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The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 1<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Global <strong>Survey</strong> <strong>Report</strong><br />

WFD <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariat for Southern and Eastern Africa (WFD <strong>RSESA</strong>)<br />

Global Education Pre-Planning Project on the Human Rights <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

Compiled by Mr Colin Allen<br />

Project Co-ordinator<br />

<strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf and Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

Published in July 2008<br />

Front Page Cover Designer: Mr Dušan Nikolič<br />

Please contact:<br />

General Secretariat<br />

<strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

PO Box 65<br />

FIN-00401<br />

Helsinki, Finland<br />

Email: info@wfdeaf.org<br />

Website: www.wfdeaf.org<br />

Funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Co-operation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations <strong>of</strong><br />

Disabled Persons International Aid Association (Shia).<br />

Co-partnered by the Danish Deaf Association (DDL), Finnish Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (FAD), <strong>No</strong>rwegian Association <strong>of</strong><br />

the Deaf (NDF) and Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR).<br />

© Copyright by the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf and Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

All rights reserved. When referring to or quoting any part <strong>of</strong> the report it is required that the publisher and the original<br />

publication be mentioned in the following form: ‘Global <strong>Survey</strong> <strong>Report</strong> WFD <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariat for Southern and<br />

Eastern Africa (WFD <strong>RSESA</strong>) by the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf and the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf,<br />

2008’.<br />

ISBN 978-952-9648-10-8<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 2<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Table <strong>of</strong> Contents<br />

1.0 Appreciation 7<br />

2.0 Introduction 8<br />

3.0 Methodology<br />

10<br />

3.1 Development <strong>of</strong> <strong>Survey</strong> Questionnaire<br />

10<br />

3.2 Implementation <strong>of</strong> the Global Education Pre-Planning Project on the<br />

Human Rights <strong>of</strong> Deaf People in WFD <strong>RSESA</strong><br />

10<br />

3.3 <strong>Report</strong>ing<br />

11<br />

3.4 <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group Meeting<br />

11<br />

4.0 Executive Summary <strong>of</strong> <strong>Survey</strong> Results<br />

12<br />

4.1 Background <strong>of</strong> the Country Respondents<br />

13<br />

4.1.1 Classification <strong>of</strong> the Developing Countries/Developed<br />

Countries<br />

13<br />

4.1.2 Contact Details <strong>of</strong> Country Respondents<br />

13<br />

4.1.3 Country Respondent Memberships<br />

13<br />

4.1.4 Background <strong>of</strong> the Country Respondents<br />

14<br />

4.2 Population <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

16<br />

4.3 Legislation and Policies<br />

18<br />

4.4 Access to Government Services<br />

19<br />

4.5 Access to the Media<br />

19<br />

4.6 Status <strong>of</strong> the National Sign Language(s)<br />

20<br />

4.7 Access to Education<br />

20<br />

4.8 Status <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreting Services<br />

22<br />

4.9 Employment<br />

23<br />

4.10 General Comments<br />

25<br />

5.0 Recommendations<br />

26<br />

5.1 Increase Knowledge <strong>of</strong> the United Nations Conventions<br />

26<br />

5.2 Training on the United Nations Convention on the Rights <strong>of</strong> Persons<br />

with Disabilities (CRPD)<br />

26<br />

5.3 Organisational Review<br />

26<br />

5.4 Organisational Development Training<br />

26<br />

5.5 Training for the National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf and Deaf<br />

Groups/Organisations<br />

27<br />

5.6 Advocacy for the Improvement <strong>of</strong> the Standard <strong>of</strong> Living for Deaf<br />

People<br />

27<br />

6.0 Geography and Population<br />

28<br />

6.1 Botswana<br />

28<br />

6.2 Burundi<br />

28<br />

6.3 Eritrea<br />

28<br />

6.4 Ethiopia<br />

29<br />

6.5 Kenya<br />

29<br />

6.6 Lesotho<br />

29<br />

6.7 Madagascar<br />

30<br />

6.8 Malawi<br />

30<br />

6.9 Mozambique<br />

31<br />

6.10 Namibia<br />

31<br />

6.11 Rwanda<br />

32<br />

6.12 Seychelles<br />

32<br />

6.13 South Africa<br />

32<br />

6.14 Sudan<br />

33<br />

6.15 Swaziland<br />

33<br />

6.16 Tanzania<br />

33<br />

6.17 Uganda<br />

34<br />

6.18 Zambia<br />

34<br />

6.19 Zimbabwe<br />

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7.0 <strong>Survey</strong> Results<br />

35<br />

7.1.0 Contact Details<br />

35<br />

7.2.0 National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

42<br />

7.2.1 Please provide the number <strong>of</strong> members your National Association <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Deaf/Deaf Group has in your country.<br />

42<br />

7.2.1.1 Deaf Members<br />

42<br />

7.2.1.2 Hard <strong>of</strong> Hearing Members<br />

42<br />

7.2.1.3 Hearing Members<br />

43<br />

7.2.1.4 Summary Status <strong>of</strong> the Associations’/Groups’ Memberships<br />

43<br />

7.2.2 In what year was your National Association/Deaf Group established?<br />

44<br />

7.2.3 Does your Deaf Association/Deaf Group have Statutes/a Constitution? 44<br />

7.2.4 Does your government recognise your national organisation as the<br />

representative <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in your country?<br />

44<br />

7.2.5 Please list some <strong>of</strong> the areas in which your association/group has<br />

adopted a policy statement.<br />

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The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 3<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.2.6 Please list the six highest priority issues/actions in your strategic action<br />

plan.<br />

7.2.7 Please describe the structure <strong>of</strong> your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf/<br />

Deaf Group (e.g. Congress/annual meeting/board/executive/districts<br />

/local associations and so forth).<br />

7.2.7.1 How many affiliated regional and/or local Deaf Associations<br />

are part <strong>of</strong> your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf?<br />

7.2.8 How many <strong>of</strong> your board members are Deaf?<br />

7.2.9 How many members <strong>of</strong> the board are Deaf women and how many are<br />

Deaf men?<br />

7.2.10 Does your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf/Deaf Group have<br />

committees for specific areas <strong>of</strong> interest or affiliation with any other<br />

relevant independent groups in your country?<br />

7.2.11 Does your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf/Deaf Group have any paid<br />

staff members?<br />

7.2.11.1 How many <strong>of</strong> the paid staff members are women and how<br />

many are men?<br />

7.2.11.2 How many <strong>of</strong> the paid staff members are Deaf?<br />

7.2.12 Is your Chief Executive Officer/Executive Director/Person-In-Charge<br />

Deaf?<br />

7.3.0 Population <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

7.3.1 Does your country’s government have any <strong>of</strong>ficial number <strong>of</strong> Deaf<br />

people in your country?<br />

7.3.2 Does your Association/Group have any <strong>of</strong>ficial or approximate figures<br />

<strong>of</strong> the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people living in your country?<br />

7.3.3 Does your Association/Group have any <strong>of</strong>ficial or approximate<br />

numbers <strong>of</strong> Deaf people who use sign language as their primary<br />

language?<br />

7.3.4 Does the situation <strong>of</strong> HIV/AIDS in your country affect Deaf women, men<br />

and children?<br />

7.4.0 Legislation and Policies<br />

7.4.1 Does your country’s government recognise Deaf people as citizens on<br />

an equal basis as other citizens in your country?<br />

7.4.2 Does your country’s government have an <strong>of</strong>fice responsible for services<br />

for People with Disabilities?<br />

7.4.2.1 If yes, what is the name, address and website <strong>of</strong> the<br />

government <strong>of</strong>fice that is responsible for services for People<br />

with Disabilities in your country?<br />

7.4.3 Does your country’s Government have any legislation or policies for<br />

Deaf people (or People with Disabilities in general)?<br />

7.4.3.1 If yes, please list some <strong>of</strong> the policies or legislation that<br />

relate to Deaf people (or People with Disabilities).<br />

7.4.4 Does your country’s Government have any anti-discrimination laws for<br />

Deaf people (or People with Disabilities)?<br />

7.4.5 Does your country’s government provide any services specifically for<br />

the Deaf Community through its government departments?<br />

7.4.5.1 If yes, what types <strong>of</strong> service are provided specifically for the<br />

Deaf Community by your country’s government?<br />

7.4.5.2 What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> the current service(s)<br />

specifically provided for the Deaf Community by your<br />

country’s government?<br />

7.4.5.3 If no, why does your country’s government not provide any<br />

service specifically for the Deaf Community?<br />

7.4.6 Does your Association/Group have any contact with your current<br />

country’s government?<br />

7.4.6.1 What type <strong>of</strong> contact does your Association/Group have with<br />

your country’s current government?<br />

7.4.7 Does your Association/Group receive any financial support from your<br />

country’s current government?<br />

7.4.7.1 What is the amount <strong>of</strong> annual financial support from your<br />

country’s government?<br />

7.4.7.2 What is the purpose <strong>of</strong> the financial support from your<br />

country’s government to the Deaf Community?<br />

7.4.8 Do Deaf people have a right to vote in national, regional and local<br />

elections?<br />

7.4.9 Are Deaf people allowed to obtain a driver’s licence?<br />

7.4.10 Are Deaf people allowed to marry Deaf or other partners?<br />

7.4.11 Are Deaf people allowed to have children?<br />

7.4.12 Are Deaf people allowed to adopt children?<br />

7.4.12.1 If Deaf people are not allowed to drive, please list the<br />

Government legislation or policy that stops them from being<br />

allowed to drive.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 4<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).<br />

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7.4.12.2 If Deaf people are not allowed to adopt children, please list<br />

any specific Government legislation or policy that stops Deaf<br />

people from being allowed to adopt children.<br />

7.5.0 Access to Government Services<br />

7.5.1 Do Deaf people have access to government services such as education,<br />

health care, employment, social welfare and any general government<br />

services?<br />

7.5.1.1 If yes, how do Deaf people access these government services?<br />

7.5.1.2 Are Deaf people satisfied with the level <strong>of</strong> access they have to<br />

the government services?<br />

7.5.2 Are Deaf people entitled to any financial assistance from your country’s<br />

government?<br />

7.5.2.1 What type <strong>of</strong> financial assistance are Deaf people entitled to<br />

receive from your country’s government?<br />

7.6.0 Access to the Media<br />

7.6.1 Does your country’s government provide sign language services for<br />

news and/or current affairs programmes on public television?<br />

7.6.2 Does your country’s government provide subtitles/captions for news<br />

and/or current affairs programmes?<br />

7.6.3 Does your country’s government <strong>of</strong>fer governmental documents in your<br />

country’s sign language(s)?<br />

7.7.0 Status <strong>of</strong> the National Sign Language(s)<br />

7.7.1 Does your country’s government formally recognise your country’s sign<br />

language(s)?<br />

7.7.1.1 What legislation/regulation formally recognises your country’s<br />

sign language(s)?<br />

7.7.1.2 When did your country’s government formally recognise your<br />

country’s sign language(s)?<br />

7.7.1.3 Does your Deaf Association lobby your government for the<br />

recognition <strong>of</strong> your country’s sign language(s)?<br />

7.7.1.4 If no, please explain the reason your Association does not<br />

lobby your current government for the recognition <strong>of</strong> your<br />

country’s sign language(s).<br />

7.7.2 Does your country have a sign language dictionary?<br />

7.8.0 Access to Education<br />

7.8.1 Does your country’s government recognise that Deaf children and Deaf<br />

students have the right to receive an education?<br />

7.8.2 Does your country’s government have any legislation or policies on Deaf<br />

Education?<br />

7.8.2.1 If yes, please list the specific name <strong>of</strong> the legislation or<br />

policies relating to Deaf Education.<br />

7.8.3 Does your country’s government provide any <strong>of</strong> the following<br />

educational settings for Deaf children and Deaf students?<br />

7.8.4 Does your country’s government provide bilingual education using your<br />

country’s sign language(s) for Deaf children and Deaf students in your<br />

country?<br />

7.8.4.1 If yes, in which educational setting is bilingual education<br />

<strong>of</strong>fered in your country using your sign language(s)?<br />

7.8.5 Does your country have any schools specifically for Deaf children and<br />

Deaf students?<br />

7.8.5.1 If yes, how many Deaf schools does your country have?<br />

7.8.5.2 If no, where do Deaf children and students receive an<br />

education in your country?<br />

7.8.5.3 What is the educational approach for communicating with<br />

Deaf children and students at the Deaf School in your country?<br />

7.8.6 What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> the level <strong>of</strong> education received<br />

by Deaf children and Deaf students in your country?<br />

7.8.7 What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> the current literacy level <strong>of</strong> Deaf<br />

children and Deaf students in your country?<br />

7.8.8 Do Deaf people have access to a University education in your country?<br />

7.8.8.1 If yes, how many Universities provide access to studies for<br />

Deaf people in your country?<br />

7.8.8.2 If no, why do Deaf people not have access to a University<br />

education in your country?<br />

7.8.9 Do Deaf people have full access to sign language interpreting services<br />

at University?<br />

7.9.0 Status <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreting Services<br />

7.9.1 Does your country have any sign language interpreters?<br />

7.9.1.1 How many sign language interpreters does your country have?<br />

7.9.1.2 Are there any sign language interpreting qualifications<br />

available in your country?<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 5<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).<br />

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7.9.1.3 Who provides the training for people who want to become<br />

qualified sign language interpreters?<br />

7.9.1.4 How many years <strong>of</strong> training are available to someone who<br />

wants to become a sign language interpreter?<br />

7.9.1.5 How many sign language interpreters in your country have<br />

formal interpreting qualifications?<br />

7.9.1.6 How do Deaf people access sign language interpreters?<br />

7.9.2 Does your country have sign language interpreting services?<br />

7.9.2.1 If yes, who provides these sign language interpreting services?<br />

7.9.2.2 In what areas <strong>of</strong> life are sign language interpreting services<br />

available in your country?<br />

7.9.2.3 What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> these sign language interpreting<br />

services?<br />

7.9.3 Do sign language interpreters receive payment for interpreting services<br />

in your country?<br />

7.9.3.1 Who is responsible for paying for a sign language interpreter?<br />

7.9.3.2 What is the average hourly rate <strong>of</strong> payment for sign language<br />

interpreters in your country?<br />

7.9.3.3 Do your sign language interpreters provide voluntary service<br />

for all sign language interpreting assignments?<br />

7.9.4 Does your country have a National Association <strong>of</strong> Sign Language<br />

Interpreters?<br />

7.9.4.1 Is your National Association <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreters<br />

independent from your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf?<br />

7.9.5 Is there a national Code <strong>of</strong> Ethics for sign language interpreters<br />

in your country?<br />

7.9.6 Is there any legislation or policy in your country which states that the<br />

government has a responsibility for the provision <strong>of</strong> sign language<br />

interpreting services?<br />

7.9.6.1 If yes, please list the legislation or policies that specifically<br />

state the government has a responsibility for the provision <strong>of</strong><br />

sign language interpreting services.<br />

7.10.0 Employment<br />

7.10.1 Does your country’s government consider that Deaf people have a right<br />

to be employed and earn a standard salary?<br />

7.10.2 Does your country’s government have any anti-discrimination laws in<br />

the area <strong>of</strong> employment, especially for Deaf people or People with<br />

Disabilities?<br />

7.10.2.1 If yes, please write clearly the name <strong>of</strong> any legislation or<br />

policy that relates to anti-discrimination in employment.<br />

7.10.3 Does your Association/Group have any <strong>of</strong>ficial or approximate figures<br />

on the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people who are in paid employment in your<br />

country?<br />

7.10.3.1 If yes, how many Deaf people are in employment?<br />

7.10.3.2 What are the most common areas <strong>of</strong> work for Deaf people in<br />

your country?<br />

7.10.4 Does your country have any figures on the percentage <strong>of</strong> Deaf people<br />

who are unemployed?<br />

7.10.4.1 Why are Deaf people unemployed in your country?<br />

7.10.5 Does your country provide employment services to assist unemployed<br />

Deaf people to look for employment?<br />

7.10.5.1 Who is responsible for providing employment services for<br />

unemployed Deaf people in your country?<br />

7.11.0 General<br />

7.11.1 Which <strong>of</strong> the following does your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf/Deaf<br />

Group consider to be the highest priority for your Deaf Community?<br />

7.11.2 Does your Association/Group have any other concerns about the<br />

standard <strong>of</strong> living <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in your country?<br />

8.0 Appendices:<br />

Appendix <strong>No</strong> 1 Cover Letter<br />

Appendix <strong>No</strong> 2 Global Human Rights <strong>Survey</strong><br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 6<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).<br />

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1.0 Appreciation<br />

The <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) and the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) wish to recognise the cooperation<br />

and support from organisations and individuals who contributed their valuable time to the second phase <strong>of</strong> the sevenregion<br />

Global Education Pre-Planning Project on the Human Rights <strong>of</strong> Deaf People. This fifth phase took place in the WFD<br />

<strong>Regional</strong> Secretariat for Eastern and Southern Africa (WFD <strong>RSESA</strong>).<br />

The funding organisations:<br />

• Swedish Organisations <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons International Aid Association (Shia)<br />

• Co-partners Danish Deaf Association (DDL), Finnish Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (FAD), <strong>No</strong>rwegian Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

(NDF) and Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR)<br />

The members <strong>of</strong> the Project Steering Committee:<br />

• Mr Tomas Hedberg, Sign Language Policy Co-ordinator, Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR)<br />

• Mr Feliciano Sola Limia, Vice President, <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD)<br />

• Ms Meri Hyrske-Fischer, Project Manager, <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD)<br />

• Ms Anneli Joneken, Project Co-ordinator, Swedish Organisations <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons International Aid Association (Shia)<br />

The members <strong>of</strong> WFD <strong>RSESA</strong>, who co-operated so efficiently:<br />

• Mr Bruno Druchen, Contact Person, WFD <strong>RSESA</strong><br />

• Ms Susan Kirima, <strong>Regional</strong> Co-ordinator, WFD <strong>RSESA</strong> Global Human Rights Project<br />

• Deaf <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> South Africa:-<br />

o Mrs Wilma Newhoudt-Druchen, President<br />

o Mr Francois Deysel, Personal Assistant to National Director<br />

o Mr William Mashabela, Driver<br />

The members <strong>of</strong> <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group <strong>of</strong> the Global Human Rights Pre-Planning Project in WFD <strong>RSESA</strong>:<br />

• Mr Bruno Druchen, South Africa<br />

• Mr Peter Makhubu, Swaziland<br />

• Ms Deborah Oyuu Iyute, Uganda<br />

The seventeen Ordinary Members <strong>of</strong> WFD <strong>RSESA</strong> who responded to the survey:<br />

1. Botswana Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

2. Burundi National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

3. Eritrean National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

4. Ethiopian National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

5. Kenya National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

6. National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf – Lesotho<br />

7. <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf in Madagascar<br />

8. Malawi National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

9. Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf in Mozambique<br />

10. Namibian National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

11. Rwanda National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

12. Deaf <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> South Africa<br />

13. Swaziland National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

14. Tanzania Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

15. Uganda National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

16. Zambia National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

17. Zimbabwe National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

The two countries in Southern and Eastern Africa who are not WFD Ordinary Members, who also responded to the survey:<br />

1. Association <strong>of</strong> People with Hearing Impairment (Seychelles)<br />

2. Sudanese National Union <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

<strong>No</strong>t least, others who have supported the project:<br />

• Mr Markku Jokinen, President, <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD)<br />

• Ms Liz Scott Gibson, President, <strong>World</strong> Association <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreters (WASLI)<br />

• Mr Knud Søndergaard, Finance Officer, <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD)<br />

• Staff members <strong>of</strong> the Albanian National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (ANAD)<br />

• Ms Phillipa Sandholm, Administrative Assistant, <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD)<br />

• Ms Carol-lee Aquiline, <strong>English</strong> Grammar Editor for the Project <strong>Report</strong>s<br />

• Ms Corrie Tijsseling, WFD Expert in Deaf Education<br />

• Ms Vera Jovanović, Ms Desanka Žižić and Mr Boba Milošević, Film Production Team for the DVD in International Sign<br />

• Everyone who contributed time to the Global Human Rights Pre-Planning Project<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 7<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


2.0 Introduction<br />

The Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) is the national organisation <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in Sweden and an Ordinary<br />

Member <strong>of</strong> the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD). SDR has been involved in 20 international projects with Deaf people in<br />

Africa, Asia, Central America and the Russian <strong>Federation</strong>, with expertise in the fields <strong>of</strong> Deaf Education, Sign Language, Deaf<br />

Women and Children, Sign Language Interpreters, Organisational Development and Income Generating Activities. SDR is a<br />

member <strong>of</strong> Shia (Swedish Organisations <strong>of</strong> Handicapped International Aid Association) an umbrella organisation for<br />

developmental co-operation <strong>of</strong> Disability Organisations. Shia was founded in 1981 in connection with “The UN Year <strong>of</strong> People<br />

with Disabilities” and when the Disability Decade began. Today there are 28 member organisations affiliated with Shia.<br />

SDR has had contact with many Deaf organisations in developing countries and recognises that approximately 90% <strong>of</strong> the world's<br />

Deaf people have never been to school and are thus more or less illiterate. Sign language is repressed in many countries and its<br />

use is not permitted in education. The consequence is that Deaf people are not aware <strong>of</strong> the rights they have in society, but live<br />

as a highly marginalised group in most developing countries. There is usually no access to information for Deaf people, which<br />

means that they do not even know what is happening in their immediate society and even less so in the world. Of the world's<br />

Deaf people only about five percent (5%) can read and write. This is due to the fact that Deaf people have not been educated in<br />

sign language. Improving the status <strong>of</strong> sign language has consequences for all areas <strong>of</strong> life for Deaf people; it opens up<br />

possibilities for participation, information and influence, and reduction <strong>of</strong> poverty.<br />

SDR approached WFD to become a partner organisation because WFD is an international organisation with global coverage<br />

although not all countries in the world are members. In order to reach as many Deaf people as possible in this project, WFD is a<br />

natural choice for SDR, as it is one <strong>of</strong> WFD's member organisations.<br />

WFD was established in 1951 and acts as an interest group representing Deaf people who use sign language. WFD works in<br />

partnership with the United Nations (UN) and its agencies and member states, other international organisations, national<br />

organisations <strong>of</strong> Deaf people, <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariats and experts. With these partners WFD pursues the rights <strong>of</strong> Deaf people to<br />

participate in society, the State and other areas <strong>of</strong> life as equal citizens.<br />

WFD has a large network with seven <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariats, national organisations <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in 130 member countries and<br />

experts within different areas: training, sign language, technology and accessibility, women's issues, human rights, health,<br />

employment and developing countries.<br />

SDR approached the <strong>No</strong>rdic Council <strong>of</strong> the Deaf to request that the four <strong>No</strong>rdic Ordinary Members <strong>of</strong> WFD become involved as<br />

co-partners in the project; these four members are the Danish Deaf Association (DDL), Finnish Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (FAD),<br />

<strong>No</strong>rwegian Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (NDF) and Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR). SDR forwarded a project proposal<br />

to Shia to carry out pre-planning survey work in conjunction with seven <strong>of</strong> WFD's regions; the proposal was granted funding for a<br />

pre-planning survey in the<br />

• Eastern Europe and Middle Asia <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariat <strong>of</strong> the WFD (WFD EEMARS)<br />

• WFD <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariat for Asia and the Pacific (WFD RSA/P)<br />

• WFD <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariat for South America (WFD RSSA)<br />

• WFD <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariat for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean (WFD MCAC)<br />

• WFD <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariat for Eastern and Southern Africa (WFD <strong>RSESA</strong>)<br />

• WFD Interim <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariat for Western and Central Africa Region (WFD WCAR)<br />

• WFD Interim <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariat for the Arab Region (WFD RSAR)<br />

Goals <strong>of</strong> the pre-planning survey<br />

• Compilation <strong>of</strong> an analysis <strong>of</strong> the situation for Deaf people in each <strong>of</strong> the seven regions according to a common<br />

questionnaire. Data is to be produced from three <strong>of</strong> the regions during the first year <strong>of</strong> pre-planning and from four <strong>of</strong><br />

the regions during the second year <strong>of</strong> pre-planning.<br />

• Production <strong>of</strong> documentation <strong>of</strong> assessment <strong>of</strong> the capacity <strong>of</strong> the national organisations and the regional structure in<br />

each region.<br />

• Production <strong>of</strong> an education plan for three <strong>of</strong> the regions during the first year <strong>of</strong> pre-planning and for four <strong>of</strong> the regions<br />

during the second year <strong>of</strong> pre-planning.<br />

• Development <strong>of</strong> training materials, methodologies and pre-planning organisational work to be used in the project.<br />

• Compilation <strong>of</strong> a global training plan on human rights for the WFD organisations to use as the basis for a complete<br />

project application to be submitted to Shia during autumn 2008 for consideration for budget 2009.<br />

Project Steering Committee<br />

A Project Steering Committee was formed to overview the survey work carried out by the Project Co-ordinator. The members <strong>of</strong><br />

the Steering Committee are:<br />

• Mr Tomas Hedberg, Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR)<br />

• Mr Feliciano Sola Limia, <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD)<br />

• Ms Meri Hyrske-Fischer, <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD)<br />

• Ms Anneli Joneken, Swedish Organisations <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons International Aid Association (Shia)<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 8<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Project Co-ordinator<br />

SDR and WFD approached the Finnish Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (FAD) to manage the project; and FAD appointed Mr Colin Allen to<br />

take on the role <strong>of</strong> Project Co-ordinator and oversee project management within the seven regions between July 2007 and<br />

December 2008. Mr Allen is based in Belgrade, Serbia where he has been associated with other FAD projects within the Balkan<br />

Region.<br />

WFD <strong>RSESA</strong> <strong>Regional</strong> Co-ordinator and <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group<br />

The position <strong>of</strong> a <strong>Regional</strong> Co-ordinator is established for each survey region. The Steering Committee agreed to appoint Ms<br />

Susan Kirima as <strong>Regional</strong> Co-ordinator for the WFD <strong>RSESA</strong> region. Ms Kirima, who is based in Nairobi, Kenya, was responsible to<br />

establish a communication network with the members <strong>of</strong> WFD <strong>RSESA</strong> as well as to co-ordinate the meeting for the <strong>Regional</strong><br />

Working Group in Johannesburg, South Africa with assistance from Mr Bruno Druchen, National Director, Deaf <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

South Africa.<br />

Each survey region also had their own <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group and the WFD <strong>RSESA</strong> <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group had three members:<br />

• Mr Bruno Druchen, South Africa<br />

• Mr Peter Makhubu, Swaziland<br />

• Ms Deborah Ouute Iyute, Uganda<br />

The members <strong>of</strong> the <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group were responsible to acknowledge the <strong>Survey</strong> Results as they were received from 18<br />

country members and non-members <strong>of</strong> WFD <strong>RSESA</strong>. They had a pivotal role in preparing a list <strong>of</strong> recommendations for the<br />

training project work to be carried out for their region in the next stage <strong>of</strong> the project.<br />

Please note:<br />

Mr Bruno Druchen Ms Deborah Oyuu Iyute Ms Susan Kirima Mr Peter Makhubu<br />

The pre-planning survey is a basic situational analysis that aims to collect information from relevant representatives and is not<br />

intended to be a complete in-depth analysis <strong>of</strong> the situation <strong>of</strong> Deaf persons in WFD <strong>RSESA</strong>. The data and issues presented in<br />

this report are based on the information received from these representatives and members <strong>of</strong> WFD <strong>RSESA</strong>.<br />

Additional notes:<br />

Terminology used in this report is taken from the survey.<br />

Each country’s exchange rate into Euro Currency is based on the rate given on 31 st May 2008 on the website<br />

www.oanda.com/convert/classic.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 9<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


3.0 Methodology<br />

3.1 Development <strong>of</strong> <strong>Survey</strong> Questionnaire<br />

According to the framework <strong>of</strong> the Global Education Pre-Planning Project on the Human Rights <strong>of</strong> Deaf People, the Project Coordinator<br />

developed a survey questionnaire to collect information on the standard <strong>of</strong> living <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in all <strong>of</strong> the seven<br />

WFD <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariats, focussing on the areas <strong>of</strong>:<br />

1. Status <strong>of</strong> the National Deaf Association<br />

2. Population <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

3. Legislation and Policies<br />

4. Access to Government Services<br />

5. Access to the Media<br />

6. Status <strong>of</strong> the National Sign Language(s)<br />

7. Access to Education<br />

8. Status <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreting Services<br />

9. Employment Status <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

The Project Co-ordinator had prior experience in survey work with Deaf people in developing countries, having conducted the<br />

FAD – Balkan <strong>Survey</strong> Project in the countries <strong>of</strong> Macedonia, Serbia and Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Turkey between<br />

2004 and 2006. Therefore, some <strong>of</strong> the Balkan <strong>Survey</strong> Questions were simply modified for this Global <strong>Survey</strong> work. The Project<br />

Co-ordinator also liaised with the President <strong>of</strong> the <strong>World</strong> Association <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreters (WASLI) for her guidance on<br />

relevant questions regarding the Status <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreting Services.<br />

The questionnaire was intended to ensure that all appropriate data was received from each member within the <strong>Regional</strong><br />

Secretariat. The survey questions were approved by the Project Steering Committee prior to commencement <strong>of</strong> the Global<br />

Education Pre-Planning Project on the Human Rights <strong>of</strong> Deaf People. The questionnaire is available at the end <strong>of</strong> this report –<br />

Appendix <strong>No</strong> 2.<br />

3.2 Implementation <strong>of</strong> the Global Education Pre-Planning Project on the Human Rights <strong>of</strong> Deaf People in WFD <strong>RSESA</strong><br />

Subsequent to the appointment <strong>of</strong> the <strong>Regional</strong> Co-ordinator for WFD <strong>RSESA</strong>, the Project Co-ordinator and <strong>Regional</strong> Co-ordinator<br />

co-operated in confirming contact addresses for the 18 country members <strong>of</strong> WFD <strong>RSESA</strong>, and four countries that are not<br />

members <strong>of</strong> WFD <strong>RSESA</strong>. The Project Co-ordinator filmed the survey questions in International Sign on a DVD that was<br />

disseminated along with the survey questionnaire in written <strong>English</strong>. The <strong>Regional</strong> Co-ordinator prepared the survey package<br />

and arranged for it to be mailed from Nairobi, Kenya, to<br />

Seventeen (18) WFD Ordinary (Country) Members in Southern and Eastern Africa:<br />

1. Botswana Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

2. Burundi National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

3. Eritrean National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

4. Ethiopian National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

5. Kenya National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

6. National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf – Lesotho<br />

7. <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf in Madagascar<br />

8. Malawi National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

9. Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf in Mozambique<br />

10. Namibian National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

11. Rwanda National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

12. Somali National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

13. Deaf <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> South Africa<br />

14. Swaziland National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

15. Tanzania Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

16. Uganda National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

17. Zambia National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

18. Zimbabwe National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

And four (4) Countries in Southern and Eastern Africa that are not WFD Ordinary Members:<br />

1. National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf <strong>of</strong> Angola<br />

2. Association <strong>of</strong> People with Hearing Impairment (Seychelles)<br />

3. Sudanese National Union <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

4. Society for the Welfare <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (Mauritius)<br />

At the end <strong>of</strong> May 2008, the Project Co-ordinator arranged to email the survey package to Seychelles.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 10<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


3.3 <strong>Report</strong>ing<br />

The <strong>Regional</strong> Co-ordinator was the central contact point for collection <strong>of</strong> the survey. The Project Co-ordinator designed a basic<br />

data programme with Excel s<strong>of</strong>tware to record respondent country answers for all surveys received from the <strong>Regional</strong> Coordinator,<br />

i.e. 19 respondent countries. He was then responsible for summarising the results into categorised sections <strong>of</strong> the<br />

report, available under “<strong>Survey</strong> Results” on page 35. The Project Co-ordinator also prepared the “Executive Summary”, found<br />

on page 12.<br />

Once the report was drafted the <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group gave comments and feedback, which were then taken into<br />

consideration in the editing phase <strong>of</strong> the report.<br />

A copy will be sent to all members <strong>of</strong> WFD <strong>RSESA</strong>, WFD, Danish Deaf Association (DDL), Finnish Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (FAD),<br />

<strong>No</strong>rwegian Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (NDF), Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR), <strong>World</strong> Association <strong>of</strong> Sign Language<br />

Interpreters (WASLI), Shia and other interested organisations. A compilation <strong>of</strong> the most relevant information from all reports<br />

will be available at the end <strong>of</strong> the project.<br />

3.4 <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group Meeting<br />

The members <strong>of</strong> the <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group and the <strong>Regional</strong> Co-ordinator met with the Project Co-ordinator in Johannesburg,<br />

South Africa, on 3 rd – 5 th June 2008. The purpose <strong>of</strong> the meeting was to discuss the major findings from the <strong>Survey</strong> Results and<br />

enable the <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group to identify priority issues to be acknowledged. The members <strong>of</strong> the <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group<br />

also had training on issues such as:<br />

a) Background <strong>of</strong> the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

b) Human Rights through Sign Languages<br />

c) Introduction <strong>of</strong> the Global Education Pre-Planning Project on the Human Rights <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

d) Brief Introduction to International Human Rights Instruments:<br />

1. Universal Declaration <strong>of</strong> Human Rights<br />

2. International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights<br />

3. International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights<br />

4. Convention on the Rights <strong>of</strong> the Child<br />

5. Convention on the Elimination <strong>of</strong> all Forms <strong>of</strong> Discrimination Against Women<br />

e) Periodic reporting, the new system <strong>of</strong> Universal Periodic Reviews and also shadow/alternative reports from NGOs<br />

f) UN Convention on the Rights <strong>of</strong> Persons with Disabilities<br />

The <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group summarised the high priority issues to be addressed for further training for the members <strong>of</strong> WFD<br />

<strong>RSESA</strong>. These can be found under “Recommendations” on page 26.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 11<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


4.0 Executive Summary <strong>of</strong> <strong>Survey</strong> Results<br />

The Executive Summary <strong>of</strong> <strong>Survey</strong> Results is categorised into ten sections and is based on the detailed data results found later in<br />

the report:<br />

1. National Associations <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

2. Population <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

3. Legislation and Policies<br />

4. Access to Government Services<br />

5. Access to the Media<br />

6. Status <strong>of</strong> the Country Sign Language(s)<br />

7. Access to Education<br />

8. Status <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreting Services<br />

9. Employment<br />

10. General Comments<br />

The target members <strong>of</strong> WFD <strong>RSESA</strong> who returned completed surveys were:<br />

