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Volume 29 Issue 5 | April & May 2024

"Ditch the tails"; four three day festivals (count them); Keying up for an inventive spring; Comet heading for Mirvish; Bach festival: connecting the dots; listening with fresh ears; on homes for music; the “Canaries” are flocking; listings galore; what we're listening to; and more.

"Ditch the tails"; four three day festivals (count them); Keying up for an inventive spring; Comet heading for Mirvish; Bach festival: connecting the dots; listening with fresh ears; on homes for music; the “Canaries” are flocking; listings galore; what we're listening to; and more.

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VOLUME <strong>29</strong> NO 5<br />

APRIL & MAY <strong>2024</strong><br />

MUSIC! LISTINGS<br />

live and livestreamed<br />

STORIES<br />

profiles, previews<br />

and interviews<br />

RECORD REVIEWS<br />

and Listening Room<br />

Barbe & Doucet’s Don Pasquale


Thursday, <strong>April</strong> 25, <strong>2024</strong><br />

SONIC UNIVERSE<br />

R. Murray Schafer John Adams<br />

Krisztina Szabo<br />

Alex Pauk, Conductor<br />

Krisztina Szabo, Mezzo Soprano<br />

R. Murray Schafer (Canada) Adieu Robert Schumann (1976)<br />

for mezzo soprano & orchestra<br />

John Adams (United States) Harmonielehre (1985)<br />

I. First Movement<br />

II. The Anfortas Wound<br />

III. Meister Eckhardt and Quackie<br />

2033/<strong>2024</strong> — BIG SEASON, BIG ORCHESTRA, BIG REPERTOIRE<br />

Alex Pauk Founder, Music Director, Conductor<br />

8:00 pm Concert<br />

7:15 pm Pre-Concert Chat<br />

Koerner Hall<br />

TICKETS<br />

Koerner Hall Box Office<br />

416 408 0208<br />

espritorchestra.com<br />

The Michael and Sonja Koerner Charitable Foundation The Mary-Margaret Webb Foundation The Max Clarkson Family Foundation Tim & Frances Price Anonymous


EVGENY KISSIN,<br />

piano & MATTHIAS<br />

GOERNE, baritone<br />

SUN APR 21, <strong>2024</strong> • 2PM<br />

ITZHAK<br />

PERLMAN, violin &<br />

ROHAN DE SILVA, piano<br />

THU MAY 16, <strong>2024</strong> • 8PM<br />

For tickets, visit<br />

ROYTHOMSONHALL.COM


<strong>29</strong>05_Apr<strong>May</strong><strong>2024</strong>_cover.indd 1<br />

<strong>2024</strong>-03-25 11:15 AM<br />

<strong>Volume</strong> <strong>29</strong> No 5 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong><br />

ON OUR COVER<br />

VOLUME <strong>29</strong> NO 5<br />

APRIL & MAY <strong>2024</strong><br />

MUSIC! LISTINGS<br />

live and livestreamed<br />

STORIES<br />

profiles, previews<br />

and interviews<br />

RECORD REVIEWS<br />

and Listening Room<br />

Barbe & Doucet’s Don Pasquale<br />

PHOTO: KK DUNDAS<br />

“It’s a story that you could say has an old, overused plot<br />

that's not relevant. It’s about an older man who believes<br />

he’s irresistible to women. This is a different take on<br />

that story, but he’s not going to take no for an answer.<br />

He wants to be able to conquer and have his conquests.<br />

The good thing is that it’s done in a very funny way,”<br />

continues Leech on the topic of Pasquale. The season is<br />

quite heavy, so I think having some levity in there will be<br />

welcomed by our cast.”<br />

Story on page 33.<br />

8 FOR OPENERS | Listening Fresh<br />

DAVID PERLMAN<br />

STORIES & INTERVIEWS<br />

12 CLASSICAL AND BEYOND |<br />

It’s time to ditch the tails |<br />

MAX CHRISTIE<br />

14 IN WITH THE NEW | Keying up<br />

for an inventive spring |<br />

WENDALYN BARTLEY<br />

16 ART OF SONG | A new journey<br />

- reimagining art song for the<br />

2020s | STEPHANIE CONN<br />

18 MUSIC THEATRE | Something<br />

to crow about, and a toast to<br />

new creation | JENNIFER PARR<br />

<br />

14<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 5


The WholeNote<br />

VOLUME <strong>29</strong> NO 5<br />

APRIL & MAY <strong>2024</strong><br />

EDITORIAL<br />

Publisher/Editor in Chief | David Perlman<br />

publisher@thewholenote.com<br />

Managing Editor | Paul Ennis<br />

editorial@thewholenote.com<br />

Recordings Editor | David Olds<br />

discoveries@thewholenote.com<br />

Listings Editor | John Sharpe<br />

listings@thewholenote.com<br />

SOCIAL MEDIA<br />

Danial Jazaeri, Colin Story<br />

social@thewholenote.com<br />

SALES, MARKETING & MEMBERSHIP<br />

Concert & Event Advertising / Membership | Karen Ages<br />

members@thewholenote.com<br />

Production & Operations | Jack Buell<br />

jack@thewholenote.com<br />

Advertising Art<br />

adart@thewholenote.com<br />

WEBSITE / SYSTEMS<br />

Kevin King<br />

systems@thewholenote.com<br />

CIRCULATION<br />

Sheila McCoy & Chris Malcolm<br />

circulation@thewholenote.com<br />

SUBSCRIPTIONS<br />

subscriptions@thewholenote.com<br />

$48 + HST (6 issues)<br />

single copies and back issues $8<br />

*international - additional postage applies<br />

WholeNote Media Inc.<br />

Centre for Social Innovation<br />

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Phone 416-323-2232 | Fax 416-603-4791<br />

Instagram @the_wholenote<br />

Facebook & Twitter @theWholenote<br />

thewholenote.com<br />

STORIES &<br />

INTERVIEWS<br />

24 EARLY MUSIC | Toronto<br />

Bach Festival: Connecting<br />

the dots | DAVID PERLMAN<br />

26 PROFILE | Andrew Burashko<br />

- the art of timing out |<br />

ANDREW SCOTT<br />

28 MOSTLY CLUBS, MAINLY JAZZ |<br />

Looking forward to the<br />

JUNOs, after the fact |<br />

COLIN STORY<br />

30 FROM UP HERE | Homes for<br />

music help communities heal<br />

and grow | SOPHIA PERLMAN<br />

33 ON OPERA | The COC’s<br />

Perryn Leech | MICHAEL<br />

ZARATHUS-COOK<br />

35 CHORAL SCENE |<br />

WHOLENOTE STAFF<br />

36 EVENTS BY DATE<br />

Live and/or online<br />

53 Ongoing, on demand<br />

& other<br />

32<br />

DISCOVERIES:<br />

RECORDINGS REVIEWED<br />

57 Editor’s Corner | DAVID OLDS<br />

59 Strings Attached | TERRY ROBBINS<br />

62 Vocal<br />

64 Classical and Beyond<br />

68 Modern and Contemporary<br />

72 Jazz and Improvised Music<br />

76 Pot Pourri<br />

77 Something in the Air |<br />

KEN WAXMAN<br />

78 What we're listening to<br />

this month<br />

79 THE BACK STORY: Light Work<br />

DAVID PERLMAN<br />

LISTINGS<br />

54 MAINLY CLUBS<br />

55 INDEX /THE WHOLENOTE<br />

WHO’S WHO<br />

Choral and Summer Music<br />

Education Directories<br />

Circulation Statement - January 30, <strong>2024</strong><br />

6000 printed & distributed<br />

Canadian Publication Product<br />

Sales Agreement 1263846<br />

ISSN 14888-8785 WHOLENOTE<br />

Publications Mail Agreement #40026682<br />

WholeNote Media Inc. accepts no responsibility or<br />

liability for claims made for any product or service<br />

reported on or advertised in this issue.<br />

COPYRIGHT © <strong>2024</strong> WHOLENOTE MEDIA INC<br />

WN<br />

WHOLENOTE<br />

MEDIA INC.<br />

6 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


<strong>2024</strong>–25<br />

SUBSCRIPTION SERIES<br />

STRINGS<br />

Juilliard Quartet Oct 24, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Miro Quartet Nov 14, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Gryphon Trio with Dec 5, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Lara St. John, violin;<br />

Aviva Chernick, vocalist<br />

JACK Quartet Jan 30, 2025<br />

Isidore Quartet Mar 27, 2025<br />

PIANO<br />

Marc André Hamelin Nov 26, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Rachel Fenlon, voice & Feb 11, 2025<br />

piano<br />

Illia Ovcharenko Mar 4, 2025<br />

Janina Fialkowska Mar 18, 2025<br />

WHAT MAKES IT GREAT ®<br />

Rob Kapilow<br />

explores Beethoven<br />

A major Sonata with<br />

the Cheng 2 Duo<br />

Rob Kapilow<br />

explores the Beethoven<br />

“Archduke” Trio with<br />

the Gryphon Trio<br />

Nov 10, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Apr 13, 2025<br />

Strings and Piano series concerts take place at<br />

Jane Mallett Theatre, 7:30 pm (NEW Start time!)<br />

What Makes It Great? ® series concerts take place at<br />

George Weston Recital Hall, Sundays at 3pm<br />

STRINGS<br />

Quatuor Danel Thurs. Oct. 12, 2023<br />

Gryphon Trio Thurs. Dec. 7, 2023<br />

Verona Quartet Thurs. Jan. 18, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Celebration of<br />

Aizuri Quartet Thurs. Feb. 22, <strong>2024</strong><br />

St. Lawrence<br />

Small Tues. Mar. 5, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Quartet Ensembles<br />

PIANO<br />

<strong>April</strong> 6, 4pm<br />

Shhh! Ensemble<br />

Obsidiana Duo Turgeon Duo Tues. Nov. 7, 2023<br />

<strong>May</strong> 4, 4pm<br />

Maria Thompson Tues. Feb. 13, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Gentileschi Corley Baroque<br />

Rilian David Fung Trio Tues. Mar. 5, <strong>2024</strong><br />

June 1, 4pm<br />

Canadian Chamber Orchestra<br />

Ladom Ensemble<br />

APERTURE ROOM 340 Yonge Street<br />

A new space for small ensembles,<br />

adventurous programming, audience<br />

interaction and musical discovery.<br />

www.music-toronto.com


The WholeNote<br />

VOLUME <strong>29</strong> NO 5<br />

APRIL & MAY <strong>2024</strong><br />

IN THIS EDITION<br />

STORIES AND INTERVIEWS<br />

Wendalyn Bartley, Max Christie, Stephanie Conn,<br />

Jennifer Parr, Andrew Scott, David Perlman,<br />

Sophia Perlman, Colin Story, Michael Zarathus-Cook<br />

CD Reviewers<br />

Max Christie, Sam Dickinson, Daniel Foley,<br />

Raul da Gama, Janos Gardonyi, Richard Haskell,<br />

Tiina Kiik, Kati Kiilaspea, Pamela Margles,<br />

Lesley Mitchell-Clarke, Cheryl Ockrant, David Olds,<br />

Ted Parkinson, Cathay Riches, Terry Robbins,<br />

Michael Schulman, Andrew Scott, Andrew Timar,<br />

Yoshi Maclear Wall, Ken Waxman, Matthew Whitfield<br />

Proofreading<br />

David Olds, John Sharpe<br />

Listings Team<br />

John Sharpe, Gary Heard, Sophia Perlman,<br />

Colin Story<br />

Design Team<br />

Kevin King, Susan Sinclair<br />

Circulation Team<br />

Dave Bell, Jack Buell, Jane Dalziel, Bruno Difilippo,<br />

Carl Finkle, Vito Gallucci, James Harris, Bob<br />

Jerome, Marianela Lopez, Miguel Brito-Lopez,<br />

Chris Malcolm, Sheila McCoy, Lorna Nevison, Janet<br />

O’Brien, Kathryn Sabo, Tom Sepp, Angie Todesco<br />

DEADLINES<br />

Weekly Online Listings Updates<br />

6pm every Tuesday for weekend posting<br />

for <strong>Volume</strong> <strong>29</strong> No. 6, SUMMER <strong>2024</strong><br />

Print listings deadline:<br />

6pm Tuesday, <strong>May</strong> 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Print advertising, reservation deadline:<br />

6pm Tuesday, <strong>May</strong> 14, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Web advertising can be booked at any time<br />

PUBLICATION DATES<br />

VOLUME <strong>29</strong> includes six print editions:<br />

September 2023 (Aug <strong>29</strong>);<br />

October & November (Sept 26);<br />

December & January (Nov 28);<br />

February & March (Jan 30);<br />

<strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> (Mar 26);<br />

Summer (<strong>May</strong> 28)<br />

Printed in Canada<br />

Couto Printing & Publishing Services<br />

an Ontario government agency<br />

un organisme du gouvernement de l’Ontario<br />

FOR OPENERS<br />

Listening fresh<br />

I<br />

have had a lot of fun going to live musical events these past four weeks –<br />

so much so that I will spare readers my periodic rant about postpandemic<br />

supply chain woes, and the perilous state of the arts, and<br />

society in general, when workers, in the arts and otherwise, struggle to<br />

keep roofs over their heads, both for work and sleep.<br />

Instead I’m just going to tell you a bit about a couple of events I attended that left<br />

me feeling as though I had been listening with a new set of ears. So here you go, in<br />

chronological order.<br />

Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Spanish Reflections, February 28 and <strong>29</strong><br />

First a bit of background: four or five times a year, going back to 2014, the TSO offers<br />

up pre-concert performances by a loosely knit group known as the Toronto Symphony<br />

Chamber Soloists, drawn from the ranks of the orchestra, with repertoire chosen in some<br />

way to enhance the listening experience of people attending the concert that follows.<br />

Sometimes the soloist or conductor of the show that follows joins in. It’s a lovely addition<br />

to the concert experience, if you’re lucky or savvy enough to have chosen that particular<br />

night, out of three or four, to attend that particular program. (It’s not the only opportunity<br />

the Chamber Soloists get to perform – but it’s as far as I know the only one built into the<br />

TSO’s regular season.)<br />

Observably, there is some mysterious law of the universe which dictates that the<br />

ability of an arts organization to impulsively change its way of doing things is inversely<br />

proportional to the size of the organization. So we should, I suppose, be grateful for what<br />

we get. But that being said, by dint of ingenious programming, the February 28 and <strong>29</strong><br />

program offered a glimpse of what the pre-concert performance for the lucky few could<br />

morph into.<br />

It was an all-Spanish concert: music director Gustavo Gimeno on the podium; piano<br />

soloist Javier Perianes; and works by Manuel de Falla (who would have guessed?) and<br />

Gimeno-protege and rising star in the contemporary compositional firmament, Francisco<br />

Coll. Coll’s Ciudad sin sueño: fantasia for Piano and Orchestra – a concerto in all but<br />

name, with Perianes at the keys, closed the first half of the program, and the second half<br />

opened with de Falla’s devilish solo piano Fantasia Baetica, arranged, note for note by<br />

none other than Francisco Coll. De Falla’s Suites 1 and 2 from the Three -Cornered Hat<br />

rounded out the night.<br />

So here’s where the bit of programming genius kicked in. The concert opened with<br />

Perianes, alone on stage, performing the 12-minute Fantasia Baetica in its original solo<br />

form, after which the orchestra came on and the concert continued, with mirroring in<br />

every direction: the solo Baerga with its energy and quirky rhythms prepared the ear<br />

for Coll’s City that Never Sleeps; the full-orchestra Baerga reflected the artistry of its<br />

composer and its arranger, and after all that fury the Three-Cornered Hat, with a vastly<br />

reduced orchestral contingent, had the listener supplying the amplification to rolling<br />

river size.<br />

T'KARONTO<br />

For thousands of years before European settlement, T’karonto (The Meeting Place)<br />

was part of the traditional territory of many Nations, including the Mississaugas<br />

of the Credit River, the Anishinaabe, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee, and the<br />

Wendat peoples, and remains their home to this day, as it now is for many diverse First<br />

Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples.<br />

This Meeting Place lies within the territory governed by the Sewatokwa’tshera’t (Dish<br />

with One Spoon) treaty between the Anishinaabe, Mississaugas and Haudenosaunee<br />

– a Treaty which bound them to share the territory and protect the land. Subsequent<br />

Indigenous Nations and Peoples, and all newcomers are invited into this treaty in the<br />

spirit of peace, friendship, respect and reconciliation. We are grateful to live and work<br />

here, helping spread the word about the healing power of music in this place.<br />

8 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Hannaford Street Silver Band, Zombie Blizzard, March 3<br />

I don’t know if there’s a medical name for the maddening condition<br />

I have, or how common it is. What it amounts to is a complete<br />

inability to simultaneously absorb words and music that I am hearing<br />

for the first time. If I give up on trying to decipher the words, I can<br />

probably hum you a bit of the music after the fact. But if I focus on<br />

absorbing the meaning of the words as they are sung, then whatever<br />

magic is in the music goes straight into my auditory spam folder.<br />

So what do I usually do? Either I make sure to at least read the texts<br />

and/or translations in the house program before the house lights go<br />

down, especially in halls<br />

where I know it’s going<br />

to be too dark to read; or<br />

I obsessively read along –<br />

surtitles or program text,<br />

whichever.<br />

I used to think it was a<br />

perfect compromise, and<br />

then something happened<br />

at Zombie Blizzard that<br />

reduced to dust the idea of<br />

program texts and surtitles<br />

as an acceptable two-state<br />

solution to placate both<br />

halves of my divided brain.<br />

As a phrase, Zombie<br />

Blizzard is the title of a<br />

Hannaford Street Silver Band concert I attended this March and of a<br />

recording (from Leaf Music in Halifax). So in a sense, the concert was<br />

a CD launch event. As individual words, Zombie and Blizzard are the<br />

titles of the first two of seven poems, each of which is recited and then<br />

sung in the performance, before moving on to the next.<br />

The Hannafords commissioned Zombie Blizzard from composer<br />

Aaron Davis specifically for Measha Brueggergosman-Lee who<br />

had latched onto Margaret Atwood’s anthology Dearly during the<br />

pandemic, and turned to Davis, her partner in musical crime for the<br />

past several years, convinced it had the potential to take their jazzfocused<br />

musical partnership into as yet unexplored musical realms.<br />

The resulting poems/songs are described on the program cover as<br />

“concert arias by Aaron Davis & Margaret Atwood.” Atwood recites<br />

each poem (more accurately the voice of Margaret Atwood is heard<br />

reciting each poem), and each recitation is followed by the equivalent<br />

“concert aria” sung by Brueggergosman-Lee, with the backing of<br />

a 12-piece Hannaford and a jazz trio (piano, drums and bass) with<br />

composer Aaron Davis at the piano.<br />

But there were no written texts for the poems anywhere: not in the<br />

program, and not on the big screen at the back of the stage, which<br />

is where I told myself they were bound to appear if they weren’t in<br />

the program. But nope. All we got on the screen was the title of each<br />

poem as Atwood’s voice, previously captured for the Leaf Record,<br />

rendered each poem in turn.<br />

And oh what beautiful readings Atwood gave. Completely free of the<br />

declamatory, angsty bullshit that poets often succumb to when asked<br />

to perform their work – afraid that their listeners might get something<br />

different from what they wrote than they intended.<br />

Instead the poet somehow gave the words permission to speak for<br />

themselves, landing like arrows or silk in the mind’s eye. At peace,<br />

fully possessed of all the intelligence it needed, the literary mind<br />

could let go, so the heart could listen fresh.<br />

From Brueggergosman too, freed of the responsibility of having<br />

to mail words to the mind, we got what felt to this listener like the<br />

performance of her life.<br />

To close, a quiet but public note of appreciation to Paul Ennis,<br />

longtime WholeNote associate, who has, for health reasons, stepped<br />

down from the deadline-driven rigors of writing our regular<br />

“Classical and Beyond” column. His voice will be missed in our<br />

coverage of that beat.<br />

“A TOUR DE FORCE…<br />

SPECTACULAR AND<br />

GENUINELY MOVING.”<br />

—The Scotsman<br />

APRIL 26 – MAY 18<br />

A hilarious generational battle of wits and<br />

wills unfolds in 1960s Technicolor Rome, as<br />

imagined by Canadian creative duo André<br />

Barbe and Renaud Doucet. Returning to the<br />

COC for the first time in 30 years, Donizetti’s<br />

irrepressible Don Pasquale sparkles like never<br />

before as the feel-good show of the season!<br />

Get your tickets today at coc.ca<br />

or call 416-363-8231.<br />

David Perlman can be reached at publisher@thewholenote.com<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 9<br />

