percent income tax and<br />

EMS billing. This year, the city has supplemented<br />

the department’s funding with<br />

$250,000 from the general fund to make the<br />

department whole. In 2021 and 2022, the<br />

city supplemented the department’s funding<br />

with federal CARES Act funding.<br />

The current income tax will bring in an<br />

estimated $2.2 million this year. If passed,<br />

the 0.25 percent increase would bring in an<br />

estimated $1.1 million per year, bringing<br />

the total estimated income tax revenue for<br />

two parcels located off of Keny Boulevard and<br />

behind Merchants Bank and the adjacent<br />

strip mall. Earlier this month, London’s<br />

board of zoning appeals approved a conditional<br />

use permit that allows Coughlin to construct<br />

22 double-unit condominiums equaling<br />

44 total occupancies on the two parcels.<br />

London Landing - single-family homes<br />

In other housing news, the city’s planning<br />

commission and city council have approved<br />

the second phase of London Landing,<br />

a development of single-family homes located<br />

at the end of Jacob Lane and behind<br />

Graceland and Mariemont avenues. The<br />

first phase is moving along with 10 of the 61<br />

homes completed and occupied and 40<br />

under construction. The second phase will<br />

see 66 homes constructed.<br />

GC Squared is the landowner and developer.<br />

Arbor Homes is the builder. The<br />

homes are priced from the high $200,000s to<br />

the low $400,000s.<br />

Pulte Group - single family homes<br />

London Mayor Patrick Closser reports<br />

that the Pulte Group is working on site and<br />

engineering items and firming up lot costs<br />

for a proposed development on 73 acres between<br />

State Route 42 (Lafayette Street) and<br />

State Route 142 (High Street). Pulte is looking<br />

to build 236 single-family homes, including<br />

ranch-style and two-story options.<br />

Westwood Collective - apartments<br />

Westwood Collective, a real estate developer<br />

based in Hilliard, continues to renovate<br />

several properties along South Main Street<br />

in downtown London, some of which will include<br />

apartment units on the upper stories.<br />

The group also is renovating the former<br />

hotel located between the railroad tracks on<br />

South Main Street. The plan is to convert it<br />

into 12 apartment units with two storefronts<br />

below.<br />

Keny Station - apartments<br />

Developer Mark Seimer had been working<br />

with the city over the past year on a proposed<br />

apartment complex named Keny<br />

Station to be located along Keny Boulevard<br />

between The Tire Shop & Lube and the<br />

<strong>Madison</strong> County Chamber of Commerce.<br />

The plan had called for 55 apartment units,<br />

a pool, and a clubhouse.<br />

“As of now, they have tabled that project,”<br />

Closser reports.<br />

the department to $3.3 million per year<br />

based on current collections.<br />

The levy is taxed on earned income only.<br />

It does not apply to pensions, Social Security,<br />

IRAs, interest bearing accounts, 401Ks,<br />

unemployment, or government assistance.<br />

The department operates out of two stations<br />

staffed by a minimum of nine people<br />

per day and a maximum of 10 people per<br />

day between the two locations. The department<br />

provides fire and EMS service to the<br />

city of London and provides mutual aid to<br />

surrounding areas when needed. Year to<br />

date, the department has gone on over 2,055<br />

runs, an average of seven runs per day.<br />

Their average response time is 4 minutes 13<br />

seconds, from the time of the call to the time<br />

they arrive on scene, accounting for both<br />

local and mutual aid calls.


www.madisonmessengernews.com <strong>October</strong> 29, <strong>2023</strong> - MADISON MESSENGER - Page 3<br />

London increases staffing for street department<br />

By Kristy Zurbrick<br />

<strong>Madison</strong> Editor<br />

The city of London is beefing up its street department<br />

staffing.<br />

On Oct. 19, city council approved an increase of three<br />

positions to the maximum number of employees allowed<br />

for the department, bringing the total number to nine.<br />

“The street department is adopting a lot more responsibilities<br />

around the city—maintenance, mowing,”<br />

said council member Bryan Robinson who sponsored the<br />

legislation. “With all the responsibilities they have, they<br />

are pulling (employees) off street (work) and putting<br />

them into other areas which neglects the street work.”<br />

In addition to street maintenance, the department<br />

assists with general building maintenance, mowing,<br />

storm sewer and water repairs, traffic light maintenance,<br />

and other tasks.<br />

In the 1970s, the department had nine full-time employees<br />

plus part-time employees, according to Bill<br />

Long, the city’s current street superintendent. Long has<br />

worked for the city since 1984, first as a firefighter and<br />

later for the street department. He said he saw the de-<br />

Fabulous fall fun in West Jeff<br />

The village of West Jefferson held its annual Fall Festival<br />

at the Community Center on Oct. 21. Guests<br />

were treated to trunk-or-treat, free food, Ultimate<br />

Bungee, a mechanical bull ride, hayrides, a haunted<br />

house, and a costume contest. The village’s parks<br />

and recreation department coordinated the event with<br />

the help of several volunteers.<br />

partment’s staffing decrease over the years even as the population<br />

and street needs increased. He made the current request for more<br />

employees. The measure passed 5-0.<br />

Facilities and equipment<br />

Council passed legislation to advertise for bids for construction<br />

of a new salt barn. The city’s old salt barn fell down. The street department<br />

has made arrangements to temporarily store salt at the<br />

<strong>Madison</strong> County Sheriff’s Office facilities.<br />

Council also passed legislation to advertise for bids and enter<br />

into a contract not to exceed $110,000 for the purchase and installation<br />

of exhaust removal systems for the fire/EMS department’s<br />

vehicles. The department received an Assistance To Firefighters<br />

grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The grant<br />

will cover 95 percent of the cost of the project; the city will cover the<br />

other 5 percent.<br />

“I know they need it over there,” said council member Rich Hays<br />

who sponsored the legislation.<br />

Public hearings<br />

Council will hold two public hearings for alley vacations at their<br />

Nov. 2 meeting. One calls for vacation of the alley that runs behind<br />

109 Canterbury Dr. The other calls for vacation of the alley between<br />

211 and 213 Toland Street. The public will have the opportunity to<br />

comment on the legislation. Later in the meeting, council will have<br />

the opportunity to vote on the legislation.<br />

Council will hold a public hearing at their Nov. 16 meeting on<br />

an application requesting a zoning change for a total of 26.5 acres<br />

off of Keny Boulevard. A developer seeks to build a combination of<br />

apartments for rent and townhomes for purchase on the land, along<br />

with a small commercial business, requiring a zoning switch from<br />

residential to multi-family planned unit development (PUD). Representatives<br />

of the project plan to speak at the hearing. The public<br />

will have a chance to comment, and council will have a chance to<br />

vote on the request later in the meeting.<br />

WILLIAM “BILLY”<br />

MARTIN<br />

Thanks to all who showed their support at<br />

“Meet the Candidates Night”<br />

Please continue to show your support by making<br />

your vote count at the<br />

Upcoming election on Tuesday Nov. 7th<br />

“Our Community depends on your Vote”<br />

Paid for by the Candidate<br />

James Ortlieb gets ready to jump high and complete<br />

a back flip on the Ultimate Bungee.<br />

<strong>Messenger</strong> photos by Jeff Pfeil<br />

Makenna Mean poses for a picture inside a Barbie-themed<br />

station in the trunk-or-treat area. The<br />

display, created by Emilee Edwards, was awarded<br />

first place as the best trunk-or-treat display.