1. Botswana Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

2. Burundi National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

3. Eritrean National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

4. Ethiopian National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

5. Kenya National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

6. National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf – Lesotho<br />

7. <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf in Madagascar<br />

8. Malawi National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

9. Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf in Mozambique<br />

10. Namibian National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

11. Rwanda National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

12. Deaf <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> South Africa<br />

13. Swaziland National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

14. Tanzania Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

15. Uganda National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

16. Zambia National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

17. Zimbabwe National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

And non-members who returned surveys were:<br />

1. Association <strong>of</strong> People with Hearing Impairment (Seychelles)<br />

2. Sudanese National Union <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

Somali made contact with the <strong>Regional</strong> Co-ordinator to inform her that the Somali National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf was not able<br />

to submit their survey due to the current political situation in the country; because <strong>of</strong> violence all the executive members <strong>of</strong><br />

the organisation have left the country.<br />

The <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group wished to make it known from the commencement <strong>of</strong> the Executive Summary that several answers<br />

to survey questions from the country <strong>of</strong> Botswana do not accurately reflect the situation there. However, although they knew<br />

the correct information, they decided that they did not wish to change these answers for the most part.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 12<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


4.1 Background <strong>of</strong> the Country Respondents<br />

4.1.1 Classification <strong>of</strong> Developing Countries/Developed Countries<br />

Reference: -<br />

(http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/DATASTATISTICS/0,,contentMDK:20420458~menuPK:64133156~pagePK:6413315<br />

0~piPK:64133175~theSitePK:239419,00.html)<br />

Based on the <strong>World</strong> Bank’s definition, three classifications were used for this analysis. Thirteen <strong>of</strong> the 19 country respondents in<br />

Southern and Eastern Africa are classified as Low Income (Burundi, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique,<br />

Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe); three are classified under Low Middle Income (Lesotho, Namibia<br />

and Swaziland), and three as Upper Middle Income (Botswana, Seychelles and South Africa).<br />

Country Low Income Low Middle Income Upper Middle Income<br />

Botswana �<br />

Burundi �<br />

Eritrea �<br />

Ethiopia �<br />

Kenya �<br />

Lesotho �<br />

Madagascar �<br />

Malawi �<br />

Mozambique �<br />

Namibia �<br />

Rwanda �<br />

Seychelles �<br />

South Africa �<br />

Sudan �<br />

Swaziland �<br />

Tanzania �<br />

Uganda �<br />

Zambia �<br />

Zimbabwe �<br />

Total 13 (68%) 3 (16%) 3 (16%)<br />

4.1.2 Contact Details <strong>of</strong> Country Respondents<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

Nineteen country respondents supplied their contact details. It was interesting to note that only four have websites (Eritrea,<br />

South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda). Only one country (Botswana) does not have email.<br />

4.1.3 Country Respondent Memberships<br />

Fifteen country respondents provided the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf members; the largest number <strong>of</strong> Deaf members is from Tanzania, with<br />

281,000 out <strong>of</strong> a total <strong>of</strong> 728,176 Deaf members in the entire WFD <strong>RSESA</strong> region. The lowest number <strong>of</strong> Deaf members provided<br />

was 18 in Seychelles. Four country respondents (Botswana, Kenya, Mozambique, and Namibia) did not supply the number <strong>of</strong><br />

Deaf members.<br />

Nine country respondents (Burundi, Eritrea, Lesotho, Madagascar, Rwanda, Seychelles, Sudan, Tanzania and Zimbabwe) supplied<br />

numbers <strong>of</strong> hard <strong>of</strong> hearing members and five country respondents (Burundi, Madagascar, Malawi, Seychelles and Zimbabwe)<br />

provided the number <strong>of</strong> hearing people who are members.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 13<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Country Total Deaf Members Total Hard <strong>of</strong> Hearing Members Total Hearing Members Total Members<br />

Botswana N/A N/A N/A N/A<br />

Burundi 815 (88%) 107 (11.5%) 5 (0.5%) 927<br />

Eritrea 2,200 (97%) 58 (3%) 0 2,258<br />

Ethiopia 5,000 (100%) 0 0 5,000<br />

Kenya N/A N/A N/A N/A<br />

Lesotho 1,998 (68%) 923 (32%) 0 2,921<br />

Madagascar 192 (88%) 2 (1%) 24 (11%) 218<br />

Malawi 1,200 (99%) 0 18 (1%) 1,218<br />

Mozambique N/A N/A N/A N/A<br />

Namibia N/A N/A N/A N/A<br />

Rwanda 100,000 (98%) 1,700 (2%) 0 101,700<br />

Seychelles 18 (50%) 6 (17%) 12 (33%) 36<br />

South Africa 20,497 (100%) 0 0 20,497<br />

Sudan 15,000 (99.5%) 50 (0.5%) 0 15,050<br />

Swaziland 1,120 (100%) 0 0 1,120<br />

Tanzania 281,000 (83%) 57,000 (17%) 0 338,000<br />

Uganda 4,700 (100%) 0 0 4,700<br />

Zambia 14,436 (100%) 0 0 14,436<br />

Zimbabwe 280,000 (99.5%) 750 (0.49%) 23 (0.01%) 280,773<br />

Total 728,176 60,596 82 788,854<br />

4.1.4 Background <strong>of</strong> the Country Respondents<br />

Seventeen out <strong>of</strong> 19 country respondents (Botswana, Burundi, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi,<br />

Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe) are Ordinary Members<br />

(OMs) <strong>of</strong> WFD and were established between 1929 to 2002; the oldest National Association in WFD <strong>RSESA</strong> is the one in South<br />

Africa, which was established in 1929, with the most recently-established being those in Botswana and Burundi (2002).<br />

Two country respondents, (Seychelles and Sudan) are not Ordinary Members <strong>of</strong> WFD. Regarding Sudan, the survey was sent to<br />

the Sudanese National Society for the Deaf as they are currently listed as the Ordinary Member <strong>of</strong> WFD; however the Project<br />

Co-ordinator received the survey back from the Sudanese National Union <strong>of</strong> the Deaf. The WFD Board is currently investigating<br />

which organisation should be the Ordinary Member, as the proper representative body for Deaf people in Sudan. Seychelles is an<br />

organisation for People with Hearing Impairment.<br />

All 19 country respondents have their own organisational statutes/constitutions. Seventeen are recognised by their country’s<br />

government as the association representing Deaf people; the two not recognised by their government are Botswana and<br />

Seychelles.<br />

Eighteen <strong>of</strong> 19 country respondents described their organisational charts; a brief overview <strong>of</strong> their structures is:<br />

• Most <strong>of</strong> the Associations hold a General Assembly or General Meeting every year, with the exception <strong>of</strong> two countries<br />

that hold meetings to elect their National Executive Board every three years<br />

• A large number <strong>of</strong> the Associations handle their own affairs and run annual meetings with their local regional members<br />

A full explanation <strong>of</strong> the organisational structures is provided on page 47.<br />

Fourteen <strong>of</strong> the 19 country respondents (Burundi, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Namibia, Rwanda, Seychelles,<br />

South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania and Uganda) outlined clear policy statements in the areas <strong>of</strong>:<br />

• Education<br />

• Employment<br />

• Human Rights for Deaf People<br />

• Sports for Deaf People<br />

• Sign Language<br />

• Sign Language Interpreters<br />

Other country respondents have not developed policy statements or did not provide this information.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 14<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Seventeen <strong>of</strong> the country respondents outlined the six highest priority issues or actions in their strategy action plans; the most<br />

common issues being:<br />

• Sign Language<br />

• Sign Language Interpreters<br />

• Deaf Education<br />

• Prevention <strong>of</strong> HIV/AIDS<br />

• Employment and Equal Opportunity<br />

• Eradication <strong>of</strong> Poverty<br />

• Advocacy<br />

• Youth<br />

• Women<br />

• Health Care Service<br />

• Organisational Development<br />

The questions then focused on numbers <strong>of</strong> <strong>Regional</strong> and Local Deaf Associations in each country. The largest number <strong>of</strong> <strong>Regional</strong><br />

Deaf Associations is in Tanzania (17) and the largest number <strong>of</strong> Local Deaf Associations is in South Africa (119). Botswana and<br />

Lesotho do not have either <strong>Regional</strong> or Local Associations.<br />

All 19 country respondents supplied information about the number <strong>of</strong> board members <strong>of</strong> their Association. The number <strong>of</strong> board<br />

members is between seven and 20; Zambia has the largest number with 20 members on the board. One question specifically<br />

asked for the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people serving as a member on the national board. Thirteen <strong>of</strong> 19 country respondents (Botswana,<br />

Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania and Uganda) have<br />

100% Deaf people on the board. The general average <strong>of</strong> Deaf people serving as a board member in countries in WFD <strong>RSESA</strong> is<br />

91%.<br />

Another question queried the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf women serving on boards. Botswana and Lesotho both have seven Deaf women out<br />

<strong>of</strong> a total <strong>of</strong> 10 board members (70%); Sudan has the smallest female representation with three out <strong>of</strong> 12 members being women<br />

(20%). Four countries (Botswana, Lesotho, Rwanda and South Africa) have more Deaf female board members than Deaf male<br />

members. The approximate average <strong>of</strong> Deaf women serving on Deaf Association Boards in WFD <strong>RSESA</strong> is 66%.<br />

Sixteen <strong>of</strong> 18 country respondents have committees for specific areas <strong>of</strong> interest or affiliation with other relevant independent<br />

groups as follows:<br />

• 15 (94%) Countries have a committee for Deaf Women’s Groups<br />

• 14 (88%) Countries have committee for Sign Language Interpreting<br />

• 12 (75%) Countries have committees on Deaf Youth and Sign Language Research, and Sports Groups<br />

• 11 (69%) Countries have committees for Deaf Education and Parents <strong>of</strong> Deaf Children<br />

• Eight (50%) Countries have a committee for Cultural Groups <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

• Three (19%) Countries have a committee for Children <strong>of</strong> Deaf Adults, Deafblind, and Deaf People with Other Disabilities<br />

• One (6%) Country has one other committee not on the general list<br />

<strong>No</strong>ne <strong>of</strong> the National Associations <strong>of</strong> the Deaf in WFD <strong>RSESA</strong> has a group or committee for Deaf Seniors or Lesbian, Gay,<br />

Transgender and Bisexual Deaf People.<br />

In reference to the employment <strong>of</strong> staff members, eleven countries (Eritrea, Ethiopia, Lesotho, Madagascar, Namibia,<br />

Seychelles, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe) supplied this information while eight countries (Botswana,<br />

Burundi, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Sudan and Swaziland) do not have any staff members. South Africa has the<br />

largest number <strong>of</strong> staff members, both Deaf and hearing, at 64. Eritrea and Tanzania both have 100% Deaf employees within<br />

their organisations.<br />

The final question in this section queried whether any <strong>of</strong> the countries had a Deaf Chief Executive, Executive Director or Deaf<br />

Person-In-Charge <strong>of</strong> the National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf. Eight countries reported in the affirmative: Eritrea, Ethiopia,<br />

Madagascar, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia. Burundi, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Sudan and<br />

Swaziland have Deaf volunteers in charge.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 15<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


4.2 Population <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

Nine <strong>of</strong> the 19 country respondents (Eritrea, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Namibia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda and<br />

Zambia) stated that their government has an <strong>of</strong>ficial number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in their country as shown below:<br />

Country<br />

Does your country’s government have any <strong>of</strong>ficial number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in your<br />

country?<br />

Total Deaf people<br />

Eritrea Yes 20,000<br />

Ethiopia Yes 250,000 approx<br />

Madagascar Yes 219<br />

Namibia Yes 8,314<br />

South Africa Yes 402,847<br />

Sudan Yes 48,862<br />

Swaziland Yes 6,000<br />

Uganda Yes 160,316<br />

Zambia Yes 16,000<br />

Total 9 Yes (47%) 912,558<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

Only four governments (Eritrea, Ethiopia, Madagascar and Sudan) stated the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf women and men:<br />

Country Deaf Women Deaf Men<br />

Eritrea approx 7,000 approx 13,000<br />

Ethiopia 125,000 125,000<br />

Madagascar 100 119<br />

Sudan 20,643 28,219<br />

Total 152,743 166,338<br />

The following shows the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people as recorded by nine country respondents themselves (Eritrea, Lesotho, Namibia,<br />

Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe):<br />

Country<br />

Does your Association/Group have any <strong>of</strong>ficial or approximate figures <strong>of</strong> the number<br />

<strong>of</strong> Deaf people living in your country?<br />

Total Deaf people<br />

Eritrea Yes 20,000<br />

Lesotho Yes 1,998<br />

Namibia Yes 8,314<br />

Seychelles Yes 600<br />

South Africa Yes approx 500,000<br />

Swaziland Yes 6,300<br />

Uganda Yes 840,000<br />

Zambia Yes 16,000<br />

Zimbabwe Yes approx 1,500,000<br />

Total 9 Yes (47%) 2,893,212<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 16<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


It was interesting to note that three countries (Eritrea, Namibia and Zambia) stated that the National Government and the<br />

Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf have the same numbers; while there is a discrepancy in numbers <strong>of</strong> Deaf people provided by the<br />

Association and Government in South Africa, Swaziland and Uganda:<br />

Country<br />

The National Government’s <strong>of</strong>ficial number <strong>of</strong> Deaf<br />

people:<br />

The Association’s/Group’s number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people:<br />

Eritrea 20,000 20,000<br />

Namibia 8,314 8,314<br />

South Africa 402,847 approx 500,000<br />

Swaziland 6,000 6,300<br />

Uganda 160,316 840,000<br />

Zambia 16,000 16,000<br />

Total 613,477 1,390,614<br />

The next question in the survey provides an essential record <strong>of</strong> Deaf people who use sign language as their primary language.<br />

Seven out <strong>of</strong> 19 countries reported their number <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Users as below:<br />

Country<br />

Does your Association/Group have any <strong>of</strong>ficial or approximate numbers <strong>of</strong> Deaf<br />

people who use sign language as their primary language?<br />

Total Sign Language Users<br />

Burundi Yes 304<br />

Eritrea Yes 5,000<br />

Seychelles Yes 400<br />

Sudan Yes 10,000<br />

Tanzania Yes 278,000<br />

Zambia Yes 14,400<br />

Zimbabwe Yes approx 1,200,000<br />

Total 7 Yes (37%) 1,508,104<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

It was interesting to compare <strong>of</strong>ficial numbers <strong>of</strong> Deaf people with the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people who use sign language as their<br />

native language:<br />

Country<br />

The National Government’s<br />

<strong>of</strong>ficial number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people<br />

The Association’s/Group’s <strong>of</strong>ficial<br />

or approximate number <strong>of</strong> Deaf<br />

people<br />

Total <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Users as<br />

stated by the Deaf<br />

Association/Group<br />

Eritrea 20,000 20,000 5,000<br />

Namibia 8,314 8,314 0<br />

South Africa 402,847 approx 500,000 0<br />

Swaziland 6,000 6,300 0<br />

Uganda 160,316 840,000 0<br />

Zambia 16,000 16,000 14,400<br />

Total 613,477 1,390,614 19,400<br />

An analysis <strong>of</strong> the survey data indicates that the average percentage <strong>of</strong> Deaf people who use sign language as reported by two<br />

countries in Southern and Eastern Africa is 54%.<br />

Country Total Deaf people (Associations’ estimates) Total Sign Language Users Average<br />

Eritrea 20,000 5,000 25%<br />

Zambia 16,000 14,400 90%<br />

Total 36,000 19,400 54%<br />

The survey approached all 19 countries with a clear question as to whether HIV/AIDS affected the Deaf women, men and<br />

children in their country. Sixteen country respondents stated “Yes”; further explanation <strong>of</strong> the situation <strong>of</strong> HIV/AIDS in the Deaf<br />

Communities in these countries can be found on page 57. Two countries (Seychelles and Sudan) stated they do not have any<br />

information about this and only one country (Madagascar) answered “<strong>No</strong>”.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 17<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


There are a number <strong>of</strong> significant concerns as follows:<br />

• Ten country respondents stated the National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf does not have any <strong>of</strong>ficial statistics about Deaf<br />

people being affected with HIV/AIDS or any report <strong>of</strong> death rates within the Deaf community<br />

• Most <strong>of</strong> the respondents believe there are a high number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people living with the HIV virus<br />

• Many Deaf women become prostitutes in attempt to earn a daily living<br />

• Due to the high number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people who are illiterate, access to written information on the prevention <strong>of</strong> HIV/AIDS<br />

is not possible<br />

A small number <strong>of</strong> country respondents provide workshops designed specifically for the Deaf Community to raise awareness<br />

about HIV/AIDS; they also provide informational materials in their country’s sign language.<br />

4.3 Legislation and Policies<br />

On the first day <strong>of</strong> the <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group Meeting, the Project Co-ordinator introduced the United Nations Convention on<br />

the Rights <strong>of</strong> Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) concentrating on the key articles relating to the Deaf Community as follows:<br />

Article 2: Definition<br />

Article 9: Accessibility<br />

Article 21: Freedom <strong>of</strong> expression and opinion, and access to information<br />

Article 24: Education<br />

Article 30: Participation in cultural life, recreation, leisure and sport<br />

At the time <strong>of</strong> the meeting, 14 countries (Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles,<br />

South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia) out <strong>of</strong> 19 survey respondents had signed the convention and only<br />

seven countries (Burundi, Madagascar, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland and Uganda) had signed the protocol.<br />

The total number <strong>of</strong> countries targeted by the survey was 21; from all <strong>of</strong> these, 15 countries (those on the list above and<br />

Mauritius) have signed the convention. Only three <strong>of</strong> 28 (Kenya, Namibia and South Africa) have ratified the convention.<br />

This section focussed on essential data collection about any legislation or policy relating to Deaf people in each country. The<br />

first question asked whether each country’s government recognised Deaf people as citizens on an equal basis as other citizens;<br />

14 <strong>of</strong> 19 countries (74%) responded ‘Yes’ with a ‘<strong>No</strong>’ from Eritrea, Madagascar, Mozambique, Seychelles and Swaziland.<br />

The <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group, during its meeting in Johannesburg, debated whether the question was clear as to the meaning <strong>of</strong><br />

the phrase “equal basis as other citizens”. Most countries in Southern and Eastern Africa have legislation for People with<br />

Disabilities but implementation <strong>of</strong> these laws has not happened. The question should have been clearer as to what is meant by<br />

“equal basis as other citizens”.<br />

The next question asked whether each country has an <strong>of</strong>fice responsible for services for People with Disabilities, to which 15 <strong>of</strong><br />

19 countries answered ‘Yes’; Burundi, Madagascar, Mozambique and Zimbabwe ticked ‘<strong>No</strong>’. Part <strong>of</strong> this question asked each<br />

country to provide contact details for this government <strong>of</strong>fice, which can be found on page 60.<br />

Ten <strong>of</strong> 19 countries confirmed their government has legislation or policy for Deaf People or People with Disabilities in general,<br />

and supplied a list <strong>of</strong> the laws or policies (see page 62). All <strong>of</strong> these laws or policies classified Deaf people under the larger<br />

group <strong>of</strong> People with Disabilities, and none <strong>of</strong> them addressed the needs <strong>of</strong> Deaf people as a group in itself. Botswana, Eritrea,<br />

Lesotho, Madagascar, Mozambique, Seychelles, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe stated their current government does not<br />

have legislation covering Deaf people or People with Disabilities.<br />

Only eight <strong>of</strong> 19 countries (Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan and Uganda) have antidiscrimination<br />

legislation for People with Disabilities (including Deaf people).<br />

Twelve <strong>of</strong> 19 countries (Botswana, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland,<br />

Tanzania, Uganda and Zimbabwe) stated their national governments provide services specifically for the Deaf Community<br />

through government departments; seven countries (Burundi, Eritrea, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Sudan and Zambia) said<br />

their government does not provide any services for the Deaf community. For those countries where the government does<br />

provide services, the types <strong>of</strong> services are:<br />

• Education System<br />

• Health Service<br />

• Audiology<br />

• Sign Language Interpreting Service<br />

The general opinion <strong>of</strong> current services <strong>of</strong>fered by national governments includes ‘not adequate provision <strong>of</strong> sign language<br />

interpreting service’ and ‘limited services <strong>of</strong>fered for Deaf people’; all respondents made the comment that access to<br />

government services needs to be improved.<br />

Fifteen <strong>of</strong> 19 country respondents (Burundi, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Namibia, Seychelles, South<br />

Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia) have contact with their country’s current government. The type <strong>of</strong><br />

contact is through meetings or conferences with governmental bodies and contact with Ministries and/or Government Agencies<br />

concerning Deaf people’s welfare needs. Three countries (South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda) have membership status within<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 18<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


the governmental committee on issues for People with Disabilities. Two Deaf people, one in South Africa and one in Uganda, are<br />

Members <strong>of</strong> Parliament; both are active members <strong>of</strong> their National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf as well.<br />

Eight <strong>of</strong> 19 country respondents (Eritrea, Ethiopia, Lesotho, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland and Tanzania,) receive<br />

funding from their national government with 11 (Botswana, Burundi, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Sudan,<br />

Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe) not receiving any government financial support at all. Those countries receiving government<br />

funding provided the annual amount they received (see page 66) and explained the purpose <strong>of</strong> the financial support.<br />

The last five questions <strong>of</strong> this section were to ascertain whether Deaf people have a right to vote in national, regional and local<br />

elections; are permitted to obtain a driver’s licence; can marry Deaf or other partners; are allowed to have children; and can<br />

adopt children. The results are as follows:<br />

Right to vote in<br />

national, regional<br />

and local elections?<br />

Allowed to obtain a<br />

driver’s licence?<br />

Allowed to marry<br />

Deaf or other<br />

partners?<br />

Allowed to have<br />

children?<br />

Allowed to adopt<br />

children?<br />

Yes 19 Countries (100%) 11 Countries (58%) 19 Countries (100%) 19 Countries (100%) 16 Countries (84%)<br />

<strong>No</strong> 0 8 Countries (42%) 0 0 1 Country (5%)<br />

Unknown/<br />

<strong>No</strong>t sure<br />

0 0 0 0 2 Countries (11%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

4.4 Access to Government Services<br />

When asked whether Deaf people have access to government services such as education, health care, employment, social<br />

welfare and other general government services, all 19 country respondents ticked ‘Yes’. To the question how Deaf people<br />

access these government services, some country respondents did not answer the question correctly while others gave various<br />

replies: Deaf people do it themselves through written communication; each Deaf person makes their own personal contacts; a<br />

sign language interpreter is provided by the government and/or through the Deaf Association.<br />

Another aspect <strong>of</strong> access to government services was whether Deaf people were entitled to any financial assistance from the<br />

government, to which only three <strong>of</strong> 19 country respondents (Namibia, Seychelles and South Africa) answered ‘Yes’.<br />

The types <strong>of</strong> financial assistance <strong>of</strong>fered to Deaf people are shown in the table below:<br />

4.5 Access to the Media<br />

Disability Allowance Disability-Specific Pension<br />

2 Countries (11%) 1 Country (5%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

Following are the results <strong>of</strong> access to the media for Deaf people in these 19 countries, based on three main questions:<br />

1) Does the government provide sign language services for news and/or current affairs programmes on public television?<br />

Eleven countries (Botswana, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland,<br />

Uganda and Zimbabwe) stated their government provides sign language services for News Programmes on television.<br />

The length <strong>of</strong> time for sign language programmes on television ranged between a half hour news bulletin once a week,<br />

to a daily thirty-minute news programme from Monday to Friday.<br />

2) Does the government provide subtitles/captions for news and/or current affairs programmes?<br />

Only one country (Zambia) has access to subtitles/captions for news bulletins.<br />

3) Does the government <strong>of</strong>fer any governmental documents in sign language?<br />

<strong>No</strong>ne <strong>of</strong> the governments provides access for Deaf people to receive governmental documents in their sign language.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 19<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


4.6 Status <strong>of</strong> the National Sign Language(s)<br />

These questions aimed to gather vital data on the status <strong>of</strong> national sign language(s) with findings as follows:<br />

• Ten <strong>of</strong> 19 countries (Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda and<br />

Zambia) stated their national sign language is formally recognised by their government<br />

• Nine <strong>of</strong> 19 countries (Botswana, Burundi, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Rwanda, Seychelles, Swaziland and Zimbabwe)<br />

stated their sign language is not recognised by their government<br />

• For the ten countries whose sign languages are recognised, recognition falls under the following categories:<br />

Country Constitution Legislation Policy Guideline<br />

Kenya � �<br />

Lesotho �<br />

Malawi �<br />

Mozambique �<br />

Namibia �<br />

South Africa � � �<br />

Sudan �<br />

Tanzania � �<br />

Uganda � � �<br />

Zambia � �<br />

• Seventeen countries (Burundi, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Seychelles,<br />

South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe) continue to actively lobby their national<br />

government to recognise their sign languages<br />

• Two countries (Botswana and Madagascar) do not lobby for recognition <strong>of</strong> their sign language due to internal problems<br />

in the Association or because <strong>of</strong> the need for a sign language dictionary to enable the Association to advocate<br />

recognition <strong>of</strong> sign language<br />

Nine <strong>of</strong> 19 countries (Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe) have a<br />

dictionary <strong>of</strong> their national sign language.<br />

4.7 Access to Education<br />

The most important part <strong>of</strong> this survey was to ascertain whether every Deaf person was entitled to and had access to good<br />

quality education. There were eight questions, the first <strong>of</strong> which asked whether governments recognised that Deaf children and<br />

Deaf students have the right to receive an education. Seventeen <strong>of</strong> 19 countries stated ‘Yes’ with two countries (Eritrea and<br />

Seychelles) saying ‘<strong>No</strong>’.<br />

Only ten out <strong>of</strong> 19 countries (Botswana, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia)<br />

responded ‘Yes’ to the question asking if the government has legislation or a policy on Deaf Education. All ten countries were<br />

able to provide the specific name <strong>of</strong> the legislation or policy relating to Deaf Education, the list <strong>of</strong> which is available on page<br />

78.<br />

The next aim was to collect information on educational settings for Deaf children and Deaf students in each country (19<br />

countries) as shown below:<br />

Early intervention Kindergarten<br />

Primary<br />

Education<br />

Secondary<br />

Education<br />

University<br />

Education<br />

Vocational Education/Training<br />

8 Yes (42%) 10 Yes (53%) 16 Yes (84%) 13 Yes (68%) 8 Yes (42%) 14 Yes (74%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

Please note: The <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group queried whether the information received about educational settings was true and<br />

correct.<br />

Four countries (Burundi, Kenya, Malawi and South Africa) have educational settings from Early Intervention right up to<br />

University Education, as well as Vocational Education and Training. Two countries where education for Deaf children is limited<br />

to primary education are Mozambique and Rwanda. Three countries (Eritrea, Madagascar and Seychelles) stated there are no<br />

educational settings for Deaf students except for Vocational Education and Training in Madagascar. The range <strong>of</strong> educational<br />

settings available for Deaf children and Deaf students in each country is outlined on page 80.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 20<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Another question addressed Bilingual Education <strong>of</strong>fered by the government, and use <strong>of</strong> the national sign language(s) for Deaf<br />

children and Deaf students. Six out <strong>of</strong> 19 countries (Botswana, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Namibia and Uganda) provided<br />

information about which levels <strong>of</strong> education are provided bilingually:<br />

Early intervention Kindergarten<br />

Primary<br />

Education<br />

Secondary<br />

Education<br />

University<br />

Education<br />

Vocational Education/Training<br />

2 Yes (33%) 4 Yes (67%) 6 Yes (100%) 6 Yes (100%) 0 Yes (0%) 4 Yes (67%)<br />

Based on six respondents<br />

However the <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group believed that actually only Uganda and Kenya have bilingual education programmes.<br />

The next question had the aim <strong>of</strong> recording the number <strong>of</strong> schools specifically for Deaf children and Deaf students; all countries<br />

except Seychelles provided replies. The largest number <strong>of</strong> Deaf schools is in South Africa, which has 47; and the smallest<br />

number is in Swaziland, which has only one. Full information about Deaf schools, schools with mainstream programmes and<br />

schools provided by non-governmental organisations can be found on page 79. To previous questions about educational settings<br />

for Deaf children and Deaf students, Eritrea, and Madagascar stated that there were no Deaf schools in their countries; however<br />

both countries do have a School for the Deaf run by a non-governmental organisation or church. Seychelles reaffirmed that<br />

there is no Deaf school in their country; all Deaf children and students attended a school for the handicapped.<br />

Another question approached the type <strong>of</strong> educational communication methods for Deaf children and Deaf students at the Deaf<br />

schools. Seventeen countries provided this information; the summarised results are:<br />

Bilingual Education 1 Oral Method 2 Cued Speech 3 Oral and Sign Language<br />

(Total Communication) 4 Auditory Verbal 5<br />

3 Countries (18%) 6 Countries (35%) 0 16 Countries (94%) 1 Country (6%)<br />

Based on 17 respondents<br />

Overall, the dominant educational communication method in the WFD <strong>RSESA</strong> region is Oral Education, indicated by the averages<br />

between 35% and 94% for the Oral Method or Oral and Sign Language.<br />

There is a clear contradiction in replies to this question which state that only three countries (Kenya, Namibia and Uganda) have<br />

bilingual education, and replies to the previous question which state that six countries do. The <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group<br />

considers it necessary to have a training seminar about Deaf Education for Southern and Eastern Africa.<br />

The following questions were asked: ‘What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> the level <strong>of</strong> education level received by Deaf children and<br />

Deaf students?’ and ‘What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> the current literacy level <strong>of</strong> Deaf children and Deaf students?’ Full details as<br />

provided by all countries can be found on page 82.<br />

Most notably, there are several comments stating that:<br />

• Deaf students’ education is below the standard <strong>of</strong> education for hearing students<br />

• Most Deaf students complete their education at the fifth grade level<br />

• Teachers are not fluent in sign language<br />

• It is believed that Deaf students are not able to complete secondary education<br />

Almost all <strong>of</strong> the country respondents stated that education is not satisfactory or is <strong>of</strong> a very low level, and provided various<br />

opinions on the current level <strong>of</strong> literacy; the common opinion is that most Deaf children and Deaf students are illiterate when<br />

they have completed their education. Details about the current state <strong>of</strong> literacy can be found on page 82.<br />

1 Bilingual Education: Sign language is considered to be the natural language (‘mother tongue’) that will be acquired as a first<br />

language. Spoken language, which is not acquired naturally by Deaf children, will be learned as a second language as the child<br />

becomes cognitively/developmentally ready. Both languages are used throughout the child’s entire education.<br />

2 Oral Education: Spoken language is assumed to be the basis for standard social and academic communication, and the human<br />

system is assumed to be designed (pre-wired) to learn language expressed in speech. Children learn about and from spoken<br />

language. Also known as auditory-oral, aural/oral education. Emphasis on speech.<br />

3 Cued Speech: A visual mode <strong>of</strong> communication that uses hand shapes and placements in combination with the mouth<br />

movements <strong>of</strong> speech to make the phonemes <strong>of</strong> a spoken language look different from each other, resulting in a visual<br />

counterpart <strong>of</strong> a spoken language.<br />

4 Total Communication: All forms and modes <strong>of</strong> communications are used. This includes natural gestures, sign language,<br />

manually-coded spoken languages, sign systems, mime, audition and speech.<br />

5 Auditory Verbal Education: Supposes that even minimal amounts <strong>of</strong> residual hearing can lead to the development <strong>of</strong><br />

spontaneous speech and language, if that residual hearing is stimulated. Children learn to process language through amplified<br />

hearing. A method <strong>of</strong> oral education with an emphasis on listening.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 21<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


At the higher level <strong>of</strong> education, the survey questions sought information as to whether Deaf people have access to University<br />

education and also asked each country to supply information about the number <strong>of</strong> Universities which <strong>of</strong>fer study placements for<br />

Deaf people. Only ten <strong>of</strong> 19 country respondents (Eritrea, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan,<br />

Tanzania and Uganda) have places for Deaf people to access University education. The number <strong>of</strong> Universities that are<br />

accessible for Deaf people in countries in the WFD <strong>RSESA</strong> Region range widely from only one University each in Eritrea, Namibia<br />

and Tanzania to all Universities in Rwanda and Sudan; full details can be found on page 84.<br />

In those countries (Botswana, Burundi, Ethiopia, Lesotho, Mozambique, Seychelles, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe) where<br />

Deaf people do not have access to University education, four different reasons were provided:<br />

1. Literacy problems<br />

2. <strong>No</strong> Deaf students have completed secondary education<br />

3. Unavailability <strong>of</strong> sign language interpreting services for Deaf students<br />

The last question <strong>of</strong> the Education part <strong>of</strong> the survey asked about Sign Language Interpreting Services <strong>of</strong>fered for Deaf students<br />

in University. Only five countries (Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia) stated that Deaf people have full access<br />

to sign language interpreting services for University.<br />

4.8 Status <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreting Services<br />

To questions focusing on the status <strong>of</strong> sign language interpreting services, 17 out <strong>of</strong> 19 countries reported that they have sign<br />

language interpreters. The next question asked them to provide the number <strong>of</strong> sign language interpreters, to which the<br />

response ranged from three in Rwanda and Swaziland to 102 in Uganda. Only one country, Seychelles, does not have any sign<br />

language Interpreters; they use hearing people who have signing skills to act as interpreters for Deaf people.<br />

The survey next aimed to gain specific information as to whether any <strong>of</strong> these sign language interpreters are appropriately<br />

qualified, to which 10 out <strong>of</strong> 19 countries responded (Eritrea, Lesotho, Madagascar, Namibia, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania,<br />

Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe). When asked where people go to obtain training to become a qualified sign language<br />

interpreter the answers were:<br />

University National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf Others<br />

3 Countries (30%) 10 Countries (100%)<br />

Based on ten respondents<br />

4 Countries (40%)<br />

The length <strong>of</strong> training ranges from one and half years up to four years (further details on page 85).<br />

The current number <strong>of</strong> sign language interpreters with formal interpreting qualifications starts with none in Zambia and Lesotho<br />

up to 77 in Uganda.<br />

When queried about how Deaf people access sign language interpreting, 13 countries stated such services are accessed through<br />

the National Deaf Association or Local Deaf Association, family members and the National Association <strong>of</strong> Sign Language<br />

Interpreters. Another question designed to collect information about who is responsible for providing sign language interpreting<br />

services for the Deaf Community, answered by 12 countries (Burundi, Eritrea, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Namibia, South Africa,<br />

Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia) resulted in the following findings:<br />

Government National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf Private Sector Others<br />

3 Countries<br />

(25%)<br />

12 Countries<br />

(100%)<br />

Based on 12 respondents<br />

1 Country<br />

(8%)<br />

4 Countries<br />

(33%)<br />

The types <strong>of</strong> sign language interpreting services <strong>of</strong>fered to the Deaf community in 12 countries (Burundi, Eritrea, Kenya,<br />

Lesotho, Malawi, Namibia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia) are:<br />

Sign Language Interpreting Services Country/Average Percentage<br />

Social Services 11 (92%)<br />

Health/Medical Services 11 (92%)<br />

Court Services 10 (83%)<br />

Funerals/Weddings 10 (83%)<br />

Counselling Services 9 (75%)<br />

Educational Services 8 (67%)<br />

Entertainment 8 (67%)<br />

Employment Services 6 (50%)<br />

Financial Institutions 6 (50%)<br />

Based on 12 respondents<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 22<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