Date: Mar 13, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Filename_ Version#<br />

COC240605_WN_Pasquale_<strong>April</strong><strong>May</strong>_FNL<br />

Client: COC Don Pasquale Creative: JF


KOERNER HALL<br />

2023.24 CONCERT SEASON<br />

The GGS New Music<br />

Ensemble<br />

TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 7:30PM<br />

TEMERTY THEATRE<br />

Free tickets available starting from<br />

10am on Tuesday, <strong>April</strong> 16.<br />

Experience a captivating contemporary<br />

music concert featuring The Glenn Gould<br />

School New Music Ensemble led by<br />

conductor Brian Current, including Samy<br />

Moussa’s dynamic Kammerkonzert for a<br />

large ensemble and Iannis Xenakis’s<br />

mesmerizing Phlegra for 11 instruments.<br />

Prepare to be immersed in a diverse<br />

sonic landscape that pushes the<br />

boundaries of musical expression.<br />

John Pizzarelli and<br />

Caity Gyorgy<br />

FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 8PM<br />

KOERNER HALL<br />

World-renowned guitarist and vocalist<br />

John Pizzarelli has been hailed by<br />

The Boston Globe for “reinvigorating<br />

the Great American Songbook.” He<br />

returns to Koerner Hall with a new<br />

album that showcases his versatility<br />

and virtuosity in exploring the timeless<br />

songs of Broadway and Hollywood.<br />

Caity Gyorgy is a two-time Juno<br />

Award-winning Canadian vocalist who is<br />

known for singing bebop and swing music.<br />

Daniel Hope:<br />

Irish Roots<br />

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 8PM<br />

KOERNER HALL<br />

“The most exciting British string player<br />

since Jacqueline du Pré” (The Observer),<br />

Koerner Hall favourite Daniel Hope<br />

returns with his ensemble to explore<br />

the rich world of Irish music. Through<br />

traditional Irish music from the<br />

Renaissance to the present day, Hope<br />

and his ensemble bring the beauty<br />

and magic of the Emerald Isle to life.<br />

Generous support provided from<br />

The Michael and Sonja Koerner Fund<br />

for Classical Programming<br />

Richard Goode, piano<br />

SUNDAY, APRIL 21, 3PM<br />

KOERNER HALL<br />

Beethoven aficionado Richard Goode<br />

will perform an all-Ludwig van<br />

Beethoven program, including the<br />

Bagatelles Nos. 6-11, the intimate<br />

Piano Sonata No. 30, and the epic<br />

Diabelli Variations.<br />

Goode will also give a series of public<br />

master classes while at the RCM.<br />

Series generously supported by Michael Foulkes<br />

& Linda Brennan and an anonymous donor<br />

Concert generously supported by<br />

Claudia Krawchuk<br />

Generous additional support provided from<br />

The Michael and Sonja Koerner Fund for<br />

Classical Programming<br />

The Glenn Gould<br />

School Piano Showcase<br />

SATURDAY, APRIL 27, 7:30PM<br />

MAZZOLENI CONCERT HALL<br />

The students of The Ihnatowycz<br />

Piano Program at The Glenn Gould<br />

School are featured in an evening<br />

of dazzling works for two pianos<br />

and piano four hands.<br />

Dover Quartet<br />

with<br />

Leif Ove Andsnes,<br />

piano<br />

SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 3PM<br />

KOERNER HALL<br />

The phenomenal Dover Quartet is<br />

joined by Norway’s foremost pianist<br />

Leif Ove Andsnes to perform piano<br />

quintets by Brahms, Dohnányi, and<br />

Joaquín Turina.<br />

Generous support provided from The<br />

Michael and Sonja Koerner Fund for<br />

Classical Programming<br />

237 BLOOR STREET WEST<br />

(BLOOR ST. & AVENUE RD.) TORONTO<br />

TICKETS & SUBSCRIPTIONS


Academy Chamber Orchestra<br />

WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 7:30PM<br />

KOERNER HALL<br />

String students from The Phil and Eli Taylor<br />

Performance Academy for Young Artists<br />

come together as the Academy Chamber<br />

Orchestra to perform a special concert.<br />

Free tickets available starting from 10am<br />

on Wednesday, <strong>April</strong> 24,<strong>2024</strong>.<br />

Peter Oundjian, Stewart Goodyear,<br />

and the Royal Conservatory Orchestra<br />

FRIDAY, MAY 3, 8PM IN KOERNER HALL<br />

TUESDAY, MAY 7, 8PM IN CARNEGIE HALL<br />

Conductor Emeritus of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra,<br />

Maestro Peter Oundjian, The Royal Conservatory’s Artist in<br />

Residence, Stewart Goodyear, and the Royal Conservatory<br />

Orchestra team up to perform in two extraordinary venues<br />

– Koerner Hall and Carnegie Hall! Program includes works by<br />

Tchaikovsky, Beethoven, and Kelly-Marie Murphy.<br />

Part of the Temerty Orchestral Program<br />

Stacey Kent Trio and<br />

Alison Young Trio<br />

SATURDAY, MAY 4, 8PM<br />

KOERNER HALL<br />

The award-winning American jazz<br />

singer performs music from her<br />

latest release, Summer Me, Winter<br />

Me. Juno Award nominated<br />

saxophonist and one of CBC’s ‘Best<br />

35 Canadian Jazz Artists under 35’<br />

Alison Young opens the evening<br />

with her trio.<br />

Concert generously supported In Memory<br />

of Robert Calvin<br />

Kronos Quartet:<br />

Five Decades<br />

THURSDAY, MAY 9, 8PM<br />

KOERNER HALL<br />

Celebrate the legacy and impact<br />

of one of the most illustrious and<br />

influential groups of our time.<br />

Series generously supported by an<br />

anonymous donor<br />

Generous additional support provided<br />

from The Michael and Sonja Koerner<br />

Fund for Classical Programming<br />

Brentano String Quartet with<br />

Jonathan Biss, piano, and<br />

Joseph Conyers, bass<br />

FRIDAY, MAY 10, 8PM KOERNER HALL<br />

The critically acclaimed Brentano String Quartet makes its Koerner Hall<br />

debut, performing Schubert’s “Trout Quintet” with virtuoso pianist<br />

Jonathan Biss and award-winning Principal Bass of the Philadelphia<br />

Orchestra Joseph Conyers.<br />

Generous support provided from The Michael and Sonja Koerner Fund<br />

for Classical Programming<br />

The Jon Cowherd Trio<br />

and Larnell Lewis & Joy Lapps<br />

SATURDAY, MAY 11, 8PM KOERNER HALL<br />

Larnell Lewis and Joy Lapps bring their signature Caribbean jazz<br />

alongside Koerner Hall favourites John Patitucci, Brian Blade, and Jon<br />

Cowherd.<br />

ON SALE NOW! 416.408.0208 RCMUSIC.COM/PERFORMANCE


CLASSICAL AND BEYOND<br />

It’s time<br />

to ditch<br />

the tails<br />

MAX CHRISTIE<br />

ALAMY<br />

Eugene Ormandy's Philadelphia Orchestra at the Teatro Colón, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1966.<br />

“It’s time” I rumble (fussing with the shirt studs and<br />

cufflinks) “once again” (muttering while untwisting the<br />

back strap on my white vest) “to carp and whine about<br />

this ridiculously outmoded uniform requirement!”<br />

The occasion? Getting set to join my colleagues in the Hamilton<br />

Philharmonic, a fine regional orchestra where I am sometimes called<br />

as a substitute. We are to perform music by Mozart, who wrote his<br />

beloved Symphony No.40 in G Minor before white tie and tails were<br />

a thing, and Richard Strauss, who lived during their rise as formal<br />

evening wear.<br />

By the time I have finished tying my white tie, a sullen recognition<br />

has somewhat overtaken my inner protestations: tails are maybe just<br />

a tiny bit cool. While I dislike every bit of the hassle, I can’t deny that I<br />

feel a little suave, cultured enough to know how to knot<br />

my own white (but greying) bow tie, made of fabric<br />

similar to the impractical (and fraying) vest. Nobody<br />

should see this stuff up close, but we, like sheep, look<br />

nice from a distance. But the moment is short-lived.<br />

What do tails really say? Do they say: “This art form<br />

is trapped in amber, its practitioners cling to tradition<br />

for their survival, the concert hall is a museum; the<br />

exhibits must never be updated.”? Or do they say: “We<br />

represent the élite, financial and cultural, we are up<br />

here, you aren’t.”? That’s what they say to me.<br />

If I consult GQ, I am told why, when and what about<br />

the tails outfit. In an article published on Hallowe’en<br />

last year (imagine!) one learns that this mode of dress<br />

developed in the 19th century, roughly paralleling<br />

the rise of the romantic-era symphony orchestra and<br />

concert hall. The article makes no mention of orchestral<br />

concerts, but most certainly makes the case that<br />

white tie and tails is de rigueur for events like state dinners or, say, the<br />

Nobel Prize ceremony.<br />

Workwear based on a century-old-plus model certainly matches<br />

staples of our repertoire, so we might be forgiven collectively for maintaining<br />

this image of social superiority, if it weren’t already so darned<br />

hard to maintain young audience’s interest. As a kid, I couldn’t have<br />

cared less what the players wore, it was the sound they produced that<br />

blew me away. If there’s any worth to what the symphony orchestra<br />

provides (a debate for a longer and more difficult article), it must be<br />

that the sounds and ideas we present belong to anyone who can hear<br />

or otherwise feel them. We benefit neither our craft nor society by<br />

distancing ourselves, or becoming living artifacts.<br />

The management view: management typically argues that they<br />

want to present a uniform image (along with, one hopes, a quality<br />

product). Where I work (the orchestra pit for the National Ballet)<br />

it took a few years to convince head office that tuxes and/or black<br />

jackets for the men were unnecessarily hot, not to mention an odd<br />

priority when the visual component of the performance was entirely<br />

on stage. For symphony orchestras, performing in full view, the code<br />

tends to hold fast: the uniform is the uniform.<br />

Except it isn’t: only a percentage of the band, those who identify<br />

as male, are required to dress in these anachronistic and often smelly<br />

layers. One or two members who present otherwise may opt in; nowadays<br />

likely no management would balk at a woman choosing to wear<br />

tails (although several groups seem still to forbid<br />

pants for women), yet should a man ask whether he<br />

might choose all-black while still presenting as male,<br />

he is likely to be subjected to insinuating cracks<br />

along the lines of “if you want to wear a dress or a<br />

blouse, go ahead…” And then of course comes the<br />

answer: “no.”<br />

Once upon a time, women were only ever in the<br />

audience at orchestral concerts, and that “once upon<br />

a time” was not so long ago, when you consider some<br />

mid-European orchestras. The Berlin Philharmonic<br />

was mono-gendered until 1982, I read on Google’s<br />

ever-helpful answer page. The Vienna Philharmonic<br />

held out for masculine-presenting players until 1997.<br />

For gosh sakes, even the Boston Symphony had allmale<br />

membership until 1957. Looking for similar<br />

information about Canadian orchestras takes a bit<br />

more digging; it’s so un-Canadian to recognize that<br />

we were just as bound up in gendering opportunity away from women<br />

here as elsewhere. There are no doubt similar dates and slow-turning<br />

changes in the personnel make-up of most Western symphony orchestras.<br />

And that leaves aside the continued dismally poor reflection of<br />

human diversity many of our orchestras demonstrate to this day.<br />

So while a “uniform” orchestra went out the window some time<br />

ago, the tradition of “tails for males” has been slow to follow. What<br />

tails really say is “looks are what matter,” and while I agree that one<br />

should be tidy on stage, presenting a uniform appearance to an audience<br />

can hardly be achieved by instructing one portion of the group to<br />

12 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s tail-less Philadelphia Orchestra come to Koerner Hall, <strong>April</strong> 21.<br />

wear something elegant and fully black and another portion to keep<br />

on wearing that awkward and busy black-and-white ensemble known<br />

as tails. And for matinées, once upon a time, it was White Jacket; for<br />

some other types of shows, tuxedo and black tie. Honestly, whom are<br />

we trying to fool?<br />

As far as I can discern from my fairly superficial reading of the facts,<br />

back in the day Orchestras were comprised of Men. Audiences were<br />

comprised of Men Wearing Tails (adhering to social<br />

uniformity of a different era), and Women Wearing<br />

Whatever Fashion Determined to be Classy. Men in the<br />

orchestra dressed to match the Men in the audience.<br />

Women in the orchestra was a contradiction in terms.<br />

I am not going to answer for my reductiveness in the<br />

service of humour, but I assume that people going to<br />

concerts today wear some version of what Women<br />

once wore. <strong>May</strong>be not, but feeling classy or at least “put<br />

together” in public is something many of us aspire to.<br />

The turning tide: It needs to be said that the tide<br />

is slowly turning, and some important ensembles<br />

have moved to the “elegant black” model, notably the<br />

Philadelphia Orchestra, elegant black since 2021. In<br />

some instances players are allowed to perform in casual<br />

wear. While I assume the management of any decentsized<br />

orchestra today would hesitate to allow players<br />

to match the random sartorial choices in the hall, they<br />

could at least, with good sense, allow the players equal<br />

leeway to determine whatever elegant black might<br />

mean. It won’t be uniform. Hallelujah and amen.<br />

Finally, is there anything that screams colonialism<br />

louder than hewing to the Middle-European, Dominant<br />

Colonialist culture, as we set ourselves on this pedestal<br />

of dress from the 19th century? Our organizations are<br />

more and more required to up their game on diversity, on representation<br />

of the under-represented, and exploration of what makes our<br />

art-form current and relevant. Let’s just, as a footnote to that very<br />

important and necessary work, ditch the tails.<br />

TODD ROSENBERG<br />

Max Christie is a Toronto-based musician and writer. He performs<br />

on principal clarinet of the National Ballet Orchestra when restrictions<br />

allow, and otherwise spends too much time on Twitter.<br />

KEYED<br />

UP!<br />

JANE MALLETT<br />

THEATRE<br />

APRIL 18–20, <strong>2024</strong><br />

A mini-festival celebrating<br />

new music for piano,<br />

harpsichord, digital organ<br />

and electronic keyboard!<br />

SOUNDSTREAMS.CA<br />

KEYED UP! #1<br />

VARIATIONS<br />

ON GOLDBERG<br />

VARIATIONS<br />

APRIL 18, <strong>2024</strong><br />

KEYED UP! #2<br />

NOTATIONS:<br />

RBC BRIDGES COMPOSER<br />

SHOWCASE<br />

APRIL 19, <strong>2024</strong><br />

KEYED UP! #3<br />

6 PIANOS<br />

12 HANDS<br />

APRIL 20, <strong>2024</strong><br />

The Michael and Sonja Koerner<br />

Charitable Foundation<br />

The Mary-Margaret<br />

Webb Foundation<br />

Epstein<br />

Family Trust<br />

The JB Doherty<br />

Family Foundation<br />

The Anne-Marie H.<br />

Applin Foundation<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 13


IN WITH THE NEW<br />

Keying up for<br />

an inventive<br />

spring<br />

WENDALYN BARTLEY<br />

Women from Space: In last month’s issue, I wrote<br />

about the Women from Space festival, which<br />

happened from March 8-10. I was delighted to<br />

attend some of the events, and came away feeling inspired<br />

and energized by what I heard. The festival opener was<br />

a spectacular improvisation by Bloop, the duo made<br />

up of trumpeter Lina Allemano and her performance<br />

partner Mike Smith, whose electronics wizardry was<br />

fully on display in the effects processing he conjured from<br />

the equipment at hand. At times Allemano also played<br />

various gong instruments, such as a large cow-bell with<br />

one of her hands, adding different sonorities to the mix.<br />

The evening ended with the explosive performances of the Women<br />

From Space Big Bang! 17-piece improvising collective, with most<br />

of the six commissioned works being conducted by the composers<br />

themselves. Each composer chose a song by Björk and created their<br />

own version from it. The band also included four singers whose vocals<br />

extended and added to the overall soundscapes. At times, it sounded<br />

like the roof was going to be blown off, the sounds were so magically<br />

intense. Throughout the performance, colourful and amoeba-like<br />

visual projections by The Liquid Crystal Display permeated the vaulted<br />

ceiling and walls of the Music Gallery stage area.<br />

On the final evening of the festival, I managed to hear the performance<br />

by Matana Roberts on saxophone, Germaine Liu on percussion<br />

and Nicole Rampersaud on trumpet and electronics. The musical<br />

dialogue between these three virtuosos still lingers in my memory,<br />

each one of them taking turns to offer their own unique sound worlds<br />

before returning to create a cluster cloud of sound textures that arose<br />

from the dynamic combination.<br />

Matana Roberts also included spoken voice in their performance, and<br />

at one point jammed extensively on various phrases from the American<br />

Pledge of Allegiance, probing the questions of what it really means to<br />

be free, and occasionally returning to “Liberty and justice for some”<br />

as a refrain. At the conclusion of the performance, they encouraged<br />

everyone to speak out on behalf of those who cannot speak for themselves,<br />

and upon leaving the stage, they proclaimed: “Free Palestine.”<br />

Soundstreams: One of the intriguing upcoming events on the<br />

spring horizon, running <strong>April</strong> 18-20, is another three day event,<br />