PAGE 4 - MADISON MESSENGER - <strong>October</strong> 29, <strong>2023</strong><br />

columns/opinions<br />

www.madisonmessengernews.com<br />

‘Talk to Me’ horror film connects with audience<br />

I believe within my horror movie loving<br />

heart that the opening sequence can determine<br />

whether you will like it, love it, or utterly<br />

loathe it.<br />

Of course, there are exceptions. For instance,<br />

it took nearly the entire two-hour<br />

run time for “Malignant” to upend my<br />

world. It took a forced second viewing of the<br />

1995 slasher, “Texas Chainsaw Massacre:<br />

The Next Generation,” for me to appreciate<br />

its twisted goofiness.<br />

In the case of the new-to-stream Australian<br />

horror film, “Talk to Me,” I knew<br />

right away I would appreciate what firsttime<br />

feature film directors Danny and<br />

Michael Philippou were attempting to do.<br />

The movie starts with the sort of showboating,<br />

long tracking shot beloved by new<br />

filmmakers trying to make a mark in the industry.<br />

It follows a 20-something man<br />

through a house party as he frantically<br />

searches for his younger brother. The<br />

guests, most of whom are inebriated<br />

teenagers, initially don’t care about the<br />

whereabouts of their missing peer. They<br />

only begin to show interest when he comes<br />

Help Us<br />

Honor Our<br />

VETERANS<br />

Submit the form below to have your family member or friend<br />

appear in our Veterans Day Rememberance Section on<br />

November 5th. Please include a photo. All forms must be received<br />

by OCTOBER 30th by 3 p.m. to be included.<br />

Veteran’s Name (first & last):<br />

Branch of Service:<br />

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Submitted By; Name & Phone#:<br />

Mail or Drop off Forms/Photos to:<br />

For More Information call 740-852-0809<br />

<strong>Madison</strong> <strong>Messenger</strong><br />

78 S. Main St. London, OH 43140<br />

Deadline Monday, <strong>October</strong> 30th by 3 p.m.<br />

the reel deal<br />

By Dedra Cordle<br />

stumbling out of a room, blank-eyed, bloodied,<br />

and screaming that spirits are trying to<br />

harm him.<br />

As the party-goers pull out their cell<br />

phones to record the drama, the blank-eyed<br />

and bloodied brother stabs his sibling and<br />

then himself. While the acting in the opening<br />

sequence leaves something to be desired,<br />

the sequence does represent the film as a<br />

whole: a decently performed “cursed teen”<br />

film unafraid of getting violent and filled<br />

with half-hearted but well-intentioned commentary<br />

about mental health and the lack<br />

of empathy caused by too much social media<br />

usage.<br />

The story settles on Mia (Sophia Wilde),<br />

a slightly odd teenager still reeling from the<br />

death of her mother two years prior. Unwilling<br />

to speak to her father about her constant<br />

grief, she attaches herself to her best friend,<br />

Jade (Alexandra Jensen), and her family —<br />

young brother, Riley (Joe Bird), and no-nonsense<br />

but still fun mom, Sue (Miranda<br />

Otto). Because they are teenagers, Mia and<br />

Jade spend hours together scrolling through<br />

their social media feeds, not really communicating<br />

or connecting unless it is to gossip<br />

about something they saw online. One of<br />

their fiercest and most frequent debates revolves<br />

around whether a video an acquaintance<br />

posted about becoming possessed after<br />

touching an embalmed hand is real or not.<br />

To see whether the video is real or fake,<br />

they leave the safety of Jade’s house to attend<br />

a house party where the severed hand<br />

is rumored to be. When they arrive, the<br />

“guest of honor” is there in the middle of the<br />

table, waiting for a willing participant to<br />

grip the disembodied appendage, say the<br />

words, “Talk to me. I’ll let you in,” and then<br />

briefly succumb to the spirit that answered<br />

your call. Of course, no one at these parties<br />

really cares whether the spirits are malevolent<br />

or not. They just want to experience it<br />

for themselves, then post it on social media<br />

for clout and content.<br />

One of the few “rules” in this game requires<br />

participants to break the grip within<br />

90 seconds or a permanent stay from the<br />

spirit. Curious about the game and desperate<br />

to see if she can contact her mother, Mia<br />

volunteers as tribute to the ghost. Naturally,<br />

things don’t go according to the rules.<br />

Although the decision to invite spirits<br />

into her body has long-lasting effects on Mia<br />

Term limits—please. Our Congress and<br />

government is a disgrace. Most of them do<br />

not have the voters’ best interests at hand.<br />

Lobbyists are who they cater to. The voting of<br />

Speaker of the House has been embarrassing.<br />

It is time to quit being Republicans and<br />

Democrats. Unite under the term “Americans”<br />

and take care of our own people with<br />

and her found family, the Philippou brothers<br />

play most of the party possession scenes<br />

not as a horror but as a druggy teen comedy.<br />

When things go wrong, they’re less terrified<br />

of the dead and more terrified of cops<br />

and angry parents. It works as a way to<br />

ground the concept in something believable:<br />

stupid kids who don’t consider the consequences<br />

of their actions.<br />

Working on a script with Daly Pearson,<br />

co-writer Danny Philippou and twin<br />

brother, Michael, have crafted a movie that<br />

is bloody and horrible but also embraces<br />

mood and moodiness. While the strength of<br />

the story wavers, the sense of foreboding<br />

and sadness is constant throughout the 93-<br />

minute run time. It lingers well after, too.<br />

While “Talk to Me” treads familiar paths<br />

inside and outside the horror genre, it is a<br />

solid movie. It has an atmosphere that few<br />

horror movies can truly sustain, a strong<br />

performance from its lead, and an ability to<br />

connect with the audience despite the fact<br />

that nearly everyone in the film makes terrible<br />

decisions. It may not break any new<br />

ground, but “Talk to Me” isn’t a film that<br />

should be buried in the ground either.<br />

“Talk to Me” is now available to stream<br />

on demand.<br />

Grade: B+<br />

Dedra Cordle is a <strong>Messenger</strong> staff writer<br />

and columnist.<br />

Time to unite as Americans<br />

Harvest time<br />

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letter to the editor<br />

our problems. Why do we think we can solve<br />

the world’s problems?<br />

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James Stambaugh<br />

London<br />

<strong>Messenger</strong> Word Search<br />

AUGER<br />

AUTUMN<br />

BOUNTY<br />

BUSHEL<br />

CROPS<br />

CULTIVATOR<br />

DRYING<br />

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GRANARY<br />

Solution on page 6<br />

INTAKE<br />

IRRIGATION<br />

MARKET<br />

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YIELD


www.madisonmessengernews.com <strong>October</strong> 29, <strong>2023</strong> - MADISON MESSENGER - Page 5<br />

<strong>Messenger</strong><br />

madison<br />

Win Your<br />

Thanksgiving Turkey!Each Participating Establishment<br />

Will Give Away A $30.00 Gift Card<br />

* Clip Coupons & Deposit In Bags At Participating Establishments *<br />

Toward The Purchase Of Your Turkey.<br />

CONTEST<br />

RULES<br />

CLIP the Turkey Contest Coupons below and fill in<br />

your name, city, and phone on each of them.<br />

DEPOSIT each coupon in the Turkey Contest Bag at<br />

the store of the sponsoring merchant whose name<br />

appears on the coupon.<br />

COUPONS may be deposited anytime until:<br />

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17, <strong>2023</strong><br />