The same 12 respondents provided their general opinion <strong>of</strong> these sign language interpreting services. The broad opinion is that<br />

there is a lack <strong>of</strong> quality in formal training and qualifications; interpreting services are not available all the time; there are not<br />

enough interpreters so supply cannot meet demand; and there is a lack <strong>of</strong> funding for these services.<br />

Fourteen out <strong>of</strong> 18 respondents stated that sign language interpreters receive payment for their interpreting assignments, with<br />

the responsibility for remitting payment as follows:<br />

Government National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf Deaf People Others<br />

8 Countries (57%) 11 Countries (79%) 4 Countries (29%) 5 Countries (36%)<br />

Based on 14 respondents<br />

• Eight countries’ governments, in Botswana, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda, are<br />

responsible for payment <strong>of</strong> interpreting services<br />

• In 11 countries (Eritrea, Kenya, Lesotho, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and<br />

Zimbabwe) the National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf provides funding for the service<br />

• Four countries (Kenya, South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe) stated that Deaf people themselves pay for the service<br />

The National Associations <strong>of</strong> the Deaf in Burundi, Madagascar, Malawi and Mozambique stated that sign language interpreters do<br />

not receive any payment for their interpreting services.<br />

Five countries detailed the provision <strong>of</strong> funding for interpreting services from other sources; this information can be found on<br />

page 89.<br />

Fourteen out <strong>of</strong> 19 countries (Botswana, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland,<br />

Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe) responded to the question asking the average rate for sign language interpreters. The<br />

lowest payment is 12.88€ for a full day <strong>of</strong> service in Zambia; and the highest payment is 158.92€ for a full day in South Africa.<br />

(Payment scales can be found on page 91).<br />

Five out <strong>of</strong> 18 countries (Eritrea, Madagascar, Malawi, Tanzania and Zimbabwe) stated their sign language interpreters provide<br />

voluntary services for all assignments and 11 other countries (Botswana, Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Mozambique,<br />

Namibia, South Africa, Sudan, Uganda and Zambia) stated that their interpreters do voluntary services sometimes; two<br />

countries (Rwanda and Swaziland) stated that their sign language interpreters never provide voluntary services for interpreting<br />

assignments.<br />

The question seeking whether each country has a National Association <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreters brought to light that only<br />

seven countries (Kenya, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia) have a national organisation for<br />

Sign Language Interpreters. Six <strong>of</strong> 19 countries (Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia) have their<br />

own national Code <strong>of</strong> Ethics for Sign Language Interpreters.<br />

The last question for this section sought information about legislation or policies which state the government has a<br />

responsibility for the provision <strong>of</strong> sign language interpreting services. Four out <strong>of</strong> 19 countries (Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa and<br />

Uganda) reported in the affirmative and provided the title <strong>of</strong> their legislation, which can be found on page 93.<br />

4.9 Employment<br />

This survey sought to gather information on employment settings for Deaf people in the region <strong>of</strong> WFD <strong>RSESA</strong>. The first question<br />

was to confirm whether the government considers that Deaf people have a right to be employed and earn a standard salary.<br />

Five out <strong>of</strong> 19 countries (Eritrea, Madagascar, Mozambique, Swaziland and Zimbabwe) stated ‘<strong>No</strong>’. The next question was<br />

whether any <strong>of</strong> the national governments have anti-discrimination laws in the area <strong>of</strong> employment, especially for Deaf people or<br />

People with Disabilities. Eleven countries (Botswana, Burundi, Eritrea, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique,<br />

Seychelles, Swaziland, and Zambia) do not have laws against discrimination <strong>of</strong> Deaf people or People with Disabilities. Six<br />

countries (Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda) provided a list <strong>of</strong> the legislation or policies relating to<br />

anti-discrimination in employment (found on page 95); two countries (Ethiopia and Namibia) stated they do have legislation but<br />

did not supply the name <strong>of</strong> their anti-discrimination legislation or policy.<br />

To the question about <strong>of</strong>ficial figures about the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people who are in paid employment, only three out <strong>of</strong> 19<br />

country respondents (Eritrea, South Africa and Zimbabwe) provided this information:<br />

Country Total Number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people employed<br />

Eritrea 10,000<br />

Sudan 14,000<br />

Zimbabwe 74<br />

Total 24,074<br />

Another question asked for information on the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people who are unemployed, and none <strong>of</strong> the 19 country<br />

respondents provided this information.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 23<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Fourteen countries (Burundi, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland,<br />

Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe) ticked the most common areas <strong>of</strong> work for Deaf people in their country with the<br />

results being:<br />

Most Common areas <strong>of</strong> work for Deaf people in WFD <strong>RSESA</strong><br />

Country/Average Percentage<br />

Based on 14 respondents<br />

Tailoring 14 Countries (100%)<br />

Carpentry 13 Countries (93%)<br />

Cleaning 11 Countries (79%)<br />

Farm Work 11 Countries (79%)<br />

Sign Language Work 11 Countries (79%)<br />

Hairdresser 10 Countries (71%)<br />

Welding 10 Countries (71%)<br />

Building 9 Countries (64%)<br />

Painter 9 Countries (64%)<br />

Catering 9 Countries (64%)<br />

Shoe Repairing 9 Countries (64%)<br />

Education 8 Countries (57%)<br />

Car Mechanic 7 Countries (50%)<br />

Management 6 Countries (43%)<br />

Bakery 5 Countries (36%)<br />

Social Services 5 Countries (36%)<br />

Printer 5 Countries (36%)<br />

Financial Industry 4 Countries (29%)<br />

Jeweller 4 Countries (29%)<br />

Office Administration 3 Countries (21%)<br />

Panel Beating 3 Countries (21%)<br />

Research Projects 3 Countries (21%)<br />

Theatre/Arts 3 Countries (21%)<br />

Engineering 2 Countries (14%)<br />

Other 5 Countries (36%)<br />

One question aimed to find out reasons for Deaf people’s unemployment; 15 countries (Botswana, Burundi, Eritrea, Ethiopia,<br />

Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe)<br />

provided justifications as follows:<br />

• Barriers in communication<br />

• Low literacy skills<br />

• Lack <strong>of</strong> education and job training for Deaf people<br />

• Discrimination towards Deaf by hearing people<br />

• Bad national economy<br />

• Lack <strong>of</strong> Deaf Awareness<br />

The final question asked if there were any employment services to assist unemployed Deaf people to find positions and also<br />

asked who is responsible for this service. Eight out <strong>of</strong> 19 countries (Eritrea, Madagascar, Namibia, South Africa, Sudan,<br />

Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia) have specialised services <strong>of</strong>fered by both the Government Employment Service and the National<br />

Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf to assist Deaf people to gain employment.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 24<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


4.10 General Comments<br />

Five issues <strong>of</strong> common concern faced by every National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf/Deaf Group globally were listed, and 18<br />

countries (Botswana, Burundi, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Namibia, Rwanda, Seychelles, South<br />

Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe) prioritised these issues for the Deaf community in their<br />

country. Please note: the majority <strong>of</strong> the countries ticked more than one ‘highest priority’. The results are:<br />

Highest Priority Issues<br />

Recognition <strong>of</strong> your country’s Sign Language(s) by your country’s Government<br />

Country/Average Percentage<br />

Based on 18 respondents<br />

14 Countries (78%)<br />

Better quality <strong>of</strong> Deaf Education 13 Countries (72%)<br />

Better Sign Language Interpreting quality and services 12 Countries (67%)<br />

Improved quality and access to Government and Community Services 12 Countries (67%)<br />

Equal Opportunity in Employment 11 Countries (61%)<br />

Others 6 Countries (33%)<br />

The final part <strong>of</strong> the survey provided the opportunity for each country to list any other concerns about the standard <strong>of</strong> living <strong>of</strong><br />

Deaf people. Eighteen countries (Botswana, Burundi, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique,<br />

Namibia, Rwanda, Seychelles, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe) took the opportunity and expressed<br />

the following common areas <strong>of</strong> concern:<br />

Government<br />

• Lack <strong>of</strong> involvement with the government programmes<br />

• Eradication <strong>of</strong> poverty for Deaf people<br />

• Decentralised service delivery for Deaf people to access easily<br />

• Funding for the National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

• Existing Legislation not being implemented<br />

Education<br />

• A large number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people are illiterate<br />

• Quality <strong>of</strong> Education needs to be improved<br />

• Need more schools for Deaf children and students<br />

Sign Language Interpreters<br />

• Training for sign language interpreters<br />

• Lack <strong>of</strong> sign language interpreters or interpreting services in rural areas<br />

• <strong>No</strong>t enough sign language interpreting services in general<br />

Employment<br />

Other<br />

• Pr<strong>of</strong>essional training for Deaf people<br />

• Opportunities for employment<br />

• High percentage <strong>of</strong> Deaf people is unemployed because <strong>of</strong> lack <strong>of</strong> education and skills<br />

• Deaf people are not seen as a equal citizens by hearing society<br />

• Training for Deaf people to improve health and social skills<br />

• Deaf Association needs to be trained in organisation and project management<br />

• Deaf people need a Leadership Training Programme<br />

• Pro-active programmes for Deaf women are needed<br />

• Dire lack <strong>of</strong> information about HIV/AIDS available in sign language for Deaf people<br />

• Ratify the Convention on the Rights <strong>of</strong> Persons with Disabilities<br />

• Gender equality in the Deaf Community<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 25<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


5.0 Recommendations<br />

This section is based on the recommendations prepared by the members <strong>of</strong> the <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group that met in<br />

Johannesburg, South Africa, on 3 rd - 5 th June, 2008 to pursue the issues highlighted in the report. The current economic<br />

situation in the WFD <strong>RSESA</strong> region, especially in the countries categorised under the <strong>World</strong> Bank Classification as Low Income<br />

(Burundi, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe) or Low<br />

Middle Income (Lesotho, Namibia and Swaziland), has an impact on any <strong>of</strong> their governments’ abilities to fund programmes to<br />

support these initiatives.<br />

It may be necessary for the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) and Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) to seek<br />

external support for the region, i.e. to seek project support and funding via partnerships with Shia and other relevant<br />

organisations.<br />

The <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group brainstormed about issues brought to light by the survey as urgent needs for the members in the<br />

Southern and Eastern Africa Region. From this they identified training needs for the region.<br />

The <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group recommended that any and all training should be available in sign language and conducted by Deaf<br />

Trainers and Experts. The <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group has identified the major needs as being:<br />

5.1 Increase Knowledge <strong>of</strong> the United Nations Conventions<br />

After receiving training on the various conventions <strong>of</strong> the United Nations, the <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group considered knowledge <strong>of</strong><br />

current conventions a powerful tool for each country’s Deaf Community. Training should be provided about the:<br />

• Universal Declaration <strong>of</strong> Human Rights<br />

• International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights<br />

• International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights<br />

• Convention on the Rights <strong>of</strong> the Child<br />

• Convention on the Elimination <strong>of</strong> all Forms <strong>of</strong> Discrimination Against Women<br />

• Periodic reporting, the new system <strong>of</strong> Universal Periodic Reviews and also shadow/alternative reports from NGOs<br />

5.2 Training on the United Nations Convention on the Rights <strong>of</strong> Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)<br />

Ideally each member <strong>of</strong> WFD RSA/P should receive full training in understanding the CRPD in its entirety, to enable them to<br />

prepare for their advocacy role within areas such as:<br />

1. How to lobby Government to sign and ratify CRPD (who, how, what)<br />

2. How the National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf can become an expert with their national government for the five articles <strong>of</strong><br />

the CRPD specifically related to the Deaf Community<br />

3. How to prepare and advise the national government about the five articles <strong>of</strong> the CRPD relating to the Deaf Community<br />

including budget preparation, advisory roles, and appropriate systems/appointments/procedures<br />

5.3 Organisational Review<br />

Essentially, a re-evaluation <strong>of</strong> the overall vision to provide clear direction for the organisation as a whole, in accordance with<br />

the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) aims. The process should focus on the following areas:<br />

• Political strength<br />

• Vision, Mission and Aims <strong>of</strong> an organisation <strong>of</strong> Deaf people<br />

• Clear definitions <strong>of</strong> roles and responsibilities in a structure with National, <strong>Regional</strong> and Local Deaf Associations<br />

• Community relationship and communication structure to be developed and put into place (including the importance <strong>of</strong><br />

transparency)<br />

• Representation and the role <strong>of</strong> Deaf, hard <strong>of</strong> hearing and hearing people within the organisation<br />

The Project Co-ordinator believes it is necessary to develop a blueprint <strong>of</strong> a national strategy for the Deaf community for each<br />

National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf in the region <strong>of</strong> WFD <strong>RSESA</strong>.<br />

5.4 Organisational Development Training<br />

The members <strong>of</strong> the <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group raised the strong need to provide organisational management training for all WFD<br />

<strong>RSESA</strong> Board Members and Senior Management Staff as follows:<br />

1. How to prepare Policy Statements<br />

2. Advocacy to and lobbying <strong>of</strong> the government for services, legislation and policy for the Deaf Community<br />

3. Financial Management/Fundraising/Grants and Project Funding from or by the governments<br />

4. Strategy Development to lobby governments to recognise national sign language(s)<br />

5. General Information about Sign Language Interpreters Training Programmes:-<br />

• Appointment <strong>of</strong> appropriate Interpreter Trainers for the training<br />

• How to prepare interpreter training programmes<br />

• How to provide interpreting services<br />

• How to accredit interpreters<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 26<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


• General policies on Sign Language Interpreter Services<br />

• Code <strong>of</strong> Ethics<br />

6. Membership Issues regarding hearing people’s involvement with an Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf run by Deaf people<br />

7. Understanding the different definitions <strong>of</strong> Deaf and Hearing Impaired<br />

8. Information about Health Education in the areas <strong>of</strong>:<br />

• HIV and AIDS<br />

• Breast cancer and reproductive health<br />

• Prevention programmes<br />

• Poverty eradication programmes<br />

9. Training for the Deaf Youth Community and Leadership Training for Deaf Youth<br />

10. Training for Deaf Women<br />

5.5 Training for the National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf and Deaf Groups/Organisations<br />

The process would ideally also include training <strong>of</strong> individual members and board members <strong>of</strong> every National Association <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Deaf and Deaf Group/Organisation in the region <strong>of</strong> WFD RSA/P, and include subjects such as:<br />

• WFD Policies<br />

• International Network and Roles <strong>of</strong> the United Nations, WFD, WFD <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariats<br />

• Global Models <strong>of</strong> Deaf Communities and Organisations, e.g. WFD, and their work<br />

• Human Rights<br />

• Gender Issues<br />

• Deaf Education/Bilingualism for Deaf Students<br />

• Review <strong>of</strong> Deaf Education<br />

• Sign Language Work<br />

• Sign Language Interpreting<br />

• Media for Deaf People<br />

• Deaf Employment/Vocational Training<br />

• National Legislation/Local Government Systems<br />

• Leadership<br />

• Empowerment and Democracy<br />

• Advocacy by the National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

• Deafhood (the Deaf collective existence; a process by which Deaf individuals come to actualise their Deaf identity)<br />

• Conflict Resolution<br />

This training will endeavour to provide empowerment and self-reliance to the National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf and Deaf<br />

Groups/Organisations as they act in accordance with their obligations to advocate and improve the status <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

community in their country.<br />

The Project Co-ordinator proposes that the training outlined below is necessary to supplement the above recommendations<br />

from the <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group:<br />

5.6 Advocacy for the Improvement <strong>of</strong> the Standard <strong>of</strong> Living for Deaf People<br />

It can be seen that sports and cultural activities are prominent in National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf work, and that essential<br />

lobbying for the improvement <strong>of</strong> the standard <strong>of</strong> living for Deaf people is sometimes lacking or difficult to achieve.<br />

A recommendation on how to address this issue is to seek partnership to conduct comprehensive data collection on the living<br />

standards <strong>of</strong> a representative sample <strong>of</strong> individual Deaf people, including vital aspects such as:<br />

• Socio-economic status<br />

• Education<br />

• Literacy skills<br />

• Employment<br />

• Access to sign language interpreting services<br />

• Access to health services<br />

• Access to government services<br />

• Access to the media<br />

An essential part <strong>of</strong> this advocacy process is to utilise existing tools such as legal documents, reports and international human<br />

rights documents relevant to Deaf people, in order to make valid proposals and arguments to better equality and living<br />

conditions. (The WFD Fact Sheet on Human Rights can be found on http://www.wfdeaf.org/pdf/fact_humanrights.pdf)<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 27<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


6.0 Geography and Population<br />

All <strong>of</strong> the following information was obtained from the Central Intelligence Agency – <strong>World</strong> Factbook<br />

(https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html)<br />

6.1 Botswana<br />

6.2 Burundi<br />

6.3 Eritrea<br />

Population: 1,842,323<br />

note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower<br />

life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates,<br />

lower population growth rates, and changes in the distribution <strong>of</strong><br />

population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected<br />

(July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: Tswana (or Setswana) 79%, Kalanga 11%, Basarwa 3%, other,<br />

including Kgalagadi and white 7%<br />

Religions: Christian 71.6%, Badimo 6%, other 1.4%, unspecified 0.4%, none<br />

20.6% (2001 census)<br />

Languages: Setswana 78.2%, Kalanga 7.9%, Sekgalagadi 2.8%, <strong>English</strong> 2.1%<br />

(<strong>of</strong>ficial), other 8.6%, unspecified 0.4% (2001 census)<br />

Population: 8,691,005<br />

note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower<br />

life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates,<br />

lower population growth rates, and changes in the distribution <strong>of</strong><br />

population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected<br />

(July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: Hutu (Bantu) 85%, Tutsi (Hamitic) 14%, Twa (Pygmy) 1%,<br />

Europeans 3,000, South Asians 2,000<br />

Religions: Christian 67% (Roman Catholic 62%, Protestant 5%), indigenous<br />

beliefs 23%, Muslim 10%<br />

Languages: Kirundi (<strong>of</strong>ficial), French (<strong>of</strong>ficial), Swahili (along Lake<br />

Tanganyika and in the Bujumbura area)<br />

Population: 5,028,475 (July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: Tigrinya 50%, Tigre and Kunama 40%, Afar 4%, Saho (Red Sea coast<br />

dwellers) 3%, other 3%<br />

Religions: Muslim, Coptic Christian, Roman Catholic, Protestant<br />

Languages: Afar, Arabic, Tigre and Kunama, Tigrinya, other Cushitic<br />

languages<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 28<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


6.4 Ethiopia<br />

6.5 Kenya<br />

6.6 Lesotho<br />

Population: 78,254,090<br />

note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower<br />

life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates,<br />

lower population growth rates, and changes in the distribution <strong>of</strong><br />

population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected<br />

(July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: Oromo 32.1%, Amara 30.1%, Tigraway 6.2%, Somalie 5.9%, Guragie<br />

4.3%, Sidama 3.5%, Welaita 2.4%, other 15.4% (1994 census)<br />

Religions: Christian 60.8% (Orthodox 50.6%, Protestant 10.2%), Muslim<br />

32.8%, traditional 4.6%, other 1.8% (1994 census)<br />

Languages: Amarigna 32.7%, Oromigna 31.6%, Tigrigna 6.1%, Somaligna 6%,<br />

Guaragigna 3.5%, Sidamigna 3.5%, Hadiyigna 1.7%, other 14.8%,<br />

<strong>English</strong> (major foreign language taught in schools) (1994 census)<br />

Population: 37,953,838<br />

note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower<br />

life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates, lower<br />

population growth rates, and changes in the distribution <strong>of</strong><br />

population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected<br />

(July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: Kikuyu 22%, Luhya 14%, Luo 13%, Kalenjin 12%, Kamba 11%, Kisii<br />

6%, Meru 6%, other African 15%, non-African (Asian, European, and<br />

Arab) 1%<br />

Religions: Protestant 45%, Roman Catholic 33%, Muslim 10%, indigenous<br />

beliefs 10%, other 2%<br />

note: a large majority <strong>of</strong> Kenyans are Christian, but estimates for<br />

the percentage <strong>of</strong> the population that adheres to Islam or<br />

indigenous beliefs vary widely<br />

Languages: <strong>English</strong> (<strong>of</strong>ficial), Kiswahili (<strong>of</strong>ficial), numerous indigenous<br />

languages<br />

Population: 2,128,180<br />

note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower<br />

life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates, lower<br />

population growth rates, and changes in the distribution <strong>of</strong><br />

population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected<br />

(July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: Sotho 99.7%, Europeans, Asians, and other 0.3%,<br />

Religions: Christian 80%, indigenous beliefs 20%<br />

Languages: Sesotho (southern Sotho), <strong>English</strong> (<strong>of</strong>ficial), Zulu, Xhosa<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 29<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


6.7 Madagascar<br />

6.8 Malawi<br />

Population: 20,042,551 (July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: Malayo-Indonesian (Merina and related Betsileo), Cotiers (mixed<br />

African, Malayo-Indonesian, and Arab ancestry - Betsimisaraka,<br />

Tsimihety, Antaisaka, Sakalava), French, Indian, Creole, Comoran)<br />

Religions: indigenous beliefs 52%, Christian 41%, Muslim 7%<br />

Languages: <strong>English</strong> (<strong>of</strong>ficial), French (<strong>of</strong>ficial), Malagasy (<strong>of</strong>ficial)<br />

Population: 13,931,831<br />

note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower<br />

life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates, lower<br />

population growth rates, and changes in the distribution <strong>of</strong><br />

population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected (July<br />

2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: Chewa, Nyanja, Tumbuka, Yao, Lomwe, Sena, Tonga, Ngoni,<br />

Ngonde, Asian, European<br />

Religions: Christian 79.9%, Muslim 12.8%, other 3%, none 4.3% (1998 census)<br />

Languages: Chichewa 57.2% (<strong>of</strong>ficial), Chinyanja 12.8%, Chiyao 10.1%,<br />

Chitumbuka 9.5%, Chisena 2.7%, Chilomwe 2.4%, Chitonga 1.7%,<br />

other 3.6% (1998 census)<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 30<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


6.9 Mozambique<br />

6.10 Namibia<br />

Population: 21,284,701<br />

note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower<br />

life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates,<br />

lower population growth rates, and changes in the distribution<br />

<strong>of</strong> population by age and sex than would otherwise be<br />

expected; the 1997 Mozambican census reported a population <strong>of</strong><br />

16,099,246 (July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: African 99.66% (Makhuwa, Tsonga, Lomwe, Sena, and others),<br />

Europeans 0.06%, Euro-Africans 0.2%, Indians 0.08%<br />

Religions: Catholic 23.8%, Muslim 17.8%, Zionist Christian 17.5%, other<br />

17.8%, none 23.1% (1997 census)<br />

Languages: Emakhuwa 26.1%, Xichangana 11.3%, Portuguese 8.8% (<strong>of</strong>ficial;<br />

spoken by 27% <strong>of</strong> population as a second language), Elomwe<br />

7.6%, Cisena 6.8%, Echuwabo 5.8%, other Mozambican languages<br />

32%, other foreign languages 0.3%, unspecified 1.3% (1997<br />

census)<br />

Population: 2,088,669<br />

note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower<br />

life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates,<br />

lower population growth rates, and changes in the distribution<br />

<strong>of</strong> population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected<br />

(July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: black 87.5%, white 6%, mixed 6.5%<br />

note: about 50% <strong>of</strong> the population belong to the Ovambo tribe<br />

and 9% to the Kavangos tribe; other ethnic groups include<br />

Herero 7%, Damara 7%, Nama 5%, Caprivian 4%, Bushmen 3%,<br />

Baster 2%, Tswana 0.5%<br />

Religions: Christian 80% to 90% (Lutheran 50% at least), indigenous beliefs<br />

10% to 20%<br />

Languages: <strong>English</strong> 7% (<strong>of</strong>ficial), Afrikaans common language <strong>of</strong> most <strong>of</strong> the<br />

population and about 60% <strong>of</strong> the white population, German 32%,<br />

indigenous languages 1% (includes Oshivambo, Herero, Nama)<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 31<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


6.11 Rwanda<br />

6.12 Seychelles<br />

6.13 South Africa<br />

Population: 10,186,063<br />

note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower<br />

life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates,<br />

lower population growth rates, and changes in the distribution<br />

<strong>of</strong> population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected<br />

(July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: Hutu (Bantu) 84%, Tutsi (Hamitic) 15%, Twa (Pygmy) 1%<br />

Religions: Roman Catholic 56.5%, Protestant 26%, Adventist 11.1%, Muslim<br />

4.6%, indigenous beliefs 0.1%, none 1.7% (2001)<br />

Languages: Kinyarwanda (<strong>of</strong>ficial) universal Bantu vernacular, French<br />

(<strong>of</strong>ficial), <strong>English</strong> (<strong>of</strong>ficial), Kiswahili (Swahili) used in<br />

commercial centers<br />

Population: 82,247 (July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: mixed French, African, Indian, Chinese, and Arab<br />

Religions: Roman Catholic 82.3%, Anglican 6.4%, Seventh Day Adventist<br />

1.1%, other Christian 3.4%, Hindu 2.1%, Muslim 1.1%, other non-<br />

Christian 1.5%, unspecified 1.5%, none 0.6% (2002 census)<br />

Languages: Creole 91.8%, <strong>English</strong> 4.9% (<strong>of</strong>ficial), other 3.1%, unspecified<br />

0.2% (2002 census)<br />

Population: 43,786,115<br />

note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower<br />

life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates,<br />

lower population growth rates, and changes in the distribution<br />

<strong>of</strong> population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected<br />

(July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: black African 79%, white 9.6%, colored 8.9%, Indian/Asian 2.5%<br />

(2001 census)<br />

Religions: Zion Christian 11.1%, Pentecostal/Charismatic 8.2%, Catholic<br />

7.1%, Methodist 6.8%, Dutch Reformed 6.7%, Anglican 3.8%,<br />

Muslim 1.5%, other Christian 36%, other 2.3%, unspecified 1.4%,<br />

none 15.1% (2001 census)<br />

Languages: IsiZulu 23.8%, IsiXhosa 17.6%, Afrikaans 13.3%, Sepedi 9.4%,<br />

<strong>English</strong> 8.2%, Setswana 8.2%, Sesotho 7.9%, Xitsonga 4.4%, other<br />

7.2% (2001 census)<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 32<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


6.14 Sudan<br />

6.15 Swaziland<br />

6.16 Tanzania<br />

Population: 40,218,455 (July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: black 52%, Arab 39%, Beja 6%, foreigners 2%, other 1%<br />

Religions: Sunni Muslim 70% (in north), Christian 5% (mostly in south and<br />

Khartoum), indigenous beliefs 25%<br />

Languages: Arabic (<strong>of</strong>ficial), Nubian, Ta Bedawie, diverse dialects <strong>of</strong> Nilotic,<br />

Nilo-Hamitic, Sudanic languages, <strong>English</strong><br />

note: program <strong>of</strong> "Arabization" in process<br />

Population: 1,128,814<br />

note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower<br />

life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates,<br />

lower population growth rates, and changes in the distribution<br />

<strong>of</strong> population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected<br />

(July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: African 97%, European 3%<br />

Religions: Zionist 40% (a blend <strong>of</strong> Christianity and indigenous ancestral<br />

worship), Roman Catholic 20%, Muslim 10%, other (includes<br />

Anglican, Bahai, Methodist, Mormon, Jewish) 30%<br />

Languages: <strong>English</strong> (<strong>of</strong>ficial, government business conducted in <strong>English</strong>),<br />

siSwati (<strong>of</strong>ficial)<br />

Population: 40,213,162<br />

note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower<br />

life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates,<br />

lower population growth rates, and changes in the distribution<br />

<strong>of</strong> population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected<br />

(July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: mainland - African 99% (<strong>of</strong> which 95% are Bantu consisting <strong>of</strong><br />

more than 130 tribes), other 1% (consisting <strong>of</strong> Asian, European,<br />

and Arab); Zanzibar - Arab, African, mixed Arab and African<br />

Religions: mainland - Christian 30%, Muslim 35%, indigenous beliefs 35%;<br />

Zanzibar - more than 99% Muslim<br />

Languages: Kiswahili or Swahili (<strong>of</strong>ficial), Kiunguja (name for Swahili in<br />

Zanzibar), <strong>English</strong> (<strong>of</strong>ficial, primary language <strong>of</strong> commerce,<br />

administration, and higher education), Arabic (widely spoken in<br />

Zanzibar), many local languages<br />

note: Kiswahili (Swahili) is the mother tongue <strong>of</strong> the Bantu<br />

people living in Zanzibar and nearby coastal Tanzania; although<br />

Kiswahili is Bantu in structure and origin, its vocabulary draws<br />

on a variety <strong>of</strong> sources including Arabic and <strong>English</strong>; it has<br />

become the lingua franca <strong>of</strong> central and eastern Africa; the first<br />

language <strong>of</strong> most people is one <strong>of</strong> the local languages<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 33<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


6.17 Uganda<br />

6.18 Zambia<br />

6.19 Zimbabwe<br />

Population: 31,367,972<br />

note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower<br />

life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates,<br />

lower population growth rates, and changes in the distribution<br />

<strong>of</strong> population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected<br />

(July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: Baganda 16.9%, Banyakole 9.5%, Basoga 8.4%, Bakiga 6.9%, Iteso<br />

6.4%, Langi 6.1%, Acholi 4.7%, Bagisu 4.6%, Lugbara 4.2%,<br />

Bunyoro 2.7%, other 29.6% (2002 census)<br />

Religions: Roman Catholic 41.9%, Protestant 42% (Anglican 35.9%,<br />

Pentecostal 4.6%, Seventh Day Adventist 1.5%), Muslim 12.1%,<br />

other 3.1%, none 0.9% (2002 census)<br />

Languages: <strong>English</strong> (<strong>of</strong>ficial national language, taught in grade schools, used<br />

in courts <strong>of</strong> law and by most newspapers and some radio<br />

broadcasts), Ganda or Luganda (most widely used <strong>of</strong> the Niger-<br />

Congo languages, preferred for native language publications in<br />

the capital and may be taught in school), other Niger-Congo<br />

languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Swahili, Arabic<br />

Population: 11,669,534<br />

note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower<br />

life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates,<br />

lower population growth rates, and changes in the distribution<br />

<strong>of</strong> population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected<br />

(July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: African 98.7%, European 1.1%, other 0.2%<br />

Religions: Christian 50%-75%, Muslim and Hindu 24%-49%, indigenous<br />

beliefs 1%<br />

Languages: <strong>English</strong> (<strong>of</strong>ficial), major vernaculars - Bemba, Kaonda, Lozi,<br />

Lunda, Luvale, Nyanja, Tonga, and about 70 other indigenous<br />

languages<br />

Population: 12,382,920<br />

note: estimates for this country explicitly take into account the<br />

effects <strong>of</strong> excess mortality due to AIDS; this can result in lower<br />

life expectancy, higher infant mortality, higher death rates,<br />

lower population growth rates, and changes in the distribution<br />

<strong>of</strong> population by age and sex than would otherwise be expected<br />

(July 2008 est.)<br />

Ethnic groups: African 98% (Shona 82%, Ndebele 14%, other 2%), mixed and<br />

Asian 1%, white less than 1%<br />

Religions: syncretic (part Christian, part indigenous beliefs) 50%, Christian<br />

25%, indigenous beliefs 24%, Muslim and other 1%<br />

Languages: <strong>English</strong> (<strong>of</strong>ficial), Shona, Sindebele (the language <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Ndebele, sometimes called Ndebele), numerous but minor tribal<br />

dialects<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 34<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.0 <strong>Survey</strong> Results<br />

7.1.0 Contact Details<br />

Country Botswana (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Upper Middle Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Botswana Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf [BOAD]<br />

Street Address Gaborone, Main Mall [Christ the King Cathedral Roman Catholic Church]<br />

Postal Address PO Box 4818<br />

City, Post Code Gaborone 00267<br />

Country Botswana<br />

Website N/A<br />

Email N/A<br />

Telephone Landline Number N/A<br />

Telephone Mobile Number N/A<br />

Fax Number N/A<br />

Country Burundi (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Low Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Burundi National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association in National Language Association National Des Sourds du Burundi<br />

Street Address Avenue Buerere, Quarter Industrielle Parcelle <strong>No</strong> R 1224<br />

Postal Address PO Box 7027<br />

City, Post Code Bujumbura, 7027<br />

Country Burundi<br />

Website N/A<br />

Email bnadeaf@yahoo.com<br />

Telephone Landline Number +257 2955 2728<br />

+257 7997 8130<br />

Telephone Mobile Number<br />

+257 7997 2643<br />

Fax Number N/A<br />

Country Eritrea (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Low Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Eritrean National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (EriNAD)<br />

Street Address Adi Yaekob Avenue, 179 House <strong>No</strong> 50<br />

Postal Address PO Box 3530<br />

City, Post Code Asmara 291-1<br />

Country Eritrea<br />

Website www.erinad.org<br />

Email enad@gemel.com.er<br />

Telephone Landline Number +291 112 4115<br />

Telephone Mobile Number +2910 716 9087<br />

Fax Number +291 112 4115<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 35<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Country Ethiopia (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Low Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Ethiopian National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (ENAD)<br />

Address Guelle Sub City Kebele 03<br />

Postal Address P.O.BOX 21359<br />

City, Post Code Addis Ababa<br />

Country Ethiopia<br />

Website N/A<br />

Email enad@ethionet.et<br />

Telephone Landline Number +251 11 122 2517<br />

Telephone Mobile Number N/A<br />

Fax Number +251 11 122 2516<br />

Country Kenya (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Low Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Kenya National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (KNAD)<br />

Postal Address PO Box 28507<br />

City, Post Code Nairobi, 00100<br />

Country Kenya<br />

Website N/A<br />

knadasskenya@yhaoo.com<br />

Email<br />

opanypw@yahoo.com<br />

Telephone Landline Number N/A<br />

Telephone Mobile Number +254 7337 4089<br />

Fax Number +254 7335 74089<br />

Country Lesotho (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Lower Middle Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf - Lesotho<br />

Street Address <strong>No</strong> 22 Mabile Road, Old Europa<br />

Postal Address PO Box 13821<br />

City, Post Code Masery 100<br />

Country Lesotho<br />

Website N/A<br />

Email deafles@leo.co.ls<br />

Telephone Landline Number +266 2232 6196<br />

Telephone Mobile Number +266 5852 4944<br />

Fax Number +266 2232 6196<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 36<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Country Madagascar (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Low Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf in Madagascar<br />

Street Address Lot 1053, Cite 67ha <strong>No</strong>rd-Quest<br />

Postal Address B.P. 13030<br />

City, Post Code Antananarivo 101<br />

Country Madagascar<br />

Website N/A<br />

Email f.m.m@moov.mg<br />

Telephone Landline Number +261 24 241 54<br />

Telephone Mobile Number N/A<br />

Fax Number N/A<br />

Country Malawi (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Low Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Associations Malawi National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (MNAD)<br />