Soundstreams mini-festival for multiple keyboards titled KEYED UP!<br />

Taking place at the Jane Mallett Theatre.<br />

Emily Doolittle with a key chime created for her<br />

composition (re)cycling I: metals<br />

The opening concert of the festival on <strong>April</strong> 18 will be a special<br />

evening devoted to Bach’s Goldberg Variations. The first half of the<br />

concert is built around a performance of the complete Variations; as<br />

they are performed, each will be followed by a newly composed one<br />

commissioned from four Canadian composers (Taylor Brook, Dorothy<br />

Chang, Emily Doolittle and André Ristic). This will be followed, in the<br />

second half, by a North American premiere performance by Australian<br />

composer and pianist Paul Grabowsky of his Improvisations on the<br />

Aria from Bach’s Goldberg Variations.<br />

I reached out to Emily Doolittle, one of the commissioned<br />

composers, who explained that each composer was assigned either<br />

seven or eight of Bach’s variations, with the further instruction that<br />

they also write at least once for each of the four keyboard instruments<br />

that will be used in the performance: piano (Jackie Leung), harpsichord<br />

(Wesley Chen), organ (John Paul Farahat), and a Nord Stage 4<br />

electronic keyboard (Gregory Oh).<br />

Doolittle was assigned variations 16 through 23 and decided to<br />

focus on Bach’s variation technique rather than on the original theme<br />

itself. She looked for what was stylistically characteristic of each of her<br />

assigned variations, whether it was a particular figure or gesture or<br />

rhythm and wrote her pieces based on that motif. Although she wrote<br />

her pieces, titled Varia, for the different keyboards, as instructed,<br />

she told me that she wanted the pieces to be adaptable to any type<br />

of keyboard instrument for future performances. “They can also be<br />

performed as a set on their own, and there’s a variety that if you were<br />

to listen to them one after the other, you’d hear certain patterns or<br />

chords, or textures that you might hear somewhere else in a different<br />

piece. There are little connections between the different pieces.”<br />

(As it turns out, our conversation ranged far beyond her contribution<br />

to this event. See Emily Doolittle’s Evolving Creative Practice, below.)<br />

KEYED UP!: the final concert features three works for six grand pianos.<br />

EMILY DOOLITTLE FACEBOOK<br />

14 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


The second KEYED UP concert on <strong>April</strong> 19, titled Notations, also<br />

consists of two distinct halves, and offers free admission. It opens<br />

with a series of world premieres by the six composers (Uko Abara,<br />

Alexandra Gorlin-Crenshaw, Gustav Knudson, Maria-Eduarda Mendes<br />

Martins, Prokhor Protasoff and Hsiu-Ping Patrick Wu) participating<br />

in Soundstreams week-long RBC Bridges Program, which offers free<br />

tuition and accommodation to six emerging Canadian and international<br />

composers. The complementary second half of the evening offers pieces<br />

by Ana Sokolović, Alvin Singleton, Monica Pearce and Ann Southam.<br />

The big Finale concert on <strong>April</strong> 20 will feature three works for six<br />

grand pianos, including two iconic pieces, Steve Reich’s Six Pianos<br />

and Terry Riley’s A Rainbow in Curved Air, along with works by Julia<br />

Wolfe, André Ristic, and Ana Sokolović.<br />

Emily Doolittle’s Evolving Creative Practice<br />

What started out as a conversation focused on Emily Doolittle’s<br />

contribution to the upcoming Soundstreams #Keynotes event<br />

turned into a wide-ranging and thought provoking discussion of her<br />

constantly evolving creative practice, worth repeating here.<br />

On the subject of the Goldbergs, for example, she has her own very<br />

personal connections with the Variations, predating this commission.<br />

Because her young daughter has insomnia, over the past year one of the<br />

ways Doolittle has helped her fall asleep is by listening together to the<br />

Goldberg Variations. Sometimes this can take at least half an hour, so<br />

she knows those pieces really well by now. Another personal connection<br />

is with her former composition teacher Louis Andriessen. After<br />

a lesson, they would sight-read together various works by Bach. On a<br />

recent visit to Amsterdam after Andriessen’s passing, she was given his<br />

signed score of the Goldberg Variations as a gift to remember him by.<br />

Birdsong: Another noteworthy aspect is her work with birdsong,<br />

in particular her interest in Hermit Thrush song. In her research,<br />

published in the Ecomusicology Review, she discovered how colonialism<br />

and nationalism impacted perceptions of North American birdsong.<br />

In the late 1700s, an influential European naturalist named<br />

Comte de Buffon wrote that the birdsongs of North America are<br />

“harsh, raucous and monotonous,” even though he himself had never<br />

left European shores. As Doolittle pointed out, “that’s exactly what<br />

European explorers heard when they arrived and often reported<br />

that the birds they heard squawked like a chicken. People hear what<br />

they’re expecting to hear. Obviously these European explorers were<br />

not talking with Indigenous people who no doubt were very well<br />

aware of the hermit thrush song,” she said.<br />

It took the observations of North American-born writers, and in<br />

particular the pioneering publication of Quebec-born “Mrs. Sheppard<br />

of Woodfield,” in 1833 to begin changing settler attitudes. Based on<br />

her field observations, Sheppard argued that North American birdsong<br />

is appealing and pleasurable to hear and that the Hermit Thrush<br />

has a really wonderful song.<br />

This interest in birdsong found its way into a recent project when<br />

Doolittle was commissioned to write 70 minutes of music for the<br />

audiobook version of Anne of Green Gables. She paired the different<br />

characters with bird songs found in Prince Edward Island or Nova<br />

Scotia, attempting to match each character’s personality with the<br />

attributes of the birdsong Anne would have heard in her environment.<br />

As a long-time member of R. Murray Schafer’s Wolf Project and<br />

performing in many of his outdoor pieces, Doolittle’s interest in the<br />

connections between sound, music and the environment have deep<br />

roots and continue to evolve. She noted how birds would respond<br />

during the outdoor performances and also how Schafer incorporated<br />

birdsong into his pieces.<br />

Ecological emergency: Another project she’s been involved with is<br />

a talk and concert series entitled Art-Making in the Anthropocene,<br />

co-led with colleagues Sarah Hopfinger and Stuart MacRae. This series<br />

explored how to approach creative work in this time of ecological<br />

emergency. When I asked her how these ideas impacted her own<br />

work, she said: “even though I’ve always cared about the environment,<br />

and have written music based on animal songs and natural soundscapes<br />

for over 25 years, my interest in natural sounds really comes<br />

from my curiosity about the sounds themselves.”<br />

Hermit Thrush: miskominikesi (raspberry picking bird)<br />

in Anishnaabmowin<br />

This is evident in one of her recent works where she began exploring<br />

sounds made by objects from the trash or recycling bins. For a commission<br />

from the Rainy Days festival in Luxembourg, she composed for a<br />

wide array of metal objects such as keys, molded pie foil containers and<br />

various sizes of tin cans. During the process of collecting and experimenting<br />

with the sound possibilities of these objects, she also gained<br />

valuable insights about packaging, visiting various grocery stores to<br />

purchase food in tin cans from different countries. One large and<br />

resonant tin can from Greece, filled with stuffed grape leaves, meant her<br />

family ate nothing but grape leaves for four days!<br />

“That’s one piece that I wouldn’t have composed without the<br />

change in thinking fostered by the discussions of the Art-Making in<br />

the Anthropocene series”, she said. The resulting composition, titled<br />

(re)cycling I: metals, was performed in the fall of 2023 in Luxembourg<br />

by the Montreal-based Architek Percussion ensemble.<br />

Future<br />

Resonance<br />

Festival<br />

<strong>April</strong> 26-28, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Various Venues<br />

Visit newmusicconcerts.com for more information!<br />

MCELROY PRODUCTIONS<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 15


“Transcending boundaries”:<br />

poet, teacher, researcher,<br />

media artist, conductor<br />

stage director and theatre<br />

director, Sandeep Bhagwati<br />

ART OF SONG<br />

A NEW JOURNEY<br />

Third of three<br />

The third event in this month’s account of recent and upcoming<br />

new music events is coincidentally another three-day festival.<br />

Titled Future Resonance and brought to us biennially by New Music<br />

Concerts, it takes place from <strong>April</strong> 26-28 in three different venues. It<br />

begins on <strong>April</strong> 26 at the Canadian Music Centre with a panel discussion<br />

titled “What Is the Real Sound of Toronto” aimed at stimulating<br />

a lively conversation about alternate ways of approaching the creation<br />

and presentation of newly made music. Doors open at 4.30 and the<br />

event wraps up with a reception from 6:30 to 7pm.<br />

On <strong>April</strong> 27, the action shifts to St. George by the Grange, the<br />

previous home of the Music Gallery, for the concert that promises<br />

to be the centrepiece of the festival, titled “Swara Sutras Goes<br />

Electronic.” “Swara sutras” in Sanskrit means an assemblage of notes,<br />

and the concert lives up to its title. In its first half, it offers four world<br />

premieres by Canadian composers where the sounds of guzheng,<br />

tablas, bamboo flute, percussion, kora, and Metis fiddle, are individually<br />

and in combination blended with new technologies. The<br />

concert’s final work features a nine-musician Swara Sutras Ensemble<br />

assembled for the occasion under the direction of Sandeep Bhagwati.<br />

The final event on <strong>April</strong> 28 takes the festival uptown to the Aga Khan<br />

Museum for a full-day immersive event titled “Śabdagatitāra: How<br />

to Inhabit These Different Temporalities?” “Śabdagatitāra” is again<br />

from Sanskrit meaning the crossing over (tāra) of methods of making<br />

(gati) sound (śabda), and promises to be an event “celebrating many<br />

musical roots and containing wonderfully unexpected sound worlds,”<br />

including pipa, Bulgarian singing, Turkish violin, double bass and<br />

musical sculptures.<br />

Coming full circle, Soundstreams appears again on the calendar<br />

for a <strong>May</strong> 4 performance of Grandma’s Shawl which reveals the story<br />

of the bond built in the early 20th century between Ukrainian and<br />

Indigenous women. Struggling to cope in their new surroundings, the<br />

Ukrainian immigrants are welcomed and supported by Indigenous<br />

women through food and Khustka shawls. The musical narrative for<br />

soprano, mezzo, piano and violin unfolds through the combining of<br />

works by both Ukrainian and Canadian composers, and takes place<br />

at the Redwood Theatre, a classic 1914 theatre, newly renovated, at<br />

1300 Gerrard St in Toronto’s east end.<br />

Reimagining art<br />

song for the 2020s<br />

STEPHANIE CONN<br />

Lieder, or art song, might seem a tough sell at times.<br />

With just two performers on stage, singer and pianist,<br />

it does not offer the visual dazzle of opera with its<br />

scenery, orchestra and casts of thousands. Texts are<br />

usually by 19th-century poets such as Verlaine, Goethe,<br />

Rilke, Heine and Hesse, and in German or French which<br />

makes them less accessible to English-speaking listeners.<br />

To do justice to the texts, songs were often throughcomposed<br />

and so they lack choruses that might catch the<br />

audience’s ears.<br />

Lieder, however, holds all the dramatic possibilities of opera – especially<br />

when the songs are presented as an entire set or cycle – but the<br />

responsibility for realizing the poet’s and composer’s intentions lies<br />

entirely with the singer and pianist. Art song can be compared to short<br />

story form, eschewing the grandeur of opera, as short stories do novels,<br />

to instead capture truth in a more compact or even epigrammatic form.<br />

Confluence: There are several musical organizations in Toronto that<br />

are taking on art song these days and updating it in a way that hopes<br />

to win new audiences, and also to afford artists new possibilities<br />

for interacting and creating. This <strong>May</strong>, Toronto audiences will have<br />

the chance to hear an especially inventive re-imagining of Heinrich<br />

Teiya Kasahara 笠 原 貞 野 (L) and pianist David Eliakis<br />

Wendalyn Bartley is a Toronto-based composer and electro-vocal<br />

sound artist. sounddreaming@gmail.com<br />

The creative spirit is alive and kicking!<br />

Composer / filmmaker Cameron Tingley presents his<br />

imaginative concert music and humorous short films,<br />

with colourful descriptions of the creative process.<br />

“Themusicexpressesmywishesandhopesforabetter<br />

world, one that celebrates diversity, tolerance, curiosity,<br />

spontaneity,eccentricity,nuance.Allthegoodstuff.”<br />

GAETZ PHOTOGRAPHY<br />

camerontingley.com<br />

A novel blend of music, film, and creative writing.<br />

16 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


TED PHILLIPS<br />

"Kasahara’s The Butterfly Project: The Ballade of Chō-Chō San<br />

Heine’s Dichterliebe as set by Robert Schumann, reinterpreted as<br />

Dichterliebe: Whose Love? It is presented by Confluence Concerts<br />

and co-created by Teiya Kasahara 笠 原 貞 野 and pianist David Eliakis.<br />

Kasahara told Wholenote that “David Eliakis and I will look at<br />

Schumann’s setting of these poems with a queer and trans lens of our<br />

lived experiences. We started with the central question, ‘Whose love is<br />

important, valid, and celebrated?’, and that is why we are presenting<br />

Dichterliebe: Whose Love?”<br />

“Lieder is where I began my classical vocal education at age 15,” says<br />

Kasahara. “It was the place I first was able to express myself through<br />

my singing voice. I think what is special about Lieder is that one<br />

can take more into consideration their own lived experience in relation<br />

to the poetry. There is less prescription in dramatic portrayal – in<br />

“performance” – in comparison to opera, where we are asked to play<br />

specific characters in usually very structured narratives.” It’s worthwhile<br />

to note that in a previous project with Confluence, Kasahara<br />

re-examined Puccini’s opera Madama Butterfly in The Butterfly<br />

Project: The Ballade of Chō-Chō San.<br />

With this program, Kasahara and Eliakis interrogate “their classical<br />

music educations, the traditions which they have perpetuated<br />

in both music and life, and the sex and gender norms that still<br />

govern much of today’s performance practices and social discourse.”<br />

Schumann composed the original Dichterliebe (A<br />

Poet’s Love) song cycle in 1840 during a period when<br />

he and his beloved Clara were uncertain if they would<br />

be allowed to marry; for this reason, the music he<br />

produced sometimes contradicts or belies the seemingly<br />

sunny content of some poems. Nevertheless<br />

it is a conventional journey of gender and love that<br />

is described in his original composition. In this<br />

new version, Kasahara and Eliakis, too, use Heine’s<br />

Lyrisches Intermezzo as a starting point and incorporate<br />

Schumann’s original settings, but they also bring<br />

in settings by Schumann’s contemporaries, including<br />

Liszt, Franz Wolf and Fanny Mendelssohn (Hensel),<br />

with some contemporary electronic additions.<br />

As Kasahara explained to WholeNote, although<br />

Dichterliebe’s themes of love, unrequited love, lost<br />

love, etc. are presented as universal “that isn’t always<br />

the case for queer and trans people in the stories<br />

we tell in historical and contemporary mediums. I<br />

also often wondered why sopranos and mezzos, but<br />

more specifically women, weren’t seen singing or<br />

recording this repertoire as much as their counterparts.<br />

Tradition has seemed to tell another story, but<br />

what has continued to bring me back to canonical works in Lieder<br />

and in opera is that my imagination, curiosity and creativity continues<br />

to inspire me to want to tell another story: queer stories, trans stories,<br />

BIPOC stories, my story.”<br />

Larry Beckwith founded<br />

Confluence Concerts in<br />

2018, and says they’ve<br />

programmed “a good deal of<br />

art song, including Debussy’s<br />

Cinq Poèmes de Charles<br />

Baudelaire in the fall of 2018,<br />

Marion Newman’s program<br />

of Indigenous Art Song in<br />

2019, a generous sampling<br />

from the fascinating Irish Art<br />

Song Project and a program<br />

of James Rolfe’s songs in the<br />

fall of 2023.” Their presentations<br />

have been creative, and as Beckwith explains, “Most have<br />

Larry Beckwith<br />

included art songs juxtaposed with jazz standards, folk or contemporary<br />

pop songs, such as last season’s All the Diamonds cabaret,<br />

curated by yours truly, or the Mandala (curated by Suba Sankaran)<br />

DAHLIA KATZ<br />

The Secret Hero of the 19 th Century<br />

June 9 th , <strong>2024</strong> at 3:00 p.m.<br />

FEATURING:<br />

Erica Iris Huang, mezzo-soprano; Elina Kelebeev, piano;<br />

Inna Perkis, piano; Ernesto Ramirez, tenor; Boris Zarankin, piano<br />

Artistic Directors: Boris Zarankin & Inna Perkis<br />

For more details and to purchase tickets<br />

www.offcentremusic.com<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 17


MUSIC THEATRE<br />

BRUCE ZINGER<br />

Soprano Meghan Lindsay and Atelier Ballet artist<br />

Eric César de Mello da Silva in All is Love<br />

SOMETHING TO<br />

CROW ABOUT<br />

and a toast to<br />

new creation<br />

and Gracias a la Vida (curated by Patricia O’Callaghan) programs in<br />

the pandemic.”<br />

Beckwith teaches music at the secondary school level and adds that<br />

he plans to bring his students to Matthias Goerne’ and Evgeny Kissin’s<br />

performance of Dichterliebe this month (<strong>April</strong> 21, Roy Thomson Hall).<br />

“The students in the voice program love art songs and often juxtapose<br />

them with musical theatre songs, which are often not dissimilar<br />

in their story-telling arcs.” With innovative productions like the<br />

Confluence show leading the way to spark interest, and the openheartedness<br />

of young singers, art song might once again take centre<br />

stage for more listeners.<br />

As Beckwith says, “Art songs endure because they are tiny perfect<br />

gems and poignantly marry words and music. We look forward to<br />

Teiya Kasahara’s re-envisioning of Schumann’s Dichterliebe with<br />

a goal towards de-mystifying and further popularizing what is in<br />

essence a very accessible, moving, timeless and entertaining art form.”<br />

Elsewhere: Some other recent and current performances offering<br />

insights into art song include Opera Atelier’s upcoming All Is Love,<br />

showcasing Measha Brueggergosman-Lee and including Reynaldo<br />

Hahn’s setting of Verlaine’s L’heure Exquise; and the Toronto<br />

Mendelssohn Singers, just before this issue went to press, presenting<br />

Franz Schubert’s song cycle Winterreisse in a new arrangement for<br />

choir, baritone Brett Polegato, and piano. This past March, in a clever<br />

contemporary turn, Nathan Keoughan and pianist/composer Peter<br />

Tiefenbach performed Tiefenbach’s dramatic and humorous cycle,<br />

The Long Walk Home, as part of Against the Grain Theatre’s Opera<br />

pub at The Drake Hotel. Jokingly referred to as “Die Tinderreise”, this<br />

original song cycle with text by James Ostime tells the story of a man’s<br />

one-night journey, echoing cycles such as Winterreise but including<br />

contemporary details.<br />

Listing details: Confluence Concerts. Dichterliebe: Whose Love?<br />

Teiya Kasahara 笠 原 貞 野 , vocalist; David Eliakis, piano. Heliconian<br />

Hall, 35 Hazelton Ave. <strong>May</strong> 3 and 4, 7:30, with pre-concert chat at<br />