EACH WINNER will be contacted after the drawings.<br />

You need not be present to win.<br />

ANYONE over 18 years of age is eligible to<br />

participate. No purchase necessary.<br />

ONLY one turkey may be won by a single<br />

household. Decisions of the judges will be final.<br />

CONTEST is not open to the employees of the<br />

participating stores or of this newspaper.<br />

ENTRY is limited to one coupon per person at each<br />

participating sponsor.<br />

CHANEY & THOMAS INSURANCE<br />

104 Lafayette St.<br />

London, OH<br />

740-852-2323<br />

NAME<br />

CITY<br />

PHONE<br />

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY<br />

NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WIN<br />

MUST BE 18 OR OLDER<br />

55 Park Avenue, London, OH (Main Entrance)<br />

740-852-4029<br />

NAME<br />

CITY<br />

PHONE<br />

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY<br />

NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WIN<br />

MUST BE 18 OR OLDER<br />

DWYER’S HARDWARE<br />

150 S. Main St., London, OH<br />

740-852-0725<br />

NAME<br />

CITY<br />

PHONE<br />

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY<br />

NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WIN<br />

MUST BE 18 OR OLDER<br />

Buckeye Realty<br />

Group<br />

NAME<br />

CITY<br />

PHONE<br />

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY<br />

NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WIN<br />

MUST BE 18 OR OLDER<br />

Lisa Jackman<br />

11 E. FIRST ST., LONDON, OH<br />

740-852-6446<br />

Wilson Printing & Graphics<br />

158 S. Main St., London, OH<br />

740-852-5934<br />

NAME<br />

CITY<br />

PHONE<br />

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY<br />

NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WIN<br />

MUST BE 18 OR OLDER<br />

Phat Daddy’s Pizza<br />

15. E. First St., London, OH<br />

740-852-3339<br />

NAME<br />

CITY<br />

PHONE<br />

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY<br />

NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WIN<br />

MUST BE 18 OR OLDER<br />

117 West High St., London, OH<br />

Suite 101<br />

NAME<br />

CITY<br />

PHONE<br />

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY<br />

NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WIN<br />

MUST BE 18 OR OLDER<br />

NAME<br />

CITY<br />

PHONE<br />

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY<br />

NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WIN<br />

MUST BE 18 OR OLDER<br />

Liz Finchum<br />

740-852-3555<br />

ernie’s pharmacy<br />

54 West High St., London, OH<br />

740-852-5131<br />

NAME<br />

CITY<br />

PHONE<br />

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY<br />

NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WIN<br />

MUST BE 18 OR OLDER<br />

180 West High St.,<br />

London, OH<br />

740-852-2266<br />

NAME<br />

CITY<br />

PHONE<br />

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY<br />

NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WIN<br />

MUST BE 18 OR OLDER<br />

280 West High St.<br />

London, OH<br />

740-852-3001<br />

Lifetime Vision Center<br />

94 W. Main St., West Jefferson, OH<br />

614-879-7239<br />

NAME<br />

CITY<br />

PHONE<br />

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY<br />

NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WIN<br />

MUST BE 18 OR OLDER<br />

M 117 W. High St. Ste. #105<br />

London, OH 43140<br />

(740) 852-3000<br />

NAME<br />

CITY<br />

PHONE<br />

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY<br />

L<br />

NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WIN<br />

MUST BE 18 OR OLDER<br />

Midland Title West, LLC<br />

madison<br />

78 s. S. Main St., London, OH<br />

740-852-0809<br />

NAME<br />

CITY<br />

PHONE<br />

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY<br />

NEED NOT BE PRESENT TO WIN<br />

MUST BE 18 OR OLDER


PAGE 6 - MADISON MESSENGER - <strong>October</strong> 29, <strong>2023</strong><br />

www.madisonmessengernews.com<br />

MP finding ways to attract and retain teachers<br />

By Kristy Zurbrick<br />

<strong>Madison</strong> Editor<br />

<strong>Madison</strong>-Plains Local Schools leaders<br />

are thinking outside the box in an effort to<br />

attract and retain teachers.<br />

Puzzle solution<br />

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James L. Peart, Agent<br />

187 West High St.<br />

London, OH 43140<br />

Bus: 740-852-5557<br />

jamie.peart.bya5@statefarm.com<br />

0901142.1<br />

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Thanksgiving<br />

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Thanksgiving Day 11/23/23<br />

12 PM Until It’s All Gone<br />

Turkey, Ham, Potatoes & Gravy, Stuffing,<br />

Corn, Baked Beans, Rolls, Drinks, and<br />

Pumpkin Pie<br />

15 E. FIRST ST., LONDON 740-852-3339<br />

PICK-UP & DELIVERY<br />

“In this day and age, there is a national<br />

teacher shortage,” said Superintendent<br />

Chad Eisler. “We have an incredibly difficult<br />

time finding staff. We were shortstaffed<br />

last year. We are short-staffed this<br />

year. I know other districts are having a<br />

very difficult time finding staff.”<br />

<strong>Madison</strong>-Plains has the added challenge<br />

of being a small, rural district, Eisler added,<br />

noting it is hard to compete with salaries offered<br />

by large urban and suburban districts.<br />

One solution <strong>Madison</strong>-Plains is putting<br />

into play involves a special agreement with<br />

the district’s teachers’ union. Typically, negotiated<br />

agreements cap pay for experience<br />

at 10 years for new hires, even if the new<br />

hires have more than 10 years of experience<br />

elsewhere.<br />

“Our (teachers’) association recognizes<br />

the struggle we’re having, so they agreed to<br />

allow us to honor experience beyond 10<br />

years,” Eisler said.<br />

This tool is being applied to new hires<br />

this year who qualify, as well as teachers<br />

who were on staff before the tool was implemented.<br />

The most recent approvals took<br />

place at the school board’s Oct. 17 meeting.<br />

Also at that meeting, the board named<br />

Ted Zanardelli, art teacher for grades K-6,<br />

as the teacher of record for not only those<br />

grade levels but also the upper grade levels.<br />

Zanardelli is licensed to teach art in grades<br />

K-12. Each department must have a teacher<br />

of record, meaning someone with a teaching<br />

license. <strong>Madison</strong>-Plains’ recent new hires<br />

for art in the upper grades are working toward<br />

alternative or supplemental teaching<br />

degrees but, until they secure them, they<br />

cannot serve as teachers of record. This is<br />

another tool that helps with filling positions.<br />

State Report Card<br />

At the Oct. 17 meeting, Karen Crites, the<br />

district’s director of curriculum, reviewed<br />

highlights of the State Report Card. Overall,<br />

the district received 3.5 stars out of 5 stars.<br />

This is the first year the state has issued<br />

star ratings. The report card measures several<br />

factors, including student achievement,<br />

progress, graduation, and early literacy.<br />

Under progress, <strong>Madison</strong>-Plains saw its<br />

greatest growth in grades 4-6 English Language<br />

Arts, sixth-grade math, English 2, biology,<br />

and American history. Crites pointed<br />

out that those classes are taught by longtime<br />

employees of the district<br />

“We’ve been going through a lot of<br />

staffing changes the last few years,” she<br />

said. “What makes me smile about this data<br />

is these are people who are still with us.”<br />

She added, “The more we can invest in<br />

our people, the more we can get them to stay<br />

with us, the better our results are.”<br />

One of the areas that could use improvement<br />

is the district’s graduation rate. Crites<br />

said school leaders are working to set up<br />

warning indicators for students as early as<br />

sixth grade.<br />

“We want to work with them every year<br />

to help them meet graduation requirements,”<br />

Crites said.<br />

Upscale bar and event venue opens<br />

By Kristy Zurbrick<br />

<strong>Madison</strong> Editor<br />

London 101 Bar•Event Venue opened on<br />

Oct. 11 in downtown London, offering both<br />

an upscale bar experience and event space.<br />

The venue is located at 101 S. Main St.<br />

in a brick building that dates back more<br />

than 100 years. Owners Anastasia and<br />

Mike Balog renovated every square inch, inside<br />

and out, while taking care to retain the<br />

building’s charm, including the original<br />

hand-cut marble floor and brick exterior.<br />

The Balogs’ efforts make for a comfortable,<br />

welcoming atmosphere in which to<br />

lounge, have a drink, and enjoy a bite to eat.<br />

The space is outfitted with pool tables, steeltip<br />

darts (Mike’s passion), televisions, Giant<br />

Jenga, cornhole, and four-in-a-row games.<br />

Anastasia’s extensive experience in the<br />

hospitality industry, including nearly 20<br />

years as a bartender, is reflected throughout<br />

the venue, including the fully stocked bar.<br />

“I am a wine lover, and I buy wine from<br />

all over the world,” she said, adding that the<br />

bar also has cognacs, more than 30 bourbons<br />

so far, and more. “We have a cocktail<br />

program, offering daily and weekly specials<br />

and special cocktails for holidays.”<br />

A pomegranate martini and Pumpkin<br />

Pie on the Rocks are among the recent specials.<br />

Mint and chocolate flavors are on tap<br />

for winter.<br />

London 101’s food menu focuses on<br />

snacks, charcuterie boards, and desserts.<br />

Anastasia patronizes area bakeries each<br />

morning to find fresh products. Customers<br />

can expect daily specials mixed in with<br />

menu staples. Brunch is served 11 a.m.-3<br />

p.m. on Saturdays.<br />

The bar also hosts themed events. First<br />

up was a Halloween party featuring bloody<br />

Shirleys, “mushed zombie brains” (gua-<br />

<strong>Messenger</strong> photo by Jeff Pfeil<br />

Anastasia and Mike Balog cut the ribbon on their new business, London 101 Bar•Event<br />

Venue, on Oct. 10. Joining them are London city officials and representatives of the <strong>Madison</strong><br />