Postal Address Private Bag 14<br />

City, Post Code Maselema, Blantyre 8<br />

Country Malawai<br />

Website N/A<br />

Email fedoma@malawi.net<br />

Telephone Landline Number +265 01 840 547<br />

+265 08 569 123<br />

Telephone Mobile Number<br />

+265 09 229 141<br />

Fax Number N/A<br />

Country Mozambique (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Low Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf in Mozambique<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association in National Language Associacao de Surdos de Mocambique<br />

Street Address c/o Escola Especial 1, Av. Salvador Allende n º 1215, Polana cimento<br />

City, Post Code Maputo<br />

Country Mozambique<br />

Website N/A<br />

asumo_map@yahoo.com<br />

Email<br />

izandamela@yahoo.com<br />

Telephone Landline Number N/A<br />

Telephone Mobile Number +258 82 298 6540<br />

Fax Number N/A<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 37<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Country Namibia (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Lower Middle Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Namibian National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

Street Address Verbena Street 4018 Khomasdal<br />

Postal Address P.O. Box 21040<br />

City, Post Code Windhoek 9000<br />

Country Namibia<br />

Website N/A<br />

Email nnad@iway.na<br />

Telephone Landline Number +264 6124 4811<br />

Telephone Mobile Number N/A<br />

Fax Number +264 6124 4811<br />

Country Rwanda (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Low Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Rwanda National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association in National Language Association Nationale des Sourds du Rwanda<br />

Street Address Avenue de l’ Umudugudu Multimedia-Sonatube<br />

Postal Address BP: C/O 4668<br />

City, Post Code Ville de KIGALI<br />

Country Rwanda<br />

Website N/A<br />

augumunya@yahoo.fr<br />

Email<br />

rnad8_rw2006@yahoo.fr<br />

Telephone Landline Number N/A<br />

+250 0843 3444 (sms)<br />

Telephone Mobile Number<br />

+250 0823 2727<br />

Fax Number N/A<br />

Country Seychelles (<strong>No</strong>t a WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Upper Middle Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Association <strong>of</strong> People with Hearing Impairment<br />

Address Market street<br />

Postal Address PO Box 504<br />

City, Post Code Victoria<br />

Country Seychelles<br />

Website N/A<br />

Email Lizyepoutande@yahoo.com.au<br />

Telephone Landline Number +248 610 378<br />

Telephone Mobile Number +248 749 791<br />

Fax Number N/A<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 38<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Country South Africa (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Upper Middle Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Deaf <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> South Africa (DeafSA)<br />

Street Address 20 Napier Road, Richmond, Johannesburg, 2092<br />

Postal Address Private Bag X04<br />

City, Post Code Westhoven, 2192<br />

Country South Africa<br />

Website www.deafsa.co.za<br />

Email nationaldirector@deafsa.co.za<br />

Telephone Landline Number +27 11 4821610<br />

Telephone Mobile Number +27 82 333 4442<br />

Fax Number +27 11 726 5873<br />

Country Sudan (<strong>No</strong>t a WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Low Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Sudanese National Union <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SNUD)<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association in National Language ( س ق ص أ ) ﱏادﻮﺴﻟا ﻰﻣﻮﻘﻟا ﻢﺼﻟا دﺎﲢا<br />

Street Address Sudatel Street<br />

Postal Address PO 2963<br />

City, Post Code Khartoum <strong>No</strong>rth, 11111<br />

Country Sudan<br />

Website N/A<br />

Email snudgesec@hotmail.com<br />

Telephone Landline Number +249 8523 5178<br />

Telephone Mobile Number +249 9228 20243<br />

Fax Number +249 8523 5178<br />

Country Swaziland (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Lower Middle Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Swaziland National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

Address Lilunga Street, Msunduza Rd<br />

Postal Address P.O. Box 3622<br />

City, Post Code Mbabane, H100<br />

Country Swaziland<br />

Website N/A<br />

snad@swazi.net<br />

Email<br />

makhosinip@hotmail.com<br />

Telephone Landline Number +268 404 7625<br />

Telephone Mobile Number +268 634 1176<br />

Fax Number +268 404 7625<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 39<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Country Tanzania (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Low Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Tanzania Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (CHAVITA)<br />

Street Address Mtoni-Mwembe Madafu <strong>of</strong>f Kilwa Road<br />

Postal Address PO Box 21591<br />

City, Post Code Temeke District, Dar Es Saraam<br />

Country Tanzania<br />

Website www.chavita.org<br />

Email chavita@raha.com<br />

Telephone Landline Number +255 7329 27569<br />

Telephone Mobile Number +255 7558 47764<br />

Fax Number +255 2221 12434<br />

Country Uganda (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Low Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Uganda National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

Street Address Plot <strong>No</strong> 118, Kamwokya Bukoto Street<br />

Postal Address PO Box 7339<br />

City, Post Code Kampala, 256<br />

Country Uganda<br />

Website www.unadug.net<br />

Email unad@infocom.co.ug<br />

Telephone Landline Number +256 414 532 875<br />

Telephone Mobile Number +256 782 498 283<br />

Fax Number +256 414 541 874<br />

Country Zambia (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Low Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Zambia National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

ZNAD House,<br />

Plot 10437 Los Angeles Crescent<br />

Street Address<br />

<strong>No</strong>rth <strong>of</strong> Kanyama<br />

Bp Filling Station, Chinika South Area<br />

Postal Address 35821<br />

City, Post Code Lusaka 10101<br />

Country Zambia<br />

Website N/A<br />

Email znaddeaf@yahoo.com<br />

Telephone Landline Number N/A<br />

Telephone Mobile Number +260 977 629 468<br />

Fax Number N/A<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 40<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Country Zimbabwe (WFD Ordinary Member)<br />

Country Classification Low Income<br />

Name <strong>of</strong> Association Zimbabwe National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (ZIMNAD)<br />

<strong>No</strong> 6 Mbare Hostel,<br />

Address<br />

Arbobennie Road, Mbare<br />

Postal Address P.O. Box 661043<br />

City, Post Code Harare<br />

Country Zimbabwe<br />

Website N/A<br />

Email zimnadorg@yahoo.com<br />

Telephone Landline Number N/A<br />

+263 912 451 156<br />

Telephone Mobile Number<br />

+263 912 450 627 (Chairman)<br />

Fax Number N/A<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 41<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.2.0 National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf/Deaf Group<br />

7.2.1 Please provide the number <strong>of</strong> members your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf/Deaf Group has in your country.<br />

7.2.1.1 Deaf Members: -<br />

Country Total Deaf Members Total Deaf Women Total Deaf Men<br />

Botswana N/A N/A N/A<br />

Burundi 815 505 310<br />

Eritrea 2,200 850 1,350<br />

Ethiopia 5,000 0 0<br />

Kenya N/A N/A N/A<br />

Lesotho 1,998 842 1,156<br />

Madagascar 192 82 110<br />

Malawi 1,200 420 780<br />

Mozambique N/A N/A N/A<br />

Namibia N/A N/A N/A<br />

Rwanda 100,000 56,000 44,000<br />

Seychelles 18 10 8<br />

South Africa 20,497 0 0<br />

Sudan 15,000 6,000 9,000<br />

Swaziland 1,120 480 640<br />

Tanzania 281,000 193,123 87,877<br />

Uganda 4,700 0 0<br />

Zambia 14,436 4,752 9,684<br />

Zimbabwe 280,000 130,000 150,000<br />

Total 728,176 393,064 304,915<br />

7.4.2.1 Hard <strong>of</strong> Hearing Members: -<br />

Country Total Hard <strong>of</strong> Hearing Members Total Hard <strong>of</strong> Hearing Women Total Hard <strong>of</strong> Hearing Men<br />

Botswana N/A N/A N/A<br />

Burundi 107 36 71<br />

Eritrea 58 25 33<br />

Ethiopia 0 0 0<br />

Kenya N/A N/A N/A<br />

Lesotho 923 387 536<br />

Madagascar 2 N/A 2<br />

Malawi 0 0 0<br />

Mozambique N/A N/A N/A<br />

Namibia N/A N/A N/A<br />

Rwanda 1,700 1,200 500<br />

Seychelles 6 5 1<br />

South Africa 0 0 0<br />

Sudan 50 20 30<br />

Swaziland 0 0 0<br />

Tanzania 57,000 32,000 25,000<br />

Uganda 0 0 0<br />

Zambia 0 0 0<br />

Zimbabwe 750 300 450<br />

Total 60,596 33,973 26,623<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 42<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.2.1.3 Hearing Members: -<br />

Country Total Hearing Members<br />

Botswana N/A<br />

Burundi 5<br />

Eritrea 0<br />

Ethiopia 0<br />

Kenya N/A<br />

Lesotho 0<br />

Madagascar 24<br />

Malawi 18<br />

Mozambique N/A<br />

Namibia N/A<br />

Rwanda 0<br />

Seychelles 12<br />

South Africa 0<br />

Sudan 0<br />

Swaziland 0<br />

Tanzania 0<br />

Uganda 0<br />

Zambia 0<br />

Zimbabwe 23<br />

Total 82<br />

7.2.1.4 Summary Status <strong>of</strong> the Associations’/Groups’ Memberships: -<br />

Country Total Deaf Members Total Hard <strong>of</strong> Hearing Members Total Hearing Members Total Members<br />

Botswana N/A N/A N/A N/A<br />

Burundi 815 (88%) 107 (11.5%) 5 (0.5%) 927<br />

Eritrea 2,200 (97%) 58 (3%) 0 2,258<br />

Ethiopia 5,000 (100%) 0 0 5,000<br />

Kenya N/A N/A N/A N/A<br />

Lesotho 1,998 (68%) 923 (32%) 0 2,921<br />

Madagascar 192 (88%) 2 (1%) 24 (11%) 218<br />

Malawi 1,200 (99%) 0 18 (1%) 1,218<br />

Mozambique N/A N/A N/A N/A<br />

Namibia N/A N/A N/A N/A<br />

Rwanda 100,000 (98%) 1,700 (2%) 0 101,700<br />

Seychelles 18 (50%) 6 (17%) 12 (33%) 36<br />

South Africa 20,497 (100%) 0 0 20,497<br />

Sudan 15,000 (99.5%) 50 (0.5%) 0 15,050<br />

Swaziland 1,120 (100%) 0 0 1,120<br />

Tanzania 281,000 (83%) 57,000 (17%) 0 338,000<br />

Uganda 4,700 (100%) 0 0 4,700<br />

Zambia 14,436 (100%) 0 0 14,436<br />

Zimbabwe 280,000 (99.5%) 750 (0.49%) 23 (0.01%) 280,773<br />

Total 728,176 60,596 82 788,854<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 43<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.2.2 In what year was your National Association/Deaf Group established?<br />

7.2.3 Does your Deaf Association/Deaf Group have Statutes/a Constitution?<br />

7.2.4 Does your government recognise your national organisation as the representative <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in your country?<br />

Country<br />

In what year was your National<br />

Association/Deaf Group<br />

established?<br />

Does your Deaf Association/Deaf<br />

Group have Statutes/a<br />

Constitution?<br />

Does your government recognise<br />

your national organisation as the<br />

representative <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in<br />

your country?<br />

Botswana 2002 Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi 2002 Yes Yes<br />

Eritrea 1998 Yes Yes<br />

Ethiopia 1971 Yes Yes<br />

Kenya 1986 Yes Yes<br />

Lesotho 1992 Yes Yes<br />

Madagascar 1985 Yes Yes<br />

Malawi 1992 Yes Yes<br />

Mozambique 1999 Yes Yes<br />

Namibia 1991 Yes Yes<br />

Rwanda 1988 Yes Yes<br />

Seychelles 2005 Yes N/A<br />

South Africa 1929 Yes Yes<br />

Sudan 1972 Yes Yes<br />

Swaziland 1989 Yes Yes<br />

Tanzania 1983 Yes Yes<br />

Uganda 1973 Yes Yes<br />

Zambia 1981 Yes Yes<br />

Zimbabwe 1995 Yes Yes<br />

Total 19 Yes (100%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

17 Yes (89%)<br />

7.2.5 Please list some <strong>of</strong> the areas in which your association has adopted a policy statement.<br />

Country Please list some <strong>of</strong> the areas in which your association has adopted a policy statement.<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong> policy statement supplied<br />

Burundi<br />

Eritrea<br />

• Education<br />

• Employment<br />

• Integration<br />

• Health<br />

• Communication<br />

• Employment<br />

• Deaf Women's Rights<br />

• Sports for the Deaf<br />

There are no formal policy statements however the Association advocates/works towards:<br />

• Respect for the Human Rights <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

Ethiopia<br />

•<br />

•<br />

Linguistics Rights<br />

Employment Rights (opportunity to obtain employment)<br />

• Rights to use Sign Language in Education<br />

• Everyday Communication<br />

• Education <strong>of</strong> the Deaf in Primary and Secondary Schools<br />

• Sign Language Interpretation in the Public and Private Sectors for Deaf/Sign Language Training for Hearing<br />

Kenya • Sports and Recreations<br />

• Employment and Self Sustenance<br />

• Access to Health Services/HIV/AIDS Training<br />

Lesotho The Policy Proposals made by our Association to the Government so far have not been responded to.<br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong> policy statement supplied<br />

Malawi Policy on the Equalisation <strong>of</strong> Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities<br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong> policy statement supplied<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 44<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Namibia<br />

Rwanda<br />

Seychelles<br />

South Africa<br />

Sudan<br />

Swaziland<br />

Tanzania<br />

Uganda<br />

• Recognition <strong>of</strong> Namibian Sign Language<br />

• Advocacy for the Rights <strong>of</strong> Persons with a Disability<br />

• Ratification <strong>of</strong> the Salamanca Statement for Special Education by the Ministry <strong>of</strong> Education<br />

• Education for All, EFA 1999<br />

• To encourage the public authorities to apply legislation related to the protection, education and<br />

employment <strong>of</strong> persons with a hearing loss<br />

• To promote the fight against discrimination <strong>of</strong> Deaf people based on gender, religion and race<br />

• Education<br />

• Social Life<br />

• Sports and Culture<br />

• Employment<br />

• Deaf Education Position Paper<br />

• South African Sign Language<br />

• South African Sign Language Interpreters<br />

• Legislation<br />

• Education<br />

• Sign Language<br />

SNAD policy on Developing in Silence to empower the Deaf Community in achieving equal rights as enjoyed by<br />

all able citizens regardless <strong>of</strong> participation, or economic and political status.<br />

To see a Tanzanian Community that recognises, accepts and cooperates with Deaf people, and ensures that<br />

they not afflicted by poverty, injustice, segregation and any kind <strong>of</strong> discrimination.<br />

1. UNAD lobbied the Ministry <strong>of</strong> health to adopt a policy on sign language training for its health workers<br />

2. Lobbied for a sign language training and research programme for SL interpreters at Kyambogo University<br />

3. The ministry <strong>of</strong> education accepted the use <strong>of</strong> sign language in schools for the Deaf<br />

4. Sign language recognised in laws and in the Constitution <strong>of</strong> Uganda<br />

Zambia <strong>No</strong> information provided<br />

Zimbabwe The Association has not adopted a policy statement but always thrives to conform to the Constitution.<br />

7.2.6 Please list the six highest priority issues/actions in your strategic action plan.<br />

Country Please list the six highest priority issues/actions in your strategic action plan.<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong> priority issues/actions<br />

Burundi<br />

Eritrea<br />

Ethiopia<br />

Kenya<br />

Lesotho<br />

1. Promoting the deaf community by training them in development activities<br />

2. To promote sign language and sign language interpretation services<br />

3. To improve the quality and accessibility <strong>of</strong> public and government services to benefit the Deaf<br />

4. To fight against HIV/AIDS in the Deaf community<br />

1. To ensure equal rights and full participation<br />

2. To educate the deaf from elementary school though high school<br />

3. To give training to the deaf to help themselves<br />

4. To publish an Eritrean Sign Language Dictionary and push the Education Authorities to use it in the<br />

curriculum as a medium <strong>of</strong> instruction<br />

5. To foster relationships with organisations within and outside <strong>of</strong> Eritrea in order to earn income to make<br />

the Association sustainable<br />

6. To train more interpreters to facilitate interpretation services in all spheres <strong>of</strong> Deaf interest<br />

1. Recognition <strong>of</strong> sign language as the natural language <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

2. Right to Education<br />

3. Right to Employment and Equal Opportunity<br />

4. Right for sign language interpreting services<br />

5. Empowerment <strong>of</strong> Deaf women<br />

6. Prevention <strong>of</strong> HIV/AIDS<br />

1. To promote the empowerment and participation <strong>of</strong> Deaf men and women, their families and carers as an<br />

integral part <strong>of</strong> Service Development or Advocacy and Networking<br />

2. To promote awareness <strong>of</strong> the needs and aspirations <strong>of</strong> Deaf men and women<br />

3. Support the development <strong>of</strong> sign language research in the Public Universities and Institutions<br />

4. Sign Language Training<br />

5. Develop the capacity <strong>of</strong> branch associations and Deaf Women’s Associations through leadership training in<br />

organisational management, entrepreneurship, information and Deaf Awareness for the General Public<br />

and Institutions, HIV/AIDS Awareness and Reproductive and Health Education<br />

6. To liaise with Government, NGOs and DPOs, with the aim <strong>of</strong> implementing policies that have direct<br />

impact on the welfare <strong>of</strong> the Deaf and Disabled<br />

1. Education and Health (Reproductive Health, HIV/AIDS, Adolescent Health, etc.)<br />

2. Employment<br />

3. Sign Language Training for Deaf members, parents, sign language interpreters and the general public<br />

4. Empowerment Programme for Parents <strong>of</strong> Deaf Children<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 45<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Madagascar<br />

Malawi<br />

1. Deaf Women’s Club<br />

2. Sign Language Dictionary<br />

3. Interpreter Education<br />

1. Deaf Rights Awareness<br />

2. Sign Language Teaching<br />

3. Sign Language Interpreters Training<br />

4. HIV/AIDS Awareness<br />

5. Capacity Building<br />

6. Empowerment (Economic and Social)<br />

Mozambique Do not have any strategic action plan because the association is currently being re- structured.<br />

Namibia<br />

Rwanda<br />

Seychelles<br />

South Africa<br />

Sudan<br />

Swaziland<br />

Tanzania<br />

Uganda<br />

Zambia<br />

1. Advocacy<br />

2. Deaf Education<br />

3. Deaf Awareness<br />

4. Deaf Women<br />

5. Namibian Sign Language<br />

6. HIV/AIDS awareness<br />

1. To promote national unity <strong>of</strong> all Deaf in Rwanda in our association<br />

2. To develop and apply programmes that support research on sign language development<br />

3. To develop and apply programmes that concentrate on gender issues as well as HIV/AIDS and other<br />

activities in the field <strong>of</strong> health, in line with the mission <strong>of</strong> the national association<br />

4. To promote equality and participation <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in the national development<br />

5. To defend the rights and interests <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in general<br />

6. Equality and quality education<br />

7. Early detection<br />

8. Pr<strong>of</strong>essional training<br />

9. Equal rights in employment<br />

10. Official acceptance <strong>of</strong> Seychellois Sign Language.<br />

1. South Africa Sign Language and Interpreting Services<br />

2. Education and Training<br />

3. Provincial Development<br />

4. Early identification and intervention<br />

5. Youth<br />

6. Women<br />

1. Education promotion<br />

2. Sign Language courses to be <strong>of</strong>fered at universities<br />

3. Employment<br />

4. Vocational education and training<br />

5. Health care<br />

6. Legislation and justice<br />

SNAD plans within the five years 2005-2010 to achieve the following results <strong>of</strong> social importance to the life<br />

and independency <strong>of</strong> the Deaf community:<br />

1. Youth Empowerment<br />

2. HIV/AIDS Education and Campaign<br />

3. Sign Language Development<br />

4. Social Programme<br />

1. Organisational Capacity Development<br />

2. Resources Mobilisation<br />

3. Strengthening Public and International Relations<br />

4. Developing Tanzania Sign Language<br />

5. Economic Empowerment <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

6. Awareness Raising, Advocacy and Lobbying for Laws and Policy Changes<br />

7. Training Deaf people about HIV/AIDS and Reproductive Health<br />

1. Promote research on Uganda Sign Language and Sign Language training<br />

2. Implement programmes focusing on gender, HIV/AIDS and other health related services<br />

3. information research, publication and dissemination<br />

4. Advocacy and lobbying to access services and resources from Government and non-governmental<br />

organisations<br />

5. Capacity building <strong>of</strong> <strong>Regional</strong> and District Associations <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

6. Monitoring and evaluation <strong>of</strong> programmes and financial management <strong>of</strong> resources<br />

1. Human Rights Programme<br />

• Sign Language Programme<br />

• Information Programme<br />

• Health and Wellness Programme<br />

2. Social Work<br />

• Membership Development Programme<br />

• Deaf Women’s Programme<br />

• Placement Service Programme<br />

3. Administration<br />

• Programme and Services Administration<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 46<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Zimbabwe<br />

1. Train more sign language interpreters<br />

2. HIV and AIDS Awareness<br />

3. Leadership and Capacity Building<br />

4. Research sign language vocabulary<br />

5. Train Deaf instructors<br />

6. Teaching sign language to hearing people including civil servants<br />

7.2.7 Please describe the structure <strong>of</strong> your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf/Deaf Group (e.g. congress/annual<br />

meeting/board/executive/districts/local associations and so forth).<br />

Country<br />

Please describe the structure <strong>of</strong> your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf/Deaf Group (e.g. congress/annual<br />

meeting/board/executive/districts/local associations and so forth).<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong> information supplied<br />

Burundi<br />

Eritrea<br />

Ethiopia<br />

Kenya<br />

Lesotho<br />

• General Assembly: Comprised <strong>of</strong> all Deaf members <strong>of</strong> the Association; it is the highest body <strong>of</strong> BNAD<br />

• The Board: Comprises the President, Vice President, Executive Director, Accountant, Branches Coordinator,<br />

Deaf Women’s Representative and Deaf Youth Representative<br />

• Executive Committee: Comprises the Executive Director, Project Co-ordinator, Accountant, Storekeeper,<br />

Interpreter, Main Sign Language Teacher, Health and Education, Trainer in charge <strong>of</strong> Culture, Arts and<br />

Sports<br />

• The Eritrean National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf is led by the General Assembly, which is the highest body <strong>of</strong><br />

the Association; the Executive Committee (12 Board Members); Chairperson; and in the head <strong>of</strong>fice the<br />

General Manager and other staff. There are also local branch <strong>of</strong>fices in four Eritrean geographic regions.<br />

• The ENAD Congress is held every four years and the annual meeting is held annually.<br />

• The Executive and the local Branch Leaders meet every three months throughout the year.<br />

• General Assembly<br />

• Executive Management Committee/Board/Secretariat<br />

• Local Associations<br />

• The General Assembly is composed <strong>of</strong> representatives <strong>of</strong> the local Associations<br />

• The Secretariat, headed by the Executive Director, has different sections including finance and property<br />

administration, and archives. There are also different project <strong>of</strong>fices<br />

• There are also groups such as Women’s, Sports and Youth (currently inactive)<br />

• Delegates Congress <strong>of</strong> 66 members representing branches every three years<br />

• Bi-Annual Delegates Congress <strong>of</strong> 33 representatives every one and half year<br />

• Governing Council - 13 members representative branch<br />

• Quarterly Meeting <strong>of</strong> six Project Sub-Committees - eight members per committee<br />

• Administration and Management Departments<br />

• Branch Associations - Quarterly Meeting<br />

• KNAD is a membership organisation; eligibility is for branch associations <strong>of</strong> Deaf people around Kenya<br />

• KNAD is an umbrella organisation for Branch Associations<br />

• The delegates from branches meet every three years to elect the board <strong>of</strong> Governors. They review<br />

activities bi-annually.<br />

• KNAD runs a Secretariat headed by an Executive Director. The organisation has projects that are headed by<br />

departmental heads. The activities <strong>of</strong> the departmental heads are reviewed by Sub-Committees who report<br />

to the Board. These committees are managed by Experts in their areas <strong>of</strong> focus.<br />

• Organisational Structure attached<br />

• We have a General Assembly which is made up <strong>of</strong> members from the District Branches; this General<br />

Assembly elects the Executive Board<br />

• The same General Assembly also elects representatives to the Women’s Wing, Youth Forum, etc.<br />

• The Executive Board appoints the Executive Director and other staff personnel<br />

Madagascar Organisational Chart provided<br />

Malawi<br />

Mozambique<br />

Namibia<br />

• Board <strong>of</strong> Trustees<br />

• General Assembly<br />

• Executive Board<br />

• Secretariat (Branch and Club)<br />

• Annual Meeting or Conference <strong>of</strong> the Central Council<br />

• Executive Secretariat<br />

• Provincial Delegation<br />

• Congress is held every two years<br />

• The Annual Meeting is an annual event<br />

• The Board meets three times a year<br />

• The Organisation is led by an appointed national Executive Director<br />

• The Association has regional Branches that are affiliated to NAD<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 47<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


• General Assembly (GA) is the supreme body <strong>of</strong> our association<br />

• Executive committee is represented by the president, who makes decisions and disseminates them to the<br />

Rwanda<br />

GA<br />

• General Secretariat or the Commission <strong>of</strong> the National Association<br />

• Council <strong>of</strong> Surveillance<br />

Seychelles Local association which is run by a management committee<br />

South Africa<br />

Sudan<br />

Swaziland<br />

Tanzania<br />

DeafSA currently has nine Deaf Provincial <strong>Federation</strong>s throughout South Africa which are recognised as NPO’s<br />

each with their own constituency. The Deaf <strong>Federation</strong>s in Gauteng, Mpumalanga, <strong>No</strong>rthern Cape and Western<br />

Cape have long benefited from financial support from the National Office. Other means <strong>of</strong> support are extended<br />

to the remainder <strong>of</strong> the Deaf Provincial <strong>Federation</strong>s.<br />

DeafSA Governance Structure<br />

The composition <strong>of</strong> the Quadrennial National Congress comprises a total <strong>of</strong> 39 representatives, via:<br />

• Twenty seven Congressional Members – three members from each <strong>of</strong> the nine DPF’s <strong>of</strong> South Africa<br />

• Three National Representatives for SA Deaf Youth<br />

• Three National Representatives for SA Deaf Women<br />

• Three National Representatives for SA Deaf Sports<br />

• Three National Representatives for SA Deafblind<br />

The National Executive Committee, <strong>of</strong> which 99% are Deaf, is comprised <strong>of</strong> provincial representatives from each<br />

province. They are chairpersons <strong>of</strong> the nine Deaf Provincial <strong>Federation</strong>s where they form part <strong>of</strong> the decisionmaking<br />

process on the national level and thereby influence the affairs <strong>of</strong> DeafSA.<br />

• General Assembly held every two years and formed <strong>of</strong> all state branches<br />

• Executive Officers hold <strong>of</strong>fice for a period <strong>of</strong> two years<br />

• Specialised Secretariats (14 Secretariats e.g. Sign Language Secretariat, Special Education Secretariat, and<br />

so forth)<br />

• Annual Meeting<br />

• Board<br />

• Executive<br />

• Districts<br />

• Local Associations<br />

• The main decision-making body is the annual general meeting representing regions and branches countrywide;<br />

they elect the National Executive Board every three years.<br />

• The Board employs the Executive Director, who is the <strong>of</strong>ficer in charge <strong>of</strong> the day to day management <strong>of</strong><br />

the organisation.<br />

• To implement the vision and mission statement in line with the pr<strong>of</strong>essional strategic plan, the director<br />

employs departmental staff depending on their educational background, skills and pr<strong>of</strong>essionalism.<br />

• At the grassroots level there is a national network <strong>of</strong> Deaf clubs from Wards, Districts and Regions.<br />

Uganda Organisational Chart provided<br />

Zambia<br />

Zimbabwe<br />

• ZNAD Membership Branches (Grass Roots)<br />

• ZNAD General Assembly (Held once every 3 years)<br />

• ZNAD Annual General Meeting (Held once every year)<br />

• ZNAD Executive Committee Board (Makes policy and decisions)<br />

• ZNAD Secretariat (Implements Programmes)<br />

• Zimbabwe National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf is composed <strong>of</strong> the Chairman and one Vice Chairman, Secretary,<br />

and one Vice Secretary, Treasurer and four committee members.<br />

• ZIMNAD has branches countrywide.<br />

• Every year ZIMNAD holds an Annual General Meeting, which draws its members from all walks <strong>of</strong> life.<br />

Individuals <strong>of</strong> national renown are also invited to take part in the Annual General Meeting. The Executive<br />

maps strategies to be followed and implemented by members <strong>of</strong> the staff.<br />

• The Branches forward their grievances to the National Association and the Executive tries to find means to<br />

rectify them.<br />

• The Executive meets two times per month in order to assess progress made by staff members. If there is<br />

any urgent matter the Executive members send each other messages through mobile phones.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 48<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.2.7.1 How many affiliated regional and/or local Deaf Associations are part <strong>of</strong> your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf?<br />

Country <strong>Regional</strong> Associations Local Associations<br />

Botswana 0 0<br />

Burundi 5 5<br />

Eritrea 0 4<br />

Ethiopia 0 14<br />

Kenya 3 13<br />

Lesotho 0 0<br />

Madagascar 12 2<br />

Malawi 3 6<br />

Mozambique 5 2<br />

Namibia 13 1<br />

Rwanda 10 25<br />

Seychelles 0 3<br />

South Africa 9 119<br />

Sudan 15 12<br />

Swaziland 4 0<br />

Tanzania 17 38<br />

Uganda 7 47<br />

Zambia 0 25<br />

Zimbabwe 0 6<br />

Total 103 322<br />

7.2.8 How many members <strong>of</strong> your board are Deaf?<br />

Country<br />

How many members <strong>of</strong> your board<br />

are Deaf?<br />

Total number <strong>of</strong> Board Members<br />

Percentage <strong>of</strong> Deaf on the<br />

Board<br />

Botswana 10 10 100%<br />

Burundi 18 19 95%<br />

Eritrea 12 12 100%<br />

Ethiopia 9 9 100%<br />

Kenya 13 13 100%<br />

Lesotho 10 10 100%<br />

Madagascar 14 14 100%<br />

Malawi 10 10 100%<br />

Mozambique 12 12 100%<br />

Namibia 7 7 100%<br />

Rwanda 9 12 75%<br />

Seychelles 6 13 46%<br />

South Africa 17 18 94%<br />

Sudan 15 15 100%<br />

Swaziland 8 8 100%<br />

Tanzania 8 8 100%<br />

Uganda 9 9 100%<br />

Zambia 17 20 85%<br />

Zimbabwe 9 15 60%<br />

Total 213 234 91%<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 49<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.2.9 How many members <strong>of</strong> the board are Deaf women and how many are Deaf men?<br />

Country Deaf Women Board Members Deaf Men Board Members Percentage <strong>of</strong> Deaf Women on the Board<br />

Botswana 7 3 70%<br />

Burundi 7 11 63%<br />

Eritrea 4 8 33%<br />

Ethiopia 3 6 33%<br />

Kenya 4 9 31%<br />

Lesotho 7 3 70%<br />

Madagascar 6 8 43%<br />

Malawi 4 6 40%<br />

Mozambique 3 9 25%<br />

Namibia 2 5 29%<br />

Rwanda 5 4 56%<br />

Seychelles 3 3 50%<br />

South Africa 9 8 53%<br />

Sudan 3 12 20%<br />

Swaziland 4 4 50%<br />

Tanzania 4 4 50%<br />

Uganda 2 7 22%<br />

Zambia 4 13 24%<br />

Zimbabwe 4 5 44%<br />

Total 85 128 39%<br />

7.2.10 Does your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf/Deaf Group have committees for specific areas <strong>of</strong> interest or affiliation<br />

with any other relevant independent groups in your country?<br />

Does your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf/Deaf Group have committees for specific areas <strong>of</strong><br />

interest or affiliation with any other relevant independent groups in your country?<br />

Deaf Women’s Groups 15 (94%)<br />

Country/Average<br />

Percentage<br />

Based on 16 Respondents<br />

Sign Language Interpreting 14 (88 %)<br />

Deaf Youth 12 (75%)<br />

Sign Language Research 12 (75%)<br />

Sports Groups 12 (75%)<br />

Deaf Education 11 (69%)<br />

Parents <strong>of</strong> Deaf Children 11 (69%)<br />

Cultural Groups <strong>of</strong> Deaf People 8 (50%)<br />

Children <strong>of</strong> Deaf Adults 3 (19%)<br />

Deafblind 3 (19%)<br />

Deaf People with Other Disabilities 3 (19%)<br />

Other Committees 1 (6%)<br />

Deaf Seniors 0<br />

Lesbian, Gay, Transgender and Bisexual 0<br />

Country Other Committees/Groups<br />

Uganda<br />

•<br />

•<br />

Sign Language Instructors/Teachers<br />

Deaf Business Groups<br />

Botswana, Seychelles and Mozambique stated their Associations do not have any specific areas <strong>of</strong> interest or affiliation with any<br />

relevant groups in their countries.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 50<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Country<br />

Does your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf/Deaf Group have committees for specific areas <strong>of</strong> interest or<br />

affiliation with any other relevant independent groups in your country?<br />

Burundi Sign Language Interpreting<br />

Sign Language Research<br />

Deaf Education<br />

Parents <strong>of</strong> Deaf Children<br />

Deaf Youth<br />

Sports Groups<br />

Deaf Women’s Groups<br />

Eritrea Sign Language Interpreting<br />

Parents <strong>of</strong> Deaf Children<br />

Sports Groups<br />

Deaf Women’s Groups<br />

Ethiopia Sign Language Interpreting<br />

Sign Language Research<br />

Deaf Education<br />

Deaf Youth<br />

Cultural Groups <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

Sports Groups<br />

Deaf Women’s Groups<br />

Kenya Sign Language Interpreting<br />

Sign Language Research<br />

Deaf Education<br />

Parents <strong>of</strong> Deaf Children<br />

Deafblind<br />

Deaf Youth<br />

Cultural Groups <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

Sports Groups<br />

Deaf Women’s Groups<br />

Children <strong>of</strong> Deaf Adults<br />

Lesotho Sign Language Interpreting<br />

Deaf Education<br />

Parents <strong>of</strong> Deaf Children<br />

Deaf Youth<br />

Sports Groups<br />

Deaf People with Other Disabilities<br />

Deaf Women’s Groups<br />

Madagascar Sign Language Interpreting<br />

Sign Language Research<br />

Deaf Education<br />

Parents <strong>of</strong> Deaf Children<br />

Cultural Groups <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

Sports Groups<br />

Deaf Women’s Groups<br />

Malawi Sign Language Interpreting<br />

Deaf Youth<br />

Deaf Women’s Groups<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 51<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Namibia Sign Language Interpreting<br />