6:45pm. Tickets: www.bemusednetwork.com/events. $25.<br />

Stephanie Conn is an ethnomusicologist, writer/editor, and<br />

former producer for CBC Radio. A member of the ensemble Puirt<br />

a Baroque, she has also sung with Tafelmusik and other period<br />

ensembles, and is active as a traditional Gaelic singer and piano<br />

accompanist in Cape Breton. Her podcast “Friend of a Friend” can<br />

be heard at https://meezstephanie.substack.com<br />

JENNIFER PARR<br />

For months there has been speculation, in “the<br />

business” and out, about what the unannounced<br />

“secret” seventh show of the upcoming <strong>2024</strong>/2025<br />

Mirvish season might be. Possibilities mooted have<br />

included Beetlejuice and MJ: the musical among others.<br />

The real news is much more exciting. It has just been announced<br />

(March 19) that this “secret show” will actually be a remount (or<br />

rather a newly enhanced version) of the hit Canadian premiere<br />

production of Dave Malloy’s Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of<br />

1812, currently finishing a triumphant and record breaking 16-week<br />

run at Streetcar Crow’s Nest in Toronto’s east end.<br />

I have been a champion of this production from very early<br />

in the process, interviewing director Chris Abraham (Dec/<br />

Broadway<br />

Classics<br />

arranged/directed by Charles Cozens<br />

featuring<br />

Jeff Madden<br />

Stephanie Brandt<br />

Ella Boich<br />

ISABEL BADER THEATER MAY 11 8 PM<br />

18 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


The cast of Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812<br />

Jan issue) after a visit to early rehearsals where the chemistry of<br />

creative team, cast and musicians was boldly on display. When I<br />

saw the show for the third time a week ago I saw a production at its<br />

peak: the story telling clear as a bell, the ensemble of performers<br />

a thrilling display of world class Canadian musical theatre talent<br />

led by Hailey Gillis as a luminous Natasha and Evan Buliung as<br />

a tormented Pierre. Director Chris Abraham, choreographer Ray<br />

Hogg, music director Ryan deSouza and the superb design team<br />

have given us a fully realized world that immerses the audience in<br />

a decadent recreation of 1812 Russia that is both true to the period<br />

and radically contemporary.<br />

Audiences hungry for exciting musical theatre have been flocking<br />

to Crow’s to experience this production that could easily have run for<br />

much longer if the space had been available. How perfect, then, that<br />

Mirvish should pick it up, giving Great Comet a chance to prolong its<br />

life and reach even more new audiences.<br />

George Krissa (Anatole) & Hailey Gillis (Natasha)<br />

Championing Canadian musical creation is something that one<br />

always wishes top-flight producers will do, and Mirvish Productions<br />

are no strangers to the role, having helped to shepherd three shows<br />

that started off as experiments in much smaller spaces into being<br />

monster hits: Two Pianos Four Hands, Drowsy Chaperone, and Come<br />

From Away.<br />

PHOTOS: DAHLIA KATZ<br />

GRANDMA’S<br />

SHAWL<br />

Experience a poignant musical<br />

journey intertwining Ukrainian<br />

and Indigenous cultures,<br />

celebrating unity, resilience, and<br />

the enduring bond of women.<br />

ARTISTS<br />

Music Director / Soprano<br />

Natalya Gennadi<br />

Mezzo-Soprano<br />

Kristine Dandavino<br />

Piano<br />

Jo Greenaway<br />

Violin<br />

Oleksandra Fedyshyn<br />

REDWOOD<br />

THEATRE<br />

MAY 4, <strong>2024</strong><br />

7:30pm<br />

SOUNDSTREAMS.CA<br />

The Michael and Sonja Koerner<br />

Charitable Foundation<br />

The Mary-Margaret<br />

Webb Foundation<br />

Epstein<br />

Family Trust<br />

The JB JB Doherty<br />

Family Foundation<br />

The Anne-Marie H. H.<br />

Applin Foundation<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 19


Musical Stage Company's Ray Hogg: fresh from<br />

co-producing Comet , MSC gets back to basics.<br />

Also recently<br />

Shifting Ground: Overlapping with Great Comet in late February, a<br />

new group of young talented performers and creative team with the<br />

name of the Shifting Ground Collective emerged seemingly out of the<br />

blue with an excellent (and also sold out) production of Sondheim’s<br />

famously problematic 1981 musical Merrily We Roll Along at the<br />

intimate Annex Theatre. I recommend looking out for more work<br />

from this talented group! https://shiftinggroundcollective.com/merrily<br />

Mother of All Shows: In early March another showcase of<br />

Canadian musical theatre talent was on display in the Toronto<br />

premiere screening at the Hot Docs Cinema of the musical film<br />

The Mother of All Shows, co-written by Melissa Agostino and<br />

David James Brock with music by Rebecca Everett, and co-starring<br />

Agostino and the brilliant Wendy Malick. While not completely<br />

successful it was both great fun to watch and exciting to see talented<br />

Canadian musical theatre writers taking risks to experiment with<br />

both form and format. www.moasfilm.com<br />

And just ahead<br />

Canadian Festival Of New Musicals: Coming up later this spring is<br />

what promises to be another showcase of new creation and Canadian<br />

talent: the Musical Stage Company’s new Canadian Festival of New<br />

Musicals in association with the Canadian Stage Company in their<br />

Berkeley Street space. Curious to know more details about this new<br />

festival running from <strong>May</strong> 22 to 26, I conversed with MSC’s artistic<br />

director Ray Hogg:<br />

WN: The new festival seems to be a continuation of the Musical<br />

Stage Company’s former showcases of new works in progress,<br />

sometimes in collaboration with the Canadian Musical Theatre<br />

Project. Now that the CMPT no longer exists will this be the new<br />

format going forward? Will it be an annual event?<br />

RH: I’ve often likened creating a new Canadian musical to raising<br />

a newborn baby - it takes a village of artists. There’s a lot that goes<br />

into developing and nurturing a musical and the process often takes<br />

longer than any other form of theatre! As for our Canadian Festival<br />

of New Musicals (CFoNM), I believe wholeheartedly in creating<br />

more opportunities to invite audiences behind the scenes to witness<br />

the many stages of creating a new musical because it truly is a<br />

fascinating developmental process.<br />

Can you tell me more about the three new works in progress which<br />

will be presented during the festival, and why they were chosen?<br />

L-R: Duncan Lang, Sydney Gauvin, Colette Richardson, Jameson Mosher<br />

Absolutely! The three new musicals we’re showcasing are all<br />

works whose developmental history has brought them close to full<br />

production readiness: In Real Life, After the Rain, and Cowboy<br />

Tempest. In Real Life is the most production-ready of the three.<br />

The book is by superstar playwright Nick Green with music &<br />

lyrics by our latest Crescendo Series artist Kevin Wong, and the<br />

show is about a near-future society (think a musical episode of<br />

The Black Mirror) that grapples with the complexities of power,<br />

technology and freedom in a digital era. We’re very excited to<br />

share a 60-minute partially staged excerpt in partnership with<br />

fu-GEN Theatre.<br />

Our Double Bill presentation will showcase readings from the two<br />

other shows. After the Rain has a book by Rose Napoli, and music<br />

and lyrics by Suzy Wilde, and we are co-developing and co-commissioning<br />

it with Tarragon Theatre. Cowboy Tempest Cabaret (book by<br />

Niall McNeil, Lucy McNulty and Anton Lipovetsky, music by Anton<br />

Lipovetsky, lyrics by Niall McNeil) features the latest work from our<br />

second Crescendo Series artist Anton Lipovetsky.<br />

They are strikingly different. After the Rain is about a struggling<br />

composer who sings backup in her parent’s band but agrees to<br />

teach piano lessons to a terminally ill adult who is only interested<br />

in learning Gymnopedie No.1. This show is a gorgeous transcendent<br />

theatrical experience that explores the healing power of music.<br />

On the flip side, Cowboy Tempest is a totally lawless adaptation of<br />

Shakespeare’s The Tempest. Think you know Shakespeare? Think<br />

again! This show was conceived by Niall McNeill, an artist with Down<br />

Syndrome, and is entirely painted with his world-view. His longtime<br />

collaborators Lucy McNulty and Anton Lipovetsky help take us on an<br />

incredible musical tour through Niall’s inspired take on Shakespeare’s<br />

tale of magic and power.<br />

Other than the showcase presentations, will there be public<br />

components to the festival such as question and answer sessions with<br />

the creative teams, or panel discussions with people in the industry?<br />

Indeed! We are really looking forward to connecting audiences with<br />

our writers, composers, and creative teams. We are anticipating some<br />

lively discussion considering how passionate this group of artists (and<br />

our audience) is! Aside from Q & A sessions, we›ll be kicking off the<br />

festival with our second iteration of the Noteworthy New Musicals<br />

Conference; a one-day musical theatre event dedicated to new musical<br />

enthusiasts, composers, lyricists and playwrights in Toronto.<br />

There will be multiple panels made up of international industry<br />

experts, a keynote speech, networking opportunities, and Musical<br />

TAYLOR LONG<br />

20 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


COURTESY OF MARIE CHOUINARD<br />

ROLLINE LAPORTE<br />

Canadian choreographer Marie Chouinard’s Le Chant du Cygne: Le Lac<br />

Murmuration<br />

Stage Company’s 20th Anniversary Birthday Bash! The content of this<br />

year’s conference is geared toward providing chances to learn more<br />

about new musical theatre, with a strong emphasis on new work<br />

development and how to get your new musical produced in Canada.<br />

Do you see this festival expanding in the future to include more<br />

shows and even more companies, like some of the festivals in the US?<br />

I hope this is a possibility! We have already have several other<br />

Canadian company’s onboard for the inaugural festival including<br />

Canadian Stage, fu-GEN and Tarragon Theatre. We also have close ties<br />

and working relationships with other Canadian companies from coast<br />

to coast and with several US companies. As for future festivals, if other<br />

companies are looking to come on board, I say the more the merrier!<br />

For more details and to buy tickets, visit<br />

musicalstagecompany.com/shows/canadian-festival-of-new-musicals/<br />

intelligence of contemporary dancers to explore the physical<br />

instinct that birds – and humans – have for flocking.<br />

Jennifer Parr is a Toronto-based director, dramaturge, fight<br />

director and acting coach, brought up from a young age on a rich<br />

mix of musicals, Shakespeare and new Canadian plays.<br />

DANCE as MUSIC THEATRE<br />

<strong>April</strong> will see three dance productions that reimagine classics<br />

in wildly different ways. First up, from ShowOne Productions, is<br />

the new Hamlet from Guillaume Côté and Robert Lepage I wrote<br />

about in the previous column. It runs <strong>April</strong> 3-7 at the Elgin Theatre,<br />

promising a new and visceral physical take on Shakespeare’s classic.<br />

What is it about Swan Lake that drives so many choreographers to<br />

articulate their own responses? Over at Harbourfront Centre from<br />

<strong>April</strong> 18-20 the Torque dance series plays host to two wildly experimental<br />

takes on what is probably the most iconic classical ballet with<br />

the Canadian premiere of the mixed program Swan Lakes and Minus 16<br />

from Gauthier Dance & Dance Company Theaterhaus Stuttgart.<br />

The two swan lakes in the program’s title are Canadian choreographer<br />

Marie Chouinard’s Le Chant du Cygne: Le Lac, a fiercely<br />

feminist manifesto in which the swans become passionate rebels,<br />

and choreographer and composer Hofesh Shechter’s Swan Cake,<br />

which is more playful and light spirited. The mixed program will<br />

conclude with legendary choreographer Ohad Naharin’s theatrical<br />

cult classic Minus 16.<br />

From <strong>April</strong> 25 to 28 at the ice rink at the Leaside Memorial<br />

Community Gardens, Montreal company Le Patin Libre are taking<br />

dance on ice to a new level of excitement and innovation with their<br />

Canadian/French/Scottish co-production Murmuration. To music<br />

by Jasmin Boivin and Philippe Le Bon, the wildly innovative work<br />

performed by a company of 15 “ice mavericks” combines the athletic<br />

virtuosity of competitive figure skaters with the choreographic<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 21


“Full of clear,<br />

radiant fervor”<br />

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY:<br />

HAYDN & BENDA<br />

Directed by Zefira Valova<br />

<strong>April</strong> 19–21, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Jeanne Lamon Hall, Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre<br />

18th-century Bohemia is the inspiration behind this<br />

program marking the Tafelmusik debut of Bulgarian<br />

violinist and il Pomo d’Oro concertmaster Zefira Valova.<br />

tafelmusik.org/bohemian<br />

(Bozar)<br />

“Mesmerizing”<br />

(Ludwig van Toronto)<br />

TRANSFORMATIONS:<br />

BACH & RAMEAU<br />

Directed by Kristian Bezuidenhout<br />

<strong>May</strong> 10–12, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Jeanne Lamon Hall, Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre<br />

Kristian Bezuidenhout returns as harpsichordist and<br />

guest director to explore music’s evolution through<br />

transcriptions, reworkings, and arrangements.<br />

tafelmusik.org/transformations


An agency of the Government of Ontario<br />

Un organisme du gouvernement de l’Ontario<br />

A HANDEL<br />

CELEBRATION<br />

“The best periodperformance<br />

choir anywhere<br />

in the world”<br />

(Globe and Mail)<br />

Directed by Ivars Taurins<br />

<strong>May</strong> 31–June 2, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Koerner Hall, TELUS Centre<br />

Tafelmusik’s 45th-anniversary season culminates<br />

with a salute to one of the greatest musical<br />

dramatists of all time. Join guest soloists Amanda<br />

Forsythe and Thomas Hobbs, with the Tafelmusik<br />

choir and orchestra as they weave a gorgeous<br />

tapestry under the direction of Ivars Taurins.<br />

tafelmusik.org/handel-celebration<br />

Image by Paulette Tavormina


EARLY MUSIC<br />

TORONTO<br />

BACH<br />

FESTIVAL<br />

Connecting the dots<br />

DAVID PERLMAN<br />

John Abberger<br />

Church of the Holy Trinity, site of this year’s Kaffeehaus<br />

PHOTOS: ELANA EMER<br />

Toronto Bach Festival was founded in 2016 by<br />

internationally-recognized Bach authority John<br />

Abberger (best known to Toronto period music<br />

devotees as principal oboist of Tafelmusik Baroque<br />

Orchestra). In the spring of 2019, columnist Matthew<br />

Whitfield interviewed Abberger for The WholeNote and<br />

wrote this: “For the past three years, the Toronto Bach<br />

Festival has presented a three-day intensive series of<br />

concerts, recitals, and lecture presentations focusing<br />

on Johann Sebastian Bach, his world, and his works.<br />

Increasing in size and scale each year, the festival attracts<br />

magnificent performers and interpreters.” Substitute<br />

“past five non-pandemic years” for “three” and the<br />

comment is as accurate today as it was then.<br />

Back in 2019, the Festival ran from <strong>May</strong> 24 to 26, book-ended by<br />

performances of Bach’s Fifth Brandenburg Concerto, among other<br />

works, on Friday, and his Lutheran Masses on the Sunday. The<br />

Saturday in between featured solo performances, by harpsichordist<br />

Luc Beauséjour and cellist Elinor Frey, and a lecture on Bach and the<br />

French Style featuring renowned musicologist Ellen Exner.<br />

“This year’s festival features an eclectic mix of Bach’s secular and<br />

sacred music” Whitfield observed to Abberger. “Is there an organizing<br />

principle or underlying idea that permeates your concerts and<br />

programming?”<br />

“Absolutely!” Abberger replied. “ From day one, a guiding principle<br />

for the programming has been that the three main genres in which<br />

_1920x1080<br />

Carmina<br />

Burana<br />

Fate, love, temptation, struggle,<br />

fulfillment. Timeless storytelling.<br />

Captivating music.<br />

Sunday, June 9, <strong>2024</strong> | 5:00 pm<br />

Tickets at www.paxchristichorale.org<br />

Bach worked, choral, keyboard and instrumental, should be represented<br />

at each festival. This is why we will always have a keyboard<br />

recital, generally alternating between harpsichord and organ. Another<br />

important artistic mandate is to perform cantatas each year. With<br />

so many to choose from, we won’t run out for quite a few years! The<br />

instrumental works comprise works for solo instruments (violin,<br />

cello and flute) as well as chamber and orchestral music. I strive each<br />

year to find a nice balance with the great diversity of genres in which<br />

Bach worked.”<br />

The pattern: Glance at the titles of the festival concerts over the<br />

years, and it’s clear that Abberger has stuck to that guiding principle<br />

from day one.<br />

Take 2018 for example: an opening concert titled “Two Brandenburg<br />

with Love,” a Saturday organ recital titled “Bach’s Inspiration” by<br />

Toronto-born Rachel Mahon (fresh off her appointment as the first<br />

woman to be appointed organ scholar at St. Paul’s Cathedral in London)<br />

and a Sunday concert titled “Cantatas and a Passion.”<br />

2020 and 2021 offered … nothing.<br />

But in 2022, the festival was back, seemingly unaffected by the<br />

hiatus. The Friday brought us “Brilliant Brandeburg”; Saturday<br />

brought an equally brilliant three-pack — a noon organ recital, by<br />

organist and Bach scholar John Bott, followed by “The Sonatas &<br />

Partitas for Solo Violin” in two parts, at 4pm and 8pm respectively,<br />

Rezonance<br />

Baroque Ensemble<br />

with<br />

Emily Klassen<br />

Madness<br />

& meaning<br />

<strong>April</strong> 28, 4 pm<br />

rezonanceensemble.com<br />

24 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


An agency of the Government of Ontario<br />

Un organisme du gouvernement de l’Ontario<br />

PHOTOS: ELANA EMER<br />

performed by violinists Julia Wedman, Patricia Ahern, Valerie Gordon<br />

and Cristina Zacharias. Sunday brought the by-now expected public<br />

lecture, by John Bott. Titled “Bach the Dramatist” it was an in-depth<br />

look at Bach’s dramatic writing in oratorio settings, particularly the<br />

Easter Oratorio and Ascension Oratorio; the 4pm final concert of the<br />

festival then featured those two oratorios.<br />

2023 gave us “Virtuoso Concerto” on the Friday, featuring concertos<br />

for one and two harpsichords, followed on Saturday by harpsichordist<br />

Steven Devine performing The Well-Tempered Clavier in two parts (at<br />

noon and 2pm). Sunday’s Annual Bach Lecture was “J.S. Bach: Cantor,<br />

Capellmeister, Director” by musicologist Daniel R. Melamed from<br />

the Jacobs School of Music in Indiana, and the 4pm Sunday finale,<br />

“Leipzig Cantatas,” crossed two more cantatas, Die Elenden sollen<br />

essen, BWV75 and Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes BWV76, off<br />