County Chamber of Commerce.<br />

camole and chips), and a graveyard slice<br />

(chocolate cake with a spooky twist). Coming<br />

up is a Sweet Sixteen party for adults<br />

who didn’t have such a party when they<br />

were teens.<br />

“It’s healthy to celebrate something that<br />

brings smiles to your face and your friends’<br />

faces,” Anastasia said.<br />

Speaking of celebrating, all or part of<br />

London 101 Bar’s 3,500 square feet of space<br />

can be rented for special occasions such as<br />

anniversaries, birthdays, weddings, and<br />

corporate events. The venue includes a commercial<br />

kitchen for catering. Customers also<br />

can choose from a massive stock of supplies<br />

and decor.<br />

“I owned an event, wedding, and party<br />

business in New York City. When I moved<br />

to Ohio, I brought hundreds of items with<br />

me,” Anastasia said. Those items run from<br />

tables, chairs, linens, silverware, and plateware<br />

to a portable bar, curtains, centerpieces,<br />

props, projection screens, and a<br />

7.5-foot tall arch.<br />

For more information, look for London<br />

101 Bar•Event Venue on Facebook or email<br />

London101Bar@gmail.com.<br />

Bar hours are: Wednesday-Friday, 4-11<br />

p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; closed Sunday-Tuesday.<br />

The Balogs are proud to be a<br />

woman-owned and veteran-owned business.<br />

Active, reserve, and retired military personnel,<br />

as well as fire, police, and EMT personnel,<br />

receive 10 percent off their bill.


www.madisonmessengernews.com <strong>October</strong> 29, <strong>2023</strong> - MADISON MESSENGER - Page 7<br />

West Jeff boutique reopens in new spot<br />

How About That Boutique by Mrs. Ollangg<br />

has relocated to 24 W. Main St., West<br />

Jefferson. A ribbon-cutting and grand reopening<br />

was held on Oct. 21. The store was<br />

originally located at 19 W. Main St.<br />

The boutique specializes in women’s casual<br />

clothing in sizes small to triple-X. The<br />

store also sells spirit wear and can create<br />

custom graphic t-shirts.<br />

In addition to clothing, customers can<br />

find a variety of hand-crafted gift items at<br />

the boutique. Owner Emily Ollangg rents<br />

out space to 15 to 20 vendors, most of them<br />

local artists. Among the items currently for<br />

sale are candles, laser engraved signs, embroidery,<br />

and garden flags. The store also includes<br />

space to rent for classes of all kinds.<br />

Another service Ollangg offers is help in<br />

“making your Pinterest dreams come alive.”<br />

“If you have an idea for a project and need<br />

some help, bring it in and we’ll see what we<br />

can do. If I can’t help, one of my vendors can<br />

usually figure it out,” Ollangg said.<br />

How About That Boutique by Mrs. Ol-<br />

COX<br />

Bertha “B” Marie Cox, 74, of South Vienna, Ohio,<br />

died on Oct. 19, <strong>2023</strong>, in her residence surrounded by<br />

her loving family. Born on June 3, 1949, in Fayette<br />

County, she was the daughter of Hezekiah and Betty<br />

Little.<br />

Bertha was a member of United Church of South Vienna.<br />

She loved sewing and quilting and continued her<br />

passion for quilting every Tuesday at the <strong>Madison</strong><br />

County Senior Center for many years. Some of her favorite<br />

pastimes included completing word searches and<br />

bowling. B bowled for several years and even tried to<br />

teach her great-grandson about proper technique.<br />

She hooked the entire family on watching the Cincinnati<br />

Reds which became one of her greatest loves. Many<br />

activities, including making dinner, quickly began to revolve<br />

around when the Reds played that day to make<br />

sure she was able to watch the game. B was a spitfire<br />

through and through. Her love of life and trademark<br />

ornery personality will truly be missed.<br />

She leaves behind: her daughter, Pamela Gayle<br />

(Chris Shore) Fulton of South Vienna; grandchildren,<br />

Christina Marie Baas, Joshua Michael Baas, Sydney<br />

Marie Fulton, and Jessica Ann Fulton; great-grandson,<br />

D.J. Shaw; brothers, Paul (Diane) Little and Jimmy<br />

(JoAnn Messer) Little; sisters, Judy Hastings, Carol<br />

Hastings, Alice Miller, and Nancy Little, all of London;<br />

and numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins.<br />

Bertha was preceded in death by: her parents;<br />

beloved husband, Princie A Cox Jr.; daughter, Roberta<br />

Marie (Christopher) Baas; sister, Donna Reed; brothersin-law,<br />

John Hastings, Rick Hastings, and Monte<br />

Miller.<br />

Calling hours and a funeral service were held on<br />

Oct. 24 in Eberle-Fisher Funeral Home and Crematory,<br />

London, with Pastor Jim Blankenship officiating. Interment<br />

followed in Kirkwood Cemetery.<br />

Memorials in B’s name may be sent to: Hospice of<br />

Dayton, 324 Wilmington Ave., Dayton, OH 45420. Condolences<br />

for the family may be shared at www.eberlefisherfuneralhome.com.<br />

obituaries<br />

HILL<br />

George N. Hill, 85, of Lancaster, Ohio, died on Oct.<br />

22, <strong>2023</strong>, at his residence. During his final moments, he<br />

was able to share one last “I Love You” with his beloved<br />

wife, Linda, while encircled in her arms, before leaving<br />

this world.<br />

Born on May 29, 1938, in Springfield, Ohio, he was<br />

the son of Edgar Hill and Mabel (Myers) Hill. After<br />

school, George enlisted in the United States Army,<br />

where he guarded the Panama Canal and served in the<br />

Panamanian Conflict of 1959.<br />

Following his time in the service, he went on to work<br />

as an electrician and HVAC specialist before joining The<br />

O.M. Scott and Sons Company, retiring as a maintenance<br />

supervisor. He was a member of the Scotts’<br />

Twenty-Year Club, and he and Linda enjoyed many<br />

trips with this group.<br />

In his free time, he enjoyed tinkering, reading his<br />

westerns, and could always be found woodworking in<br />

his garage working on projects for Linda and other<br />

lucky family members.<br />

George is survived by: his adoring wife of 61 years,<br />

Linda (Beverly) Hill; son, George E. (Angela) Hill, and<br />

daughter, Sandra Mihaltian (Louie Medeiros); grandchildren,<br />

Delaney Hill, Katelyn Hill, Logan “Elyse” Mihaltian,<br />

Lexi (Chris) Wedlock, Matteson, and Paxton<br />

Mihaltian; great-grandson, Ember Kairos Mihaltian;<br />

nephews, Bill (Mary) Carawan and Ben (Candy)<br />

Carawan; several beloved great-nieces and greatnephews;<br />

and numerous cousins, including special<br />

cousin, Ginny Morgan.<br />

George was preceded in death by: his parents; sister,<br />

Judith Carawan; and brother-in-law, C.W. Carawan.<br />

Visitation and a celebration of George’s life took<br />

place on Oct. 27 at Eberle-Fisher Funeral Home & Crematory,<br />

London. Interment followed in Paint Memorial<br />

Cemetery.<br />

Memorials in George’s honor may be sent to benefit<br />

the Wounded Warrior Project at https://support.woundedwarriorproject.org/.<br />

Condolences for the family are may be shared at<br />

www.eberlefisherfuneralhome.<br />

<strong>Messenger</strong> photo by Jeff Pfeil<br />

Surrounded by family, friends, and representatives from the <strong>Madison</strong> County Chamber<br />

of Commerce and the village of West Jefferson, Emily Ollangg, owner of How About That<br />

Boutique in West Jefferson, cuts the ribbon at her new location.<br />

langg has been in business since 2021.<br />

Hours are: Wednesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-6<br />

p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; and Sunday,<br />

11 a.m.-3 p.m. Starting Nov. 1 and running<br />

through Dec. 31, the shop also will be open<br />

on Monday and Tuesday, 5-8 p.m.<br />

Maxine L. Howland (97) passed away on Monday, <strong>October</strong> 16,<br />

<strong>2023</strong>. Maxine was born in Franklin County, OH on November 17, 1925, to<br />

George and Florence (Rowland) Gardner. She is survived by her children,<br />

Kenneth (Linda) Wilson, Teri (Mike) Delong, Gary (Brenda) Howland, and stepdaughter<br />

Patricia Howland. She was also blessed with 16 grandchildren, 31<br />

great-grandchildren, and 10 great-great-grandchildren along with numerous<br />

nieces, nephews, and cousins. She was preceded in death by her parents; her<br />

husbands, Glen Wilson and Roger “Pat” Howland; her stepson, John Howland;<br />

her brothers, Paul, Richard, and Pearl Gardner; and her sister, Irene Pennington.<br />