Sign Language Research<br />

Deaf Education<br />

Cultural Groups <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

Deaf Women’s Groups<br />

Rwanda Sign Language Interpreting<br />

Deaf Education<br />

Parents <strong>of</strong> Deaf Children<br />

Deafblind<br />

Deaf Youth<br />

Sports Groups<br />

Deaf People with Other Disabilities<br />

Children <strong>of</strong> Deaf Adults<br />

Deaf Women’s Groups<br />

South Africa Sign Language Interpreting<br />

Sign Language Research<br />

Deaf Education<br />

Parents <strong>of</strong> Deaf Children<br />

Deafblind<br />

Deaf Youth<br />

Cultural Groups <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

Sports Groups<br />

Deaf Women’s Groups<br />

Sudan Sign Language Interpreting<br />

Sign Language Research<br />

Deaf Education<br />

Deaf Youth<br />

Cultural Groups <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

Deaf Women’s Groups<br />

Swaziland Deaf Youth<br />

Sports Groups<br />

Deaf Women’s Group<br />

Tanzania Sign Language Interpreting<br />

Sign Language Research<br />

Deaf Education<br />

Parents <strong>of</strong> Deaf Children<br />

Uganda Sign Language Interpreting<br />

Sign Language Research<br />

Parents <strong>of</strong> Deaf Children<br />

Deafblind<br />

Deaf Youth<br />

Cultural Groups <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

Sports Groups<br />

Deaf Women’s Groups<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 52<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Zambia<br />

Zimbabwe<br />

Sign Language Interpreting<br />

Sign Language Research<br />

Parents <strong>of</strong> Deaf Children<br />

Deaf Youth<br />

Cultural Groups <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

Sports Groups<br />

Deaf Women’s Groups<br />

Sign Language Interpreters<br />

Sign Language Researchers<br />

Deaf Education<br />

Parents <strong>of</strong> Deaf Children<br />

Deaf Youth<br />

Sports Groups<br />

Deaf People with Other Disabilities<br />

Deaf Women’s Groups<br />

Children <strong>of</strong> Deaf Adults<br />

7.2.11 Does your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf/Deaf Group have any paid staff members?<br />

7.2.11.1 How many <strong>of</strong> the paid staff members are women and how many are men?<br />

7.2.11.2 How many <strong>of</strong> the paid staff members are Deaf?<br />

Does your<br />

National<br />

Association <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Country<br />

Deaf/Deaf Group<br />

have any paid<br />

staff members?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Total Paid<br />

Staff<br />

Members<br />

Paid<br />

Women<br />

Paid Men<br />

Total Paid<br />

Deaf Staff<br />

Members<br />

Paid<br />

Deaf<br />

Women<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 53<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).<br />

Paid<br />

Deaf<br />

Men<br />

Percentage<br />

<strong>of</strong> Deaf<br />

Staff<br />

Members<br />

Eritrea Yes 33 15 18 33 11 22 100%<br />

Ethiopia Yes 38 26 12 23 18 5 61%<br />

Kenya <strong>No</strong><br />

Lesotho Yes 2 1 1 1 1 0 50%<br />

Madagascar Yes 2 1 1 1 0 1 50%<br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes 5 2 3 3 1 2 60%<br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles Yes 5 3 2 3 1 2 60%<br />

South Africa Yes 64 43 21 35 22 13 55%<br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong><br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania Yes 10 3 7 10 3 7 100%<br />

Uganda Yes 19 8 11 14 5 9 74%<br />

Zambia Yes 13 5 8 9 3 6 69%<br />

Zimbabwe Yes 4 2 2 2 1 1 50%<br />

Total 11 Yes (58%) 195 134 69%<br />

Based on 19 respondents


7.2.12 Is your Chief Executive Officer/Executive Director/Person-In-Charge Deaf?<br />

Country Is your Chief Executive Officer/Executive Director/Person-In-Charge Deaf?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi Yes Voluntary<br />

Eritrea Yes<br />

Ethiopia Yes<br />

Kenya Yes Voluntary<br />

Lesotho Vacant<br />

Madagascar Yes<br />

Malawi Yes Voluntary<br />

Mozambique Yes Voluntary<br />

Namibia Yes<br />

Rwanda Yes Voluntary<br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes<br />

Sudan Yes Voluntary<br />

Swaziland Yes Voluntary<br />

Tanzania Yes<br />

Uganda Yes<br />

Zambia Yes<br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total<br />

8 Yes (42%)<br />

7 Yes Voluntary (37%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 54<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.3.0 Population <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

7.3.1 Does your country’s government have any <strong>of</strong>ficial number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in your country?<br />

Country<br />

Does your country’s government have any <strong>of</strong>ficial number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in your<br />

country?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Total Deaf people<br />

Eritrea Yes 20,000<br />

Ethiopia Yes approx 250,000<br />

Kenya <strong>No</strong><br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar Yes 219<br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes 8,314<br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes 402,847<br />

Sudan Yes 48,862<br />

Swaziland Yes 6,000<br />

Tanzania <strong>No</strong><br />

Uganda Yes 160,316<br />

Zambia Yes 16,000<br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 9 Yes (47%) 912,558<br />

Country Deaf Women Deaf Men<br />

Eritrea approx 7,000 approx 13,000<br />

Ethiopia 125,000 125,000<br />

Madagascar 100 119<br />

Sudan 20,643 28,219<br />

Total 152,743 166,338<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

7.3.2 Does your Association/Group have any <strong>of</strong>ficial or approximate figures <strong>of</strong> the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people living in your<br />

country?<br />

Country<br />

Does your Association/Group have any <strong>of</strong>ficial or approximate figures <strong>of</strong> the<br />

number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people living in your country?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Total Deaf people<br />

Eritrea Yes 20,000<br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong><br />

Kenya <strong>No</strong><br />

Lesotho Yes 1,998<br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes 8,314<br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles Yes 600<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 55<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


South Africa Yes 500,000 approx<br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong><br />

Swaziland Yes 6,300<br />

Tanzania <strong>No</strong><br />

Uganda Yes 840,000<br />

Zambia Yes 16,000<br />

Zimbabwe Yes approx 1,500,000<br />

Total 9 Yes (47%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

2,893,212<br />

Please note: Lesotho gives the same figure for the Deaf population and for Deaf membership <strong>of</strong> the National Association <strong>of</strong><br />

the Deaf. Three countries (Eritrea, Namibia and Zambia) reported their National Government and their Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

as having the same numbers <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in their country.<br />

Country Deaf Women Deaf Men<br />

Eritrea 7,000 13,000<br />

Lesotho 842 1,156<br />

Namibia 0 0<br />

Seychelles 0 0<br />

South Africa 0 0<br />

Swaziland 0 0<br />

Uganda 440,000 400,000<br />

Zambia 0 0<br />

Zimbabwe 900,000 600,000<br />

Total 1,347,842 1,014,156<br />

7.3.3 Does your Association/Group have any <strong>of</strong>ficial or approximate numbers <strong>of</strong> Deaf people who use sign language as<br />

their primary language?<br />

Country<br />

Does your Association/Group have any <strong>of</strong>ficial or approximate<br />

numbers <strong>of</strong> Deaf people who use sign language as their primary<br />

language?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Total Number <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Users<br />

Burundi Yes 304<br />

Eritrea Yes 5,000<br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong><br />

Kenya <strong>No</strong><br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia <strong>No</strong><br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles Yes 400<br />

South Africa <strong>No</strong><br />

Sudan Yes 10,000<br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania Yes 278,000<br />

Uganda <strong>No</strong><br />

Zambia Yes 14,400<br />

Zimbabwe Yes approx 1,200,000<br />

Total 7 Yes (37%) 1,508,104<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 56<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Country Deaf Women Sign Language Users Deaf Men Sign Language Users<br />

Burundi 103 201<br />

Eritrea 2,000 3,000<br />

Sudan 3,000 7,000<br />

Tanzania 189,000 89,000<br />

Zimbabwe 725,000 475,000<br />

Total 919,103 574,201<br />

7.3.4. Does the situation <strong>of</strong> HIV/AIDS in your country affect Deaf women, men and children?<br />

Country Does the situation <strong>of</strong> HIV/AIDS in your country affect Deaf women, men and children?<br />

Botswana Yes<br />

Burundi Yes<br />

Eritrea Yes<br />

Ethiopia Yes<br />

Kenya Yes<br />

Lesotho Yes<br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi Yes<br />

Mozambique Yes<br />

Namibia Yes<br />

Rwanda Yes<br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong> information<br />

South Africa Yes<br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong> information<br />

Swaziland Yes<br />

Tanzania Yes<br />

Uganda Yes<br />

Zambia Yes<br />

Zimbabwe Yes<br />

Total 16 Yes (84%)<br />

Country<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

If yes, please describe the situation with HIV/AIDS in the Deaf community in your country, including any<br />

<strong>of</strong>ficial statistics on the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people living with HIV/AIDS.<br />

Botswana HIV/AIDS affects all people in Botswana but we have no statistics.<br />

Burundi<br />

Eritrea<br />

Ethiopia<br />

Kenya<br />

There is a steady rise in HIV/AIDS infection every year in the Deaf community in Burundi. The lack <strong>of</strong> equal<br />

access to HIV Education which most hearing persons can access makes Deaf people easy prey to HIV/AIDS. Also<br />

unemployment pushes Deaf youths, boys and girls alike, into juvenile delinquency thus increasing the possibility<br />

<strong>of</strong> HIV/AIDS infection. Also due to unemployment many deaf women resort to prostitution in an attempt to earn<br />

their daily bread.<br />

Many members <strong>of</strong> the Eritrean National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf have knowledge about HIV/AIDS but people living<br />

with HIV are not among them. The Ministry <strong>of</strong> Health has information about non-members. There are many Deaf<br />

affected by this virus, mostly in remote areas. The problem is there is no campaign or training about HIV/AIDS<br />

aimed towards the Deaf specifically. This is because <strong>of</strong> social discrimination, isolation and lack <strong>of</strong> awareness<br />

about sign language in society and by the government authorities. Because <strong>of</strong> their disability, lack <strong>of</strong> work and<br />

communication problems, some Deaf are affected. To prevent exposure to and transmission <strong>of</strong> HIV/AIDS, EriNAD<br />

is trying to lead campaigns and workshops for Deaf people to raise their awareness about protecting themselves.<br />

The Deaf community is highly affected by HIV/AIDS because <strong>of</strong> lack <strong>of</strong> information, but we do not have <strong>of</strong>ficial<br />

statistics on the number <strong>of</strong> deaf affected. We are trying to provide training and make information available in<br />

sign language.<br />

The Liverpool Special Care and Treatment Centre runs three Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT) sites for<br />

the Deaf, managed by Deaf counsellors and providing targeted services to the Deaf Community. The results <strong>of</strong><br />

their pilot programme for the Deaf community showed a seven percent increase in prevalence <strong>of</strong> HIV/AIDS in the<br />

Deaf Community in the 24 months <strong>of</strong> the programme (according to VCT client records at the 3 Deaf VCT sites).<br />

This figure is significant given that it is equal to the prevalence in the general population, which stands at<br />

around six percent according to statistics kept by the National HIV/AIDS Control Council. This has happened<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 57<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Lesotho<br />

Malawi<br />

Mozambique<br />

Namibia<br />

Rwanda<br />

South Africa<br />

Swaziland<br />

Tanzania<br />

Uganda<br />

Zambia<br />

Zimbabwe<br />

despite several efforts by different organisations to educate the Deaf on HIV/AIDS. Deaf persons still have a low<br />

level <strong>of</strong> knowledge and understanding about HIV/AIDS due to the low literacy level, which inhibits their ability to<br />

obtain and process information. The HIV/AIDS messages are in formats that are not Deaf-friendly. Deaf people<br />

also have other vulnerabilities related to gender, age and geographical factors.<br />

Deaf people in Lesotho are victims <strong>of</strong> HIV and AIDS in the sense that there is no information about HIV and AIDS<br />

designed for the less literate Deaf people to understand. All the workshops about HIV and AIDS are designed for<br />

hearing people, and there are no sign language interpreters for such workshops or for information broadcast on<br />

national television. Deaf people are at a higher risk, therefore, <strong>of</strong> contracting the disease, due to lack <strong>of</strong><br />

appropriate information about HIV and AIDS.<br />

• Many Deaf people are infected due to lack <strong>of</strong> information about HIV/AIDS such as how it is spread and how<br />

to prevent it<br />

• Most Deaf women and children are abused by men – they are raped because people have the misconception<br />

that disabled people cure AIDS<br />

• There is a lack <strong>of</strong> access to anti-retroviral drugs (ARVs) because most Deaf people are not aware <strong>of</strong> where to<br />

access ARVs nor do they have general information on the therapy<br />

• There are no <strong>of</strong>ficial statistics on the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people infected because there has been no research<br />

done on this area nation-wide<br />

In Zambezia province the number <strong>of</strong> deaf affected with HIV/AIDS is high, but few Deaf people have died from<br />

this epidemic disease. There are no <strong>of</strong>ficial statistics. It is probable that less then help number (WHAT MEAN??)<br />

<strong>of</strong> deaf are affected by HIV/AIDS<br />

The situation <strong>of</strong> HIV/AIDS in Namibia does affect Deaf persons, women, men and children. Although there are no<br />

confirmed statistics, the Association is aware <strong>of</strong> some members who are living with HIV/AIDS. The problem is<br />

worsened by the fact that information and services are not equally delivered to the Deaf community due to the<br />

public’s misconception about Deaf and other persons with disabilities... i.e. Deaf cannot have sex or cannot get<br />

infected with HIV, etc.<br />

As for all citizens in Rwanda, HIV/AIDS affects most Deaf people in all regions <strong>of</strong> Rwanda; there are no HIV<br />

detection services for the Deaf such as the VCT/PMTCT. Twenty (20) HIV seropositive cases were found in the<br />

town <strong>of</strong> Kigali, <strong>of</strong> whom 12 have died. However, that number is not included in <strong>of</strong>ficial statistics.<br />

DeafSA is part <strong>of</strong> SANAC (South African National AIDS Council).<br />

Programmes are currently being developed to make counselling services accessible.<br />

<strong>No</strong> numbers are available.<br />

Officially we do not have any figures; however the rate <strong>of</strong> HIV has had a drastic effect on the Deaf community<br />

largely to ignorance. This is unfortunate in itself.<br />

HIV/AIDS became a threat to many African countries due to lack <strong>of</strong> appropriate information, negative attitudes,<br />

stigmatisation and poverty. The number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people dying from HIV/AIDS is not known because even those<br />

affected by HIV/AIDS are not receiving appropriate attention. It is a great tragedy in Tanzania.<br />

Deaf people in Uganda have limited access to HIV/AIDS information due to information dissemination that is not<br />

Deaf-friendly, such as the use <strong>of</strong> television without sign language interpreters, radio and the print media. About<br />

70% <strong>of</strong> Deaf people can not read or write. The Ugandan government is being praised internationally for its efforts<br />

to fight and reduce the prevalence <strong>of</strong> HIV/AIDS from 12% to 6.4%, but this does not take into account the<br />

prevalence rates among the Deaf community who have been left behind in the fight against the HIV/AIDS<br />

epidemic.<br />

UNAD has worked hard to educate Deaf people about the disease by lobbying for resources to carry out<br />

HIV/AIDS-related activities through drama, training and voluntary counselling and testing. The efforts have<br />

raised awareness in Government and Civil Society Organisations specialising in HIV/AIDS prevention and many<br />

efforts are being made to include Deaf issues in their programmes. Even The AIDS Support Organisation (TASO) in<br />

Uganda is arranging for special programmes to train Deaf counsellors, who can then provide confidential services<br />

directly to Deaf clients rather than going through third parties.<br />

Currently each TASO branch in the country keeps its data on the number <strong>of</strong> affected Deaf people confidential at<br />

the local level, so there is no accurate national data, only a few cases recorded at the respective centres.<br />

• Deaf people need advertisements on our National Television about HIV/AIDS to be interpreted into sign<br />

language<br />

• The Deaf community wants to have airtime on the National Television network to spread HIV/AIDS messages<br />

to its members through sign language and the use <strong>of</strong> sign language interpreters<br />

• The spread <strong>of</strong> HIV/AIDS among the Deaf community is increasing<br />

• There are communication barriers between Deaf clients and VCT staff/counsellors<br />

<strong>No</strong> <strong>of</strong>ficial statistics due to factors like:-<br />

• Inadequate communication with the health sectors countrywide because they don’t use sign language<br />

• Little or no counselling for Deaf people<br />

• Most Deaf people are afraid <strong>of</strong> being publicly open as they think this will break up their marriage or cause<br />

them to be rejected by others<br />

• <strong>No</strong>n-awareness – others are not aware <strong>of</strong> the current situation<br />

• Cultural beliefs from their parents/families e.g. Apostolic Church-goers do not believe in clinical treatment,<br />

they believe in using holy water or herbs and so forth<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 58<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.4.0 Legislation and Policies<br />

7.4.1 Does your country’s government recognise Deaf people as citizens on an equal basis as other citizens in your<br />

country?<br />

Country<br />

Does your country’s government recognise Deaf people as citizens on an equal basis as other citizens in<br />

your country?<br />

Botswana Yes<br />

Burundi Yes<br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong><br />

Ethiopia Yes<br />

Kenya Yes<br />

Lesotho Yes<br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi Yes<br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes<br />

Rwanda Yes<br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes<br />

Sudan Yes<br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania Yes<br />

Uganda Yes<br />

Zambia Yes<br />

Zimbabwe Yes<br />

Total 14 Yes (74%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

Please note: that the <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group debated whether the question was clear as to the meaning <strong>of</strong> the phrase “equal<br />

basis as other citizens”. Most countries in Southern and Eastern Africa have legislation for People with Disabilities but<br />

implementation <strong>of</strong> these laws has not happened. The question should have been clearer as to what is meant by “equal basis as<br />

other citizens”.<br />

7.4.2 Does your country’s government have an <strong>of</strong>fice responsible for services for People with Disabilities?<br />

Country Does your country’s government have an <strong>of</strong>fice responsible for services for People with Disabilities?<br />

Botswana Yes<br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea Yes<br />

Ethiopia Yes<br />

Kenya Yes<br />

Lesotho Yes<br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi Yes<br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes<br />

Rwanda Yes<br />

Seychelles Yes<br />

South Africa Yes<br />

Sudan Yes<br />

Swaziland Yes<br />

Tanzania Yes<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 59<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Uganda Yes<br />

Zambia Yes<br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 15 Yes (79%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

7.4.2.1 If yes, what is the name, address and website <strong>of</strong> the government <strong>of</strong>fice that is responsible for services for<br />

People with Disabilities in your country?<br />

Country<br />

Botswana<br />

Eritrea<br />

If yes, what is the name, address and website <strong>of</strong> the government <strong>of</strong>fice that is responsible for services for<br />

People with Disabilities in your country?<br />

National Co-ordinating Committee for People with Disabilities<br />

Private Bag 0038<br />

Gaborone<br />

www.moh.gov.bw<br />

Ministry <strong>of</strong> Labour and Human Welfare<br />

PO Box Asmara<br />

Eritrea<br />

Tel: 158146<br />

Fax: 291-151749<br />

Ethiopia Under Ministry <strong>of</strong> Labour and Social Affairs, there is a Rehabilitation Department, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.<br />

Kenya<br />

Lesotho<br />

Malawi<br />

National Council for Persons with Disabilities<br />

Ministry <strong>of</strong> Gender Culture and Social Services<br />

PO Box 30276<br />

Nairobi<br />

Kenya<br />

Rehabilitation Unit (Ministry <strong>of</strong> Heath and Social Welfare)<br />

PO Box 514<br />

Masery - 100<br />

Lesotho<br />

Ministry <strong>of</strong> Persons with Disabilities and the Elderly<br />

Private Bag 380<br />

Lilongwe<br />

Ministry <strong>of</strong> Health and Social Service Ministerial Building<br />

Harvey Street<br />

P/Bag 13198<br />

Windhoek<br />

www.helathnet.org.na<br />

www.op.gov.na/Decade_peace/health.htm<br />

Namibia<br />

Ministry <strong>of</strong> Labour and Social Welfare<br />

32 Mercedes Street<br />

Khomasdal Windhoek<br />

Private bag 19005<br />

Windhoek<br />

Namibia,<br />

www.op.gov.na/Decade_peace/health.htm<br />

Rwanda Office <strong>of</strong> the Ministry in charge <strong>of</strong> local affairs (MINALOC)<br />

Seychelles<br />

South Africa<br />

Sudan<br />

National Council for the Disabled<br />

Office Room <strong>No</strong> 4 Lungos Building<br />

Stad Popiler Car Park<br />

Victoria<br />

ncfd@seychelles.net<br />

Office on the Status <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

The Presidency<br />

Union Buildings<br />

Private Bag x 1000<br />

Pretoria 1<br />

www.government.gov.za<br />

Ministry <strong>of</strong> Social Welfare and Women’s and Children’s Affairs<br />

Department <strong>of</strong> Disabled People<br />

P O Box 1266<br />

Khartoum<br />

Sudan<br />

Fax: +2983 783150<br />

www.welfare.gov.sd<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 60<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Swaziland<br />

Tanzania<br />

Uganda<br />

Zambia<br />

Ministry for Health and Social Welfare<br />

Office <strong>of</strong> the National Disability Co-ordinator<br />

Disability Unit<br />

P.O. Box 8<br />

Mbabane H100<br />

Swaziland<br />

www.ministryforhealth@gov.sz<br />

Ministry <strong>of</strong> Health and Social Welfare<br />

Department <strong>of</strong> Social Welfare<br />

PO Box 1949<br />

Dar Es Salaam<br />

Tele: +255 2222 180100 or +255 7828 25029<br />

Hon. Madada Suleiman<br />

Minster <strong>of</strong> State for the Elderly and Disability<br />

PO Box 7136<br />

Kampla<br />

Uganda<br />

Tel: 256 – 772-611107<br />

Email: skymadada@yahoo.com<br />

www.mglsd.go.ug<br />

Zambia Agency for Persons with Disabilities<br />

P.O. Box 50073<br />

Leopards Hill Road<br />

Lusaka<br />

Tel: 01261948<br />

Fax: 260128<br />

7.4.3 Does your country’s Government have any legislation or policies for Deaf people (or People with Disabilities in<br />

general)?<br />

Country<br />

Does your country’s Government have any legislation or policies for Deaf people (or People with<br />

Disabilities in general)?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi Yes<br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong><br />

Ethiopia Yes<br />

Kenya Yes<br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi Yes<br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes<br />

Rwanda Yes<br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes<br />

Sudan Yes<br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania Yes<br />

Uganda Yes<br />

Zambia <strong>No</strong><br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 10 Yes (53%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

Please note: A member <strong>of</strong> the <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group stated that Lesotho has legislation for People with Disabilities; he<br />

attended a meeting with the Minister <strong>of</strong> Justice, who is blind himself.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 61<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.4.3.1 If yes, please list some <strong>of</strong> the policies or legislation that relate to Deaf people (or People with Disabilities)<br />

(please write the name <strong>of</strong> the legislation or policy in full).<br />

Country<br />

If yes, please list some <strong>of</strong> the policies or legislation that relate to Deaf people (or People with Disabilities)<br />

(please write the name <strong>of</strong> the legislation or policy in full).<br />

Burundi Article 22: <strong>No</strong> one can be a target <strong>of</strong> discrimination due to physical or mental disability.<br />

Ethiopia<br />

It has been passed by Parliament only just recently and is not yet available. We will provide a copy in the<br />

future.<br />

Kenya<br />

Persons with Disabilities Act 2003, Special Education Policy - Sessional Paper <strong>No</strong> 1 - 2005, Disability Human<br />

Rights Policy - Kenya Chapter - 2007<br />

Malawi Policy on Equalisation <strong>of</strong> Opportunities for People with Disabilities<br />

Namibia<br />

Rwanda<br />

South Africa<br />

These are just some <strong>of</strong> the activities taking place in Namibia, under the National Disability Council in Namibia:<br />

Namibia Disability Programme (NDP): EU funded sub-programme to support the NFPDN (National <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

Persons with Disabilities <strong>of</strong> Namibia) in its activities, both in Windhoek and in regional <strong>of</strong>fices to be established<br />

in the rural areas. We will support the Disability Movement (NFPDN and its member organisations) in:<br />

• Delivering awareness raising campaigns<br />

• Increasing representation at the national level and capacity mobilisation in rural areas<br />

• Supporting the Ministry <strong>of</strong> Health and Social Services in target regions in the development <strong>of</strong> Community<br />

Based Rehabilitation programmes, in order to reach people with disabilities in their communities<br />

• Supporting the Ministry <strong>of</strong> Education in target regions to implement their Inclusive Education mandate<br />

1. All disabled persons enjoy the same rights as others under law; they have to be treated respectfully and<br />

with dignity<br />

2. Persons with disabilities have the right to live with family and in the same conditions as other family<br />

members<br />

3. Persons with disabilities have the right to express their opinion on questions <strong>of</strong> national interest and on all<br />

questions concerning themselves; they contribute to the national development according to their ability<br />

4. Employment Equity Act<br />

5. South African Federal Council on Disability (SAFCD): The Call for Inclusive Education (1994)<br />

6. South African Constitution (1996)<br />

7. South African Schools Act: <strong>No</strong>rms and Standards for Language Policy in Public Schools (1996)<br />

8. An Integrated National Disability Strategy (INDS) (1997)<br />

9. Promotion <strong>of</strong> Equality and Prevention <strong>of</strong> Unfair Discrimination Act (2001)<br />

10. Education White Paper 6: Special Needs Education (EWP6) (2001)<br />

1. Sudan Constitution mentions social justice for all citizens without discrimination<br />

Sudan<br />

2.<br />

3.<br />

Sudan Constitution mentions the right to education for all citizens without discrimination<br />

Sudan Constitution mentions the rights <strong>of</strong> persons with special needs in employment, education,<br />

entertainment, culture, etc.<br />

Tanzania Tanzania Policy on Disability (2004); Disability Employment Act (1982)<br />

Uganda<br />

Specific laws and polices for People with Disabilities:<br />

• Persons with Disability Act 2006<br />

• Policy on Disability in Uganda 2006<br />

• National Council on Disability Act 2003<br />

Policies/laws with a provision about Disability:<br />

• Constitution <strong>of</strong> Uganda 1995, amended 2005<br />

• Communication Act 1998<br />

• University and Tertiary Institutions Act 2001<br />

• Children’s Statute 1996<br />

• Local Government Act 1997, amended 2001<br />

• Land Act 1998<br />

• Rules <strong>of</strong> Procedure <strong>of</strong> Parliament 1996<br />

• Uganda Traffic and Road Safety Act<br />

• Uganda People’s Defence Forces Act, amended 2005<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 62<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.4.4 Does your country’s Government have any anti-discrimination laws for Deaf people (or People with Disabilities)?<br />

Country<br />

Does your country’s Government have any anti-discrimination laws for Deaf people (or People with<br />

Disabilities)?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong><br />

Ethiopia Yes<br />

Kenya Yes<br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar Yes<br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes<br />

Rwanda Yes<br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes<br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong><br />

Sudan Yes<br />

Tanzania <strong>No</strong><br />

Uganda Yes<br />

Zambia <strong>No</strong><br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 8 Yes (42%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

7.4.5 Does your country’s government provide any services specifically for the Deaf Community through its government<br />

departments?<br />

Country<br />

Does your country’s government provide any services specifically for the Deaf Community through its<br />

government departments?<br />

Botswana Yes<br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong><br />

Ethiopia Yes<br />

Kenya Yes<br />

Lesotho Yes<br />

Madagascar Yes<br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes<br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles Yes<br />

South Africa Yes<br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong><br />

Swaziland Yes<br />

Tanzania Yes<br />

Uganda Yes<br />

Zambia <strong>No</strong><br />

Zimbabwe Yes<br />

Total 12 Yes (63%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 63<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.4.5.1 If yes, what types <strong>of</strong> service are provided specifically for the Deaf Community by your country’s government?<br />

7.4.5.2 What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> the current service(s) specifically provided for the Deaf Community by your<br />

country’s government?<br />

Country<br />

If yes, what types <strong>of</strong> service are provided<br />

specifically for the Deaf Community by your<br />

country’s government?<br />

Botswana Education System <strong>No</strong> information supplied<br />

Ethiopia<br />

Kenya<br />

Lesotho<br />

Madagascar<br />

Namibia<br />

Seychelles Audiology<br />

South Africa<br />

Swaziland<br />

Tanzania<br />

Uganda<br />

• Education System<br />

• Free medical service<br />

• Television programme in sign language<br />

• Education System<br />

• Interpreter Service at Universities, Colleges and<br />

Courts <strong>of</strong> Law<br />

Sign language interpreters will be provided at<br />

Government Meetings and Workshops, and paid for by<br />

the government.<br />

• Sign language on television<br />

• Meeting rooms for the Deaf Club<br />

Disability Allowance Programme for Deaf people<br />

• Sign Language Interpreter Services<br />

• Disability Allowance Programme for Deaf people<br />

• Social and Health Services<br />

The Ministry for Heath and Social Welfare provides<br />

grants to children with a disability and Deaf children,<br />

in particular Deaf students. This is not a nationally<br />

well-advertised or well-known support service.<br />

• Education<br />

• Vocational Training<br />

• Resettlement Services<br />

• Rehabilitation<br />

• Community Rehabilitation services for People<br />

with Disabilities<br />

• Department <strong>of</strong> ENT (Ear, <strong>No</strong>se and Throat) for<br />

those needing hearing assessment<br />

• Support Sign Language Interpreters Training at<br />

Kyambogo University<br />

• Employ Deaf Teachers <strong>of</strong> Deaf<br />

What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> the current service(s)<br />

specifically provided for the Deaf Community by your<br />

country’s government?<br />

There are no adequate services provided for the Deaf.<br />

However, a few sign language interpreters have been<br />

employed by Government for some secondary schools.<br />

Lack <strong>of</strong> awareness <strong>of</strong> the needs <strong>of</strong> the Deaf and limited<br />

resources are the main reasons.<br />

• The general opinion is that the government is<br />

trying to accommodate the deaf in the current<br />

services available for all People with Disabilities<br />

(PWDs) by reserving 10% <strong>of</strong> jobs for PWDs but Deaf<br />

people are not qualified<br />

• Deaf persons are not discriminated against as the<br />

Persons with Disability Act accommodates all, but<br />

education <strong>of</strong> the Deaf is a barrier to opportunities<br />

• The Disability Act guarantees any PWD has a right<br />

to these privileges provided he/she is competent<br />

enough<br />

The services are not enough; however we appreciate<br />

the effort taken to meet us halfway even though it<br />

doesn’t happen all the time.<br />

1. Government in Toamasina provides sign language<br />

on TV for the Deaf in Toamasina<br />

2. Government in Mahajanga provides a venue for<br />

Deaf meetings<br />

3. The situation is difficult with Government because<br />

there have been several changes (Mayor, <strong>of</strong>fices,<br />

etc.) but we are not discouraged<br />

1. Because <strong>of</strong> the low standard <strong>of</strong> education in the<br />

country, the grants are available to help Deaf<br />

persons help themselves with a little cash to buy<br />

food and make a simple living<br />

2. Currently, the Namibian Disability Council is in the<br />

process <strong>of</strong> re-arranging all these services and<br />

ensure adequate service for its members<br />

3. Special Education is important for Deaf children<br />

because they cannot fit well in the mainstream<br />

education system, but at the moment our<br />

government, through the Ministry <strong>of</strong> Education, has<br />

an Inclusive Education policy that is being<br />

promoted and gaining momentum<br />

Under-staffed, under-equipped, do not provide<br />

adequate information to the public, no innovation in<br />

new technologies.<br />

Sign language interpreters are not always available for<br />

every Deaf person through the government services<br />

especially in the rural areas.<br />

The current level <strong>of</strong> services is encouraging; for<br />

instance, Government is now fully aware <strong>of</strong> our<br />

Programme and all Ministries are already well-informed<br />

about disability issues, which warrant improvement in<br />

the long run.<br />

1. More government funding is needed<br />

2. Sign language needs <strong>of</strong>ficial recognition<br />

3. Interpreting services should be provided at the<br />

government’s expense<br />

1. Government support to Deaf people is limited;<br />

there is a high demand for more primary and<br />

secondary schools in Uganda. UNAD is following up<br />

with the government to provide<br />

employment/placement <strong>of</strong> sign language<br />

interpreters at all public institutions such as the<br />

courts, health services and educational institutions<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 64<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Zimbabwe<br />

• Support Services for Deaf Students at the higher<br />

education level (Interpreters and Affirmative<br />

Action)<br />

1. Special classes for Deaf children<br />

2. The Department <strong>of</strong> Physiological Services within<br />

the Ministry <strong>of</strong> Health and Child Welfare<br />

3. There may be other services but they are not<br />

known by the Deaf population<br />

so that Deaf people have access to equal services.<br />

2. UNAD is also lobbying the Government to support<br />

the development <strong>of</strong> sign language in Uganda as its<br />

constitutional mandate states that “the<br />

Government shall promote the development <strong>of</strong> Sign<br />

Language for the Deaf’. Currently efforts are<br />

underway by the National Council on Higher<br />

Education to develop a sign language curriculum.<br />

The general opinion is that there are not many Deaf<br />

people and they need to be treated like hearing<br />

people.<br />

Please note: Eritrea made a comment: The Deaf community has problems with unemployment, no education for the Deaf, no<br />

protection <strong>of</strong> sign language, no elementary, junior or high schools for the deaf and no interpreting services. Deaf people are not<br />

allowed to drive or to hold a driving licence, or to compete in cycling races with hearing teams. In general, services are not<br />

adequate and are almost non-existent.<br />

7.4.5.3 If no, why does your country’s government not provide any service specifically for the Deaf Community?<br />

Country If no, why does your country’s government not provide any service specifically for the Deaf Community?<br />

Burundi<br />

Eritrea<br />

For the most part, it is a lack <strong>of</strong> awareness, the absence <strong>of</strong> deaf representatives in the government and the<br />

fact that our country has always been in a civil crisis which means that government <strong>of</strong>ficials have been<br />

focussing on peace negotiations rather than disability.<br />

Because <strong>of</strong> economic problems, war, the cultural and political situation, maybe discrimination against the<br />

naturally disabled (deaf). There is lack <strong>of</strong> awareness <strong>of</strong> sign language because <strong>of</strong> the Association’s short history<br />

with. There are also no policies that support the Deaf and the Association's policies and objectives. We have a<br />

lot <strong>of</strong> things to lobby the government about.<br />

Malawi<br />

The government, through the Ministry for Persons with Disabilities and Malawi Council for the Handicapped,<br />

provides services to all persons with disabilities, not to specific disabilities.<br />

Mozambique They expect the Deaf Association, together with disability organisations, to provide special services.<br />

Rwanda<br />

The government <strong>of</strong> Rwanda hasn’t proposed any specific services to the Deaf community because the<br />