Abberger’s list.<br />

Which brings us to this year’s festival: The opening Friday concert, at<br />

Eastminster United Church, on the Danforth, is “The Game of Threes”<br />

and features, among other works, Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No.3<br />

in G Major, Concerto for Three Violins in D Major, and Violin Concerto<br />

in A Minor. The violin-playing honours are distributed among Adrian<br />

Butterfield, who directs the concert, and two of Abberger’s longtime<br />

Tafelmusik cohorts: Patricia Ahern and Cristina Zacharias.<br />

Saturday brings an intriguing mix of sacred and secular: a noon<br />

organ recital by Aaron James at St. Andrews Church at 73 Simcoe<br />

Street, across from Roy Thomson Hall, followed by two performances,<br />

at 4pm and 8pm, of “Kaffeehaus” – a 2022 festival innovation relocated<br />

from its theoretically ideal location (the Concert Hall at Yonge and<br />

Davenport) to the friendlier and more rough-and-ready surrounds of<br />

Church of the Holy Trinity (19 Trinity Sq, behind the Toronto Eaton<br />

Centre), where the pews are not bolted to the floor and more than one<br />

cup of coffee has been spilled over the years!)<br />

Sunday takes us back across the Bloor viaduct to Eastminster, first<br />

for the public lecture, provisionally titled “Bach’s Music Library and Its<br />

Influence on His Style,” presented via live broadcast, by musicologist<br />

Christoph Wolff – someone, Abberger says, he has been hoping to bring to<br />

the festival since its inception. The festival’s final concert, “How Brightly<br />

Shines” is at 4pm and promises to live up to its name. Wie schön leuchtet<br />

der Morgenstern (how brightly shines the morning star) is the title of two<br />

of the works on the program – one by Bach and one by Johann Kuhnau.<br />

And shining stars there will be a-plenty on view: Yeree Suh and Sinéad<br />

White, sopranos; Daniel Taylor and Nicholas Burns, altos; Charles Daniels<br />

and Shane Hanson, tenors; Jesse Blumberg and Martin Gomes, basses;<br />

and whomever comprises the The Toronto Bach Festival Orchestra<br />

which will have had three days to bond as an ensemble.<br />

VIA ZOOM: I caught up with John Abberger via Zoom in<br />

Charlottesville, Virginia on March 12 – the final day of Tafelmusik’s<br />

recent six city US tour, of a program titled “Passions Revealed,” devised<br />

by guest director Aisslin Nosky. Here are some snippets from that<br />

conversation.<br />

J.A, ON ATTENDANCE: We’ve sold out a number of performances,<br />

but not so far in Eastminster, so we have good capacity there which<br />

is good. Last year we had to move the opening concert to Church of<br />

the Holy Trinity, with a capacity of, I think, 400, so I’m hopeful that<br />

we can maybe do 450 or 500 at Eastminster this year. Our opening<br />

concert, the instrumental music, is so far always the most popular,<br />

which is interesting to me because it’s the vocal music that’s the heart<br />

of Bach’s output. But we’re building an audience for that, too. We<br />

have a devoted core, and we add people every year. So I’m confident<br />

about that.<br />

ON GUEST ARTISTS: As you know I like to bring in people. And this<br />

year we’ve got two really interesting new guests: Adrian Butterfield,<br />

the violinist, is coming from London. And Yeree Suh is this wonderful<br />

Korean soprano who lives in Stuttgart. Oh, and tenor Charles Daniels<br />

is coming back, I don’t mean to minimize him. He’s one of the best.<br />

So those are our big guest artists. But I think it’s important that we<br />

support people here in Toronto as well, you know. So that’s why I’m<br />

really pleased to present organist Aaron James for the first time.<br />

ON “THE GAME OF THREES”:<br />

Adrian and I did the programming together. I have my opinions,<br />

it’s part of my job as artistic director to shape each program as a part<br />

of the whole festival. So there was a lot of really interesting back and<br />

forth about that. I really wanted the Concerto for 3 Violins. It’s one<br />

of Bach’s strongest concertos, and it only survived in a version for<br />

three harpsichords. The first movement is like Vivaldi on steroids. It’s<br />

almost sonata form, a fantastic movement. I’ve really wanted to do<br />

that for some time. So from there, the third Brandenburg made sense.<br />

And so on.<br />

ON BACH’S INFLUENCES: (last year’s festival was close to all-<br />

Bach, this year noticeably less so.)<br />

We are still only scratching the surface. Our idea is to show a little<br />

bit of what music influenced Bach. What were his models, what influenced<br />

his compositional style? Vivaldi was a huge one. You know 1711<br />

was the publication in Amsterdam of his L’Estro Armonico, Opus 3<br />

concertos for solo instruments, and people in Europe went crazy for<br />

that music. I talked at the Kaffeehaus last year about Prince Johan-<br />

Erst of Saxe-Weimar. Bach worked for him as a very young man, in his<br />

early 20s maybe? But anyway, the Prince went to Amsterdam, I think<br />

ALL IS LOVE<br />

DEBUSSY / HAHN / HANDEL<br />

LULLY / PURCELL / RAMEAU<br />

<strong>April</strong> 11 to 14 at Koerner Hall<br />

A ravishing blend of singing, ballet and<br />

orchestral music, fully staged in the glorious<br />

acoustic of Koerner Hall. Featuring Artists of<br />

Atelier Ballet, and Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra.<br />

“A Miracle.”<br />

—Robert Harris,<br />

The Globe and Mail<br />

operaatelier.com<br />

Season<br />

Presenting<br />

Sponsor<br />

Radio Sponsor<br />

Media Partner<br />

Eric César de Mello da Silva and<br />

Meghan Lindsay by Bruce Zinger<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 25


in 1713 – Bach’s life is all these little tiny tidbits of information, right?<br />

So you kind of hope you’re gonna connect the dots with some vague<br />

sense of accuracy. There is a document that says the prince brought<br />

home so much music they had to have new shelves constructed in<br />

the library, and Bach made these harpsichord transcriptions of three<br />

or four of them. The prince was writing music too, and I think that<br />

was their way of studying them.<br />

And [Dieterich] Buxtehude too, in the realm of organ influences<br />

was huge. There’s a video of a program Tom Allen did recently with<br />

and for Sweetwater Music Festival. He calls it Bach’s Long Walk In<br />

the Snow – walking to Lubeck to hear Buxtehude play. He went in<br />

November, and the people he worked for said “Okay, you can go,<br />

but be back in time for the Christmas season” and he said he’d be<br />

gone for four weeks, and he stayed for three months … so there’s a<br />

nice sub-theme leading from Saturday to Sunday. Aaron James plays<br />

Buxtehude’s Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern in his organ recital,<br />

one of my favourite pieces of his. And Bach loved that chorale too.<br />

David Perlman can be reached at publisher@thewholenote.com<br />

AND ELSEWHERE<br />

Toronto Symphony Orchestra: You can get your Bach on in a<br />

few places this spring. The Toronto Symphony presents “Brilliant<br />

Bach,” a crowd-pleasing program with some of the concerti for<br />

multiple violins, including the Concerto for Two Violins & String<br />

Orchestra BWV 1043 and Concerto for Three Violins & String<br />

Orchestra BWV 1064R, as well as Brandenburg Concerto No.2<br />

BWV 1047 and more. Jonathan Crow leads and plays solo violin.<br />

Wednesday, Apr 24 to Saturday, Apr 27 at 8pm, Roy Thomson<br />

Hall; Sunday, Apr 28 at 3pm, George Weston Recital Hall<br />

Trinity Bach on the GO: Increasingly it’s worth the trip to<br />

Hamilton, and the GO train is at your service, so why not consider<br />

a program planned there by the Trinity Bach Project, intriguing<br />

for its contextualization of J.S. Bach’s music. The concert includes<br />

Bach’s beautiful Motet Jesu, meine Freunde, but also pieces by<br />

those who influenced him, and those whom he influenced: motets<br />

by his predecessor Heinrich Schütz, and Monteverdi’s Cantate<br />

Domino, but also Anton Bruckner’s sacred motet Locus iste. Felix<br />

Deák offers selected movements of Suites Nos.1 & 2 for unaccompanied<br />

cello. Nicholas Nicolaidis conducts the chamber choir, and<br />

Aaron James is at the organ.<br />

Saturday, Apr 20, at 3pm St. John the Evangelist Church<br />

(Hamilton).<br />

Stephanie Conn<br />

PROFILE<br />

Andrew<br />

Burashko<br />

The Art of Timing Out<br />

ANDREW SCOTT<br />

During a particularly compelling moment in The Art<br />

of Time Ensemble’s recent performance, Dance<br />

to the Abyss: Music From The Weimar Republic,<br />

the ensemble, now in its final season, performed<br />

Cab Calloway’s Minnie the Moocher five times in a<br />

row. Utilizing a set of detailed instructions from a<br />

document titled Nazi Germany’s Dance Band Rules<br />

and Regulations, the ensemble uses each rendition to<br />

iteratively strip away the lifeblood and very essence of<br />

what makes that great 1931 song so paradigmatically part<br />

of the jazz of swing-era Harlem.<br />

In the Art of Time’s skilled musical hands, the song metamorphoses<br />

(and I mean this in the most Kafkaesque of ways) into something<br />

more Joseph Goebbels-approved propaganda, than Lennox<br />

Avenue swing.<br />

Far from being repetitive, the successive<br />

iterations exemplify the adage death<br />

by 1,000 cuts; the ten rules gradually purge<br />

any vestige of Black, Jewish and American<br />

influence from a piece that the Nazis would<br />

have classified as “degenerate art.”<br />

In many ways, the piece epitomized<br />

the sort of work that only The Art of Time<br />

DAVID LEYES<br />

Andrew Burashko<br />

Ensemble could successfully pull off.<br />

Programmed immediately before the show’s<br />

intermission, the selection evoked a set<br />

of conflicting emotions – darkly funny, of<br />

course, but also horrifyingly revelatory of how easily a vibrant musical<br />

form could be, and was, co-opted for nefarious fascistic purposes. But<br />

conflicting emotions are the point. Dance to the Abyss is like so much<br />

of the work that Art of Time, under the able leadership of pianist and<br />

Artistic Director Andrew Burashko, has done with consistent aplomb<br />

over its 25-year history. It is a performance-based challenge to the audience,<br />

designed to make one both listen with intentionality, and think.<br />

“One of the things that I’ve been most interested in these last 25 years<br />

is to offer as mixed and eclectic a program as possible,” states Burashko,<br />

reflecting upon the expanse of work that the group has done since its<br />

inception in 1998: pairing the compositions of contemporary American<br />

jazz pianist Joey Calderazzo with the lieder of Richard Strauss; reimagining<br />

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band with a cast of musicians<br />

comprised of this country’s finest jazz, classical, and pop players; or<br />

finally, the ensemble’s upcoming <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> tribute to Joni Mitchell in<br />

26 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Dance to the Abyss: L-R: Andrew Burashko, Drew Jurecka, Andrew Downing,<br />

Lydia Munchinsky, Nathan Hiltz, Kelsley Grant, Kris Maddigan, Kevin Turcotte,<br />

Larry Larson. Text as displayed is from Czech/Canadian fiction writer<br />

Joseph Škvorecký’s story “Eine Kleine Jazzmusik”, published in 1966.<br />

Both Sides Now. Fusion, hybridity and a purposeful attempt to reside in<br />

the musical margins, defying classification, have been the raison d’etre<br />

for both Art of Time, and Burashko for a quarter century.<br />

JOHN LAUENER<br />

Minnie the Moocher<br />

written and performed<br />

by band leader, composer<br />

and singer Cabell "Cab"<br />

Calloway III, earned him<br />

the nickname "The Hi De<br />

Hi De Hi Man" based on<br />

his scatting in the song.<br />

traditional program notes. How does one<br />

convey the context and the story behind<br />

the music through the music itself?<br />

“How does one make it both rigorously<br />

historically accurate, and compelling<br />

enough to offer audiences an entry point<br />

into the incredible 400 years of history<br />

and music that we today call classical?”<br />

wonders Burashko.<br />

That question, coming from the<br />

Art of Time’s director in <strong>2024</strong>, is, of<br />

course, rhetorical. Presenting challenging,<br />

disparate music to audiences in a<br />

cohesive manner that combines dramaturgy,<br />

spoken word, humour, historical<br />

narration and stylistic intersection<br />

is exactly the sort of thing that the<br />

pianist and his ensemble have long since<br />

figured out how to do. A big part of that,<br />

and of the Art of Time’s longevity and<br />

success more generally, is defying the strict performance practices that<br />

reigned supreme in classical music during the 20th century. “When<br />

the Art of Time started,” states Burashko, “the idea of someone talking<br />

and breaking through the fourth wall was almost never done. But I<br />

have always wanted to speak to, engage with, and entertain the audience;<br />

I have had no interest in the ‘this is our offering, take it or leave it’<br />

approach to concert presentation.”<br />

The swamp of human desire: Burashko garnered an initial reputation<br />

at age 17, when he made his debut with the Toronto Symphony<br />

Orchestra as a classical pianist of note, immersed in the standard<br />

concertizing repertoire that the role demands. As he explained to me,<br />

however, he soon became interested in “exploring where high art, for<br />

lack of a better term, intersects with popular culture.” Many previous<br />

Art of Time presentations have mined this intersection – Burashko<br />

cites Igor Stravinsky’s Ebony Concerto, which the Russian composer<br />

wrote for Woody Herman’s First Herd, or Dmitri Shostakovich’s Jazz<br />

Orchestra Suites. But it is Berlin’s cabaret scene of the late 1920s in<br />

Dance to the Abyss that perhaps best exemplifies this fusion.<br />

“I was always fascinated with the richness of that scene” Burashko<br />

states. “I love Kurt Weill, Erwin Schulhoff and the composers of that<br />

era. Plus, the Dadaists like Kurt Schwitters, writers such as Franz<br />

Kafka and Thomas Mann, and the Berlin Cabaret which contributed to<br />

what at the time was a swamp of unfettered human desire.”<br />

The challenge here, as with any Art of Time show, is how to navigate<br />

the swamp rather than just describe it, especially when you eschew<br />

Dismantling: Whether Art of Time was a harbinger of change or the<br />

beneficiary of fortuitous timing, things in the classical music world<br />

“have changed considerably over the last 25 years,” Burashko says.<br />

As evidence, he points out that today, even the august and renowned<br />

pianist András Schiff concertizes with a clip-on Lavalier microphone,<br />

addressing his audience from the stage between works, something<br />

that would have been anathema even a few years earlier.<br />

What, discovered during Art of Time’s inaugural 1999 season<br />

(listed originally as Chamber Music Unlimited), was that the bringing<br />

together of disparate music (Cage, Gershwin, Crumb, and Lieberson)<br />

in combination with dance, evocative staging, and thoughtful on-stage<br />

commentary (modest initially, but expanded throughout the seasons),<br />

constituted a gradual dismantling of the restrictive traditions of the art<br />

form – an intoxicating elixir for an audience hungry for a welcoming<br />

entry point into a world of great music.<br />

“It still amazes me: I would meet people who said they don’t<br />

know how to listen to classical music or even what makes it good,”<br />

continues Burashko. “But music should elicit a visceral reaction. And<br />

ETERNAL CITIES<br />

BY MASMOUDI QUARTET<br />

Tickets available online at www.alliance-francaise.ca<br />

© Sandra Sunshine Photography<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 27


MOSTLY CLUBS, MAINLY JAZZ<br />

JOHN LAUENER<br />

Shakespeare: If Music Be (2010.) Peggy Baker (left) along with<br />

Stephen Dann, Barbara Hannigan and Joel Quarrington was<br />

one of Burashko's earliest Art of Time collaborators.<br />

while I’m happy if people walk away [from an Art of Time Ensemble<br />

performance] having learned something, I first and foremost want to<br />

turn people onto this great music.”<br />

As much as Burashko’s now well-honed skills as a raconteur,<br />

presenter of ideas, and a setter of appropriate performance contexts<br />

now appear effortless, these were, of course, a set of skills that he had<br />

to develop along the trajectory of the ensemble’s life. “It has been an<br />

incredible ride,” he acknowledges. “When Art of Time started, I was<br />

strictly a concert pianist. But since then, who knows how many hours<br />

I’ve spent conducting, staging, directing and producing. And now,<br />

the whole curation thing has really become a part of me with things<br />

unfolding in a way that I could not have predicted.”<br />

Hierarchical inevitability: With a nod to the inevitability of hierarchical<br />

career trajectories that promote competent people into opportunities<br />

requiring an entirely different set of skills from those they<br />

had mastered in their previous position, the success of Art of Time has<br />

meant a necessary move away from what initially attracted Burashko to<br />

a career in music in the first place. “It’s funny,” he says, expanding upon<br />

this point. “The more successful the organization became, the more<br />

I’ve had to compete with the machine that surrounds it and now overshadows<br />

the art. I am just tired of everything that goes into running an<br />

organization that has nothing to do with the art itself. The fundraising<br />

and the organizing. It all requires so much energy. And, well, life is<br />

short, and I just want to play, for lack of a better word.”<br />

Whether it was the pivotal pause-to-reflect that the COVIDlockdowns<br />

of the early 2020s unexpectedly bestowed, or the opportunity<br />

that a 25th anniversary affords to tie a nice bow on things, this<br />

has been announced as the Art of Time’s coda season. Burashko is<br />

quick to point out that he is not “hanging up the brand,” citing such<br />

upcoming projects as an animated film capture of the aforementioned<br />

Minnie the Moocher performance titled Jackboots to Jazz, a Sgt.<br />

Pepper’s Ontario summer tour, a Shakespeare show at Stratford, and,<br />

finally, a creative reimagining of Igor Stravinsky’s The Soldier’s Tale in<br />

October (complete with a newly commissioned libretto).<br />

And yet, despite all of this, there is something conclusionary about the<br />

feel of this season. “We have over 80 projects in our back pocket, at least a<br />

dozen of which I would love to see given some kind of life, so I’m hoping<br />

there will be more touring. But, in terms of what’s next, I honestly<br />

don’t have a clue. And, quite frankly, I’m finding that very exciting.”<br />

The Art of Time’s presentation of Both Sides Now will run from<br />

<strong>May</strong> 9 to 11 at Toronto’s Harbourfront Centre.<br />

Andrew Scott is a Toronto-based jazz guitarist (occasional pianist/<br />

singer) and professor at Humber College, who contributes regularly<br />

to The WholeNote Discoveries record reviews.<br />

Looking forward<br />

to the JUNOs<br />

(after the fact)<br />

COLIN STORY<br />

Ah, awards season. That very special time of year<br />

when artists across a variety of fields experience<br />

the thrill of being nominated, grapple with<br />

existential issues of the validity of awards and rankings<br />

within the arts, eat a moderately expensive banquet<br />

salad, and rub shoulders with fellow Canadian musicindustry<br />

colleagues. (When I attended the JUNOs, in<br />

2016, Canadian hip-hop legend Kardinal Offishall came<br />

up behind me, patted me on the shoulder and said “keep<br />

doing what you’re doing, man.” When I turned around,<br />

he said “oh, sorry, thought you were, uhh…” and promptly<br />

left. It remains a proud moment.)<br />

This year, I had a chance to interview four nominated musicians<br />

(Jocelyn Gould, Noam Lemish, Gentiane MG, and Laila Biali) in anticipation<br />

of the big event: about their projects, their thoughts on the big<br />

day, on other musicians, and on what comes after the JUNOs.<br />

By the time you read this, all that anticipation will be after the fact.<br />

The event will already have taken place – on Sunday March 24 <strong>2024</strong>, at<br />