Maxine worked for a while at the Joyce Shoe Factory in Columbus, OH, but she<br />

was primarily a treasured homemaker. Her hobbies included crocheting,<br />

flowers, puzzle books, and grandchildren. She was very loving and active with<br />

her family. That love extended to anyone who needed help. She was always<br />

there to lend a hand or word any way she could. She will be deeply missed.<br />

A funeral service was held for Maxine at Porter Tidd Funeral Home, 331 West<br />

Main St. in Mt Sterling, OH on Friday, <strong>October</strong> 20th. Maxine was laid to rest<br />

at the South Solon Cemetery in Stokes Township.<br />

Happy<br />

Halloween<br />

HAPPY<br />

HALLOWEEN<br />

This is the season for goblins and witches to be roaming our neighborhoods.<br />

Regardless of when Trick or Treat time might be in your<br />

locality, remember that some of the little haunts<br />

may be so intent on their ghostly business that<br />

they may forget to be as cautious as they should<br />

be. Please be careful. Let us all help make this a<br />

safe and enjoyable Halloween for everyone.<br />

Dana Fisher<br />

Eberle-Fisher<br />

Funeral Home and Crematory<br />

103 North Main Street<br />

London, Ohio 43140-1144<br />

67 Cherry Street, London<br />

• Monuments & Markers<br />

• Mausoleums, Bronze Memorials<br />

• Custom Sandblasting<br />

A Family Trade for over 60 years<br />

CALL TIM<br />

740-852-5674<br />

TRICK Trick<br />

OR or<br />

TREAT Treat<br />

Phone<br />

(740) 852-2345<br />

www.eberlefisherfuneralhome.com<br />

ROBY’S<br />

MEMORIAL<br />

DESIGN AND<br />

LETTERING<br />

1-888-858-8607<br />

Mon.-Fri., 9 am-5 pm • Sat. 9 am-12 pm<br />

<strong>Madison</strong> County’s<br />

Most Experienced<br />

Monument Company


PAGE 8 - MADISON MESSENGER - <strong>October</strong> 29, <strong>2023</strong><br />

www.madisonmessengernews.com<br />

Annual weed survey shows trends and changes<br />

By Amanda Douridas<br />

<strong>Madison</strong> County Extension Educator<br />

Agriculture and Natural Resources<br />

Each year in late summer, I drive a loop<br />

around the county noting types and severity<br />

of weeds I see above soybean canopies.<br />

Ohio State University Extension educators<br />

and weed scientists have been conducting<br />

weed surveys around the state since 2006.<br />

This enables us to monitor weed population<br />

shifts and herbicide effectiveness.<br />

I use a scale of 1 to 3, with 1 representing<br />

a low infestation with an occasional<br />

plant present, 2 representing a moderate<br />

infestation with large patches, and 3 representing<br />

a severe infestation where there<br />

are multiple patches of weeds.<br />

This year, I traveled 134 miles observing<br />

an estimated 4,715 acres across 93<br />

fields. Overall, fields were pretty similar<br />

to last year with 31 percent of fields completely<br />

weed-free. Severity was low across<br />

most fields, as well. Marestail, once our<br />

worst weed, continues its downward trend<br />

with presence in only 5 percent of fields<br />

and very low severity.<br />

On the other hand, volunteer corn continues<br />

to be one of the worst weeds infesting<br />

30 percent of fields, up from 22 percent<br />

in 2022. Giant ragweed was the second<br />

most prevalent weed, infesting 23 percent<br />

of fields which is about the same as last<br />

year. Waterhemp is currently the big weed<br />

of concern for herbicide resistance. It has<br />

shown a tremendous ability to develop resistance<br />

across multiple herbicide groups<br />

in states to our west. Presence in <strong>Madison</strong><br />

County fields did increase from 13 percent<br />

to 17 percent this year and had a slightly<br />

higher average severity than weeds previously<br />

mentioned.<br />

The weeds that typically have a higher<br />

average severity are foxtails and other<br />

grasses. While only identified in 9 percent<br />

of fields, the average severity was 1.63,<br />

0.38 points higher than the next highest<br />

severity, which was waterhemp at 1.25.<br />

Again, these severities are averages based<br />

on the 1 to 3 ranking.<br />

Other common weeds to note are velvetleaf,<br />

common lambsquarter, and redroot<br />

pigweed, each of which were found in<br />

9 percent to 10 percent of fields.<br />

The most obvious reason for good weed<br />

control is to reduce competition for nutrients,<br />

water, and space with our crops.<br />

Weeds can also provide habitat for harmful<br />

insects and diseases, making it easier<br />

for those pests to impact crop yield. Weeds<br />

should also be kept from blooming when<br />

pesticide applications are anticipated to<br />

avoid killing beneficial pollinators which<br />

can be sensitive to certain herbicides, insecticides,<br />

and fungicides.<br />

Marestail was once one of the most severe weeds in soybean fields as depicted above<br />

but surveys the past two years have shown a decline in prevalence as more farmers<br />

have implemented better control strategies.<br />

For more information on weed control,<br />

subscribe to the C.O.R.N. newsletter and<br />

view past articles at agcrops.osu.edu. Additional<br />

resources can be found at<br />

u.osu.edu/osuweeds.


www.madisonmessengernews.com <strong>October</strong> 29, <strong>2023</strong> - MADISON MESSENGER - Page 9<br />

OSU offers conflict resolution for Ohio farmers<br />

By Robert Moore, Attorney<br />

OSU Agricultural & Resource Law Program<br />

Extension attorneys and farm management specialists<br />

will be available to meet with parties to assist with resolving<br />

and skill to help understand and resolve issues.<br />

OFRS will be able to assist on a wide variety of matters. The<br />

their issues. These services will be more infor-<br />

following are issues for which OFRS can provide assistance:<br />

Ohio has over 76,000 farms and 13 million acres of<br />

farmland. In such a large and diverse industry, conflicts<br />

commonly arise that can lead to disputes, litiga-<br />

a family struggling with transition planning or per-<br />

• Farm transition planning<br />

mal and may include sitting at the kitchen table with • Family communication<br />

tion, and appeals. Ultimately, these conflicts can cause haps meeting in a pasture to discuss shared fence line<br />

• Business entities<br />

harmful effects that threaten the viability of Ohio concerns between neighboring farmers.<br />

• Business practices<br />

agriculture.<br />

3. Formal mediation. Sometimes conflicts escalate to<br />

To address these issues, a new program has been hard feelings and entrenched positions. When this • Land use<br />

developed: Ohio Farm Resolution Services at The Ohio happens, formal mediation may be appropriate. This • Property issues/neighbor issues<br />

State University (OFRS). The goal of OFRS is to cultivate<br />

solutions to the conflicts that impact Ohio’s diator to assist the parties in negotiating jointly ac-<br />

• Farm leases<br />

process will involve the intervention of a trained me-<br />

• Zoning<br />

farms and farm families.<br />

ceptable resolution of issues in conflict. The mediator • Energy leases<br />

OFRS will provide a three-pronged approach to assist<br />

farms and farm families in resolving problems and shuttling between separate rooms, where the parties<br />

meets with the parties at a neutral location, often<br />

• Farm labor issues<br />

• Farmland drainage<br />

conflicts:<br />

can discuss the dispute and explore a variety of solutions.<br />

Formal mediation is often the last step before • Crops/agronomy/soils disputes<br />

1. Education resources. The first approach will be to<br />

provide educational resources that may lead to a resolution.<br />

Educational resources may be in the form of Most consultation and mediation services will be • ODA administrative appeals<br />

litigation.<br />

• USDA administrative appeals<br />

bulletins, publications, articles, or individual discussions.<br />

For example, OFRS may provide a law bulletin Peggy Hall, David Marrison, Jeff Lewis, and Robert OFRS is available to provide educational and consultation<br />

conducted by OFRS’s primary consultants/mediators: • Farm lender/creditor negotiations<br />

on farm leasing to a tenant and landowner involved in Moore. OFRS also will develop a pool of outside mediators<br />

who can assist with matters that require special January 2024. For more information or to refer someone to<br />

services now. Mediation services will be available beginning in<br />

a lease dispute. Some disputes can be resolved<br />

through education alone.<br />

or unique technical knowledge. OFRS is committed to OFRS, contact Robert Moore at moore.301@osu.edu or (614) 247-<br />

2. Consultation and informal resolution services. OSU providing individuals who have both the knowledge 8260. Information is also available at farmoffice.osu.edu/ofrs.<br />