Sudan<br />

government thinks that Deaf people are people incapable <strong>of</strong> doing anything.<br />

1. Low and/or no financial resources provided in the annual budget <strong>of</strong> the Sudanese government for the<br />

government <strong>of</strong>fices that are responsible for disabled people.<br />

2. Legislation and laws related to disabled people are not active.<br />

Zambia <strong>No</strong> information provided<br />

7.4.6 Does your Association/Group have any contact with your country’s current government?<br />

7.4.6.1 What type <strong>of</strong> contact does your Association/Group have with your country’s current government?<br />

Country<br />

Does your<br />

Association/Group<br />

have any contact<br />

with your current<br />

country’s<br />

government?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

What type <strong>of</strong> contact does your Association/Group have with your country’s current<br />

government?<br />

Burundi Yes Our Association has a co-operation agreement with various Ministries.<br />

Eritrea Yes<br />

Ethiopia Yes<br />

Kenya Yes<br />

Lesotho Yes<br />

We have a little contact with a specific government body (Ministry <strong>of</strong> Labour) and a little<br />

with other Government bodies about Deaf issues.<br />

Our Association has been registered with the Ministry <strong>of</strong> Justice – Associations Registry<br />

<strong>of</strong>fice, which undertakes a monitoring role. Also we have a close working relationship<br />

with the Rehabilitation Department <strong>of</strong> the Ministry <strong>of</strong> Labour and Social Affairs.<br />

1. Ministry <strong>of</strong> Education<br />

2. Ministry <strong>of</strong> Social Service<br />

3. Ministry <strong>of</strong> Gender and Sports<br />

4. Ministry <strong>of</strong> Labour<br />

5. Policy development with various ministries on issues that have direct impact on the<br />

welfare <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

We have good relations with various Government Departments e.g. Ministry <strong>of</strong><br />

Education, Ministry <strong>of</strong> Health and Social Welfare.<br />

Madagascar Yes<br />

We have lobbied the government several times about Human Rights Conventions from<br />

the United Nations.<br />

Malawi Yes When discussing disability issues at meetings and conferences.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 65<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes<br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles Yes<br />

South Africa Yes<br />

Sudan Yes<br />

Swaziland Yes<br />

Tanzania Yes<br />

Uganda Yes<br />

Zambia Yes Partnerships<br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 15 Yes (79%)<br />

1. The Ministry <strong>of</strong> Education<br />

2. Ministry <strong>of</strong> Health and Social Service<br />

3. Ministry <strong>of</strong> Labour has a Deaf representative on its Employment Commission<br />

The association promotes all projects and invites the government’s participation; the<br />

government is co-operative for most projects. We can say we have a good collaboration.<br />

Memorandum <strong>of</strong> Understanding on service level agreements with the various Ministries<br />

for subsidised programmes in the fields <strong>of</strong> Education, Social Welfare, Employment and<br />

Health.<br />

Deaf Representation on the South African Disability Alliance.<br />

The Chairperson <strong>of</strong> DeafSA is a current Member <strong>of</strong> Parliament.<br />

Membership <strong>of</strong> the National Council for the Care and Rehabilitation <strong>of</strong> Persons with<br />

Disabilities.<br />

We are working with the Ministry for Health and Social Welfare and The National<br />

Disability Unit, which houses the Disability Programme.<br />

At the moment the Association has submitted an action plan to the Disability Programme<br />

for sign language training for Social Health Care Givers and implementation <strong>of</strong> training<br />

for Deaf Youth. The government supports these initiatives via a short-term contact. The<br />

Welfare Department assists with funding educational trips, which we utilise when<br />

establishing links with neighbouring countries.<br />

CHAVITA works closely with the Ministry <strong>of</strong> Health and Social Welfare, which has a<br />

special department which deals with organisations <strong>of</strong> people with disabilities. We are<br />

also affiliated with the Tanzania <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> Organisations <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons and the<br />

East Africa <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> Disabled People (EAFOD).<br />

1. UNAD has been consulted by various government departments on education, health,<br />

information, judiciary matters, gender, disability and legislation as an expert on<br />

Deaf issues<br />

2. UNAD has participated in the development <strong>of</strong> policies and laws, programmes that<br />

aim at including people with disabilities in the Government development process<br />

3. UNAD is a member <strong>of</strong> the National Community Based Rehabilitation Committee,<br />

chaired by the Minster for Disability<br />

4. UNAD has two representatives on the National Council on Disability<br />

5. UNAD Executive Director is a Member <strong>of</strong> Parliament<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

7.4.7 Does your Association/Group receive any financial support from your country’s current government?<br />

7.4.7.1 What is the amount <strong>of</strong> annual financial support from your country’s government?<br />

Country<br />

Does your<br />

Association/Group receive<br />

any financial support from<br />

your country’s current<br />

government?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea Yes 200,000 Nakfa (8,606€ on 31 st May 2008)<br />

Ethiopia Yes Approximately 1,000 Euro per annum.<br />

Kenya <strong>No</strong><br />

Lesotho Yes<br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes <strong>No</strong> information supplied.<br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

What is the amount <strong>of</strong> annual financial support from your country’s<br />

government?<br />

USD1,400.00 (902.00€ on 31 st May 2008) from the Department <strong>of</strong> Social Welfare,<br />

Rehabilitation Unit.<br />

Seychelles Yes SR11,000 per month (894€ on 31 st May 2008).<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 66<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


South Africa Yes ZAR1, 500,000 per year (127,395€ on 31 st May 2008).<br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong><br />

Swaziland Yes <strong>No</strong> information supplied.<br />

Tanzania Yes USD2, 500 (1,610.50€ on 31 st May 2008).<br />

Uganda <strong>No</strong><br />

Zambia <strong>No</strong><br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 8 Yes (42%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

7.4.7.2 What is the purpose <strong>of</strong> the financial support from your country’s government to the Deaf Community?<br />

Country What is the purpose <strong>of</strong> the financial support from your country’s government to the Deaf Community?<br />

Eritrea For <strong>of</strong>fice rent, administration expenses, travel, accommodation, meetings and workshops/training.<br />

Ethiopia Project work<br />

Lesotho To strengthen the Association through the current activities e.g. administration costs.<br />

Namibia<br />

• Namibian Sign Language Dictionary work<br />

• HIV/AIDS awareness training<br />

Seychelles • Salaries and daily expenses<br />

South Africa<br />

• Programme Services e.g. Sign Language Interpreters Training, Skill Development Training, Adult Basic<br />

Education Training, Administration Costs and Leadership Training for Youth and Deaf Women<br />

• Dissemination <strong>of</strong> information<br />

Swaziland This is a quadrennial assistance to attend conferences or undertake trips.<br />

Tanzania Support day to day <strong>of</strong>fice and administration costs.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 67<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.4.8 Do Deaf people have a right to vote in national, regional and local elections?<br />

7.4.9 Are Deaf people allowed to obtain a driver’s licence?<br />

7.4.10 Are Deaf people allowed to marry Deaf or other partners?<br />

7.4.11 Are Deaf people allowed to have children?<br />

7.4.12 Are Deaf people allowed to adopt children?<br />

Country<br />

Do Deaf people<br />

have a right to<br />

vote in national,<br />

regional and local<br />

elections?<br />

Are Deaf people<br />

allowed to obtain a<br />

driver’s licence?<br />

Are Deaf people<br />

allowed to marry<br />

Deaf or other<br />

partners?<br />

Are Deaf people<br />

allowed to have<br />

children?<br />

Are Deaf people<br />

allowed to adopt<br />

children?<br />

Botswana Yes Yes Yes Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes<br />

Eritrea Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes<br />

Ethiopia Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes<br />

Kenya Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes<br />

Lesotho Yes Yes Yes Yes <strong>No</strong>t sure<br />

Madagascar Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes<br />

Malawi Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes<br />

Mozambique Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes<br />

Namibia Yes Yes Yes Yes Unknown<br />

Rwanda Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes<br />

Seychelles Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes<br />

South Africa Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes<br />

Sudan Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes<br />

Swaziland Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes<br />

Tanzania Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes<br />

Uganda Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes<br />

Zambia Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes<br />

Zimbabwe Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes<br />

Total 19 Yes (100%) 11 Yes (58%) 19 Yes (100%) 19 Yes (100%) 16 Yes (84%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

7.4.12.1 If Deaf people are not allowed to drive, please list the Government legislation or policy that stops them from<br />

being allowed to drive.<br />

Country<br />

If Deaf people are not allowed to drive, please list the Government legislation or policy that stops them<br />

from being allowed to drive.<br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong> information supplied<br />

Eritrea<br />

Ethiopia<br />

Kenya<br />

It is not written in the Ministry <strong>of</strong> Land and Transportation and Traffic Rules but the Traffic Officers prohibit<br />

Deaf people from driving and being given driving licences. We have tried to solve this problem but it is hard. We<br />

will not stop trying.<br />

Outdated civil code that does not recognise that deaf people can manage their own affairs. There is a plan to<br />

revise the code and hopefully the deaf will then be allowed to drive. Our association is advocating for this.<br />

The Colonial Traffic Act that is in place has not been changed to allow Deaf to obtain a driving licence. However<br />

a few Deaf people are getting access and are being allowed to drive provided they pass the tests.<br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong> information supplied<br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong> information supplied<br />

Rwanda<br />

Sudan<br />

Deaf are not authorised to possess a driving license in Rwanda because there is no legislation applicable<br />

specifically for Deaf.<br />

• Traffic laws and regulations<br />

• General Medical Council Law<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 68<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.4.12.2 If Deaf people are not allowed to adopt children, please list any specific Government legislation or policy that<br />

stops Deaf people from being allowed to adopt children.<br />

Country<br />

If Deaf people are not allowed to adopt children, please list any specific Government legislation or policy<br />

that stops Deaf people from being allowed to adopt children.<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong> information supplied.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 69<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.5.0 Access to Government Services<br />

7.5.1 Do Deaf people have access to government services such as education, health care, employment, social welfare and<br />

any general government services?<br />

7.5.1.1 If yes, how do Deaf people access these government services?<br />

7.5.1.2 Are Deaf people satisfied with the level <strong>of</strong> access they have to the government services?<br />

Country<br />

Do Deaf people<br />

have access to<br />

government<br />

services such as<br />

education, health<br />

care,<br />

employment,<br />

social welfare<br />

and any general<br />

government<br />

services?<br />

If yes, how do Deaf people access these<br />

government services?<br />

Are Deaf people satisfied with the<br />

level <strong>of</strong> access they have to the<br />

government services?<br />

Botswana Yes Yes (<strong>No</strong> information provided on “how”) <strong>No</strong> – there is a language barrier.<br />

Burundi Yes<br />

Eritrea Yes<br />

Ethiopia Yes<br />

Kenya Yes<br />

Lesotho Yes<br />

Madagascar Yes<br />

Malawi Yes<br />

Mozambique Yes<br />

• The government pays for sign language<br />

interpreting services<br />

• Deaf people put their thoughts in writing for<br />

communication with Government people<br />

• In education they resort to lip-reading,<br />

especially in secondary school and college<br />

• Only for those Deaf people who are qualified<br />

with trade skills does the government provide<br />

an employment service<br />

• Deaf people get health care and some social<br />

welfare<br />

As citizens they have access to government<br />

services. Medical services are free for Deaf people<br />

since the majority <strong>of</strong> them are poor.<br />

• Government provides two schools for the<br />

Deaf. Deaf students in primary schools are<br />

supported by government<br />

• Access to health care in the government<br />

hospital is for all but limited<br />

• Deaf persons who are qualified can get a job<br />

on merit<br />

• Public debates, forums, workshops and<br />

seminars are accessible by invitation<br />

Deaf people access these government services<br />

through the referral system by the <strong>of</strong>fice (National<br />

Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf <strong>of</strong> Lesotho’s <strong>of</strong>fice) and<br />

with interpreters.<br />

• Vocational Training Programme<br />

• Official Government Programmes<br />

• By registering with the responsible<br />

government departments like the Malawi<br />

Council for the Handicapped<br />

• They can access medication in public hospitals<br />

• Education: there are few government schools<br />

for the Deaf through an inclusive education<br />

policy<br />

• Health: Deaf people experience barriers but<br />

are granted free medicines when presenting<br />

Deaf membership card<br />

• Deaf people have free access to public<br />

transport<br />

<strong>No</strong>, the government services are<br />

inadequate. In fact, the government<br />

does not provide adapted services.<br />

<strong>No</strong>t at all. They face so many<br />

challenges in education,<br />

interpretation, court, social welfare,<br />

etc.<br />

• <strong>No</strong>, because access to education<br />

is limited in that no sign language<br />

interpreting service is available<br />

at secondary and tertiary level<br />

education.<br />

• Employment opportunity is very<br />

limited<br />

• <strong>No</strong>, Deaf people complain that<br />

the government does not give<br />

them equal opportunity to obtain<br />

good employment<br />

• Access to public debates is free<br />

for all but the hindrance is lack <strong>of</strong><br />

interpreting services<br />

<strong>No</strong>, Deaf people are not satisfied<br />

because many government <strong>of</strong>fices are<br />

not familiar with deaf awareness or<br />

needs.<br />

Also there is a low number <strong>of</strong> sign<br />

language interpreters for Deaf people<br />

to access government services fully.<br />

Government is not prepared to<br />

provide quality services for Deaf<br />

people.<br />

• <strong>No</strong><br />

<strong>No</strong>, at the Health Service Deaf people<br />

still experience communication<br />

barriers with health workers<br />

especially doctors.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 70<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Namibia Yes<br />

Rwanda Yes<br />

• Government provides education for Deaf<br />

children<br />

• Employ Deaf people with qualifications in the<br />

government departments<br />

There is a law that the ministry in charge <strong>of</strong> labour<br />

has to follow to define the method and extent <strong>of</strong><br />

accessibility support for handicapped people in<br />

employment, health treatment and education.<br />

Seychelles Yes • Services are free for all <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes<br />

Sudan Yes<br />

Swaziland Yes<br />

Tanzania Yes<br />

Uganda Yes<br />

Zambia Yes<br />

Zimbabwe Yes<br />

Total 19 Yes (100%)<br />

• Through DeafSA Provincial and <strong>Regional</strong><br />

<strong>of</strong>fices<br />

• Dissemination <strong>of</strong> Information<br />

• Workshops<br />

• Funded programmes<br />

• Sign Language interpreters (not widely<br />

available)<br />

Deaf people have to pay service fees; there are<br />

limited free services.<br />

It has been stated in 7.4.6.1 that Deaf people get<br />

financial support from Government for Social<br />

Welfare and Education. But other services such as<br />

housing are not accessible to Deaf people due to<br />

their low income.<br />

Through the Department <strong>of</strong> Social Welfare under<br />

directive from the Ministry.<br />

• The Government pays for the salaries <strong>of</strong> Deaf<br />

teachers; at the university level there is<br />

provision for sign language interpreters<br />

• The few Deaf people with qualifications can<br />

access government services, such as those<br />

who are qualified as teachers and are<br />

employed at schools for the Deaf<br />

• The Government provides sign language<br />

interpreting services when Deaf people access<br />

justice services<br />

Deaf people can go to hospital or clinics<br />

individually. There are special schools and also<br />

vocational training centres for PWDs. Few Deaf are<br />

aware <strong>of</strong> Social Welfare Services so only a few<br />

have benefited from services such as acquiring<br />

grants for their children or government payment<br />

for hospital bills.<br />

• In Education, there are special schools for the<br />

Deaf around the country<br />

• In Health, there is a department for<br />

psychological services which also caters for<br />

Deaf children<br />

• In Employment, there are loans for which one<br />

can apply to initiate income generation<br />

projects.<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

In some cases, government services<br />

are inadequate.<br />

<strong>No</strong>, Deaf people are not quite happy<br />

with access to governmental services<br />

because they are not sufficiently<br />

accessible.<br />

<strong>No</strong>, not 100%, it could be done better<br />

by provision <strong>of</strong> more sign language<br />

interpreters<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 71<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).<br />

<strong>No</strong><br />

<strong>No</strong>! This is not good enough for Deaf<br />

people.<br />

<strong>No</strong>t all – we continue to advocate to<br />

ensure that government services are<br />

responsive to Deaf people’s needs.<br />

<strong>No</strong>, there is a lot to be done.<br />

This is hampered by lack <strong>of</strong> sign<br />

language interpreters in the various<br />

levels <strong>of</strong> Government; this can be<br />

improved if the Government<br />

implements the PWDS Act 2006 which<br />

has numerous provisions for all<br />

departments <strong>of</strong> the government.<br />

<strong>No</strong>t much has been done for the Deaf<br />

to get access to quality education and<br />

employment.<br />

• They are not satisfied because<br />

information does not fully reach<br />

them<br />

• In Education, for instance,<br />

teachers practise oralism and<br />

many Deaf children do not<br />

understand the proceedings in the<br />

classroom<br />

• In Health, they end up being<br />

given the wrong medicine<br />

because the personnel are not<br />

familiar with sign language<br />

• In Employment, more needs to be<br />

done because Deaf people’s<br />

applications are always turned<br />

down<br />

• <strong>No</strong> Deaf person has benefited<br />

from the loan scheme although<br />

hearing disabled people have<br />

benefited; the reason is that Deaf<br />

people may not be aware <strong>of</strong> these<br />

loans available from the<br />

government


7.5.2 Are Deaf people entitled to any financial assistance from your country’s government?<br />

7.5.2.1 What type <strong>of</strong> financial assistance are Deaf people entitled to receive from your country’s government?<br />

Country<br />

Are Deaf people<br />

entitled to any<br />

financial<br />

assistance from<br />

your country’s<br />

government?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong><br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong><br />

Kenya <strong>No</strong><br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Disability<br />

Allowance<br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes �<br />

General<br />

Pension<br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles Yes �<br />

South Africa Yes �<br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong><br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania <strong>No</strong><br />

Uganda <strong>No</strong><br />

Zambia <strong>No</strong><br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 3 Yes (16%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

Disability-specific Pension Other Description<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 72<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.6.0 Access to the Media<br />

7.6.1 Does your country’s government provide sign language services for news and/or current affairs programmes on<br />

public television?<br />

Country<br />

Does your country’s<br />

government provide<br />

sign language<br />

services for news<br />

and/or current affairs<br />

programmes on<br />

public television?<br />

Botswana Yes<br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea Yes<br />

Ethiopia Yes<br />

Kenya <strong>No</strong><br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar Yes<br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique Yes<br />

Namibia Yes<br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

Please provide detailed information on how many hours or days per week Deaf<br />

people receive sign language services for news and/or current affairs programmes<br />

on public television.<br />

News 30 minutes a day for a total <strong>of</strong> 3 hours 30 minutes per week. This provision has<br />

been available only eight months and we are still working on the process <strong>of</strong> having<br />

other programmes interpreted.<br />

The Deaf receive the National News Summary once a week on public television but they<br />

are not satisfied with the signing nor with the programme because it will not cover<br />

Deaf issues and activities, or include information about the Deaf and the Association.<br />

Five times per week. For two days it is available for 30 minutes; on the other three<br />

days it is about 10 minutes.<br />

National TV<br />

• Each Sunday morning at 8.00 for 20 minutes: sermons in Malagasy Sign Language<br />

about the Bible and religious songs<br />

• Each Sunday afternoon at 13.00 for 30 minutes: news in Malagasy Sign Language:<br />

info about Madagascar, politics, the world, etc. from the previous week<br />

The news on TV is seldom interpreted, only 15 to 30 minutes on the evening news<br />

broadcast.<br />

Every day the sign language service for Deaf persons happens for only 30 minutes during<br />

the national news broadcast; and on Mondays for a one-hour programme ‘Talk <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Nation’.<br />

The National Broadcaster is compelled to provide SASL interpreters by the<br />

requirements <strong>of</strong> ICASA (Independent Communications Authority <strong>of</strong> South Africa); after<br />

DeafSA’s intervention the SABC will provide the following:<br />

• SABC Channel 1 News prime time 30 minutes per day = 2.5 hours a week<br />

South Africa Yes<br />

•<br />

•<br />

SABC Channel 2 News prime time 30 minutes per day = 2.5 hours a week<br />

SABC Channel 3 News 60 seconds late evening = 5 minutes a week<br />

• ETV 5 minutes a day = 25 minutes a week<br />

• DTV (Programme for Deaf People) Saturdays at 12:00 (30 min)<br />

• Zwahashu (Deaf SASL interpreter) on Wednesdays 30 min<br />

• Sports rap 30 minutes every day<br />

Sudan Yes 15 minutes a day, but for NEWS ONLY!<br />

Swaziland Yes<br />

Tanzania <strong>No</strong><br />

Swazi TV has interpreted news for Deaf viewers only on Sunday. This is the week’s news<br />

summarised and interpreted. There is no live interpretation in Swaziland.<br />

Uganda Yes 15 minutes per day for only news programmes.<br />

Zambia <strong>No</strong><br />

Zimbabwe Yes 30 minutes per day – seven days per week (average three and half hours per week).<br />

Total 11 Yes (58%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 73<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.6.2 Does your country’s government provide subtitles/captions for news and/or current affairs programmes?<br />

Country<br />

Does your country’s government provide<br />

subtitles/captions for news and/or current<br />

affairs programmes?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong><br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong><br />

Kenya <strong>No</strong><br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia <strong>No</strong><br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa <strong>No</strong><br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong><br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania <strong>No</strong><br />

Uganda <strong>No</strong><br />

Please provide detailed information on how many<br />

hours/days per week news/current affairs programmes<br />

(subtitled/captioned) are <strong>of</strong>fered for Deaf people.<br />

Zambia Yes Subtitles <strong>of</strong>ten appear on our national TV news<br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 1 Yes (5%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

Please note: The <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group wished it to be acknowledged that in a few countries, for example Uganda, Kenya<br />

and South Africa, the National Television channel has “top news” text scrolling on the bottom <strong>of</strong> the screen. This is not<br />

considered a ‘subtitled programme’.<br />

7.6.3 Does your country’s government <strong>of</strong>fer governmental documents in your country’s sign language(s)?<br />

Country<br />

Does your country’s government <strong>of</strong>fer governmental documents in your country’s sign<br />

language(s)?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong><br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong><br />

Kenya <strong>No</strong><br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia <strong>No</strong><br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa <strong>No</strong><br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong><br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania <strong>No</strong><br />

Uganda <strong>No</strong><br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 74<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Zambia <strong>No</strong><br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 0 Yes<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 75<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.7.0 Status <strong>of</strong> the National Sign Language(s)<br />

7.7.1 Does your country’s government formally recognise your country’s sign language(s)?<br />

7.7.1.1 What legislation/regulation formally recognises your country’s sign language(s)?<br />

7.7.1.2 When did your country’s government formally recognise your country’s sign language(s)?<br />

7.7.1.3 Does your Deaf Association/Deaf Group lobby your government for the recognition <strong>of</strong> your country’s sign<br />

language(s)?<br />

7.7.1.4 If no, please explain the reason your Association/Group does not lobby your current government for the<br />

recognition <strong>of</strong> your country’s sign language(s).<br />

Country<br />

Does your<br />

country’s<br />

government<br />

formally<br />

recognise<br />

your<br />

country’s<br />

sign<br />

language(s)?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

What<br />

legislation/<br />

regulation<br />

formally<br />

recognises<br />

your<br />

country’s<br />

sign<br />

language(s)?<br />

When did your country’s<br />

government formally<br />

recognise your country’s<br />

sign language(s)?<br />

Does your<br />

Deaf<br />

Association/<br />

Deaf Group<br />

lobby your<br />

government<br />

for the<br />

recognition <strong>of</strong><br />

your<br />

country’s sign<br />

language(s)?<br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Kenya Yes<br />

Legislation,<br />

Policy<br />

Lesotho Yes Policy<br />

Sign Language<br />

recognition was drafted<br />

in the Constitution but<br />

rejected by the majority<br />

<strong>of</strong> Kenyans in the<br />

Referendum <strong>of</strong> 2005<br />

because the Constitution<br />

did not reflect their<br />

views.<br />

Stated in various<br />

Ministry-specific policies<br />

e.g. Ministry <strong>of</strong><br />

Education, Ministry <strong>of</strong><br />

Health and Social<br />

Welfare.<br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi Yes Policy 2006 Yes<br />

Mozambique Yes Policy 2005 Yes<br />

Namibia Yes Constitution 1991 Yes<br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

South Africa Yes<br />

Constitution,<br />

Policy,<br />

Guideline.<br />

If no, please explain the reason<br />

your Association/Group does not<br />

lobby your current government<br />

for the recognition <strong>of</strong> your<br />

country’s sign language(s).<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 76<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).<br />

<strong>No</strong><br />

Yes<br />

Yes<br />

1994 Yes<br />

Sudan Yes Policy 1971 Yes<br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Tanzania Yes<br />

Policy,<br />

Guideline<br />

1994 Yes<br />

The Association is still working on<br />

a problem we have.<br />

We still have to print a sign<br />

language dictionary and book DAM<br />

(Deaf Action in Madagascar 07-<br />

09). We will then show it to the<br />

Government. We have asked<br />

newspapers to lobby government<br />

about sign language in the<br />

Constitution because we did not<br />

receive info about voting for the<br />

new President, Mayor, etc.


Uganda Yes<br />

Zambia Yes<br />

Constitution,<br />

Legislation,<br />

Policy<br />

Legislation,<br />

Policy<br />

1995 Yes<br />

1996 Yes<br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Total 10 Yes (53%) 17 Yes (89%)<br />

7.7.2 Does your country have a sign language dictionary?<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

Country Does your country have a sign language dictionary?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong><br />

Ethiopia Yes<br />

Kenya Yes<br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar Yes<br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique Yes<br />

Namibia <strong>No</strong><br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes<br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong><br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania Yes<br />

Uganda Yes<br />

Zambia Yes<br />

Zimbabwe Yes<br />

Total 9 Yes (47%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 77<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.8.0 Access to Education<br />

7.8.1 Does your country’s government recognise that Deaf children and Deaf students have the right to receive an<br />

education?<br />

7.8.2 Does your country’s government have any legislation or policies on Deaf Education?<br />

7.8.2.1 If yes, please list the specific name <strong>of</strong> the legislation or policies relating to Deaf Education.<br />

Country<br />

Does your<br />

country’s<br />

government<br />

recognise<br />

that Deaf<br />

children and<br />

Deaf students<br />

have the right<br />

to receive an<br />

education?<br />

Does your<br />

country’s<br />

government<br />

have any<br />

legislation or<br />

policies on<br />

Deaf<br />

Education?<br />

Botswana Yes Yes Towards Education for All<br />

Burundi Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Ethiopia Yes Yes<br />

Kenya Yes Yes<br />

Lesotho Yes Yes Special Education Policy<br />

Madagascar Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes Yes<br />

Rwanda Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes Yes<br />

Sudan Yes Yes<br />

Swaziland Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

If yes, please list the specific name <strong>of</strong> the legislation or policies relating to<br />

Deaf Education.<br />

There is no specific legislation relating to deaf education BUT a policy on<br />

special needs education for persons with disabilities<br />

• Special Education Policy<br />

• Disability Act<br />

Towards Education for All<br />

Ministry <strong>of</strong> Education 1999<br />

Tanzania Yes Yes Tanzania Policy on Special Education<br />

Uganda Yes Yes<br />

Zambia Yes Yes • Inclusive Education<br />

Zimbabwe Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 17 Yes (89%) 10 Yes (53%)<br />

• South African Schools Act: <strong>No</strong>rms and Standards for Language Policy in<br />

Public Schools (1996)<br />

• An Integrated National Disability Strategy (INDS) (1997)<br />

• Education White Paper 6: Special Needs Education (EWP6) (2001)<br />

• Law planning organisation <strong>of</strong> the education system<br />

• National Plan <strong>of</strong> Education for ALL PEOPLE<br />

• Rights <strong>of</strong> Persons with Disabilities (Constitution)<br />

• Persons with Disabilities Act 2006<br />

• Mixture <strong>of</strong> Inclusive Education and Special Schools policies<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 78<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.8.3 Does your country’s government provide any <strong>of</strong> the following educational settings for Deaf children and Deaf<br />

students?<br />

Country<br />

Early<br />

intervention<br />

(Up to 5 years<br />

old)<br />

Kindergarten<br />

(Between 3/4<br />

years old to 5/6<br />

years old)<br />

Primary<br />

(From 5/6<br />

years old to<br />

12/13 years<br />

old)<br />

Secondary<br />

(From 12/13<br />

years old to<br />

17/18 years<br />

old)<br />

University<br />

(After 18 years<br />

old)<br />

Vocational<br />

Education/Training<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Burundi Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes<br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes Yes<br />

Kenya Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes<br />

Lesotho Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Malawi Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes<br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> Yes <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> Yes <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes<br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Swaziland Yes Yes Yes <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Tanzania Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes<br />

Uganda Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes Yes<br />

Zambia <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Total 8 Yes (42%) 10 Yes (53%)<br />

16 Yes<br />

(84%)<br />

13 Yes (68%) 8 Yes (42%) 14 Yes (74%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

Please note: The <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group queried whether the information received about educational settings was true and<br />

correct.<br />

7.8.4 Does your country’s government provide bilingual education using your country’s sign language(s) for Deaf<br />

children and Deaf students in your country?<br />

Country<br />

Does your country’s government provide bilingual education using your country’s sign language(s) for Deaf<br />

children and Deaf students in your country?<br />

Botswana Yes<br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong><br />

Ethiopia Yes<br />

Kenya Yes<br />

Lesotho Yes<br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes<br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa <strong>No</strong><br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong><br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania <strong>No</strong><br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 79<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Uganda Yes<br />

Zambia <strong>No</strong><br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 6 Yes (32%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

7.8.4.1 If yes, in which educational setting is bilingual education <strong>of</strong>fered in your country using your sign language(s)?<br />

Country<br />

Early<br />

intervention<br />

(Up to 5 years<br />

old)<br />

Kindergarten<br />

(Between 3/4<br />

years old to 5/6<br />

years old)<br />

Primary<br />

(From 5/6<br />

years old to<br />

12/13 years<br />

old)<br />

Secondary<br />

(From 12/13<br />

years old to<br />

17/18 years<br />

old)<br />

University<br />

(After 18 years<br />

old)<br />

Vocational<br />

Education/Training<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes Yes <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Kenya Yes Yes Yes Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes Yes Yes Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Uganda <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> Yes Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Total 2 Yes (33%) 4 Yes (67%) 6 Yes (100%) 6 Yes (100%) 0 Yes 4 Yes (67%)<br />

Based on six respondents<br />

Please note: The <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group believed that actually only Uganda and Kenya have bilingual education programmes.<br />

7.8.5 Does your country have any schools specifically for Deaf children and Deaf students?<br />

7.8.5.1 If yes, how many Deaf schools does your country have?<br />

Country<br />

Does your country have any<br />

schools specifically for Deaf<br />

children and Deaf students?<br />

If yes, how many Deaf schools does your country have?<br />

Botswana Yes Two Special Schools - Deaf Units in Mainstream Schools<br />

Burundi Yes Two Private Primary Schools<br />

Eritrea Yes Two Deaf Schools owned by missionaries – <strong>No</strong>n-Governmental Schools for Deaf<br />

Ethiopia Yes 10 but there are many schools for the hearing with separate classes for Deaf<br />

Kenya Yes<br />

40 residential primary schools for the Deaf and 30 Deaf Primary Units,<br />

three Secondary Schools for the Deaf,<br />

four Vocational Training Centres and a number <strong>of</strong> Vocational Workshops in<br />

some primary schools for the deaf in rural areas<br />

Lesotho Yes Two Primary Schools (Roman Catholic Schools)<br />

Madagascar Yes<br />

Nine Deaf Schools - seven schools belonging to the Lutheran Church and<br />

two private schools<br />

Malawi Yes Four Deaf Schools<br />

Mozambique Yes Three schools in two cities out <strong>of</strong> 16 cities and more then 45 rural areas<br />

Namibia Yes<br />

Rwanda Yes<br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

Two government schools and three units for Deaf run by sponsored funds.<br />

These units mainly provide orientation to kindergarten and then the children<br />

are brought to the two government schools.<br />

In our country there are two public primary schools for the deaf and six other<br />

private primary schools.<br />

For secondary education students are integrated in normal schools with other<br />

students.<br />

South Africa Yes 47 Schools<br />

Sudan Yes 15 Schools<br />

Swaziland Yes<br />

We have only one school for the Deaf (Primary School since 1975); a High<br />

School is being constructed and shall be operational this year (July 2008)<br />

Eight Special Schools for Deaf and about 28 integrated primary and secondary<br />

Tanzania Yes<br />

schools (Special Units for Deaf Students have been established to cater for<br />

Deaf or Sign Language Users).<br />

Uganda Yes 10 special schools for the Deaf (eight primary and two secondary)<br />

Zambia Yes<br />

Only three Deaf Residential Schools, the rest are day Units for the Deaf in the<br />

mainstream schools<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 80<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Zimbabwe Yes Three Deaf Schools<br />

Total 18 Yes (95%) 271 Schools (Deaf, Private, Integrated and NGOs)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

7.8.5.2 If no, where do Deaf children and students receive an education in your country?<br />

Country If no, where do Deaf children and students receive an education in your country?<br />

Seychelles At the School for the Handicapped (School for the Exceptional Child)<br />

7.8.5.3 What is the educational approach for communicating with Deaf children and students at the Deaf School in your<br />

country?<br />

Country Bilingual Education 1 Oral Method 2 Cued Speech 3<br />

Oral and Sign Language<br />

(Total Communication) 4<br />

Auditory Verbal 5<br />

Botswana �<br />

Burundi �<br />

Eritrea � �<br />

Ethiopia �<br />

Kenya � � �<br />

Lesotho � �<br />

Madagascar �<br />

Malawi �<br />

Mozambique � �<br />

Namibia � �<br />

South Africa � � �<br />

Sudan �<br />

Swaziland �<br />

Tanzania �<br />

Uganda � �<br />

Zambia �<br />

Zimbabwe �<br />

Please note: Rwanda did not tick any <strong>of</strong> the educational approaches. They stated that there is no educational vision for<br />

communication with Deaf children and students because teachers are not trained/educated to teach in sign language. Deaf<br />

children and students in Rwanda receive education with other (normal) children.<br />

1 Bilingual Education: Sign language is considered to be the natural language (‘mother tongue’) that will be acquired as a first<br />

language. Spoken language, which is not acquired naturally by Deaf children, will be learned as a second language as the child<br />

becomes cognitively/developmentally ready. Both languages are used throughout the child’s entire education.<br />

2 Oral Education: Spoken language is assumed to be the basis for standard social and academic communication, and the human<br />

system is assumed to be designed (pre-wired) to learn language expressed in speech. Children learn about and from spoken<br />

language. Also known as auditory-oral, aural/oral education. Emphasis on speech.<br />