Scotiabank Centre in Halifax, hosted by national icon Nelly Furtado.<br />

As the winners themselves will doubtless remind us, looking out at<br />

their fellow nominees, there are no losers at an event which more<br />

than anything is a celebration of the Canadian music industry at a<br />

particularly precarious moment in the history of recorded music.<br />

So in that celebratory vein, we offer you the thoughts of four<br />

worthy contenders, and alongside their reflections, a list of the other<br />

nominees in all the categories we usually cover in the “Mainly Jazz”<br />

beat of this magazine. The icing on the cake: almost all the nominated<br />

albums were reviewed in this magazine’sDISCoveries section over the<br />

past 12 months. So you can see what we said about them before we<br />

knew they were going to be nominated.<br />

About their nominated albums<br />

The artist: Noam Lemish:<br />

Category: Jazz Album of the Year (Solo)<br />

Reviewed by us: Vol 28 No.3<br />

“My album Twelve features my<br />

original compositions for a chambersized<br />

jazz orchestra (12tet) featuring<br />

myself on piano alongside an allstar<br />

cast from amongst Toronto’s<br />

finest jazz musicians. The six pieces<br />

in the record showcase long-form,<br />

28 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Clockwise from top left: Noam Lemish,<br />

Gentiane MG, Jocelyn Gould, Laila Biali<br />

through-composed music that embraces genre-bending as an essential<br />

feature. My own multi-cultural upbringing and life shapes the<br />

sounds of this record thus blending my rootedness in jazz and western<br />

art music alongside musical influences from my Israeli childhood and<br />

Eastern-European Jewish heritage.”<br />

The artist: Laila Biali:<br />

Category: Vocal Jazz Album of the Year<br />

Reviewed by us: Vol <strong>29</strong> No.1<br />

“Your Requests was my response<br />

to 150 song requests submitted by<br />

friends, fans and followers over social<br />

media (Facebook, Instagram and “X”).<br />

I’ve always loved engaging community<br />

and crowd-sourcing material – and for<br />

Your Requests I decided to make the<br />

Great American Songbook the focus. It’s my first full album release of<br />

jazz standards and it features Kurt Elling, Emilie-Claire Barlow, Caity<br />

Gyorgy, Anat Cohen, Grégoire Maret, Kelly Jefferson, George Koller,<br />

Larnell Lewis, Ben Wittman and Manino Costa.”<br />

Napoleon. The album contains a combination of originals and lesser<br />

played standards that have significant meaning to me.<br />

On getting ready for the big event<br />

Gould: I won Jazz Album Of The Year: Solo in 2021, a year in which<br />

the JUNOs were hosted online due to Covid. Although I have already<br />

won a JUNO, I have never had the opportunity to attend. The biggest<br />

excitement for me is simply to get to be there in person and be<br />

surrounded by the immense amount of talent that will be present.<br />

I also love Halifax, and am thrilled to have an opportunity to visit such<br />

a beautiful city.<br />

The artist: Gentiane MG<br />

Category: Jazz Album of the Year (Solo)<br />

Reviewed by us: <strong>Volume</strong> 28 No.2<br />

“Walls Made of Glass is my third trio<br />

album with this ensemble. Composing<br />

this music, my intent was to<br />

immortalize moments that felt particularly<br />

meaningful, just like one could do<br />

with a picture, but in this case, through<br />

music. I took a long time to create this<br />

album at every step of the way. Writing, workshopping, creating and<br />

thinking about the artwork, and every aspect of the recording process.<br />

A bit more than a year after the release, despite the fact that I am<br />

excited to start writing again and to explore new territories, there is<br />

nothing I would want to change about this album, and for me, this is a<br />

great artistic accomplishment.”<br />

The artist: Jocelyn Gould<br />

Category: Jazz Album of the Year (Solo)<br />

Reviewed by us: Vol.<strong>29</strong> No.4<br />

Sonic Bouquet is my third album<br />

as a leader. The personnel spans three<br />

generations of jazz musicians and<br />

contains mentors and peers of mine.<br />

The band is half Canadian and half<br />

American, and consists of an unusual<br />

front line of two guitars and clarinet. I<br />

co-produced this album with my mentor and friend, guitarist Randy<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | <strong>29</strong>


MG: I’m very proud to be nominated for the Junos alongside so<br />

many amazing projects and musicians. As a French Canadian from<br />

Quebec, it means a lot for me to be nominated for the number one<br />

Canadian music award ceremony. It makes me feel more part of the<br />

great Canadian musical community. As an artist, I believe strongly<br />

in the meaning of sharing art as a way of making the world a better<br />

place, and to be nominated for a JUNO Awards definitely helps the<br />

music to be more widely shared.<br />

Lemish: It means a lot for my music to be recognized in this way.<br />

This nomination is not only an acknowledgment of my work as a<br />

pianist and composer, but really the collective efforts of everyone that<br />

was involved in creating this album. I’m really looking forward to<br />

taking part in the festivities in Halifax with my fellow nominees!<br />

Biali: This nomination came as quite a surprise. It’s been a tough<br />

few years for many musicians, so it was a lovely boost – though<br />

I always remind myself that we create music for the love of it, to<br />

connect with listeners and hopefully spread some goodness in the<br />

world. That’s really what drives us, though the recognition of a JUNO<br />

nomination is helpful and a great honour, of course.<br />

On other nominees<br />

Gould: I have always been a huge admirer of Christine Jensen. She’s<br />

a phenomenal musician, and is also someone that I look up to in the<br />

music industry. I’ve loved all of her records, including the one that is<br />

currently nominated.<br />

Biali: Caity Gyorgy is a phenom and I was very grateful to have her<br />

guest with me on Your Requests (on Pennies from Heaven). I also<br />

had the opportunity to share the stage recently with Dominique Fils-<br />

Aimé and the audience was completely rapt. She is an electrifying<br />

performer, completely devoted to her art, and a beautiful soul.<br />

Upcoming Post-JUNO Shows<br />

Lemish: I’ll be performing at The Rex (in Toronto) <strong>May</strong> 8-11 with<br />

the wonderful American guitarist/oud virtuoso and long time musical<br />

collaborator Amos Hoffman.<br />

Biali: I will be joining the Mississauga Temple Big Band for the<br />

first time on Saturday, <strong>April</strong> 27 at the Mississauga Salvation Army<br />

Mississauga Community Church. My trio featuring George Koller and<br />

Ben Wittman will play a few selections on our own, and then I’ll be<br />

playing and singing with the large ensemble the rest of the night.<br />

Colin Story is a jazz guitarist, writer, and teacher based<br />

in Toronto. He can be reached at www.colinstory.com,<br />

and on Instagram and Twitter.<br />

The complete list of Jazz Category nominees<br />

Vocal jazz album of the year<br />

Songwriter, Alex Bird & Ewen Farncombe Vol 28 No.4<br />

You’re Alike, You Two, Caity Gyorgy and Mark Limacher Vol <strong>29</strong> No.5<br />

Little Bit a’ Love, Denielle Bassels Vol <strong>29</strong> No.1<br />

Our Roots Run Deep, Dominique Fils-Aimé<br />

Your Requests, Laila Biali Vol <strong>29</strong> No.1<br />

Jazz album of the year (solo)<br />

Day Moon, Christine Jensen<br />

Walls Made of Glass, Gentiane MG Vol 28 No.2<br />

Sonic Bouquet, Jocelyn Gould Vol <strong>29</strong> No.4<br />

Twelve, Noam Lemish Vol 28 No.3<br />

The South Detroit Connection, Russ Macklem<br />

Jazz album of the year (group)<br />

Migrations, Allison Au with the Migrations Ensemble Vol <strong>29</strong> No.4<br />

Septology-The Black Forest Session, Canadian Jazz Collective<br />

Vol 28 No.6<br />

Cry Me a River, Hilario Duran and His Latin Jazz Big Band Vol <strong>29</strong> No.3<br />

Recent History, Mike Murley & Mark Eisenman Quartet Vol <strong>29</strong> No.4<br />

Convergence, Nick Maclean Quartet feat. Brownman Ali Vol <strong>29</strong> No.5<br />

FROM FEATURE UP HERE<br />

HOMES FOR MUSIC<br />

help communities<br />

heal and grow<br />

SOPHIA PERLMAN<br />

When it comes to defining the line between North<br />

and South in Ontario, it very much depends on<br />

who you ask and where you are.<br />

If you are using The WholeNote’s website to search for listings using<br />

the JUST ASK feature, you will find the province’s vast geography<br />

divided into zones, with all of “Northern Ontario” defined as “zone<br />

10”, the southern border of which starts somewhere near Mattawa,<br />

and covers anything north of Algonquin Park and Highway 17 – with<br />

a bit of a dip south to also include Manitoulin Island. And it doesn’t<br />

seem to know where to classify Sundridge or Emdale, though I suspect<br />

if you asked people there, their compass would pull north rather<br />

than east, which is where LUDWIG (Listings Utility for WholeNote<br />

Information Gathering) – as it was affectionately dubbed back in the<br />

early 2000s – currently wants to put them.<br />

In other words, like most government agencies and service sectors,<br />

The WholeNote lumps “the North” into one big zone that encompasses<br />

nearly half the province’s geography (if not necessarily the<br />

equivalent population!) and doesn’t yet have ways of accounting for<br />

and documenting the variety and richness of Northern musical life.<br />

The (big) view from up here…<br />

If I was keeping track of the state of the Ontario music and arts<br />

community purely from what I see on my social media feeds, or on<br />

the news, things would seem decidedly gloomy: this morning, for<br />

example, I woke up to another news story about how many arts festivals<br />

are on the brink of collapse, and every time an orchestra or arts<br />

company folds, or another venue or artist-friendly space closes, there<br />

is an outpouring of very understandable grief, and passionate conversation<br />

about the state of things and questions about what we “as a<br />

community” can do.<br />

It’s why I still eagerly await a print copy of this magazine - because<br />

it’s physical, tangible proof of all the music that is still alive and<br />

surviving and even thriving. Similarly, using Orchestra Canada’s<br />

fantastic database as a starting place, I was able to go from there to<br />

find 81 orchestras in Ontario alone whose websites indicated they<br />

were still active. This includes professional “regional” orchestras, auditioned<br />

or non-auditioned community ensembles and – perhaps more<br />

important than all of these – youth orchestras training programs. Best<br />

of all, when I zoom the map in on “Northern Ontario” (as we have<br />

defined it), I discover that my “less populated” zone is already home<br />

to eight of these organizations. (As a relatively recent transplant to the<br />

zone, I know that “discover” is a very loaded word – like thinking you<br />

have discovered the full extent of food when you open your refrigerator<br />

door. I am constantly “discovering” things that are obvious to my<br />

neighbours - musically and otherwise.)<br />

30 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Dave and Don Carroll -<br />

The Sons of Maxwell.<br />

Conductor William<br />

Rowson (top):<br />

Sudbury Symphony<br />

Orchestra and<br />

Stratford Symphony<br />

(499km apart).<br />

Conductor Joshua<br />

Wood: North Bay<br />

Symphony to Timmins<br />

Symphony (362km)<br />

Five out of eight!<br />

The Sudbury Symphony Orchestra used<br />

its season this year to bring in the finalists<br />

in their search for new leadership. They<br />

recently announced composer/conductor<br />

William Rowson as the new Artistic and<br />

Executive Director. Their <strong>April</strong> 20th program,<br />

Lights, Camera, Symphony will serve<br />

as his debut, which features the world<br />

premiere of Rowson’s Suite from the 2020<br />

Film Brotherhood, alongside some of John<br />

Williams most iconic film scores. Rowson<br />

also remains on as the music director for<br />

the Stratford Symphony Orchestra. It will<br />

be interesting to see whether this creates a<br />

model for collaboration and resource sharing<br />

across the north/south divide!<br />

Rowson is not the only northern conductor<br />

pulling double duty. Joshua Wood serves as<br />

Music Director for the symphonies in both<br />

North Bay and Timmins. His combined<br />

schedule for the 2023-24 season offers a<br />

small glimpse into what this kind of collaboration<br />

between orchestras can look like.<br />

The Timmins Symphony Orchestra has two<br />

concerts left in its main concert season – a<br />

collaboration with local favourites Dave and<br />

Don Carroll (The Sons of Maxwell) on <strong>April</strong> 6,<br />

and a Britain and Bohemia program featuring<br />

principal cellist Yu Pei with the Timmins<br />

Symphony Chorus on <strong>May</strong> 11. The North Bay Symphony is presenting<br />

a program of Brahms, Elgar and Haydn, featuring mezzo-soprano<br />

Rachel Wood on <strong>April</strong> 27, and closing their concert session with the<br />

Mendelssohn Octet on <strong>May</strong> 26. The final concert in Wood’s busy<br />

schedule brings players from both orchestra’s string sections together<br />

at St. Matthew’s Anglican Cathedral in Timmins for a joint chamber<br />

concert of works by Mendelssohn and Boccherini.<br />

Heading west, you find the Sault Symphony Orchestra under the<br />

leadership of Artistic Director Stephen Mallinger. Their four-concert<br />

season wraps up on <strong>May</strong> 12, with The SSO On Broadway. Continue<br />

along Highway 17 and you find yourself at the western (and southern)<br />

end of Zone 10, where the Thunder Bay Symphony Orchestra has four<br />

concerts left in their masterworks, pops and family programming this<br />

year. Of particular note: returning by popular demand, on <strong>April</strong> 13, is<br />

The Spirit Horse Returns – a concert production that combines traditional<br />

teachings, original visual art, music and an all-new orchestral<br />

score by Kevin Lau, with Jodi Contin and Andrew Balfour. Suitable<br />

for all ages, it tells “the story of the Ojibwe Horses, traditional helpers<br />

and spirit guides for<br />

First Nations and Metis<br />

people. It’s a journey<br />

of hope and reconciliation<br />

as Indigenous<br />

and non-Indigenous<br />

people come together to<br />

rescue the last of these<br />

horses and give them<br />

new life. Suitable for all<br />

ages, this production is<br />

an entertaining opportunity<br />

to learn about<br />

Indigenous cultures,<br />

reconciliation, and how<br />

we all play a part in the<br />

future of the land and its<br />

inhabitants.”<br />

Rhonda Snow is the Métis visual artist and Ojibwe<br />

Horse Knowledge Keeper who created the art<br />

seen in “The Spirit Horse Returns”. This painting<br />

is called The Small Spanish Mustang jumped<br />

over Thunder Mountain to Save the Breed.<br />

RHONDA SNOW<br />

ATTENTION ZONE 10!<br />

WHOLENOTE MUSICAL EVENT LISTINGS are free of<br />

charge and can be submitted by artists, venues or<br />

presenters at any time, from anywhere in Ontario.<br />

We invite listings for date-specific LIVE events (including<br />

events streamed live). They don’t all make it into print but<br />

are all made available to the public on our website.<br />

HOW TO LIST<br />

Use the convenient online form at<br />

thewholenote.com/applylistings<br />

or email listings to listings@thewholenote.com.<br />

Inquiries about WholeNote listings can be addressed to<br />

John Sharpe, Listings Editor at listings@thewholenote.com<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 31


ROB GOWAN<br />

Where does music live?<br />

Of the 81 orchestras in Ontario that I found, only a very few have<br />

primary or sole occupancy of a “concert hall.” A handful more have<br />

shared tenancy at one of the regional or municipal “performing arts<br />

centres.” The further north you go, the wider the variety of spaces you<br />

see orchestras using: schools, community centres, historical buildings,<br />

union halls, cultural centres. An overwhelming number of orchestras<br />

use churches too, in some capacity. As the conversation continues<br />

to evolve about “who belongs” - in the orchestra, composing for the<br />

orchestra and in the audience – we need to recognize that how we<br />

choose the spaces we use is a big part of the picture.<br />

Churches may be ideal rehearsal spaces, and acoustically good for<br />

orchestral music. But while the event you are hosting may be inclusive,<br />

and while your organization may have clearly outlined policies<br />

on Reconciliation, human rights, diversity and inclusion, it’s<br />

important to ask yourself whether the space actually lives up to those<br />

standards. At the very minimum it’s worth asking for the venue’s<br />

own written policies before you invite an audience into the space – so<br />

you spend your hard-earned venue money on spaces that are actively<br />

trying to make everyone feel safe. And no matter what the policies<br />

say, the question remains as to whether people with various lived<br />

experiences are ever going to feel safe enough to surrender to the<br />

magic of what is being created in a space where they are surrounded<br />

by religious iconography and text.<br />

A whole other issue needs to be considered when you think about<br />

church and faith-based spaces as homes for orchestral music: the issue<br />

of aging and often dwindling congregations. Back down in Zone 1<br />

(Toronto, this magazine’s birthplace), there are examples of solutions<br />

to this concern: in some cases music can become the thing that<br />

revitalizes a church that is committed to inclusivity (like Metropolitan<br />

Community Church, or Trinity-St. Paul’s). Or when a congregation is<br />

eventually faced with closing up altogether, you end up, sometimes<br />

The Harmony Centre in Owen Sound and The (new!) Hugh’s Room, in Toronto.<br />

years later, with spaces like the new digs for<br />

Hugh’s Room, or as you head north, other examples<br />

like the Harmony Centre in Owen Sound.<br />

Moving toward reconciliation<br />

As we head back towards Zone 10, I have to<br />

admit that as a southern Ontario-raised person,<br />

Thunder Bay was a city which largely existed in<br />

my consciousness because of “bad news.” Now,<br />

of all of the orchestras in my zone, Thunder Bay<br />

Symphony Orchestra seems to be the one putting<br />

Reconciliation most at the forefront in a way that<br />

is based in action and focused on creating dialogue<br />

that helps us start chipping away at these complicated<br />

questions.<br />

Their final concert of the season, <strong>May</strong> 3, is<br />

a free concert at Fort William Historical Park<br />

that has been an annual tradition since at least<br />

2018. This year’s edition of the concert, titled<br />

Noondaagotoon, features the Thunder Mountain<br />

Singers, Juno nominated cellist and composer<br />

Cris Derksen and guitarist Lewis Chapman.<br />

TBSO’s website says: “Noondaagotoon means play it (so it makes a<br />

sound) in Ojibway. If you’ve been to a Noondaagotoon concert, you<br />

know this to be true. This annual collaboration between the TBSO<br />

and Indigenous performers has become one of the highlights of our<br />

season. It is an exciting opportunity to strengthen long-standing relationships<br />

