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Tony Siqi Yun, piano| December 1, 2023 | House Program

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CLASSICAL / SOLOIST SERIES<br />

TONY SIQI YUN<br />

Piano<br />

DECEMBER 1 AT 7:30 PM<br />

CLASSICAL / SOLOIST SERIES<br />

TONY SIQI YUN<br />

Piano<br />

DECEMBER 1 AT 7:30 PM


CLASSICAL / SOLOIST SERIES<br />

TONY SIQI YUN<br />

Piano<br />

DECEMBER 1 AT 7:30 PM<br />

PROGRAM<br />

BACH/BUSONI Herr Gott, nun schleuss den Himmel auf, BWV 617<br />

LISZT Bénédiction de Dieu dans la Solitude, S. 173/3<br />

BEETHOVEN<br />

Piano Sonata No. 21 in C Major, Op. 53, Waldstein<br />

Allegro con brio<br />

Introduzione: Adagio molto<br />

Rondo: Allegretto moderato – Presto<br />

INTERMISSION<br />

BERIO<br />

“Wasserklavier” from Six Encores<br />

BRAHMS Piano Sonata No. 3 in F Minor, Op. 5<br />

Allegro maestoso<br />

Andante espressivo<br />

Scherzo: Allegro energico<br />

Intermezzo: Andante molto<br />

Finale: Allegro moderato ma rubato


PROGRAM NOTES<br />

The admiration Ferruccio Busoni (1866-1924)<br />

felt for the music of J.S. Bach can be seen in the<br />

many solo piano transcriptions he made of Bach’s<br />

music. Originally composed for organ, the chorale<br />

prelude that opens this concert (Lord God, Now<br />

Open the Heavens), requires exquisite voicing<br />

and judicious use of pedal to convey the original’s<br />

walking bass line, running sixteenth notes, and<br />

elongated chorale melody. Melodic projection<br />

also lies at the heart of Bénédiction de Dieu dans<br />

la Solitude (The Blessing of God in Solitude) by<br />

Franz Liszt (1811-1886). One of a set of 10 pieces<br />

inspired by the poetry of Alphonse de Lamartine,<br />

the poem at the heart of this piece expresses the<br />

unexpected discovery of faith in God. The way<br />

Liszt constantly shifts the piano figuration to<br />

embrace the repeated melodic lines makes it easy<br />

to hear in the music’s spirituality, a foreshadowing<br />

of Liszt’s own religious conversion when he later<br />

received holy orders at the Vatican.<br />

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) wrote 32<br />

piano sonatas and it’s perhaps not surprising that<br />

many of the more popular ones have been given<br />

nicknames for identification, or are referred to<br />

by the sonata’s dedicatee, as is the case with the<br />

Opus 57 Sonata inscribed to Count Ferdinand<br />

von Waldstein. In addition to the enormous<br />

technical challenges Beethoven requires of the<br />

performer in this sonata, it is remarkable how<br />

many novel piano effects are employed that<br />

make this sonata so distinctive. Fine examples<br />

of this sonic originality include the way that the<br />

first movement’s opening theme in solid thirds,<br />

is almost immediately activated with broken<br />

tremolos, and the final movement’s octave<br />

glissandos in both hands in the coda.<br />

Italian composer, Luciano Berio (1925-2003),<br />

was known during his lifetime as a leader of<br />

the avant-garde, but would occasionally write<br />

expressive, short piano pieces. In 1990, he<br />

published some of these piano miniatures as,<br />

Six Encores, with “Wasserklavier” being the<br />

oldest piece, dating from 1965. Its title translates<br />

as “Water Piano,” and the fluidity of the tempo<br />

and rolled chords reflect this.<br />

Johannes Brahms (1833-1897), composed and<br />

performed the three piano sonatas he marked<br />

as Opus 1, Opus 2, and today’s towering Opus<br />

5, before he turned 21. He would never again<br />

write a piano sonata and Opus 5, with its fivemovement<br />

design of alternating fast-slow<br />

movements, is the most performed and recorded<br />

of the three. This sonata’s outer movements are<br />

dramatically conceived with an emphasis on<br />

motivic development often employing intensely<br />

chromatic harmonies as heard in the elaborate<br />

realization of the descending stepwise-moving<br />