Harvest milkweed pods to help Monarch butterflies<br />

Did you know that milkweed is the most important<br />

plant for the Monarch butterfly? Milkweed is referred<br />

to as a “host” plant for the Monarch, meaning their<br />

survival is dependent on finding and utilizing these<br />

colorful native plants. To promote healthy populations<br />

of Monarch butterflies, the <strong>Madison</strong> Soil and Water<br />

Conservation District (SWCD) is part of the Ohio Pollinator<br />

Habitat Initiative’s annual milkweed pod collection.<br />

Interested participants are asked to collect<br />

common milkweed pods and drop them off at the specially<br />

marked collection bin in front of the SWCD office<br />

at 831 U.S. Highway 42 NE, London, through Nov. 15.<br />

Several species of milkweed native to Ohio, including<br />

common, butterfly, and swamp milkweed, are all<br />

used by Monarchs on their annual migration through<br />

the region. When collecting seed pods, be sure you are<br />

collecting from the common milkweed only.<br />

Pick pods when they are dry and gray or brown in<br />

color. If the center seam pops with gentle pressure,<br />

they are ready to be picked. Leave some pods (10 to 25<br />

percent) on the plants so that seeds have a chance to<br />

naturally disperse and do their job as an important<br />

food source for milkweed bugs and other critters.<br />

Put collected pods into paper bags or paper grocery<br />

sacks. Avoid plastic because of the risk of moisture accumulation.<br />

Clearly mark the county where pods were<br />

collected on each container along with the date of collection.<br />

Store pods in a cool, dry area until delivered<br />

to collection station.<br />

Once collected, the pods will be processed with the help of the<br />

prison horticultural programs and the seeds will be planted in<br />

pollinator projects across Ohio.<br />

For more information about this program or how to establish<br />

pollinator habitat on your property, contact Broc Sehen, SWCD<br />

district technician, at (740) 852-4003.


PAGE 10 - MADISON MESSENGER - <strong>October</strong> 29, <strong>2023</strong><br />

columns/opinions<br />

www.madisonmessengernews.com<br />

Trick or Treat<br />

• Monroe Township/Plumwood—Oct. 31,<br />

5-7 p.m.<br />

• Fairfield Township—Oct. 31, 5-7 p.m.<br />

• Mount Sterling—Oct. 31, 5:30-7 p.m.<br />

• West Jefferson—Oct. 31, 6-8 p.m.<br />

• Plain City—Oct. 31, 6-8 p.m.<br />

• London—Oct. 31, 6-8 p.m. Additionally,<br />

the city will have two backdrops set up at<br />

Cowling Park for photo opportunities.<br />

Martha Geib Memorial<br />

Scholarship Online Auction<br />

The Martha Geib Memorial Scholarship<br />

Committee is hosting an online auction on<br />

Nov. 4. Bidding runs from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.<br />

Winners may pick up their items at First<br />

Presbyterian Church, 211 Garfield Ave.,<br />

London, from 1 to 4 p.m. Nov. 5. Proceeds<br />

will be awarded to London and <strong>Madison</strong>-<br />

Plains High School seniors.<br />

Visit mgms@betterworld.org to join the<br />

auction or make a donation. Feel free to contact<br />

Christina Finney with any questions at<br />

cfinney@mplsd.org. Follow the event on<br />

Facebook at Martha Geib Memorial Scholarship<br />

and Instagram at marthageib_ms.<br />

Martha Geib was a resident and pediatrician<br />

in <strong>Madison</strong> County and a graduate<br />

of London High School. She believed<br />

strongly in supporting her community. Her<br />

hope was that her support would make the<br />

community a better place.<br />

Exhibit<br />

The London Visual Arts Guild is hosting<br />

“Photography, Writers & Illustrators Show,”<br />

an exhibit featuring works submitted by<br />

community members. The show will run<br />

Nov. 2-26 at the London Arts Center, 121 E.<br />

First St. An opening reception is set for 2-4<br />

p.m. Nov. 4. Regular gallery hours are:<br />

Thursday and Sunday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Saturday,<br />

10 a.m.-2 p.m. Admission is free.<br />

Health District<br />

The <strong>Madison</strong> County London City Health<br />

District Board will meet at 5 p.m. Nov. 8 at<br />

<strong>Madison</strong> County Public Health, 306<br />

Lafayette St., London.<br />

Developmental Disabilities<br />

The <strong>Madison</strong> County Board of Developmental<br />

Disabilities will meet at 4 p.m. Nov.<br />

9 at the administrative office, 500 Elm St.,<br />

London. If the meeting must be canceled or<br />

rescheduled, it will take place on Nov. 16.<br />

Pancake/Sausage Breakfast<br />

The Jefferson Township Firefighters are<br />

hosting a pancake and sausage breakfast<br />

from 7 to 11 a.m. Nov. 4 at the firehouse,<br />

745 W. Main St., West Jefferson. The menu<br />

includes pancakes, sausage, and choice of<br />

coffee, juice, water, or milk. The firefighters<br />

are doing the cooking. Visitors are welcome<br />

to check out a fire truck while they are<br />

there. The cost is by donation. A portion of<br />

the donations will go to the Good Samaritan<br />

Food Pantry in West Jefferson.<br />

Pleasant Township Trustees<br />

The next meeting of the Pleasant Township<br />

trustees is set for 7 p.m. Nov. 1 in township<br />

building, 84 N. London St., Mount<br />

Sterling. Call (740) 869-3755 for details.<br />

Al-Anon<br />

Al-Anon meetings are taking place from<br />

5:30 to 6:30 p.m. on Wednesdays at West<br />

Jefferson United Methodist Church, 36 S.<br />

Center St. Parking and the entrance are located<br />

on the side of the church. Al-Anon is a<br />

fellowship of relatives and friends of alcoholics<br />

who share their experiences,<br />

strength, and hope to solve their common<br />

problems. Organizers believe that alcoholism<br />

is a family illness and that changed<br />

attitudes can aid in recovery.<br />

Grief Support<br />

Ohio’s Hospice Loving Care is hosting a<br />

grief support group from 2 to 3 p.m. the<br />

third Thursday of each month at the <strong>Madison</strong><br />

County Senior Center, 280 W. High St.,<br />

London. Upcoming dates are Nov. 16, and<br />

Dec. 21. Reservations are not required. For<br />

details, contact Ray Vance at (937) 469-0565<br />

or RVance@OhiosHospice.org.<br />

Alzheimer’s Family Support<br />

The Alzheimer’s Family Support Group<br />

meets at 6 p.m. the first Thursday of each<br />

month at St. John’s Lutheran Church, 380<br />

Keny Blvd., London. For more information,<br />

call Pat Baynes at (937) 269-3605. Everyone<br />

is welcome.<br />

Mt. Sterling Community Center<br />

164 E. Main St., (740) 869-2453.<br />

Oct. 30—9 a.m.-12 p.m., indoor open play<br />

pickleball, free for a limited time, donations<br />

accepted.<br />

Oct. 31—3-6 p.m., food pantry for income<br />

eligible households. Pre-packed food boxes<br />

are delivered to your vehicle. Bring proof of<br />

residence at first visit and picture ID every<br />

visit. Call (740) 869-2453 for details.<br />

5-6 p.m., Take Off Pounds Sensibly<br />

7-8 p.m., Alcoholics Anonymous<br />

Nov. 1—9 a.m.-12 p.m., indoor open play<br />

pickleball, free for a limited time.<br />

10 a.m.-3 p.m., sewing for adults<br />

11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., senior lunch program<br />