3 Cued Speech: A visual mode <strong>of</strong> communication that uses hand shapes and placements in combination with the mouth<br />

movements <strong>of</strong> speech to make the phonemes <strong>of</strong> a spoken language look different from each other, resulting in a visual<br />

counterpart <strong>of</strong> a spoken language.<br />

4 Total Communication: All forms and modes <strong>of</strong> communications are used. This includes natural gestures, sign language,<br />

manually-coded spoken languages, sign systems, mime, audition and speech.<br />

5 Auditory Verbal Education: Supposes that even minimal amounts <strong>of</strong> residual hearing can lead to the development <strong>of</strong><br />

spontaneous speech and language, if that residual hearing is stimulated. Children learn to process language through amplified<br />

hearing. A method <strong>of</strong> oral education with an emphasis on listening.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 81<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.8.6 What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> the level <strong>of</strong> education received by Deaf children and Deaf students in your country?<br />

7.8.7 What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> the current literacy level <strong>of</strong> Deaf children and Deaf students in your country?<br />

Country<br />

Botswana<br />

Burundi<br />

Eritrea<br />

Ethiopia<br />

Kenya<br />

Lesotho<br />

Madagascar<br />

Malawi<br />

Mozambique<br />

Namibia<br />

Rwanda<br />

What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> the level <strong>of</strong><br />

education received by Deaf children and Deaf<br />

students in your country?<br />

The level <strong>of</strong> Deaf students’ education is below that<br />

<strong>of</strong> hearing students.<br />

The general opinion is that the level <strong>of</strong> deaf<br />

education is lamentably low.<br />

• When deaf students finish fifth grade, they are<br />

obliged to go to hearing schools<br />

(mainstreaming), which is very tough and<br />

challenging. Most drop out and leave school so<br />

the level <strong>of</strong> education is generally limited to the<br />

fifth grade.<br />

• Integration is also very hard for the Deaf<br />

because teachers do not know sign language.<br />

We feel it is very low. From secondary school<br />

upwards, education is not in sign language and there<br />

are not even any good teachers adequately trained in<br />

sign language in the primary and junior secondary<br />

schools<br />

• Teachers <strong>of</strong> the Deaf are not fluent in Kenyan<br />

Sign Language<br />

• Quality <strong>of</strong> Deaf Education is low<br />

• The Ministry <strong>of</strong> Education does not conduct<br />

inspections to ensure quality and good standards<br />

• Education <strong>of</strong> the Deaf is improving but the ratio<br />

<strong>of</strong> Deaf children per teacher is high<br />

The current level <strong>of</strong> education is not satisfactory<br />

enough for the Deaf people to gain employment.<br />

Hearing people don’t believe that Deaf students can<br />

reach a high level <strong>of</strong> education.<br />

• Most <strong>of</strong> them do not go on to higher education<br />

because <strong>of</strong> communication problems in class<br />

• Many Deaf finish at the primary school level<br />

• Deaf students receive low and poor quality<br />

education because they are taught via oral<br />

language, which is hard to understand<br />

Deaf children who attend special schools for the deaf<br />

receive poor education.<br />

At the secondary education level, Deaf students do<br />

not pass their examinations at the regular hearing<br />

schools.<br />

Very low, education provision to Deaf children does<br />

not fit the children’s needs and students are not<br />

academically empowered upon leaving school.<br />

The general opinion with regard to education for<br />

Deaf children and students is ‘not satisfactory’<br />

because <strong>of</strong> the lack <strong>of</strong> decent communication - they<br />

usually speak instead <strong>of</strong> using sign language.<br />

What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> the current literacy<br />

level <strong>of</strong> Deaf children and Deaf students in your<br />

country?<br />

Literacy is very low<br />

The literacy level <strong>of</strong> Deaf children and students is very<br />

low.<br />

Generally speaking the level <strong>of</strong> literacy <strong>of</strong> deaf children<br />

and students is very poor and low.<br />

It is very low. Schools are concentrated in towns and the<br />

majority <strong>of</strong> the deaf in rural areas do not have access to<br />

education.<br />

Low literacy level.<br />

The literacy level <strong>of</strong> Deaf children and Deaf students is<br />

low, if not non-existent.<br />

<strong>No</strong>t sure.<br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong> level. Most are illiterate.<br />

Most Deaf people are illiterate because <strong>of</strong> the low level<br />

<strong>of</strong> education attained. About 98% <strong>of</strong> the Deaf population<br />

does not read or write.<br />

Many Deaf students do not know how to write and read.<br />

The average school-leaver does so at standard 8 or grade<br />

10, and still has not mastered reading and writing <strong>English</strong><br />

fluently.<br />

The general opinion <strong>of</strong> the current level <strong>of</strong> literacy <strong>of</strong><br />

Deaf children in Rwanda is that Deaf people in Rwanda<br />

are using a sign language alphabet that is not the <strong>of</strong>ficial<br />

one.<br />

• Deaf learners have little access to the regular<br />

school curriculum<br />

• The majority <strong>of</strong> school educators and parents<br />

South Africa<br />

•<br />

are not pr<strong>of</strong>icient in SASL<br />

Absence <strong>of</strong> Deaf role models has serious<br />

implications for the development <strong>of</strong> Deaf<br />

learners especially in terms <strong>of</strong> acquisition <strong>of</strong><br />

language<br />

Majority <strong>of</strong> Deaf people have low literacy levels.<br />

Sudan The quality <strong>of</strong> Deaf education is not good. More than 95% <strong>of</strong> the Deaf population is illiterate.<br />

Swaziland<br />

Very low level. Government is reviewing the Policy<br />

on Education <strong>of</strong> the Deaf. Sign language skills <strong>of</strong> Deaf<br />

children are dismally low and they are not formally<br />

taught Sign Language. But it is envisaged that this<br />

will improve in future.<br />

As stated we find that if sign language is not taught as<br />

the <strong>of</strong>ficial language, the students’ literacy rate declines<br />

each and every teaching period <strong>of</strong> the calendar year.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 82<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Tanzania<br />

Uganda<br />

Zambia<br />

Zimbabwe<br />

Deaf students have limited opportunities for higher<br />

learning.<br />

The quality <strong>of</strong> Deaf education is still poor.<br />

More efforts are being made to lobby the Minister <strong>of</strong><br />

Education and Sports to research and monitor the<br />

performance <strong>of</strong> special schools for the Deaf and<br />

address the hindrances to quality education.<br />

The level <strong>of</strong> education received by Deaf children is<br />

very low.<br />

The general opinion is that it is quite good up to the<br />

primary level, but thereafter there is no<br />

improvement. Deaf people end up being taught only<br />

by key words at the vocational training level, to<br />

enable them to take the final practical tests.<br />

Poor academic achievements in high school.<br />

60% <strong>of</strong> the Deaf population are illiterate, 20% have<br />

completed primary school, 8% have completed secondary<br />

school and 2% have completed a tertiary/university<br />

education; the remainder have received vocational<br />

education.<br />

Very low.<br />

The current literacy level <strong>of</strong> Deaf children and Deaf<br />

students is pathetic.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 83<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.8.8 Do Deaf people have access to a University education in your country?<br />

7.8.8.1 If yes, how many Universities provide access to studies for Deaf people in your country?<br />

7.8.8.2 If no, why do Deaf people not have access to a University education in your country?<br />

Country<br />

Do Deaf people<br />

have access to a<br />

University<br />

education in your<br />

country?<br />

If yes, how many Universities provide<br />

access to studies for Deaf people in<br />

your country?<br />

If no, why do Deaf people not have access to<br />

a University education in your country?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong> Because <strong>of</strong> literacy problems.<br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea Yes<br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong><br />

Kenya Yes<br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar Yes Yes<br />

Malawi Yes Two Universities<br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes<br />

Rwanda Yes All Universities<br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes Four Universities<br />

One University and college but no deaf<br />

people have reached the university level<br />

- there is no sign language interpreting<br />

service.<br />

Three Public Universities, however most<br />

Deaf people never reach the admission<br />

level.<br />

One National University, but few<br />

resources are available and there are no<br />

sign language interpreters.<br />

Sudan Yes All universities on an equal basis<br />

The deaf are unable to access university<br />

education since even secondary education is<br />

not accessible.<br />

All universities are open to the deaf if they<br />

pass the entrance exam. However, no<br />

interpreting service is available hence the deaf<br />

are forced to learn by using their own notes.<br />

There are no provisions for Deaf people to<br />

study at the university level; sign Language<br />

Interpreters are not available.<br />

This access is a new opportunity <strong>of</strong>fered by the<br />

main university beginning in March 2008.<br />

They do not provide academic subjects or<br />

school curriculums for Deaf students.<br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> information provided,<br />

Tanzania Yes One University<br />

Uganda Yes Five Public Universities<br />

Zambia <strong>No</strong><br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 10 Yes (53%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

Lack <strong>of</strong> interpreters and the high qualification<br />

requirements hinder Deaf students’ entry to<br />

the universities.<br />

<strong>No</strong> teachers available to teach sign language<br />

and no interpreters in the Education Sectors.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 84<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.8.9 Do Deaf people have full access to sign language interpreting services at University?<br />

Country Do Deaf people have full access to sign language interpreting services at University?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong><br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong><br />

Kenya Yes<br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia <strong>No</strong><br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes<br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong><br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania Yes<br />

Uganda Yes<br />

Zambia Yes<br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 5 Yes (26%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 85<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.9.0 Status <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreting Services<br />

7.9.1 Does your country have any sign language interpreters?<br />

7.9.1.1 How many sign language interpreters does your country have?<br />

7.9.1.2 Are there any sign language interpreting qualifications available in your country?<br />

Country<br />

Does your country have<br />

any sign language<br />

interpreters?<br />

How many sign language interpreters<br />

does your country have?<br />

Are there any sign language<br />

interpreting qualifications available<br />

in your country?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi Yes 5 interpreters <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea Yes<br />

Ethiopia Yes<br />

30 interpreters (including staff,<br />

interpreters <strong>of</strong> our association, school<br />

teachers <strong>of</strong> the deaf, families and<br />

friends)<br />

About 15 interpreters; family members<br />

and friends <strong>of</strong> the deaf serve as<br />

interpreters also although they do not<br />

have formal sign language training.<br />

Kenya Yes 20 interpreters <strong>No</strong><br />

Lesotho Yes 10-plus interpreters Yes<br />

Madagascar Yes<br />

4 qualified interpreters, 13 trained<br />

interpreters and other un<strong>of</strong>ficial<br />

interpreters.<br />

Malawi Yes 11 Interpreters <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique Yes<br />

A few, but they are not pr<strong>of</strong>essional and<br />

many <strong>of</strong> them work for churches and not<br />

for the deaf organisation or community.<br />

Namibia Yes 10 Certified Interpreters Yes<br />

Rwanda Yes 3 Interpreters <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes 30 Interpreters Yes<br />

Sudan Yes 20 Interpreters Yes<br />

Swaziland Yes 3 Interpreters <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania Yes 45 Interpreters Yes<br />

Uganda Yes 102 Interpreters Yes<br />

Zambia Yes<br />

About 30 Interpreters with various levels<br />

<strong>of</strong> skill (from poor signing to pr<strong>of</strong>icient).<br />

Zimbabwe Yes 15 Interpreters Yes<br />

Total 17 Yes (89%) 10 Yes (53%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

Please note: The <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group stated that a training project for sign language interpreters was conducted under<br />

the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Finnish Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf; therefore the answer from Botswana should be changed to “Yes”, with at<br />

least 20 Interpreters in the country.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 86<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).<br />

Yes<br />

<strong>No</strong><br />

Yes<br />

<strong>No</strong><br />

Yes


7.9.1.3 Who provides the training for people who want to become qualified sign language interpreters?<br />

Country University<br />

Community<br />

College<br />

Eritrea �<br />

Lesotho �<br />

Madagascar � �<br />

Namibia �<br />

South Africa � �<br />

Sudan �<br />

Tanzania �<br />

Uganda � �<br />

Zambia �<br />

Zimbabwe �<br />

National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf Other<br />

The National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

provides basic sign language training to<br />

beginners; then the Icelandic<br />

International Development Agency<br />

(ICEIDA) provides theoretical and<br />

practical training to those who want to<br />

become qualified interpreters-<br />

Both the National Union <strong>of</strong> the Deaf and<br />

National Society for the Deaf.<br />

Deaf Clubs and other tailored<br />

programmes<br />

Zambia National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

(ZNAD) and Zambia National Association<br />

<strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreters (ZNASLI).<br />

7.9.1.4 How many years <strong>of</strong> training are available to someone who wants to become a sign language interpreter?<br />

Country Four Years Three Years Two Years<br />

Less than<br />

One Year<br />

Eritrea �<br />

Lesotho �<br />

Madagascar �<br />

Namibia �<br />

South Africa �<br />

Sudan �<br />

Tanzania �<br />

Uganda �<br />

Zambia �<br />

Zimbabwe<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 87<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).<br />

Other<br />

If qualified teachers and good books are<br />

available it can be mastered within six<br />

months.<br />

There is no training <strong>of</strong> sign language<br />

interpreters in our country. The last training<br />

was the Eastern and Southern Africa <strong>Regional</strong><br />

Sign Language Interpreting project under the<br />

Finnish Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf, back in 2000.<br />

Please note: Swaziland stated they have signed an agreement with the Government <strong>of</strong> Scotland, through the Scottish<br />

organisation Deaf Action, to train 15 interpreters.


7.9.1.5 How many sign language interpreters in your country have formal interpreting qualifications?<br />

Country How many sign language interpreters in your country have formal interpreting qualifications?<br />

Eritrea About 10 interpreters<br />

Ethiopia About 15 interpreters<br />

Lesotho The current interpreters have no formal interpreting qualifications<br />

Madagascar 4 interpreters<br />

Namibia 10 certified interpreters<br />

South Africa 20 interpreters<br />

Sudan 5 interpreters<br />

Tanzania At least 6 interpreters<br />

Uganda<br />

77 interpreters have qualifications<br />

(25 interpreters hold Diplomas while 52 hold Certificates)<br />

Zambia <strong>No</strong>ne<br />

Zimbabwe 14 interpreters<br />

7.9.1.6 How do Deaf people access sign language interpreters?<br />

Country How do Deaf people access sign language interpreters?<br />

Botswana Through non-governmental organisations or government.<br />

Burundi The National Association contacts Interpreters whenever a Deaf person needs them.<br />

Eritrea<br />

By requesting the Deaf Association to make arrangements and appointments. The Association is ready to solve<br />

the issues and problems <strong>of</strong> the Deaf by sending interpreters when needed.<br />

Ethiopia Through the National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf, and family members.<br />

Lesotho<br />

Namibia<br />

South Africa<br />

Sudan<br />

Deaf people have personal choice <strong>of</strong> interpreters. The Deaf person who needs a sign language interpreter<br />

informs the <strong>of</strong>fice and then the <strong>of</strong>fice contacts the Interpreter in question.<br />

Through the Deaf schools and National Association; also some public services such as Courts and Police Stations<br />

have on-site sign language interpreters.<br />

Through the National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf - the South African Sign Language Interpreter at the National<br />

Office co-ordinates interpreting services.<br />

1. Arranged contacts by associations<br />

2. Personal contacts<br />

3. Requests from the government services departments<br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong> information supplied.<br />

Tanzania<br />

Uganda<br />

The Interpreter Association works in co-operation with our organisation; we established a services co-ordination<br />

<strong>of</strong>fice where Deaf persons who need the service can place an order and obtain agreement for the service.<br />

1. Through the Uganda National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

2. Through the Local Deaf Association<br />

Zambia Through the Association <strong>of</strong> Sign Language interpreters. Or by private arrangement with interpreters.<br />

Zimbabwe<br />

1.<br />

2.<br />

Through text messages via their mobile phones<br />

Through messages via their next door or other neighbours<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 88<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.9.2 Does your country have sign language interpreting services?<br />

7.9.2.1 If yes, who provides these sign language interpreting services?<br />

Country<br />

Does your<br />

country have<br />

sign language<br />

interpreting<br />

services?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

If yes, who<br />

provides these<br />

sign language<br />

interpreting<br />

services?<br />

Government<br />

National<br />

Association <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Deaf<br />

Burundi Yes �<br />

Eritrea Yes �<br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong><br />

Kenya Yes �<br />

Lesotho Yes �<br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi Yes �<br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes � �<br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

Private<br />

Sector<br />

South Africa Yes � � �<br />

Sudan Yes �<br />

Swaziland Yes �<br />

Tanzania Yes �<br />

Uganda Yes � �<br />

Zambia Yes �<br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 12 Yes (63%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 89<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).<br />

Other<br />

Both the National Union <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

and National Society for the Deaf.<br />

NAD and ASLI<br />

Our stakeholders such as disabled<br />

persons organisations, and others<br />

who invite Deaf people to their<br />

meetings or seminars.<br />

Association <strong>of</strong> Sign Language<br />

interpreters.<br />

Please note: Again the <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group stated that the three countries who ticked “<strong>No</strong>” should have ticked “Yes”<br />

because those countries were involved with the Interpreter Training Project under the Finnish Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf.


7.9.2.2 In what areas <strong>of</strong> life are sign language interpreting services available in your country?<br />

In what areas <strong>of</strong> life are sign language<br />

interpreting services available in your<br />

country?<br />

Burundi<br />

Eritrea<br />

Social Services � � � � � � � � � � �<br />

Health/Medical Services � � � � � � � � � � �<br />

Employment Services � � � � � �<br />

Court Services � � � � � � � � � �<br />

Educational Services � � � � � � � �<br />

Counselling Services � � � � � � � � �<br />

Financial Institutions � � � � � �<br />

Funerals/Weddings � � � � � � � � � �<br />

Entertainment � � � � � � � �<br />

Others � � �<br />

Country Others<br />

Namibia Broadcasting Services<br />

South Africa Interpreter in Parliament for the Deaf Member, and Media<br />

Uganda Parliament, Driving Tests and Media<br />

7.9.2.3 What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> these sign language interpreting services?<br />

Country What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> these sign language interpreting services?<br />

Burundi<br />

Eritrea<br />

Kenya<br />

Lesotho<br />

Malawi<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 90<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).<br />

Kenya<br />

Lesotho<br />

These services are deemed fair. However since there are no pr<strong>of</strong>essional qualifications, the interpreters face<br />

various obstacles when working in <strong>of</strong>ficial settings.<br />

Interpretation services in Eritrea are few; they are just starting now. The Association is training more<br />

Interpreters and awareness is rising. But generally speaking we are at the very beginning stage.<br />

Most interpreters are not qualified or recognised by government for employment as sign language interpreters.<br />

They are employed as clerks who do interpretation.<br />

Interpreters are after money and are not pr<strong>of</strong>essional - any novice can service a big meeting but in the end they<br />

always fail.<br />

This happens even though interpretation is now well understood by the general public.<br />

There is a lack <strong>of</strong> cooperation between the consumer, the interpreter and the organisers.<br />

There are not enough services, however they are very important. There is a high need and demand for sign<br />

language interpreter training so that Deaf people can gain access to information and services.<br />

There are not enough sign language interpreters; the ratio is 1:200 interpreters to Deaf people.<br />

The negative attitude <strong>of</strong> the general public towards the interpreting pr<strong>of</strong>ession prevents interpreters from<br />

performing better; sometimes they are denied permission to provide their services at e.g. Courts and Hospitals.<br />

Namibia <strong>No</strong>t enough information supplied<br />

South Africa<br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong>t satisfied<br />

Swaziland<br />

More skilled interpreters need to be trained.<br />

Services need to be expanded and made available for Deaf people in the rural areas.<br />

Need to improve co-operation with the National Association <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreters.<br />

The Deaf Association believes that these are communication facilitators who are experts in their own right and<br />

are there to strengthen the voice <strong>of</strong> the Deaf Community.<br />

Tanzania The number <strong>of</strong> interpreters needs to be increased to meet the demand <strong>of</strong> Deaf persons.<br />

Lack <strong>of</strong> payment for sign language interpreters is the major problem faced as far as these services are<br />

concerned.<br />

Uganda The National Association <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreters needs strengthening to effectively lobby and promote the<br />

pr<strong>of</strong>ession.<br />

There is a lack <strong>of</strong> specialisation in the sign language interpreter training programme thus no accreditation.<br />

Zambia Interpreting services need a lot <strong>of</strong> improvement in signing skills, voicing and observance <strong>of</strong> Code <strong>of</strong> Ethics.<br />

Malawi<br />

Namibia<br />

South Africa<br />

Sudan<br />

Swaziland<br />

Tanzania<br />

Uganda<br />

Zambia


7.9.3 Do sign language interpreters receive payment for interpreting services in your country?<br />

7.9.3.1 Who is responsible for paying for a sign language interpreter?<br />

7.9.3.2 What is the average hourly rate <strong>of</strong> payment for sign language interpreters in your country?<br />

Country<br />

Do sign<br />

language<br />

interpreters<br />

receive<br />

payment for<br />

interpreting<br />

services in<br />

your<br />

country?<br />

Who is<br />

responsible<br />

for paying<br />

for a sign<br />

language<br />

interpreter?<br />

Government<br />

Botswana Yes �<br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

National<br />

Association<br />

<strong>of</strong> the<br />

Deaf/Deaf<br />

Group<br />

Eritrea Yes �<br />

Ethiopia Yes �<br />

Deaf<br />

People<br />

Kenya Yes � � �<br />

Lesotho Yes � �<br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes � �<br />

Rwanda Yes �<br />

South Africa Yes � � �<br />

Sudan Yes �<br />

Swaziland Yes<br />

Others<br />

Government pays a<br />

salary for those<br />

working in schools.<br />

During workshops,<br />

symposiums and<br />

training the<br />

organisers pay.<br />

<strong>No</strong>n-Governmental<br />

Organisations<br />

NGOs are informed<br />

that any organisation<br />

or department, for<br />

example court,<br />

requesting the<br />

participation <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Deaf Association in<br />

their meeting is<br />

responsible to pay for<br />

interpreting services.<br />

What the average hourly rate<br />

<strong>of</strong> payment for sign language<br />

interpreters in your country?<br />

BWP 75 (7.62€ on 31 st May<br />

2008).<br />

100 Eri Currency (Nasfa) (8.60€<br />

on 31 st May 2008).<br />

The amount varies according<br />

to availability <strong>of</strong> funds but in<br />

general it is about 15.00€ per<br />

day or about 2.00€ per hour.<br />

Rates vary depending on the<br />

ability <strong>of</strong> the organisers to<br />

pay; they range from USD65.00<br />

to USD85.00 per day (42.65€ to<br />

54.75€ on 31 st May 2008).<br />

USD30.00 per day (19.33€ on<br />

31 st May 2008).<br />

200 NAD (Namibian Dollars-N$)<br />

(17.18€ on 31 st May 2008).<br />

Hourly rate is fixed at<br />

USD50.00 (32.20€ on 31 st May<br />

2008).<br />

ZAR 468.00 for a half day<br />

(39.75€ on 31 st May 2008).<br />

ZAR 1,870.00 for a full day<br />

(158.92€ on 31 st May 2008).<br />

10 – 50 Sudanese pounds a day<br />

(3.22€ to 16.10€ on 31 st May<br />

2008).<br />

• R350per hour per for<br />

pr<strong>of</strong>essional rates (29.90€<br />

on 31 st May 2008).<br />

• Services for the deaf are<br />

R150per hour (12.82€ on<br />

31 st May 2008).<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 91<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Tanzania Yes � �<br />

Uganda Yes � � �<br />

Institutions which<br />

invite or are in need<br />

<strong>of</strong> Deaf contributions<br />

at various gatherings<br />

Zambia Yes � Private Sector<br />

Zimbabwe Yes � �<br />

Total<br />

14 Yes<br />

(78%)<br />

Additional Information from Seychelles:<br />

Based on 18 respondents<br />

• USD50.00 per full day<br />

service (32.20€ on 31 st<br />

May 2008).<br />

• USD30.00 for half day<br />

(19.33€ on 31 st May 2008).<br />

• USD10.00 to USD15.00 for<br />

short assignments (6.44€<br />

to 9.66€ on 31 st May<br />

2008).<br />

35,000 UGX per day (13.92€ on<br />

31 st May 2008).<br />

<strong>No</strong>t hourly but daily. The rate<br />

ranges from USD$20 to USD$30<br />

per day (12.88€ to 19.33€ on<br />

31 st May 2008).<br />

The rate <strong>of</strong> payment depends<br />

on agreement between the<br />

interpreter and the client. In<br />

most cases it’s a negotiable<br />

rate; there is no fixed rate.<br />

There are no interpreters available in the country <strong>of</strong> Seychelles; Deaf people use hearing people who know sign language for<br />

interpreting support. There are plans for a French expert to provide an interpreter training programme, to commence in 2009.<br />

7.9.3.3 Do your sign language interpreters provide voluntary service for all sign language interpreting<br />

assignments?<br />

Country Do your sign language interpreters provide voluntary service for all sign language interpreting assignments?<br />

Botswana Sometimes<br />

Burundi Sometimes<br />

Eritrea Yes<br />

Ethiopia Sometimes<br />

Kenya Sometimes<br />

Lesotho Sometimes<br />

Madagascar Yes<br />

Malawi Yes<br />

Mozambique Sometimes<br />

Namibia Sometimes<br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Sometimes<br />

Sudan Sometimes<br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania Yes<br />

Uganda Sometimes<br />

Zambia Sometimes<br />

Zimbabwe Yes<br />

Total 5 Yes (28%)<br />

Based on 18 respondents<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 92<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.9.4 Does your country have a National Association <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreters?<br />

7.9.4.1 Is your National Association <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreters independent from your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf?<br />

7.9.5 Is there a national Code <strong>of</strong> Ethics for sign language interpreters in your country?<br />

Country<br />

Does your country have a National<br />

Association <strong>of</strong> Sign Language<br />

Interpreters?<br />

Is your National Association <strong>of</strong> Sign<br />

Language Interpreters<br />

independent from your National<br />

Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf?<br />

Is there a national Code <strong>of</strong><br />

Ethics for sign language<br />

interpreters in your country?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Kenya Yes Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique Yes Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes Yes Yes<br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Tanzania Yes <strong>No</strong> Yes<br />

Uganda Yes Yes Yes<br />

Zambia Yes Yes Yes<br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 7 Yes (37%) 5 Yes (26%) 6 Yes (32%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

7.9.6 Is there any legislation or policy in your country which states that the government has a responsibility for the<br />

provision <strong>of</strong> sign language interpreting services?<br />

7.9.6.1 If yes, please list the legislation or policies that specifically state the government has a responsibility for the<br />

provision <strong>of</strong> sign language interpreting services.<br />

Country<br />

Is there any legislation or policy in<br />

your country which states that the<br />

government has a responsibility<br />

for the provision <strong>of</strong> sign language<br />

interpreting services?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong><br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong><br />

Kenya Yes<br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia <strong>No</strong><br />

If yes, please list the legislation or policies that specifically state the<br />

government has a responsibility for the provision <strong>of</strong> sign language<br />

interpreting services.<br />

Disability Act Misc 39. Accessibility - 21, Rights and Privileges - 19,<br />

Polling Sec - 30. There are other sections in the Rights and Privileges and<br />

Civic Rights, Miscellaneous, Offences and Penalties <strong>of</strong> the Act. These<br />

authorise the government to provide sign language interpreting services<br />

but have not been enforced.<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 93<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Rwanda Yes<br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes<br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong><br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania <strong>No</strong><br />

The law says that public services are required to provide communication<br />

access for Deaf persons, by using sign language, sign messages and other<br />

means if possible during meetings, conferences, information bulletins<br />

and so forth.<br />

Integrated National Disability Strategy<br />

Draft National Language Policy<br />

Uganda Yes Persons with Disabilities Act 2006<br />

Zambia <strong>No</strong><br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 4 Yes (21%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 94<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.10.0 Employment<br />

7.10.1 Does your country’s government consider that Deaf people have a right to be employed and earn a standard<br />

salary?<br />

7.10.2 Does your country’s government have any anti-discrimination laws in the area <strong>of</strong> employment, especially for Deaf<br />

people or People with Disabilities?<br />

7.10.2.1 If yes, please write clearly the name <strong>of</strong> any legislation or policy that relates to anti-discrimination in<br />

employment.<br />

Country<br />

Does your<br />

country’s<br />

government<br />

consider that Deaf<br />

people have a<br />

right to be<br />

employed and<br />

earn a standard<br />

salary?<br />

Does your<br />

country’s<br />

government have<br />

any antidiscrimination<br />

laws<br />

in the area <strong>of</strong><br />

employment,<br />

especially for Deaf<br />

people or People<br />

with Disabilities?<br />

Botswana Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

If yes, please write clearly the name <strong>of</strong> any legislation or policy<br />

that relates to anti-discrimination in employment.<br />

Ethiopia Yes Yes <strong>No</strong> information supplied<br />

The Disability Act states that no persons or companies shall deny a<br />

Kenya Yes Yes<br />

person with disabilities access to opportunities for suitable<br />

employment.<br />

Lesotho Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes Yes <strong>No</strong> information supplied<br />

According to the Law on Persons with Disabilities<br />

Rwanda Yes Yes<br />

1.<br />

2.<br />

Discrimination is prohibited in work<br />

A person with a disability must be hired first if there is<br />

competition between two equally-qualified candidates<br />

Seychelles Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes Yes Employment Equity Act<br />

1. <strong>No</strong> qualified disabled person can be stopped from getting a<br />

Sudan Yes Yes<br />

2.<br />

job (Constitution)<br />

<strong>No</strong>t less than 2% <strong>of</strong> public or private sector jobs must be<br />

dedicated for disabled people (Labour Law)<br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania Yes Yes Employment and Care and Maintenance Act 1982<br />

1. Persons with Disabilities Act 2006.<br />

Uganda Yes Yes<br />

2. Guidelines for Managing Disability in the Workplace 2006 (not<br />

yet implemented)<br />

Zambia Yes <strong>No</strong><br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 14 Yes (74%) 8 Yes (42%)<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 95<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.10.3 Does your Association/Group have any <strong>of</strong>ficial or approximate figures on the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people who are in<br />

paid employment in your country?<br />

7.10.3.1 If yes, how many Deaf people are in employment?<br />

Does your<br />

Association/Group<br />

have any <strong>of</strong>ficial or<br />

approximate figures on<br />

Country<br />

the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf<br />

people who are in paid<br />

employment in your<br />

country?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Total Number <strong>of</strong> Deaf<br />

people employed<br />

Number <strong>of</strong> Deaf Women<br />

employed<br />

Number <strong>of</strong> Deaf Men<br />

employed<br />

Eritrea Yes 10,000 3,000 7,000<br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong><br />

Kenya <strong>No</strong><br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia <strong>No</strong><br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa <strong>No</strong><br />

Sudan Yes 14,000 1,000 13,000<br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania <strong>No</strong><br />

Uganda <strong>No</strong><br />

Zambia <strong>No</strong><br />

Zimbabwe Yes 74 13 61<br />

Total 3 Yes (16%) 24,074<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

4,013 20,061<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 96<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.10.3.2 What are the most common areas <strong>of</strong> work for Deaf people in your country?<br />

What are the most common areas <strong>of</strong> work<br />

for Deaf people in your country?<br />

Burundi<br />

Eritrea<br />

Ethiopia<br />

Office Administration<br />

Management<br />

Education<br />

Theatre/Arts<br />

Research Projects<br />

Sign Language Work<br />

Social Services<br />

� ��<br />

� � � �� �<br />

� � � � � �� �<br />

� ��<br />

� ��<br />

� � � � �� � �� � �<br />

� � � ��<br />

Farm Work � � � � � �� � ��� Financial Industry � � � �<br />

Engineering<br />

Welding<br />

� �<br />

� � �� � ��� � �<br />

Carpentry � � � � � �� � ��� � �<br />

Jeweller � � � �<br />

Tailoring � � � � � � �� � ��� � �<br />

Building � � � � � �� � �<br />

Painting � � � � � � �� �<br />

Cleaning � � � � �� ��� � �<br />

Car Mechanic<br />

Panel Beater<br />

� � � � � ��<br />

� ��<br />

Shoe Repairing<br />

Bakery<br />

Hairdresser<br />

Printer<br />

� � � � � ��� �<br />

� � � � �<br />

� � � �� � �� � �<br />

� � �� �<br />

Catering<br />

Others<br />

� � � �<br />

�<br />

� ��� �<br />

� �� �<br />

Country Others<br />

Mozambique Private sector, packer, carrier, cleaner and domestic worker.<br />

Sudan Accounting, Free Trades, Electricity and industry worker.<br />

Tanzania Media House (as News Translators and Analysis Unit).<br />

Uganda Driver and Government Executive.<br />

Zambia Housemaid<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 97<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).<br />

Lesotho<br />

Malawi<br />

Mozambique<br />

Namibia<br />

South Africa<br />

Sudan<br />

Swaziland<br />

Tanzania<br />

Uganda<br />

Zambia<br />

Zimbabwe


7.10.4 Does your country have any figures on the percentage <strong>of</strong> Deaf people who are unemployed?<br />

7.10.4.1 Why are Deaf people unemployed in your country?<br />

Country<br />

Does your country have any<br />

figures on the percentage <strong>of</strong><br />

Deaf people who are<br />

unemployed?<br />

Why are Deaf people unemployed in your country?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong> Language barriers and communication problems.<br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Eritrea <strong>No</strong><br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong><br />

Kenya <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> information supplied.<br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong><br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia <strong>No</strong><br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

1. Because <strong>of</strong> low literacy<br />

2. Because <strong>of</strong> communication problems<br />

3. Prejudices<br />

4. They are uninformed about job opportunities which are <strong>of</strong>ten<br />

announced via radio<br />

5. Ignorance<br />

The Government only provides unemployment services for people who have<br />

done time in the National Military Service, so Deaf people are unable to<br />

receive this support from the government. However the Association <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Deaf can give this service to individuals.<br />

1. Deaf do not get adequate training or education<br />

2. Discrimination by employers<br />

3. Training <strong>of</strong> the deaf is not geared to their specific needs<br />

Their level <strong>of</strong> education hinders them from formal employment and the job<br />

market is very competitive.<br />

1. Low education levels<br />

2. Negative attitude <strong>of</strong> employers towards Deaf people<br />

3. Communication problems<br />

4. Lack <strong>of</strong> Legislation or laws to enforce employment <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

Deaf men do not like to work with hearing colleagues and managers in<br />

companies because their salaries are not commensurate with the work<br />

done. The Deaf Women previously had their own business but not any longer<br />

because the manager has retired. Deaf people would like Deaf Clubs to set<br />

up businesses in the regions.<br />

Whether they are qualified or not the government and many companies<br />

consider Deaf people as unable to work; they are neglected, they are seen<br />

as handicapped with little ability to work, they are illiterate, they<br />

experience barriers to attaining employment, and there is a lack <strong>of</strong><br />

employment placement services and policies.<br />

• Deaf people have little knowledge to compete for positions in<br />

government and in other projects to turn around the country’s<br />

economy<br />

• Deaf people in Namibia lack skills with which they can compete in the<br />

labour market; the skills they possess are vocational skills that are illpaid<br />

and make their lives hard<br />

The main reason for Deaf people’s unemployment is due to the fact that<br />

Deaf in Rwanda are illiterate. Previously there were no laws protecting<br />

persons with disabilities in general and particularly Deaf people. That<br />

meant no help or support whatsoever, nor access to employment. <strong>No</strong>w the<br />

anti-discrimination law for persons with disabilities has been made public.<br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong> • Lack <strong>of</strong> education and dependence on benefits<br />