– and establish new ones – while creating space for musical<br />

reconciliation with Fort William First Nation.” Seems like a good<br />

precedent for presenters and performers everywhere.<br />

The Thunder Mountain Singers<br />

Back home…<br />

In my own community, the dedicated board at Grace United Church<br />

decided to disband and give up their home in their 100-year-old church,<br />

right downtown off the main intersection. The board was deliberate and<br />

careful as they wound down operations, in considering what they hoped<br />

the space would turn into, what kinds of other needs it could fill in the<br />

community, and what kind of legacy they wanted to leave in our township.<br />

They started by donating the grand piano to the public school.<br />

They also worked alongside Amanda Drury, a lifelong community<br />

member, and gave her the time and support in her goal of purchasing<br />

the space as a home for Rise - a community holistic wellness centre.<br />

“The goal” Drury says, “is to provide services to help youth, adults<br />

and seniors connect, heal and grow in their own community.” She<br />

envisions a space where all feel valued and feel a sense of belonging<br />

and connection with others. “The arts, specifically music, have the<br />

power to do just that. One of the best ways to gather and connect<br />

people is through the arts, through feeling and expressing ourselves<br />

through different mediums.” She is already making the space available<br />

to musicians, artists and other community-based practitioners.<br />

The sanctuary remains a beautiful acoustic space. It’s small, on the<br />

scale of church sanctuaries, and a whole symphony orchestra might<br />

be a bit of a squeeze. But the next time one of our northern organizations<br />

(or any other symphony) decides to send a chamber group on the<br />

road, our community is a<br />

bit more ready to give the<br />

music another home.<br />

Sophia Perlman grew<br />

up bouncing around<br />

the jazz, opera, theatre<br />

and community arts<br />

scene in Toronto. She<br />

now eagerly awaits<br />

the arrival of her<br />

monthly WholeNote to<br />

Hornepayne, Ontario,<br />

where she uses it to<br />

armchair-travel and<br />

inform her Internet<br />

video consumption.<br />

32 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com<br />

RICK JACOBSON


BEAT BY BEAT PART ONE: theDownBeat<br />

THE COC’S PERRYN LEECH<br />

IN CONVERSATION<br />

compiled and edited by<br />

MICHAEL ZARATHUS-COOK<br />

The design team of Renaud Doucet & André Barbe hatched their concept for Scottish Opera’s Don Pasquale among the cats of Rome in 2014.<br />

KK DUNDAS<br />

GAETZ PHOTOGRAPHY<br />

“It’s a story that you could say has an old, overused<br />

plot that’s not relevant. It’s about an older man who<br />

believes he’s irresistible to women. This is a different take<br />

on that story, but he’s not going to take no for an answer.<br />

He wants to be able to conquer and have his conquests.”<br />

Perryn Leech<br />

Perryn Leech – General Director of the Canadian Opera Company<br />

– is speaking here about Don Pasquale, one of the three final shows<br />

of the current Canadian Opera Company’s season, in an interview<br />

that ranged from from his mission to support new operas to the<br />

opportunities and implications of sharing a venue with the National<br />

Ballet of Canada (NBoC). After a season of staples of the canon, the<br />

COC is closing strong with a trio of seldom-staged works, including<br />

the world premiere of a COC-commissioned work. “The good thing<br />

is that it’s done in a very funny way,” continues Leech on the topic of<br />

Pasquale. “The season is quite heavy, so I think having some levity in<br />

there will be welcomed by our cast.”<br />

In contrast to that levity is Luigi Cherubini’s Medea, which follows<br />

Don Pasquale in <strong>May</strong>. It’s an opera that lives or dies based on the<br />

soprano singing the title role. When asked what he’s looking forward<br />

to the most in Sondra Radvanovsky’s take, Leech responds in his characteristically<br />

colourful way:<br />

“It’s a bit like asking, ‘What are you most looking forward to in a<br />

LeBron James performance?’ This is a world superstar who can sing<br />

anything and I will be entranced. She was the one that approached<br />

me and said, ‘I really want to sing Medea. Are you interested in doing<br />

that?’ The reason it’s rarely done is not the quality of the music, but<br />

the fact that it’s so impossible to cast. So when Sondra comes to you<br />

with an idea like that, ‘Yes, let’s see how we can make that work.’”<br />

Leech began his role at the COC amidst the roiling waves of the<br />

pandemic, tasked with preparing the company to keep the programming<br />

momentum going during the lockdowns, and preparing for<br />

live performances when the opportunity arose. In the interview he<br />

looks back on his first time visiting the Four Seasons Centre for the<br />

Performing Arts to attend a COC production.<br />

“I walked up from Union Station and knew it was just past the<br />

Hilton Hotel. There’s a slight bend in the road on University from<br />

Union Station, and I saw this hive of activity. The foyer was lit up,<br />

and there were people inside. It looked like such a welcoming space,<br />

which is different from some theatres where you just see the sign of<br />

the show. This was clearly a communal meeting place to share art.<br />

It was wildly exciting to see it for the first time and know that I was<br />

going to be part of a 2,000-person audience that night.”<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 33


MARTY SOHL<br />

HAUI<br />

Sondra Radvanovsky in Medea, The Metropolitan Opera, 2022<br />

Leech also spoke in the interview about how the Canadian Opera<br />

Company Theatre on Front Street offers creative opportunities that the<br />

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts cannot encompass.<br />

“We want to present stories that haven’t been told on the operatic<br />

stage in Toronto. Opera is an expensive business, so a smaller<br />

and more intimate space is a good starting place for someone new to<br />

opera. … You can really see the sweat on people’s faces and see them<br />

get into the story in a way that is hard to do in a larger auditorium.<br />

You can feel the impact of the human voice pressing on your chest.<br />

It’s a deeply engaging and immersive way of seeing opera. What I<br />

want to do in that space is much more of that.”<br />

Neema Bickersteth<br />

The season’s final show is a case in point: Aportia Cryptych: a Black<br />

Opera for Portia White appears to be an example of the COC walking the<br />

walk in response to all the recent talk about more diverse stories in opera.<br />

“Portia White was a Nova Scotian Black singer who sang opera<br />

and would have been an absolute world superstar. However, she<br />

wasn’t able to perform on stages because of rules that didn’t allow<br />

Black singers and performers to be on stage. So the telling of her story<br />

is way overdue. Of course, there are more opportunities now, but<br />

you also have to consider if there are still those kinds of barriers in<br />

place for Black singers today. Barriers are coming down, but are they<br />

coming down quickly enough?”<br />

Created by composer Sean <strong>May</strong>es and director/librettist HAUI,<br />

Aportia Cryptych runs June 14 to 16, with Neema Bickersteth,<br />

Adrienne Danrich and SATE, in the roles of Portia Body, Portia Spirit,<br />

and Portia Soul respectively.<br />

Michael Zarathus-Cook is Editor-in-Chief of CANNOPY Visual<br />

and Performing Arts Newsletter. The interview with Perryn Leech<br />

quoted here appears in tandem with a similarly-themed conversation<br />

with Hope Muir, Artistic Director of the National Ballet of<br />

Canada, in the Hubs & Huddles series presented by CANNOPY. You<br />

can access the full story by visiting www.performingarts.substack.<br />

com and subscribing to Hubs & Huddles.<br />

BEAT BY BEAT PART TWO: OPERA ROUNDUP<br />

This thing we call opera happens in a diverse range of<br />

spaces and forms: from plush-seated theatres to barebones<br />

settings, and from in-concert presentations to<br />

elaborately staged..<br />

Below are some samples to tempt your appetites. You’ll find more in our<br />

EVENTS BY DATE starting on page 36, or by searching “opera” online at<br />

thewholenote.com/index.php/listings/just-ask.<br />

All is Love <strong>April</strong> 11-14<br />

Imagine a world where “Amour” cannot resist getting involved, for<br />

better or worse, in the emotions and choices of everyone else. Opera<br />

Atelier’s spring production combines music of the French Baroque<br />

with 19th and 20th century repertoire on this theme, in a blended,<br />

fully staged program of magnificent singing, ballet and orchestral<br />

music. Conductor David Fallis leads a stellar cast including tenor<br />

Colin Ainsworth, soprano Measha Brueggergosman-Lee, tenor Jesse<br />

Blumberg, and soprano Meghan Lindsay. (Koerner Hall)<br />

El huésped del sevillano (The Guest at the Inn) <strong>May</strong> 3-5<br />

A wealthy young man arrives in Seville seeking adventure, meets a<br />

group of gypsies including a beautiful singer and things, of course, get<br />

complicated. This 1926 zarzuela with music by Jacinto Guerrero, blends<br />

folk elements with the operatic; and spoken dialogue with some lively<br />

dancing. Toronto Operetta Theatre, founded by Guillermo Silva Marin,<br />

is Canada’s only professional operetta company. They have presented<br />

more than 58 operettas, some seldom seen, since their 1985 production<br />

of Lehar’s The Count of Luxembourg. (Jane Mallett Theatre)<br />

The Hobbit (<strong>May</strong> 31- June 2)<br />

Dean Burry’s critically acclaimed opera The Hobbit was commissioned<br />

for a 2004 premiere by The Canadian Children’s Opera<br />

Company, and remounted in 2016. With a cast of over 100 children<br />

and youth, and accompanied by a chamber orchestra, Bilbo, Gandalf<br />

and their companions embark on an adventure replete with goblins,<br />

wolves, spiders; a dethroned dwarf-king, a mysterious ring and a<br />

terrifying dragon. Suitable for all ages. (Harbourfront Centre Theatre.)<br />

Opera Masterpieces with Jonathan Kravtchenko (<strong>April</strong> 5) presented<br />

by Alliance Française features soprano Antonina Laskarzhevska and baritone<br />

Bohdan Kirieiev, with pianist Jonathan Kravtchenko and violinist<br />

Daniel Temnik, in a program of mainly Mozart and Rossini. Kravtchenko<br />

follows it with Tango for Two (<strong>May</strong> 5 and 17) about a sailor and his<br />

soulmate in a Nova Scotia coastal town, with music and libretto by<br />

Kravtchenko and the same soloists, in a new concert-opera, “where dance<br />

and opera unite in a revolutionary harmony.” (Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre)<br />

La battaglia di Legnano (<strong>April</strong> 7) wraps up VOICEBOX | Opera in<br />

Concert 50th anniversary season with a rarely seen Verdi opera set in<br />

1176 against the backdrop of the Lombard League’s triumph over Frederic<br />

Barbarossa at Legnano, and so welll-received at its Rome premiere in 1849<br />

that the audience demanded the fourth act be repeated. (Jane Mallett<br />

Theatre.) VOICEBOX | Opera in Concert’s own remarkable history –<br />

presenting more than 158 operas, 90 of which were Canadian premieres –<br />

will be likewise applauded at Opera in Concert’s 50th Birthday (<strong>May</strong> 11)<br />

– with a salon in the intimate Edward Jackman Centre.<br />

Iron Chef d’Orchestre (<strong>May</strong> 21), co-hosted by 15-year Tapestry<br />

Opera regular Jennifer Tung and Keith Klassen, is being pitched as a<br />

“delicious” mix of classical and opera, “with a little game show, some<br />

improv and maybe even some ventriloquism,” and with the audience<br />

invited to “participate in the creation process.” Special guests include<br />

Krisztina Szabó. (Theatre Passe Muraille). Le Kitchen Party (<strong>May</strong> 22),<br />

another culinary-themed Tapestry Opera affair, features Julianne<br />

Gallant who brings infectiously warm Acadian traditional and<br />

contemporary compositions to Toronto, with everyone encouraged<br />

to join in singing and dancing that will transport you to small-town<br />

Maritime Canada: Jacques Arsenault, tenor; Marie Andrée Gaudet,<br />

violin; Pierre-André Doucet, piano (Theatre Passe Muraille)<br />

34 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


BEAT BY BEAT PART THREE: CHORAL ROUNDUP<br />

<strong>April</strong> and <strong>May</strong> in Ontario are a time of great choral<br />

activity. A whole season of singing together typically<br />

culminates in concerts that celebrate a collective love for<br />

the music shared and the love of sharing the music.<br />

Friends and family in the audiences rub elbows with people who just<br />

like the sound of many voices raised together in song, and also people<br />

who think that maybe…just maybe…they’d like to do some singing<br />

themselves. They “audition” choirs by going to concerts.<br />

The WholeNote’s “Canary Pages” is our annual choral directory. The<br />

online version includes profiles of many Ontario choirs, with more<br />

being added all the time. On page 55 of this print edition you’ll find an<br />

index that includes “teasers” for them.<br />

Our printed event listings include 75 choral performances, with 56<br />

different choirs named. Online, our online event listings are updated<br />

weekly and searchable for “choral.”<br />

You can find the online Canary Pages and the updated event listings<br />

by visiting thewholenote.com<br />

Here are a few samples of what all the singing’s about. Details are in<br />

the event listings, starting on page 36!<br />

ANNIVERSARIES<br />

The Upper Canada Choristers celebrate their 30th anniversary with<br />

their “New Beginnings” concert on <strong>May</strong> 10, conducted by Laurie Evan<br />

Fraser.The UCC’s accomplished Latin ensemble Cantemos, pianist Hye<br />

Won (Cecilia) Lee, and the Boys’ Choir of Maurice Cody Junior Public<br />

School directed by Carole Snow are also featured in the performance,<br />

which includes four premieres - one by a grade five student.<br />

The Amadeus Choir of Greater Toronto, conducted by Kathleen<br />

Allan, celebrates their 50th anniversary season this year. “As we reflect<br />

on our five decades of artistic excellence, we recognize that it has only<br />

been made possible through the dedication of our community.” On<br />

<strong>May</strong> 15 they are presenting Haydn’s Creation, with soloists Midori<br />

Marsh, soprano; Andrew Haji, tenor; Tyler Duncan, baritone; and the<br />

Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Common Thread Community Chorus, conducted by Isabel Bernaus<br />

is an 80-voice SATB choir that promotes community and social<br />

justice through music. “Sing On!” is their 25th anniversary concert,<br />

on <strong>May</strong> 25, with guest artists Anne Lederman and Ian Bell. “With our<br />

diverse and meaningful repertoire, we aim to change the world one<br />

song at a time – and have fun doing it!”<br />

VOICEBOX | Opera In Concert is celebrating their 50th anniversary<br />

this year, and the OIC Chorus, currently directed by Robert Cooper,<br />

has sung in nearly every production since 1978. But the chorus itself<br />

has also had its own rich musical life, performing with orchestras,<br />

at festivals, and in shared concerts with other choirs. They sang the<br />

Toronto premiere of Paul Winter’s jazz mass Missa Gaia, and they<br />

sang in R. Murray Schafer’s Apocalypsis during the International<br />

Choral Festival. VOICEBOX | VOICEBOX | OIC has two performances<br />

upcoming, Verdi’s La battaglia di Legnano (<strong>April</strong> 7) and a salon,<br />

Opera in Concert’s 50th Birthday (<strong>May</strong> 11).<br />

The Upper Canada Choristers<br />

UPCOMING CHORAL CONCERTS<br />

(Greater Toronto Area unless otherwise noted)<br />

Apr 13 Healey Willan Singers. Spring Delights<br />

Apr 14 Toronto Classical Singers. Morning and Evening - In the<br />

Afternoon.<br />

Apr 20 Elmer Iseler Singers. Triple Choir Splendour: Sonic Light<br />

Apr 20 Toronto Beach Chorale. W. A. Mozart: Requiem<br />

Apr 20 Toronto Mendelssohn Choir. Singsation: Harmonizing<br />

Resistance – The Power of Music in Social Change.<br />

Apr 27 Mississauga Chamber Singers. Fauré’s Requiem<br />

Apr 27 Toronto Mendelssohn Choir. Verdi’s Requiem<br />

Apr 28 Achill Choral Society. Illuminare (Orangeville)<br />

Apr 28 Metropolitan United Church. Gala Hymn Festival<br />

Apr 28 The Edison Singers. Warm Breath of Spring: Folksongs &<br />

Spirituals (Niagara-on-the-Lake). Also <strong>May</strong> 4 (Toronto) & <strong>May</strong> 5 (Elora).<br />

Apr 30 Toronto Mendelssohn Choir. Verdi’s Requiem<br />

<strong>May</strong> 02 Serenata Singers. Sing Me A Love Song. Also <strong>May</strong> 3.<br />

<strong>May</strong> 04 Karen Schuessler Singers. Secrets of Old South (London)<br />

<strong>May</strong> 04 North Halton Community Singers. Spring Concert: What a<br />

Wonderful World (Georgetown)<br />

<strong>May</strong> 04 Yorkminstrels Show Choir. Celebrating 50 Years of<br />

Song and Dance<br />

<strong>May</strong> 05 Toronto Chamber Choir. The Bard, Reimagined (Kaffeemusik)<br />

<strong>May</strong> 05 Toronto Children’s Chorus. True Colours: Let Your Light Shine!<br />

<strong>May</strong>10 Exultate Chamber Singers. Home in the 6ix–Part 2!<br />

<strong>May</strong> 11 Oriana Singers. A Tribute to Gordon Lightfoot. (Port Hope)<br />