for anyone 60 and older, RSVP by calling<br />

(740) 869-2453<br />

5-6 p.m., all levels yoga class, $10<br />

Nov. 2—10 a.m.-12 p.m., food pantry for<br />

income eligible households. Call (740) 869-<br />

2453 for details.<br />

10 a.m.-12 p.m., WIC participants can<br />

sign up and load benefits. WIC provides food<br />

packages to income eligible pregnant<br />

women and children until age 5. WIC also<br />

provides nutrition education and breastfeeding<br />

support to anyone in the community.<br />

Call (740) 852-3068 to schedule an<br />

appointment.<br />

Nov. 3—9 a.m.-12 p.m., indoor open play<br />

pickleball, free for a limited time.<br />

Nov. 4—9-10 a.m., free dance class by an<br />

online instructor (call center for details)<br />

9 a.m.-12 p.m., indoor open play pickleball,<br />

free for a limited time.<br />

10 a.m.-3 p.m., sewing for all ages and<br />

abilities<br />

Nov. 5—7-8:30 p.m., HEAT training (plyometrics/speed<br />

and agility), grades K-12<br />

Produce Market–Second and fourth<br />

Tuesdays of every month.<br />

<strong>Madison</strong> County Senior Center<br />

280 W. High St., (740) 852-3001.<br />

Oct. 30—8:30 a.m., indoor walking/exercise;<br />

9 a.m., chair volleyball; 9:30 a.m., crocheting,<br />

knitting, and needle crafts; 10:30<br />

a.m., sitting exercise/strengthening; 1 p.m.,<br />

euchre<br />

Oct. 31—9 a.m., quilting class; 10 a.m.,<br />

bowling; 4-7 p.m., billiards, hand-and-foot<br />

cards, workout room open<br />

Nov. 1—8:30 a.m., indoor walking and exercise<br />

class; 9 a.m., chair volleyball; 12 p.m.,<br />

bridge<br />

Nov. 2—8:30 a.m., Mott’s Military Museum<br />

trip departss; 9 a.m., chair volleyball<br />

Nov. 3—8:30 a.m., indoor walking and exercise<br />

class; 9 a.m., painting class; 10 a.m.,<br />

hand chimes practice<br />

Nov. 4—9 a.m.-2 p.m., Holiday Craft<br />

Bazaar.<br />

London Public Library<br />

20 E. First St. , (740) 852-9543.<br />

• Toddler Time. For ages 0-3 years old.<br />

Oct. 31, 10-10:30 a.m.<br />

• Preschool StoryTime. For ages 3-6<br />

years old. Oct. 31, 11-11:45 a.m.<br />

• Dinovember Egg Hunt. Between Nov.<br />

1 and Nov. 30, find a plastic egg hiding in<br />

the library and open it to reveal a dino<br />

sticker that you get to keep. Take it to a<br />

staff member to refill the egg and hide it for<br />

someone else. Limit one egg/sticker per person<br />

per day.<br />

• Kindergarten Club. The next session is<br />

set for Nov. 2, 6:30-7:15 p.m. Children ages<br />

3-6 can practice the alphabet, motor skills,<br />

numbers, counting, sorting, patterns, and<br />

more to prepare for kindergarten.<br />

• CPR Certification Course. On Nov. 4,<br />

11 a.m.-2 p.m., the London Fire Department<br />

will provide CPR and AED training. All participants<br />

will be certified by the American<br />

Heart Association after completing the<br />

course. Participants must be 13 or older to<br />

register. Registration is required. Lunch<br />

will be provided.<br />

HBMLibrary<br />

270 Lilly Chapel Rd., West Jefferson, call<br />

(614) 879-8448.<br />

• Storytime. Wednesdays and Fridays at<br />

10:30 a.m.<br />

• Storybook Build. At 11 a.m. Nov. 4,<br />

children are invited to build the houses from<br />

“The Three Little Pigs’ and take home and<br />

a copy of the book. Registration is required.<br />

• Booklovers. The group will discuss<br />

“Gilead” by Marilynn Robinson at 4 p.m.<br />

Nov. 6.<br />

Mount Sterling Library<br />

60 W. Columbus St., (740) 869-2430.<br />

• Storytime. Mondays at 10:30. Ages 2-5.<br />

• Bright Beats. Sign up for Bright Beats,<br />

a free music and movement-based program<br />

for children. Classes are being held on<br />

Wednesdays through Nov. 15.<br />

• Bookmobile Visits. The last bookmobile<br />

visits of the season are Nov. 1: 3-3:30<br />

p.m. at Grace Community Church in South<br />

Solon 3:45-4:15 p.m. at Sedalia Christian<br />

Union Church.<br />

• Ladies Night Out Movie. The next<br />

movie night is a Barbie party on Oct. 30.<br />

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Reserve a spot by<br />

calling the library or texting Melissa at (614)<br />

315-7939. The library provides pizza, popcorn,<br />

cold drinks, and flavored coffees. Participants<br />

are asked to bring a potluck dish.<br />

• National Veterans Memorial & Museum.<br />

In honor of Veterans Day, the library<br />

will host an interactive program at 6 p.m.<br />

Nov. 2. This event offers the chance to speak<br />

and pose questions to one of the museum educators<br />

and touch real artifacts, such as ration<br />

bags from World War I to the present,<br />

canteens, helmets from World War I to the<br />

present, body armor, uniforms from World<br />

War II to the present, and training<br />

grenades. Body armor, flak jackets, field<br />

telephones, and nurses uniforms will be on<br />

display, as well.<br />

Plain City Library<br />

305 W. Main St., (614) 873-4912.<br />

• Storytime. Mondays, 10:30-11 a.m.<br />

• National Novel Writing Month<br />

(NaNoWriMo): Come Write In. Thursdays in<br />

November, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Whether you are<br />

a seasoned WriMo or just getting started,<br />

join us for a series of write-ins at the library<br />

to work on your story and meet fellow writers.<br />

Every November, writers across the<br />

country take on the NaNoWriMo challenge<br />

where they try to write a whole novel or<br />

50,000 words in one month. The library will<br />

have writing resources and goodies available<br />

for adult and teen writers.<br />

• Graphic Novel Book Club. On Nov. 4<br />

at 11 a.m., the group will read and discuss<br />

“El Deafo” by Cece Bell. Request a copy from<br />

the library or find it on Libby and Hoopla.<br />

The library will have extra copies available<br />

for pickup inside the library. Recommended<br />

for ages 8 and up.<br />

• Pokemon Pop-Up. On Nov. 7 at 2 p.m.,<br />

play the Pokemon Trading Card Game and<br />

meet fellow Pokemon fans. Instruction will<br />

be available to anyone new to the game. The<br />

library will provide cards and materials.<br />

• DIY Custom Mug. On Nov. 8 at 6 p.m.,<br />

create a custom mug. Submit a single-color<br />

design and choose a background color or design.<br />

You will cut your design on the library’s<br />

Cricut and heat set it on the heat<br />

press. Registration is required.


www.madisonmessengernews.com <strong>October</strong> 29, <strong>2023</strong> - MADISON MESSENGER - Page 11<br />