bassline the opens the first movement. The lyrical<br />

music in these outer movements is often set<br />

apart with beautifully supportive accompaniment<br />

patterns. The central third movement is marked<br />

Scherzo but there is a Viennese waltz quality that<br />

makes the music dance. One of the reasons for<br />

this sonata’s popularity undoubtedly lies in how<br />

the main musical idea from the second movement<br />

is reworked in the fourth movement, which<br />

explains this movement’s subtitle, Rückblick<br />

(Retrospect). This moment of calm is balanced<br />

by the steady build-up in the final movement to a<br />

rapturous coda in F major that continually gains<br />

in velocity and bravura until the dramatic widely<br />

spaced chords at the movement’s conclusion.<br />

©<strong>2023</strong> by John Burge for the Isabel<br />

ABOUT TONY SIQI YUN<br />

“<strong>Tony</strong> is a true poet of the keyboard. Expressive,<br />

and with his own distinct voice, yet elegant and<br />

posied.” — Pianist Magazine<br />

The Canadian-born pianist <strong>Tony</strong> <strong>Siqi</strong> <strong>Yun</strong>, Gold<br />

Medalist at the First China International Music<br />

Competition (2019) and awarded the Rheingau<br />

Music Festival’s <strong>2023</strong> Lotto-Förderpreis, is quickly<br />

becoming a sought-after soloist and recitalist.<br />

During the 2022-23 season, he made his<br />

highly acclaimed subscription debut with the<br />

Philadelphia Orchestra under the baton of<br />

Yannick Nézet-Séguin, and this season, he joins<br />

Nézet-Séguin on a US Tour with Orchestre


Metropolitain, including an appearance at<br />

Carnegie Hall. Also in <strong>2023</strong>-24, he makes debut<br />

appearances at the Colorado Music Festival, the<br />

Aspen Festival, the Vail Dance Festival and with<br />

the Hamilton (ON) Philharmonic, conducted<br />

by Gemma New. Other engagements include<br />

Edmonton Symphony and Orchestra Lumos with<br />

Michael Stern, the Rhode Island Philharmonic<br />

with Joseph Young and the New Jersey<br />

Symphony. <strong>Tony</strong> has also appeared with the<br />

Cleveland Orchestra, Toronto Symphony, Buffalo<br />

Philharmonic, Orchestre de Chambre de Paris<br />

and Shanghai Symphony Orchestra.<br />

<strong>Tony</strong> regularly performs solo recitals in both<br />

Europe and North America. Recent and future<br />

highlights include his debuts at the Hamburg<br />

Elbphilharmonie, Gewandhaus Leipzig, Tonhalle<br />

Düsseldorf, Philharmonie Luxembourg and in<br />

North America at Stanford Live, Gilmore Rising<br />

Stars Series, and 92nd Street Y in New York, with<br />

a return visit to the Vancouver Recital Series.<br />

He is a recipient of the Jerome L. Greene<br />

Fellowship at the Juilliard School where he<br />

studies with Professors Yoheved Kaplinsky and<br />

Matti Raekallio. ●<br />

Give the gift of music<br />

this holiday season with an<br />

Isabel Gift Certificate<br />

in the amount of your choice.<br />

Janina<br />

Fialkowska,<br />

piano<br />

IN THE<br />

NEW<br />

YEAR<br />

MANCHESTER COLLECTIVE<br />

WITH ABEL SELAOCOE<br />

GRYPHON TRIO<br />

CLASSICAL / SOLOIST SERIES<br />

Sunday, Jan 21, 2024, 2:30 pm<br />

Praised for her musical<br />

integrity and refreshing<br />

natural approach, pianist<br />

Janina Fialkowska has<br />

been hailed as “one of<br />

the Grandes Dames of<br />

piano playing” (Franfurter<br />

Allgemeine). A venerated<br />

interpreter of the music<br />

of Chopin, she makes her<br />

long-awaited return to the<br />

Isabel, sharing the music<br />

that made her famous.<br />

SING AND SWING—<br />

A JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER<br />

PRESENTS PRODUCTION<br />

TICKETS:<br />

General Public $45+<br />

Faculty/Staff $41+<br />

Students $10+<br />

GIFT CARDS & TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: queensu.ca/theisabel · 613-533-2424

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