South Africa <strong>No</strong><br />

Sudan <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> information supplied.<br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong> <strong>No</strong> information supplied.<br />

Tanzania <strong>No</strong><br />

Uganda <strong>No</strong><br />

Zambia <strong>No</strong><br />

• Low education and literacy levels<br />

• Lack <strong>of</strong> career guidance in schools<br />

• Employers do not know how to handle Deaf employees<br />

• Lack <strong>of</strong> education<br />

• Negative attitudes<br />

• Stigmatisation<br />

• Low education levels (skills and qualifications)<br />

• Negative attitudes from employers<br />

• Scarcity <strong>of</strong> job opportunities<br />

• Poor education among Deaf people<br />

• Poor national economy<br />

• Bad altitude among employers; they view Deaf people as unable to<br />

perform work<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 98<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 0 Yes<br />

• Negative attitudes from hearing counterparts, who believe that it is<br />

impossible to communicate with the Deaf<br />

Based on 19 respondents<br />

Please note: The answers from Rwanda to Questions 7.10.2 and 7.10.4.1 with regard to anti-discrimination legislation are<br />

conflicting. To the first question the response was ‘Yes’ but the response to the second question was ‘<strong>No</strong>’.<br />

7.10.5 Does your country provide employment services to assist unemployed Deaf people to look for<br />

employment?<br />

7.10.5.1 Who is responsible for providing employment services for unemployed Deaf people in your<br />

country?<br />

Country<br />

Does your country<br />

provide<br />

employment<br />

services to assist<br />

unemployed Deaf<br />

people to look for<br />

employment?<br />

Botswana <strong>No</strong><br />

Burundi <strong>No</strong><br />

Who is<br />

responsible for<br />

providing<br />

employment<br />

services for<br />

unemployed<br />

Deaf people in<br />

your country?<br />

Government<br />

Employment<br />

Service<br />

National Association<br />

<strong>of</strong> the Deaf/Deaf<br />

Group<br />

Eritrea Yes �<br />

Ethiopia <strong>No</strong><br />

Kenya <strong>No</strong><br />

Lesotho <strong>No</strong><br />

Madagascar Yes<br />

Malawi <strong>No</strong><br />

Mozambique <strong>No</strong><br />

Namibia Yes � �<br />

Rwanda <strong>No</strong><br />

Seychelles <strong>No</strong><br />

South Africa Yes � �<br />

Sudan Yes �<br />

Swaziland <strong>No</strong><br />

Tanzania Yes � � Religious organisations<br />

Uganda Yes<br />

Zambia Yes<br />

Zimbabwe <strong>No</strong><br />

Total 8 Yes (42%)<br />

Other, please write down:<br />

� Disabled persons organisations<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 99<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).<br />

�<br />

Based on 19 respondents


7.11.0 General<br />

7.11.1 Which <strong>of</strong> the following does your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf/Deaf Group consider to be the highest priority<br />

for your Deaf Community?<br />

Which <strong>of</strong> the following<br />

does your National<br />

Association <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Deaf/Deaf Group<br />

consider to be the<br />

highest priority for<br />

your Deaf Community?<br />

Botswana<br />

Burundi<br />

Eritrea<br />

Ethiopia<br />

Kenya<br />

Lesotho<br />

Better quality <strong>of</strong> Deaf<br />

Education � � � � � � � � � � ���<br />

Equal Opportunity in<br />

Employment � � � � � � � � ���<br />

Better Sign Language<br />

Interpreting quality and � � � � � � � � � ���<br />

services<br />

Recognition <strong>of</strong> your<br />

country’s Sign Language<br />

by your country’s<br />

Government<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 100<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).<br />

Madagascar<br />

� � � � � � �<br />

Malawi<br />

Namibia<br />

Rwanda<br />

� �<br />

Seychelles<br />

South Africa<br />

�<br />

Sudan<br />

Swaziland<br />

Tanzania<br />

Uganda<br />

Zambia<br />

����<br />

Improved quality and<br />

access to Government<br />

and Community Services � � � � � � � � ��� �<br />

Other � � � � �<br />

Country Other<br />

Burundi Sign Language Research and Deaf Leadership.<br />

Eritrea<br />

To provide Vocational Training to the Deaf; to train Deaf Youth in sports; and to make the Deaf aware about<br />

HIV/AIDS etc.<br />

Madagascar<br />

The same issues we’ve raised throughout the survey but the most important for us is to include sign language in<br />

the Government’s Constitution.<br />

Mozambique The Association is not functioning because <strong>of</strong> conflicts throughout the executive board and structure. .<br />

South Africa Access to Health.<br />

Tanzania Participation in decision-making bodies e.g. Parliament, Local Government, etc.<br />

7.11.2 Does your Association/Group have any other concerns about the standard <strong>of</strong> living <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in your<br />

country? Please list them.<br />

Country<br />

Botswana<br />

Burundi<br />

Eritrea<br />

Ethiopia<br />

Kenya<br />

Does your Association/Group have any other concerns about the standard <strong>of</strong> living <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in your<br />

country? Please list them.<br />

• Deaf people are not supported equally<br />

• Lack <strong>of</strong> involvement in government programmes<br />

• Concerned about integration and pr<strong>of</strong>essional training for Deaf people<br />

• Additionally we work toward the inclusion <strong>of</strong> the deaf community in political life<br />

Our Association as an umbrella organisation is concerned with equality and full participation <strong>of</strong> the Deaf in all<br />

spheres <strong>of</strong> life:<br />

• Ensuring human rights and linguistic rights<br />

• Teaching the Deaf to support themselves<br />

• Training <strong>of</strong> sign language interpreters<br />

• Training Deaf people in social and cultural issues, life, sports, HIV, sexual abuse, health issues,<br />

organisational management, project management, constitutional rights and financial management<br />

• Advocate for policy development<br />

• Poverty eradication for Deaf people<br />

• To create employment opportunities or to provide support for the Deaf to be self-employed<br />

• Kenya has a high rate <strong>of</strong> skilled Deaf school-leavers who are unemployed and hawking in the streets<br />

• The capacity <strong>of</strong> Deaf leaders in the National Association, as well as in the branches, has deteriorated due to<br />

ethnic rivalry<br />

• All the branches are now dormant because the National Association no longer has funds to support them as<br />

has been the case in the past when the National Association was supported by Shia/SDR<br />

• There is great need for reconstruction so that the capacity <strong>of</strong> the branches is effective<br />

• Members in the branches need more leadership training and organisational management skills<br />

• Deaf women are the ignored ones in the management <strong>of</strong> organisations<br />

• More capacity building is needed<br />

Zimbabwe


Lesotho<br />

Madagascar<br />

Malawi<br />

Mozambique<br />

Namibia<br />

Rwanda<br />

• Decentralised service delivery at the community level for Deaf people to access easily<br />

• Improved Secretariat with fulltime personnel for better co-ordination <strong>of</strong> the Association's activities in the<br />

districts<br />

• We think the most important thing is the Deaf children in Deaf schools in Madagascar; the Government<br />

should be held accountable for this<br />

• Deaf adults in the regions want to have their own businesses<br />

• FMM hopes to have equal human rights and rights <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

• High percentage <strong>of</strong> unemployment due to little education obtained<br />

• <strong>No</strong>t enough sign language interpreters to provide services to the Deaf in different areas<br />

• High death rate due to the HIV/AIDS pandemic since most Deaf does not have access to information about<br />

HIV and AIDS<br />

• Lack <strong>of</strong> civic education on how Deaf could promote their own livelihood eg. Self employment and business<br />

management<br />

The Association doesn’t have any concern but the Deaf people themselves have concerns about the standard <strong>of</strong><br />

living.<br />

• The overall concern still is education - we cannot compete with the hearing world in our own country if we<br />

are illiterate, we cannot expect the public to consider us as people who can make significance<br />

contributions to the socio-economic status <strong>of</strong> the country if we are not armed with University Degrees;<br />

instead we will be regarded as beggars because all we do is demand assistance and we cannot do anything<br />

on our own. This is a very negative preconception and an insult to the Deaf people in our country, but the<br />

truth is we do not have knowledge; those with knowledge are very few as opposed to the masses who ‘have<br />

not’.<br />

• We want government to fund our organisation and to allow us to work closely with them in all things that<br />

concern Deaf persons; because this will help them make the best decision which Deaf people will<br />

appreciate and benefit from fully.<br />

Yes, we are worried that our country is not interested in us; they communicate with persons with disabilities<br />

instead <strong>of</strong> contacting us directly and asking us to express our own needs and opinions.<br />

Because most Deaf depend on the benefits provided by the government, they become lazy and dependant on<br />

others. Most families encourage them to take the benefits and stay at home. This sometime leads to abuse in<br />

Seychelles the family. They are asked to look after the other children or do chores for other family members. The family<br />

thus stops them from living their own dreams or becoming independent. This leads also to lack <strong>of</strong><br />

empowerment.<br />

Sudan Level <strong>of</strong> poverty among deaf people is very high.<br />

Swaziland<br />

Tanzania<br />

Uganda<br />

Zambia<br />

Zimbabwe<br />

We are still marginalised; we want to have access to general resources in employment and education, as<br />

accorded all citizens <strong>of</strong> Swaziland.<br />

• Electronic Assistive Devices such as alarms and so forth<br />

• Expose Deaf people to Information Communication and Technology, including use <strong>of</strong> computers, email,<br />

Internet, etc<br />

• Ratification <strong>of</strong> the UN Convention on the Rights <strong>of</strong> Persons with Disabilities<br />

• There is a high demand by Deaf people for employment; the NAD is striving to promote opportunities that<br />

can secure the employment rights <strong>of</strong> Deaf people<br />

• Despite many policies/laws/acts in Uganda, little Is being done to implement them and secure the<br />

fundamental human rights enshrined in these legislations<br />

• Creating Deaf Awareness<br />

• To be less dependant on relatives and guardians<br />

• Improved access to the media<br />

• Unemployment – need to reduce the poverty <strong>of</strong> Deaf people through employment<br />

• Need to improve communication with the general public<br />

• Need more schools for Deaf children around our country<br />

• Need gender equality for Deaf people and the community at large<br />

• Great need for leaders from abroad to continue passing on the latest information and for our leaders to<br />

feature in different meetings worldwide<br />

• Need financial assistance from government or other organisations, and to attain better education<br />

• Need improved communication with different institutions such as police, hospitals (health sector), courts<br />

and other public services<br />

• Be Christians; need more churches with bilingual preachers – sign language should be one <strong>of</strong> the languages<br />

used<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 101<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


8.0 Appendices Appendix <strong>No</strong> 1<br />

Dear President and Secretary,<br />

Global Education Pre‐Planning Project on the<br />

Human Rights <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

Email: DeafHumanRights@yahoo.com.au<br />

3 rd March 2008<br />

I wish to introduce the new project “Global Education Pre-Planning Project on the Human Rights <strong>of</strong> Deaf People” implemented<br />

by the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) in co-operation with the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR). This<br />

project is a preparation for a Global project “Deaf Global Human Rights Training Project” to commence hopefully in 2009. An<br />

application will be submitted 2008 to Swedish funding bodies.<br />

The purpose <strong>of</strong> the pre-planning project is to conduct a global survey to collect information on the standard <strong>of</strong> life for Deaf<br />

people in each one <strong>of</strong> the seven WFD <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariats, focussing on the areas <strong>of</strong>:<br />

1. Contact Details,<br />

2. Status <strong>of</strong> the National Deaf Association,<br />

3. Population <strong>of</strong> Deaf people,<br />

4. Legislations and Policies,<br />

5. Access to Government Services,<br />

6. Access to the Media,<br />

7. Status <strong>of</strong> the Country Sign Language,<br />

8. Access to Education,<br />

9. Status <strong>of</strong> the Sign Language Interpreting Services,<br />

10. Status <strong>of</strong> the Deaf Employment and<br />

11. General.<br />

Your Association is a member <strong>of</strong> the WFD – <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariat in Southern and Eastern Africa and this group is the fifth<br />

region to be surveyed in this project.<br />

It will be appreciated if you take time to complete this survey as soon as possible to enable us to finalise the draft Fact-Finding<br />

<strong>Report</strong>. The Project will establish a temporary <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group consisting <strong>of</strong> two or three members from the Ordinary<br />

WFD Members <strong>of</strong> the <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariat in Southern and Eastern Africa Region. The <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group is planning to<br />

meet in June 2008 to discuss the draft Fact-Finding <strong>Report</strong>. The <strong>Regional</strong> Working Group is responsible for confirming the<br />

recommendations from the Fact-Finding <strong>Report</strong> to be used in the application for the “Deaf Global Human Rights Training<br />

Project”.<br />

The project has appointed a <strong>Regional</strong> Co-ordinator Ms Susan Kirima from Nairobi, Kenya and her responsibility is to establish a<br />

contact point with all members <strong>of</strong> the WFD <strong>Regional</strong> Secretariat in Southern and Eastern Africa for this project. If you have any<br />

questions about the survey, please do not hesitate to contact Ms Susan Kirima and her email address is skirima@yahoo.com<br />

Please find the survey questions attached in <strong>English</strong> language and attached is a copy <strong>of</strong> a DVD in International Sign, based on the<br />

survey questions. Please be aware that it is essential to answer all <strong>of</strong> the survey questions correctly to provide the true<br />

reflection <strong>of</strong> the actual standard <strong>of</strong> living <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in your country.<br />

Please return your survey questions to:<br />

Ms Susan Kirima<br />

<strong>Regional</strong> Co-ordinator<br />

C/- Dean <strong>of</strong> Students <strong>of</strong>fice<br />

P.O Box 30197<br />

University Way<br />

Nairobi<br />

Kenya<br />

Email: skirima@yahoo.com<br />

Fax: +254-020-245566<br />

It will be appreciated if Ms Susan Kirima can receive your survey by no later than Friday, 18 th April 2008.<br />

Thank you for your co-operation to make this possible achievement for every Deaf person in your country.<br />

Yours sincerely,<br />

Colin Allen<br />

Project Co-ordinator<br />

The <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf and the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

Email: DeafHumanRights@yahoo.com.au<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 102<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


Appendix <strong>No</strong> 2<br />

<strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

Global Education Pre‐Planning Project<br />

on the Human Rights <strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

Email: DeafHumanRights@yahoo.com.au<br />

A GLOBAL<br />

SURVEY<br />

Global Education<br />

Pre-planning Project<br />

on the Human Rights<br />

<strong>of</strong> Deaf People<br />

<strong>Regional</strong> Secretariat in Eastern and Southern Africa<br />

March 2008<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 103<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


1.0 Contact Details<br />

1.1 Country: ______________________________________________________________________________<br />

1.2 Name <strong>of</strong> the National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf: __________________________________________________<br />

___________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

1.3 Street Address:<br />

Street Address: ______________________________________________________________________________<br />

Street Address: ______________________________________________________________________________<br />

City: _____________________________________________________________________________________<br />

Post code / Zip Code: _______________________________________________________________________<br />

Country: ______________________________________________________________________________<br />

1.4 Postal Address:<br />

Postal Number: ______________________________________________________________________________<br />

City: _____________________________________________________________________________________<br />

Post code / Zip Code: _______________________________________________________________________<br />

Country: ______________________________________________________________________________<br />

Website Address: _______________________________________________________________________<br />

Email Address: ______________________________________________________________________________<br />

1.5 Telephone Numbers:<br />

Landline Number: _________________________________________________________<br />

Mobile Number: _________________________________________________________<br />

Facsimile Number: _________________________________________________________<br />

Project Data Use Only<br />

Country Reference <strong>No</strong>: ..............................................................................<br />

Received Date: ......................................................................................<br />

Data Entered: ........................................................................................<br />

Country Classifications:<br />

□ Low Income □ Lower Middle Income<br />

□ Upper Middle Income □ High Income<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 104<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


2.0 National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

2.1 Please provide the <strong>of</strong>ficial name <strong>of</strong> your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf in both <strong>English</strong> and in your<br />

language:<br />

2.1.1 <strong>English</strong>: _____________________________________________________________________________________<br />

2.1.2 In your national language: _____________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

2.2 Please provide the number <strong>of</strong> members your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf has in your country?<br />

2.2.1 Deaf Members: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

2.2.1.1 Deaf Women: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

2.2.1.2 Deaf Men: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

2.2.2 Hard <strong>of</strong> Hearing Members: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

2.2.2.1 Hard <strong>of</strong> Hearing Women: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

2.2.2.2 Hard <strong>of</strong> Hearing Men: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

2.2.3 Hearing Members: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

2.3 In what year was your National Association established?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

2.4 Does your Deaf Association have Statutes/a Constitution?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 2.5<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 2.5<br />

2.5 Does your government recognise your national organisation to represent Deaf people in your country?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 2.6<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 2.6<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 105<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


2.6 Please list some the areas in which your association has adopted a policy statement?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

2.7 Please list the six highest priority issues/actions in your strategic action plan<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

2.8 Please describe structure <strong>of</strong> your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (e.g. congress/annual meeting/<br />

board/ executive/districts/local associations etc)?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 106<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


2.8.1 How many affiliated regional and/or local Deaf Associations is part <strong>of</strong> your National Association <strong>of</strong> the<br />

Deaf?<br />

2.8.1.1 Number <strong>of</strong> <strong>Regional</strong> associations: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

2.8.1.2 Number <strong>of</strong> Local associations: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

2.9 How many members <strong>of</strong> your members are Deaf?<br />

[___________________] <strong>of</strong> [___________________]<br />

(Deaf Board Members) (Total <strong>of</strong> Board Members)<br />

2.10 How many members <strong>of</strong> the board are Deaf women and how many are Deaf men?<br />

2.10.1 Deaf women: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

2.10.2 Deaf men: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

2.11 Does your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf have committees for specific area <strong>of</strong> interest or affiliation<br />

with any other relevant independent groups in your country?<br />

□ Sign Language Interpreters □ Sign Language Researchers □ Deaf Education<br />

□ Parents <strong>of</strong> Deaf Children □ Deaf Seniors □ Deafblind<br />

□ Deaf Youth □ Cultural groups <strong>of</strong> Deaf people □ Sports groups<br />

□ Deaf people with other disabilities □ Lesbian, Gay, Transgender and Bisexual<br />

□ Deaf Women’s Groups □ Children <strong>of</strong> Deaf Adults<br />

□ Other, please write down:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

2.12 Does your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf have any paid staff members?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 2.12.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 2.13<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 107<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


2.12.1 How many <strong>of</strong> the paid staff members are women and who many are men?<br />

2.12.1.1 Women: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

2.12.1.2 Men: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

2.12.2 How many <strong>of</strong> the paid staff members are Deaf?<br />

2.11.2.1 Deaf Women: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

2.11.2.2 Deaf Men: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

2.13 Is your Chief Executive Officer / Executive Director / Person-in-charge Deaf?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 3.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 3.1<br />

3.0 Population <strong>of</strong> Deaf people<br />

3.1 Does your country’s government have any <strong>of</strong>ficial records on the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in your<br />

country?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 3.1.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 3.2<br />

3.1.1 If yes, please provide the <strong>of</strong>ficial number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in your country?<br />

3.1.1.1 Total: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

3.1.1.2 Deaf Women: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

3.1.1.3 Deaf Men: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

3.2 Does your Association have any <strong>of</strong>ficial or approximate figures on the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people living in<br />

your country?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 3.2.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 3.3<br />

3.2.1 If yes, please provide the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in your country<br />

3.2.1.1 Total: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

3.2.1.2 Deaf Women: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

3.2.1.3 Deaf Men: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 108<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


3.3 Does your Association have any <strong>of</strong>ficial or approximate figures on the Deaf people who use sign<br />

language as their primary language?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 3.3.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 3.4<br />

3.3.1 If yes, please provide the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people who use sign language in your country<br />

3.3.1.1 Total: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

3.3.1.2 Deaf Women: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

3.3.1.3 Deaf Men: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

3.4. Does the situation <strong>of</strong> HIV/AIDS in your country affect Deaf women, men and children?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 3.4.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong> information available, please go to Question 4.1<br />

3.4.1 If yes, please describe the situation with HIV/AIDS in the Deaf community in your country including any<br />

<strong>of</strong>ficial statistics on the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people living with HIV/AIDS.<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 109<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


4.0 Legislations and Policies<br />

4.1 Does your country’s government recognise Deaf people as citizens on an equal basis as other citizens<br />

in your country?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.2<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.2<br />

4.2 Does your country’s government have an <strong>of</strong>fice responsible for services for People with Disabilities?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.2.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.3<br />

4.2.1 If yes, what is the name, address, and website address <strong>of</strong> the government <strong>of</strong>fice that is responsible for<br />

services for People with Disabilities in your country?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

4.3 Does your country’s Government have any legislation or policies for Deaf people (or People with<br />

Disabilities in general)?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.3.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.4<br />

4.3.1 If yes, please list some <strong>of</strong> the policies or legislation that relates to Deaf people (or People with<br />

Disabilities), (please write the name <strong>of</strong> the legislations or policies in full detail):<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

4.4 Does your country’s Government have any anti-discrimination laws for Deaf people (or People with<br />

Disabilities)?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.5<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.5<br />

4.5 Does your country’s government provide any services specifically for the Deaf Community through its<br />

government departments?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.5.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.5.3<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 110<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


4.5.1 If yes, what types <strong>of</strong> service are provided specifically for the Deaf Community by your country’s<br />

government?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

4.5.2 What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> the current service(s) specifically provided for the Deaf Community by<br />

your country’s government?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

Please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.6<br />

4.5.3 If no, why does your country’s government not provide any service specifically for the Deaf<br />

Community?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 111<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


4.6 Does your Association have any contacts with your current country’s government?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.6.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.7<br />

4.6.1 What type <strong>of</strong> contact does your Association have with your country’s current government?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

4.7 Does your Association receive any financial support from your country’s current government?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.7.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.8<br />

4.7.1 What is the amount <strong>of</strong> annual financial support from your country’s government?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

4.7.2 What is the purpose <strong>of</strong> the financial support from your country’s government to the Deaf Community?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

4.8 Do Deaf people have a right to vote in national, regional and local elections?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.9<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.8.1<br />

4.8.1 If Deaf people do not have the right to vote, please list the government legislation or policies that<br />

specifically exclude Deaf people from having the right to vote:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

4.9 Are Deaf people allowed to obtain a driver’s licence?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.10<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.9.1<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 112<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


4.9.1 If Deaf people are not allowed to drive, please list the Government legislation or policies that stop<br />

them from being allowed to drive:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

4.10 Are Deaf people allowed to marry Deaf or other partners?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.11<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.10.1<br />

4.10.1 If Deaf people are not allowed to get married, please list any specific Government legislation or policy<br />

that specifically stops Deaf people from being allowed to marry (or to be allowed to marry another<br />

deaf person):<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

4.11 Are Deaf people allowed to have children?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.12<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.11.1<br />

4.11.1 If Deaf people are not allowed to have children, please list any specific Government legislation or<br />

policy that stops Deaf people from being allowed to have children.<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

4.12 Are Deaf people allowed to adopt children?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 5.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 4.12.1<br />

4.12.1 If Deaf people are not allowed to adopt children, please list any specific Government legislation or<br />

policy that stops Deaf people from being allowed to adopt children.<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 113<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


5.0 Access to Government Services<br />

5.1 Do Deaf people have access to government services such as education, health care, employment,<br />

social welfare and any general government services?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 5.1.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 5.2<br />

5.1.1 If yes, how do Deaf people access these government services?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

5.1.2 Are Deaf people satisfied with the level <strong>of</strong> access they have to the government services?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

5.2 Are Deaf people entitled to any financial assistance from your country’s government?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 5.2.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 6.1<br />

5.2.1 What type <strong>of</strong> financial assistance are Deaf people entitled to receive from your country’s government?<br />

□ Disability allowance □ General Pension □ Disability-specific Pension<br />

□ Other, please write down:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 114<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


6.0 Access to the Media<br />

6.1 Does your country’s government provide sign language services for news and/or current affairs<br />

programmes on public television?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 6.1.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 6.2<br />

6.1.1 Please provide detailed information on how many hours or days per week Deaf people receive sign<br />

language services for news and/or current affairs programmes on public television.<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

6.2 Does your country’s government provide subtitles / captions for news and/or current affairs<br />

programmes?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 6.2.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 6.3<br />

6.2.1 Please provide detailed information on how many hours / days per week are news / current affairs<br />

programmes (subtitled / captioned) <strong>of</strong>fered for Deaf people?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

6.3 Does your country’s government <strong>of</strong>fer governmental documents in your country’s sign language?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 7.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 7.1<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 115<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


7.0 Status <strong>of</strong> the Country Sign Language<br />

7.1 Does your country’s government formally recognise your country’s sign language(s)?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 7.1.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 7.1.3<br />

7.1.1 What legislation/regulation formally recognises your country’s sign language?<br />

□ Constitution □ Legislation □ Policy □ Guideline<br />

□ Other, please write down:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

7.1.2 When did your country’s government formally recognise your country’s sign language?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

Please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 7.2<br />

7.1.3 Does your Deaf Association lobby your government for the recognition <strong>of</strong> your country’s sign<br />

language(s)?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 7.2<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 7.1.4<br />

7.1.4 If no, please explain the reason your Association does not lobby your current government for the<br />

recognition <strong>of</strong> your country’s Sign Language.<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

7.2 Does your country have a sign language dictionary?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.1<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 116<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


8.0 Access to Education<br />

8.1 Does your country’s government recognise that Deaf children and Deaf students have the right to<br />

receive an education?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.2<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.2<br />

8.2 Does your country’s government have any legislation or policies on Deaf Education?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.2.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.2.2<br />

8.2.1 If yes, please list the specific name <strong>of</strong> the legislation or policies relating to Deaf Education:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

Please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.3<br />

8.2.2 If no, are all Deaf children and Deaf students entitled to receive any education in your country?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.3<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.3<br />

8.3 Does your country’s government provide any <strong>of</strong> the following educational settings for Deaf children<br />

and Deaf students?<br />

Early intervention (Up to 5 years old) □ Yes □ <strong>No</strong><br />

Kindergarten (Between 3/4 years old to 5/6 years old) □ Yes □ <strong>No</strong><br />

Primary (From 5/6 years to 12/13 years old) □ Yes □ <strong>No</strong><br />

Secondary (From 12/13 years to 17/18 years old) □ Yes □ <strong>No</strong><br />

University (After 18 years old) □ Yes □ <strong>No</strong><br />

Vocational Education / Training □ Yes □ <strong>No</strong><br />

8.4 Does your country’s government provide bilingual education using your country’s sign language for<br />

Deaf children and Deaf students in your country?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.4.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.5<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 117<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


8.4.1 If yes, in which educational setting is bilingual education <strong>of</strong>fered in your country using your sign<br />

language?<br />

Early intervention (Up to 5 years old) □ Yes □ <strong>No</strong><br />

Kindergarten (Between 3/4 years old to 5/6 years old) □ Yes □ <strong>No</strong><br />

Primary (From 5/6 years to 12/13 years old) □ Yes □ <strong>No</strong><br />

Secondary (From 12/13 years to 17/18 years old) □ Yes □ <strong>No</strong><br />

University (After 18 years old) □ Yes □ <strong>No</strong><br />

Vocational Education / Training □ Yes □ <strong>No</strong><br />

8.5 Does your country have any schools specifically for Deaf children and Deaf students?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.5.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.5.3<br />

8.5.1 If yes, how many Deaf schools does your country have?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

8.5.2 What is the educational approach for communicating with Deaf children and students at the Deaf<br />

School in your country?<br />

□ Bilingual Education □ Oral Method □ Cued Speech<br />

□ Oral and Sign Language (Total Communication) □ Auditory Verbal<br />

□ Other, please write down:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

Please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.6<br />

8.5.3 If no, where do Deaf children and students receive an education in your country?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 118<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


8.6 What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> the level <strong>of</strong> education received by Deaf children and Deaf students in<br />

your country?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

8.7 What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> the current literacy level <strong>of</strong> Deaf children and Deaf students in your<br />

country?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

8.8 Do Deaf people have access to a University education in your country?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.8.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.8.2<br />

8.8.1 If yes, how many Universities provide access to studies for Deaf people in your country?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

Please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 8.9<br />

8.8.2 If no, why do Deaf people not have access to a university education in your country?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

Please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.1<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 119<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


8.9 Do Deaf people have full access to sign language interpreting services at University?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.1<br />

9.0 Status <strong>of</strong> the Sign Language Interpreting Service<br />

9.1 Does your country have any sign language interpreters?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.1.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.1.6<br />

9.1.1 How many sign language interpreters does your country have?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

9.1.2 Are there any sign language interpreting qualifications available in your country?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.1.3<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.2<br />

9.1.3 Who provides the training for people who want to become qualified sign language interpreters?<br />

□ University □ Community College □ National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

□ Other, please write down:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

9.1.4 How many years <strong>of</strong> training are available to someone who wants to become a sign language<br />

interpreter?<br />

□ Four Years □ Three Years □ Two Years □ Less than One Year<br />

□ Other, please write down:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 120<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


9.1.5 How many sign language interpreters in your country have formal interpreting qualifications?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

9.1.6 How do Deaf people access sign language interpreters?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

9.2 Does your country have sign language interpreting services?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.2.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.3<br />

9.2.1 If yes, who provides these sign language interpreting services?<br />

□ Government □ National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf □ Private Sector<br />

□ Other, please write down:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

9.2.2 What areas <strong>of</strong> life are sign language interpreting services available in your country?<br />

□ Social Services □ Health/Medical Services □ Employment Services<br />

□ Court Services □ Educational Services □ Counselling Services<br />

□ Financial Institutions □ Funerals / Weddings □ Entertainments<br />

□ Other, please write down:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 121<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


9.2.3 What is the general opinion <strong>of</strong> these sign language interpreting services?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

9.3 Do sign language interpreters receive payment for interpreting services in your country?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.3.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.3.3<br />

9.3.1 Who is responsible for paying for a sign language interpreter?<br />

□ Government □ National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf □ Deaf people<br />

□ Other, please write down:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

9.3.2 What the average hourly rate <strong>of</strong> payment for Sign Language Interpreters in your country?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

Please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.4<br />

9.3.3 Do your sign language interpreters provide voluntary service for all sign language interpreting<br />

assignments?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.4<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.4<br />

□ Sometimes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.4<br />

9.4 Does your country have a National Association <strong>of</strong> Sign Language Interpreters?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.4.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.5<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 122<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


9.4.1 Is your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Sign Language Interpreters independent from your National<br />

Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.5<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.5<br />

9.5 Is there a national Code <strong>of</strong> Ethics for sign language interpreters in your country?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.6<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.6<br />

9.6 Is there any legislation or policy in your country which states that the government has a responsibility<br />

for the provision <strong>of</strong> sign language interpreting services?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 9.6.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 10.1<br />

9.6.1 If yes, please list the legislation or policies that specifically state the Government has a responsibility<br />

for the provision <strong>of</strong> sign language interpreting services.<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

10.0 Employment<br />

10.1 Does your country government consider Deaf people to have a right to be employed and earn a<br />

standard salary?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 10.2<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 10.2<br />

10.2 Does your country’s government have any anti-discrimination laws in the area <strong>of</strong> employment,<br />

especially for Deaf people or People with Disabilities?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 10.2.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 10.3<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 123<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


10.2.1 If yes, please write clearly the name <strong>of</strong> any legislation or policies that relate to anti-discrimination in<br />

employment:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

10.3 Does your Association have any <strong>of</strong>ficial or approximate figures on the number <strong>of</strong> Deaf people who are<br />

in paid employment in your country?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 10.3.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 10.4<br />

10.3.1 If yes, how many Deaf people are in employment?<br />

10.3.1.1 Total: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

10.3.1.2 Deaf Women: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

10.3.1.3 Deaf Men: - [___________________] please write the number in this box<br />

10.3.2 What are the most common areas <strong>of</strong> work for Deaf people in your country?<br />

□ Office Administration □ Management □ Education □ Theatre /Arts<br />

□ Research Projects □ Sign Language □ Social Services □ Farm work<br />

□ Financial Industry □ Engineering □ Welding □ Carpentry<br />

□ Jeweller □ Tailoring □ Building □ Painter<br />

□ Cleaning □ Car Mechanic □ Panel Beater □ Shoe Repairing<br />

□ Bakery □ Hairdresser □ Printer □ Catering<br />

□ Other, please write down:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 124<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


10.4 Does your country any figures on the percentage <strong>of</strong> Deaf people who are unemployed?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 10.4.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 10.5<br />

10.4.1 If yes, what percentage <strong>of</strong> Deaf people are unemployed in your country? If possible, give percentage <strong>of</strong><br />

unemployed Deaf women and Deaf men.<br />

10.4.1.1 Total: - [___________________] please write the percentage in this box<br />

10.4.1.2 Deaf Women: - [___________________] please write the percentage in this box<br />

10.4.1.3 Deaf Men: - [___________________] please write the percentage in this box<br />

10.4.2 Why are Deaf people unemployed in your country?<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

10.5 Does your country provide employment service to assist unemployed Deaf people to look for<br />

employment?<br />

□ Yes, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 10.5.1<br />

□ <strong>No</strong>, please go to Question <strong>No</strong> 11.1<br />

10.5.1 Who is responsible for providing employment service for unemployed Deaf people in your country?<br />

□ Government Employment Service □ National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf<br />

□ Other, please write down:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 125<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).


11.0 General<br />

11.1 Which <strong>of</strong> the following does your National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf consider to be the highest priority<br />

for your Deaf Community?<br />

□ Better quality <strong>of</strong> Deaf Education<br />

□ Equal Opportunity in Employment<br />

□ Better Sign Language Interpreting quality and services<br />

□ Recognition <strong>of</strong> your country’s Sign Language by your country’s Government<br />

□ Improved quality and access to Government and Community Services<br />

□ Other, please write down:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

11.2 Does your Association have any other concerns about the standard <strong>of</strong> living <strong>of</strong> Deaf people in your<br />

country? Please list those:<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

____________________________________________________________________________________________<br />

Thank you for taking the time<br />

to complete this <strong>Survey</strong><br />

The Project is under the auspices <strong>of</strong> the Swedish National Association <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (SDR) and the <strong>World</strong> <strong>Federation</strong> <strong>of</strong> the Deaf (WFD) Page <strong>No</strong> 126<br />

and funded by the Swedish Agency for International Development Cooperation (Sida) and Swedish Organisations’ <strong>of</strong> Disabled Persons<br />

International Aid Association (Shia).