Rotary Student of the Month: London<br />

Always willing to help<br />

The London Rotary Club is pleased to<br />

honor senior Aubrey Miller as London High<br />

School’s <strong>October</strong> Student of the Month.<br />

Students of the month are selected by<br />

school administrators based on their academic<br />

and extracurricular achievement and<br />

positive character.<br />

Aubrey has a 4.499 grade point average<br />

and is ranked first in her class. She states<br />

her favorite class is Introduction to Literature.<br />

Aubrey has served as class president<br />

all four years of high school. She also has<br />

been on student council for seven years. She<br />

is a member of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor<br />

Society and has earned dean’s list honors. She has been<br />

on the merit honor roll, is a member of the Superintendent’s<br />

Student Advisory Team, and served as a student<br />

representative to the London High School Principal Selection<br />

Team.<br />

When asked to name a school staff member who inspires<br />

her, Aubrey named science teacher Rosa Flores.<br />

“Mrs. Flores has been impactful for me because<br />

throughout her class I was able to take my knowledge<br />

and transfer it into my college classes. She has truly<br />

prepared me in a better way to understand how to take<br />

Aubrey Miller<br />

The London Rotary Club is pleased to<br />

honor senior Kyla McCoy as <strong>Madison</strong>-<br />

Plains High School’s <strong>October</strong> Student of the<br />

Month.<br />

Students of the month are selected by<br />

school administrators based on their academic<br />

and extracurricular achievement and<br />

positive character.<br />

Kyla has a 4.155 grade point average<br />

and is ranked second in her class. Her favorite<br />

course is CTE Leadership.<br />

Kyla has been involved in FFA during<br />

her high school years, earning her Greenhand,<br />

Chapter, and State degrees. She also<br />

has earned the Star Greenhand Award, Star Chapter<br />

Award, Star Junior Award, and Premier Leadership<br />

Award. She has served as chapter sentinel and vice<br />

president and competed on the following CDE teams:<br />

parliamentary procedure (three years), meat judging<br />

(one year), job interview (two years), and livestock judging<br />

(one year).<br />

Additionally, Kyla has been a cheerleader, earning<br />

two letters cheering for varsity football and three letters<br />

cheering for varsity basketball. She won the Rising Star<br />

Award during the 2020-21 school year, was a UCA All-<br />

American cheerleader in 2022, and won the Eagle<br />

Award for the 2022-23 school year.<br />

She is this year’s student council secretary, National<br />

Honor Society president, and senior class president. She<br />

served last year as the junior class vice president. She<br />

also was this year’s homecoming queen.<br />

Outside of school, Kyla is the co-president of the<br />

Fairfield Rascals 4-H Club, has shown goats at the<br />

<strong>Madison</strong> County fair for nine years, and was the 2022<br />

<strong>Madison</strong> County Junior Fair goat ambassador. She has<br />

been a member of the <strong>Madison</strong> County Junior Fair<br />

notes and how to be a better college student,”<br />

Aubrey said.<br />

About Aubrey, Flores said, “Aubrey is<br />

always prepared for class and excelled in<br />

honors biology. Aubrey is a great<br />

leader/peer mentor in class, always willing<br />

to help her classmates out with labs or with<br />

our weekly quiz content or with daily homework.<br />

I was proud to hear that Aubrey had<br />

decided to take CCP biology and did well,<br />

along with other CCP courses. I believe her<br />

goal is to complete an associate’s degree before<br />

her high school graduation at London,<br />

and I am certain she will succeed. Aubrey is<br />

a dedicated student who sets goals for herself and works<br />

diligently to succeed in accomplishing them.”<br />

Aubrey plans to attend a four-year university to pursue<br />

a career in forensic science. She is the daughter of<br />

Harry and Sarah Miller of London.<br />

The London Rotary Club has a proud history dating<br />

back to 1929. It is a member of Rotary International, a<br />

volunteer organization of 1.2 million businesses and<br />

professional leaders united worldwide to provide humanitarian<br />

service and help build good will and peace.<br />

Rotary Student of the Month: <strong>Madison</strong>-Plains<br />

Leader with bright future<br />

Kyla McCoy<br />

Board and is a Kayle Mast Photography<br />

senior ambassador.<br />

When asked to name a <strong>Madison</strong>-<br />

Plains staff member who inspires her, Kyla<br />

named April Sparks, assistant principal at<br />

the 7-12 building.<br />

“Her dedication to <strong>Madison</strong>-Plains<br />

truly shows each day in the school building.<br />

She goes out of her way to stay involved<br />

with the students even though she does not<br />

see them each day in the classroom,” Kyla<br />

said. “Mrs. Sparks also works very hard to<br />

make school enjoyable for the students and<br />

always has a positive and personable demeanor.<br />

It is very obvious that she strives to keep the<br />

student body involved by coming up with new activities<br />

that interest everyone. Although she has only been at<br />

<strong>Madison</strong>-Plains for a short amount of time, she has<br />

truly made a positive impact on many and has become<br />

such an inspiration to the students at our school.”<br />

About Kyla, Sparks said, “Kyla is a true leader who<br />

leads by example. Her love for her school is evident in<br />

her actions and her efforts to help it develop. She acts<br />

with integrity in everything she does. I know Kyla has<br />

a bright future ahead of her and am excited to see what<br />

she accomplishes.”<br />

After graduation, Kyla plans to attend a four-year<br />

university to major in education or agricultural business.<br />

She is the daughter of Jennifer and Michael English.<br />

The London Rotary Club has a proud history dating<br />

back to 1929. It is a member of Rotary International, a<br />

volunteer organization of 1.2 million businesses and<br />

professional leaders united worldwide to provide humanitarian<br />

service and help build good will and peace.<br />

‘Sounds of Season’ auditions<br />

Each December, the <strong>Madison</strong> County Arts Council (MCAC) hosts<br />

“Sounds of The Season,” a concert featuring local talent.<br />

This year, the event will take place at 7 p.m. Dec. 17 at London’s<br />

First United Methodist Church.<br />

MCAC is holding auditions at 6 p.m. Nov. 20-21 at Brennan Loft,<br />

158 S. Main St., London. Those who audition must bring a prepared<br />

number. Singers must bring a copy of their sheet music. An accompanist<br />

will be provided. No compact discs or digital accompaniment<br />

is permitted. Performers of all kinds are welcome.<br />

For those who are chosen to perform, a rehearsal will take place<br />

at 9 a.m. Dec. 16.<br />

MCAC is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing and<br />

fostering education and entertainment through sponsorship and<br />

presentation of the performing and visual arts in <strong>Madison</strong> County.<br />

In addition to Sounds of the Season, MCAC annually sponsors a<br />

countywide summer musical, Young Artist Showcase, dinner theater<br />

opportunities, and fine arts scholarships to <strong>Madison</strong> County<br />

high school students.<br />

HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR<br />

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4TH<br />

9 a.m. - 2 p.m.<br />

MADISON COUNTY SENIOR CENTER<br />

280 WEST HIGH STREET<br />

LONDON, OHIO<br />

A wide variety of handcrafted items.<br />

Lots of yummy breakfast and lunch items available<br />

to purchase at our Senior Café.<br />

FREE Raffle prizes. You don’t need to<br />

be present to win as long as you can<br />

pick up your prize within 7 days.


AUCTION<br />

481<br />

BU<br />

ACRES<br />

5<br />

VA<br />

V<br />

ACANT GR<br />

SMA<br />

RAIN ALL A FARMS<br />

LAND<br />

UILDING CREA<br />

SITE GE<br />

5 LOCATIONS<br />

A<br />

BUY ANY INDIVIDU<br />

UAL TRA<br />

CT<br />

T, T, COMBIN<br />

NA<br />

ATION OR WHOLE<br />

MADISON | FA<br />

AYE<br />

YETTE | CHAMP<br />

PAIGN | CLARK COUNTIES<br />

4 12 ACRE<br />

S TOT<br />

AL TILLABLE<br />

WE<br />

DNE<br />

SDAY<br />

Y, , NOVE<br />

EMBER 8 • 6 PM<br />

A<br />

UCTION HELD at<br />

The Butc<br />

cher Block Restaurant<br />

2280 SR 56, London, OH<br />

PRODUCTIVE LAND D | GOOD SOILS<br />

TRACT #1: 73 ACRES<br />

w/73 ac. tillable. t 431.55' frontage<br />

on<br />

Linson Road. Located off Rt. 38 so<br />

outh of London, OH on Linson<br />

Road near <strong>Madison</strong> Plains School<br />

.. <strong>Madison</strong> County.<br />

TRACT #2: 171 ACRES<br />

w/145 ac<br />

c. tillable. 2554.19' frontage<br />

on US 62 & 179.51' on Harrison<br />

Road. Located on Rt. 62 on<br />

north side of <strong>Madison</strong> Mills, Fayet<br />

tte County.<br />

TRACT #3: 91.8 ACRES<br />

w/80 ac. tillable. 30' frontage<br />

on<br />

O'Day-Harrison Road. Located so<br />

outhwest of Mt. Sterling and<br />

north of <strong>Madison</strong> Mills on O'Da<br />

ay-Harrison Road, <strong>Madison</strong><br />

County.<br />

TRACT #4: 41 ACRES w/25 ac. tillable<br />

llable& & 17 ac. wooded. 250'<br />

frontage<br />

on Broadgauge<br />

Road. Located<br />

L off Rt. 56, 10 miles<br />

north of London, OH at 12815 Bro<br />

oadgauge Road, Clark Coun-<br />

ty.<br />

TRACT #4A:<br />

5 ACRE<br />

building site, s predominately tillable<br />

w/250' frontage adjacent to toTract t 4 -- 41 acres.<br />

TRACT #5: 105.4 ACRES<br />

w/83 ac. a tillable. 228.09' frontage<br />

on Urbana London Road. Located<br />

9 miles north of of London, OH<br />

on SR 56, Champaign & Clark cou<br />

unties.<br />

PREVIEW:WALK W<br />

LAND AT YOUR Y<br />

LEISURE ANYTIME<br />

O<br />

FOR DET<br />

S,<br />

TERMS & CONDITIONS,<br />

CALL<br />

800-450-3440 TAILED<br />

BROCHURE<br />

or WITH<br />

www.wilnat.com<br />

w.wilnat.com<br />

WILSON NATIONAL LLC<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

Mark MMark Wilson, Auctioneer A<br />

| | Brandon<br />

Wilson, Auctioneer


PAGE 16 - MADISON MESSENGER - <strong>October</strong> 292, <strong>2023</strong><br />

www.madisonmessengernews.com

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