<strong>May</strong> 11 Orpheus Choir of Toronto. The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci<br />

<strong>May</strong> 11 Peterborough Singers. St Matthew’s Passion (Peterborough)<br />

<strong>May</strong> 11 Vesnivka Choir. Spring Concert<br />

<strong>May</strong> 11 VOCA Chorus of Toronto. Earth, Sea & Sky III<br />

<strong>May</strong> 13 West Toronto Community Choir. Singing Across the Generations<br />

<strong>May</strong> 25 St. Elizabeth Scola Cantorum. Vespers Spring Concert<br />

<strong>May</strong> 25 VIVA Singers Toronto. Poetry in Motion<br />

<strong>May</strong> 25 Toronto Mendelssohn Choir. Take the Podium<br />

Conducting Symposium<br />

<strong>May</strong> 31 Tafelmusik. A Handel Celebration. Also June 1 & 2.<br />

Jun 01 Etobicoke Centennial Choir. Musica del sur<br />

Jun 01 Jubilate Singers. Requiems<br />

Jun 01 SoundCrowd. Back to Broadway Live<br />

Jun 01 Voices Chamber Choir. All-Night Vigil<br />

Jun 02 Jubilate Singers. Requiems. (Newmarket)<br />

Compiled and edited by WholeNote staff<br />

TORONTO CITY OPERA’S MACINA COMPETITION<br />

Saturday <strong>May</strong> 11, 2pm, Church of the Redeemer, Toronto<br />

Founded in 1946 by James Rosselino, and transformed by<br />

Giuseppe Macina into Toronto Opera Repertoire in 1971,<br />

Toronto City Opera was reborn again in 2017.<br />

The first annual Giuseppe Macina Operatic Voices Competition,<br />

made possible by a generous donation from Anthony Fusco Sr,<br />

honours Macina’s legacy of championing Canadian opera artists of<br />

tomorrow and culminates in a live public performance featuring<br />

eight young Canadian opera singers. Thanks to the generosity of the<br />

Azrieli Foundation, TCO will welcome these eight Emerging Opera<br />

Artists to their Opera Mentoring Program for each opera in their<br />

season. torontocityopera.com/macina-competition<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 35


LIVE OR ONLINE | Apr 1 to Jun 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Monday <strong>April</strong> 1<br />

● 7:30: Don Wright Faculty of Music. Western<br />

University Salsa Band. Paul Davenport<br />

Theatre, Talbot College, Western University,<br />

1151 Richmond St. N., London. 519-661-3767<br />

or www.music.uwo.ca/events. Free.<br />

Tuesday <strong>April</strong> 2<br />

● 12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation.<br />

Lunchtime Chamber Music: Music for Clarinets.<br />

Clarinet chamber group; Peter Stoll,<br />

leader. Yorkminster Park Baptist Church,<br />

1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167 or www.yorkminsterpark.com.<br />

Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 1:00: St. James Cathedral. Tuesday Organ<br />

Recital. Sarah Mole, voice; Nathan Jeffrey,<br />

organ. Cathedral Church of St. James,<br />

106 King St. E. 416-364-7865 or www.<br />

stjamescathedral.ca/recitals. Free. Donations<br />

encouraged.<br />

● 6:00: Don Wright Faculty of Music. Electroacoustic<br />

Composers Concert. Von Kuster<br />

Hall, Music Building, Western University,<br />

1151 Richmond St. N., London. 519-661-3767<br />

or www.music.uwo.ca/events. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Brantford Music Club. The Campbell<br />

Trio. Artsong, chamber, and opera. James<br />

Campbell, clarinet; Leslie Fagan, soprano;<br />

Angela Park, piano. Sanderson Centre for the<br />

Performing Arts, 88 Dalhousie St., Brantford.<br />

1-800-265-0710 or www.brantfordmusicclub.<br />

com. $30; $10(st); Free(elementary st).<br />

● 7:30: Don Wright Faculty of Music. Western<br />

University Pop Band. Paul Davenport<br />

Theatre, Talbot College, Western University,<br />

1151 Richmond St. N., London. 519-661-3767<br />

or www.music.uwo.ca/events. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Shen Yun Performing Arts. Shen Yun.<br />

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts,<br />

145 Queen St. W. 1-877-663-7469 or tickets@<br />

fldfca.org. From $100. Also Mar 30(2:00 &<br />

7:30), Apr 3(2:00), 4(7:30), 5(7:30), 6(2:00 &<br />

7:30), 7(2:00).<br />

● 8:00: Hugh’s Room Live. A’Court, Spiegel &<br />

Vinnick. Charlie A’Court, guitar; Lloyd Spiegel,<br />

guitar, Suzie Vinnick, vocals. <strong>29</strong>6 Broadview<br />

Ave. www.showpass.com/acourt-spiegel-vinnick.<br />

$35.<br />

Wednesday <strong>April</strong> 3<br />

● 2:00: Shen Yun Performing Arts. Shen<br />

Yun. See Apr 2. Also Apr 4(7:30), 5(7:30),<br />

6(2:00 & 7:30), 7(2:00).<br />

● 3:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. World Rock<br />

Symphony Orchestra. OLG Stage at Fallsview<br />

Casino, 6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara Falls.<br />

ticketmaster.ca. From $59. Also 8:30pm,<br />

Apr 4(3pm, 8:30pm), 5(9pm).<br />

● 7:30: Don Wright Faculty of Music. Student<br />

Composers Chamber Music Concert. Von<br />

Kuster Hall, Music Building, Western University,<br />

1151 Richmond St. N., London. 519-661-<br />

3767 or www.music.uwo.ca/events. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Soundstreams. TD Encounters:<br />

Recovered Voices - Piano Works of Unsung<br />

Masters. Includes a discussion surrounding<br />

the relationship of featured composers in<br />

their historical and musical eras, culminating<br />

with an audience Q&A. Works by Margaret<br />

Bonds, Ian Cusson, Robert Nathaniel Dett,<br />

and Florence Price. Elijah Stevens, piano;<br />

Irene Huang, piano; Jesse Plessis, piano.<br />

Temerty Theatre, Telus Centre, 273 Bloor St.<br />

W. www.Soundstreams.ca. Free.<br />

● 8:00: Show One Productions. The Tragedy<br />

of Hamlet: Prince of Denmark. Created<br />

by Robert Lepage & Guillaume Côté. Elgin and<br />

Wingtergarden Theatre Centre, 189 Yonge<br />

St. www.ticketmaster.ca. From $57. Also<br />

Apr 4(8pm), 5(8pm), 6(2pm & 8pm), 7(2pm).<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

R. Strauss’s Don Quixote. Ligeti: Lontano;<br />

Wagner: Prelude to Act I of Parsifal; Samy<br />

Moussa: Trombone Concerto (North American<br />

première/TSO Co-commission); R.<br />

Strauss: Don Quixote. Jörgen van Rijen, trombone;<br />

Michael Casimir, viola; Joseph Johnson,<br />

cello; Gustavo Gimeno, conductor. Roy Thomson<br />

Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. From<br />

$35. Also Apr 6.<br />

● 8:30: Fallsview Casino Resort. World Rock<br />

Symphony Orchestra. OLG Stage at Fallsview<br />

Casino, 6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara Falls.<br />

ticketmaster.ca. From $59. See Apr 3(3pm).<br />

Also Apr 4(3pm, 8:30pm), 5(9pm).<br />

Thursday <strong>April</strong> 4<br />

● 12:00 noon: Metropolitan United Church.<br />

Noon at Met: Glenn Gould School Chamber<br />

Music Showcase. Metropolitan United<br />

Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331 x226.<br />

Freewill donation.<br />

WOMEN’S MUSICAL CLUB OF TORONTO<br />

APRIL 4, <strong>2024</strong> | 1.30 PM<br />

JANE COOP<br />

piano<br />

416-923-7052 | wmct.on.ca<br />

● 1:30: Music in the Afternoon. Jane Coop.<br />

Works by Haydn, Beethoven, Ravel, Debussy,<br />

and Chopin. Jane Koop, piano. Walter Hall,<br />

Edward Johnson Building, University of<br />

Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-923-7052 X1.<br />

$50; free(st with ID at door). NOTE: Artist and<br />

repertoire have changed.<br />

● 3:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. World<br />

Rock Symphony Orchestra. See Apr 3. Also<br />

Apr 4(8:30pm), 5(9pm).<br />

● 5:30: Environmental Defence Canada.<br />

<strong>2024</strong> Environmental Defence Gala. Elin Kesley,<br />

speaker. Musical guests: Chris McKhool from<br />

Sultans of String; Dr. Duke Redbird, Elder,<br />

poet, broadcaster and filmmaker; Alyssa Delbaere-Sawchuk<br />

of the Metis Fiddler Quartet;<br />

Marc Merilainen, singer & songwriter;<br />

and Shannon Thunderbird, singer & songwriter.<br />

Toronto Reference Library, 789 Yonge<br />

St. www.act.environmentaldefence.ca/<br />

page/142631/event/1. $500(Gala ticket);<br />

$5000(Table).<br />

● 6:00: Arraymusic. Prepared Guitar<br />

Workshop with Nilan Perera. Array Space,<br />

155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019. PWYC. Four<br />

week course to <strong>April</strong> 11; Bring an electric guitar<br />

and amplifier. Also Mar 21, 28, Apr 11.<br />

● 7:00: Art Gallery of Ontario. Tafelmusik:<br />

Making Herself Heard. Works of Élisabeth<br />

Jacquet de la Guerre, Isabella Leonarda,<br />

Marianne Martinez, and the enigmatic Mrs.<br />

Philarmonica. Geneviève Gilardeau, violin;<br />

Cristina Zacharias, violin; Michael Unterman,<br />

cello; Charlotte Nediger, harpsichord. Art Gallery<br />

of Ontario, Walker Court, 317 Dundas St.<br />

W. www.ago.ca/events/tafelmusik-makingherself-heard.<br />

A seated performance free<br />

with general admission. Also <strong>May</strong> 5.<br />

● 7:30: Brampton On Stage. RENT Presented<br />

by Brampton Music Theatre. The Rose<br />

Brampton, 1 Theatre Lane, Brampton. 905-<br />

874-2800. From $20. Also Apr 5(7:30pm),<br />

6(1pm & 7:30pm), 7(1pm).<br />

● 7:30: Burlington Performing Arts Centre.<br />

Amanda Martinez. Burlington Performing<br />

Arts Centre - Community Studio Theatre,<br />

440 Locust St., Burlington. www.burlingtonpac.ca<br />

or 905-681-6000. From $49.50.<br />

● 7:30: Shen Yun Performing Arts. Shen Yun.<br />

See Apr 2. Also Apr 5(7:30), 6(2:00 & 7:30),<br />

7(2:00).<br />

● 8:00: FabCollab. F for Feria. Flamenco<br />

dance and music. Isaac Tovar, dancer; Laura<br />

Peralta, dancer; Bárbara Martínez, singer;<br />

Alison MacDonald, dancer; Shirlita “La Pili”,<br />

singer; Nicolas Hernandez, guitar; Benjamin<br />

Barille, guitar; Nasrine Rahmani, percussion.<br />

918 Bathurst Centre for Culture, Arts, Media<br />

and Education, 918 Bathurst St. 647-768-5288<br />

or www.fabcollab.ca/fforfamilia. $53.32(Premium),<br />

$39(regular admission).<br />

● 8:00: Show One Productions. The Tragedy<br />

of Hamlet: Prince of Denmark. See Apr 3. Also<br />

Apr 5(8pm), 6(2pm & 8pm), 7(2pm).<br />

● 8:30: Fallsview Casino Resort. World<br />

Rock Symphony Orchestra. See Apr 3. Also<br />

Apr 5(9pm).<br />

WHOLENOTE Event Listings are free of charge<br />

and can be submitted by artists, venues or presenters at any time.<br />

WE INCLUDE<br />

Daily listings for date-specific events such as live and/or livestream<br />

performances, workshops, etc.<br />

A directory of alternative venues - mainly clubs mostly jazz.<br />

Listings for ongoing, on-demand and other music-related activities not<br />

tied to a specific date.<br />

HOW TO LIST<br />

Use the convenient online form at thewholenote.com/applylistings<br />

or email listings to listings@thewholenote.com.<br />

Changes to listings already submitted can usually be accommodated.<br />

Please note, we do not take listings over the phone.<br />

Inquiries about WholeNote listings should be addressed to<br />

John Sharpe, Listings Editor at listings@thewholenote.com<br />

DEADLINES<br />

Weekly Listings Update (our e-letter)<br />

& JUST ASK (our searchable online listings)<br />

Eligible listings received by 6pm Tuesday, each week, will be included<br />

in the following Sunday’s e-letter, and simultaneously posted to our<br />

searchable online listings database.<br />

Please note: the weekly listing e-letter typically looks one week ahead. The<br />

Just Ask database is searchable as far into the future as we have listings.<br />

The WholeNote, print magazine<br />

Our next print issue, <strong>Volume</strong> <strong>29</strong> no.6 covers June to August <strong>2024</strong>.<br />

The print listings submission deadline is Tuesday <strong>May</strong> 7.<br />

See page 8 for a list of 2023/24 publication dates.<br />

Advertising inquiries should be addressed to<br />

Karen Ages at advertising@thewholenote.com<br />

REGISTER TO RECEIVE THE WEEKLY LISTINGS UPDATE at thewholenote.com/newsletter<br />

36 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Friday <strong>April</strong> 5<br />

● 12:00 noon: TYT Theatre. The Hunting<br />

of the Snark. Recommended for ages<br />

6-12. Wychwood Theatre, 601 Christie St.<br />

boxoffice@tyttheatre.com. From $31. Also<br />

Apr 6(12pm & 3pm), 7(12pm & 3pm), 13(12pm<br />

& 3pm), 14(12pm & 3pm).<br />

● 12:10: Music at St. Andrew’s. Noon Time<br />

Recital. Kapustin: Etude No.1; Ravel: Le<br />

Tombeau de Couperin (selections); Clara<br />

Schumann: Nocturne Op.6 No.2; and other<br />

four-hand music for piano. Lisa Tahara, piano;<br />

Jayne Sakurako Abe, piano. St. Andrew’s<br />

Presbyterian Church, 73 Simcoe St. 416-593-<br />

5600 x220. Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 5:15: Kingston Baroque Consort. Celebration!:<br />

Dazzling Baroque Showpieces.<br />

Bach: Orchestral Suite No.1 in C BWV 1066;<br />

Mouret: Suite of Symphonies for Brass,<br />

Strings & Timpani No.1. St. James Anglican<br />

Church, 10 Union St, Kingston. legerek@<br />

queensu.ca or 613-217-5099 or at Novel Idea,<br />

156 Princess St or www.livemusickingston.<br />

ca/kingston-baroque-consort-2023/. $25;<br />

$10(st); Free(under 17).<br />

● 7:30: Brampton On Stage. RENT Presented<br />

by Brampton Music Theatre. See Apr 4. Also<br />

Apr 6(1pm & 7:30pm), 7(1pm).<br />

● 7:30: Don Wright Faculty of Music. Western<br />

University Wind Ensemble Concert: To<br />

Amuse and Beguile. Paul Davenport Theatre,<br />

Talbot College, Western University,<br />

1151 Richmond St. N., London. 519-661-3767<br />

or www.music.uwo.ca/events. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Shen Yun Performing Arts. Shen Yun.<br />

See Apr 2. Also Apr 6(2:00 & 7:30), 7(2:00).<br />

● 8:00: Alliance Française de Toronto. Opera<br />

Masterpieces with Jonathan Kravtchenko.<br />

Mozart: Don Giovanni’s Aria from Don Giovanni;<br />

Rossini: “Largo al factotum” from The<br />

Barber of Seville: Mozart: Papageno Scene<br />

from The Magic Flute: and other works.<br />

Antonina Laskarzhevska, soprano; Bohdan<br />

Kirieiev: baritone; Jonathan Kravtchenko,<br />

piano; Daniel Temnik, violin. Spadina Theatre,<br />

Alliance Française de Toronto, 24 Spadina Rd.<br />

www.alliance-francaise.ca. $20; $15(sr/st).<br />

● 8:00: Hugh’s Room Live. Jack de Keyzer.<br />

<strong>29</strong>6 Broadview Ave. www.showpass.com/<br />

jack-de-keyzer-2. $40.<br />

● 8:00: Link Music Lab. Experimental Link<br />

Series: Pouya Ehsaei Trio with Sadio Sissokho<br />

and Peter Lutek. Pouya Ehsaei, electronics;<br />

Sadio Sissokho, kora/percussion/vocals;<br />

Peter Lutek, reeds. Small World Music Centre,<br />

Studio 101, 180 Shaw St. 416-536-5439.<br />

$30; $20(Early Bird).<br />

● 8:00: Old Mill Toronto. Fever: A Peggy Lee<br />

Celebration with Alisha Oliver. Jazz, pop, big<br />

band, swing, blues, Latin jazz. 21 Old Mill Rd.<br />

www.oldmilltoronto.com/event/alisha-oliver.<br />

$20. Minimum $30 food & beverage spend.<br />

Restricted to ages 19+. Dinner at 6pm. Show<br />

at 8pm.<br />

● 8:00: Royal Conservatory of Music. 21C<br />

Music Festival Series: Laurie Anderson.<br />

Koerner Hall, TELUS Centre, 273 Bloor St. W.<br />

416-408-0208; of www.rcmusic.com/performance.<br />

SOLD OUT.<br />

● 8:00: Show One Productions. The Tragedy<br />

of Hamlet: Prince of Denmark. See Apr 3. Also<br />

Apr 6(2pm & 8pm), 7(2pm).<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Consort. Madrigal Mania.<br />

Artistic Direction by Paul Jenkins. Trinity-St.<br />

Paul’s Centre, Jeanne Lamon Hall,<br />

427 Bloor St. W. www.torontoconsort.org<br />

or 416-964-6337. From $20. Also Apr 6.<br />

POSTPONED.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Symphony<br />

Exploder. A live listening party to<br />

explore Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring, presented<br />

by Gustavo Gimeno and Hrishikesh<br />

Hirway in a stageside conversation with the<br />

full orchestra as they dissect the mesmerizing<br />

layers of Stravinsky’s work accompanied<br />

by live replays of musical sections and microscopic<br />

insight into the orchestra in action<br />

culminating in a complete performance of<br />

the work. Gustavo Gimeno, conductor. Roy<br />

Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375 or<br />

www.tso.ca. From $35.<br />

● 9:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. World Rock<br />

Symphony Orchestra. See Apr 3.<br />

Saturday <strong>April</strong> 6<br />

● 12:00 noon: TYT Theatre. The Hunting<br />

of the Snark. See Apr 5. Also Apr 6(3pm),<br />

7(12pm & 3pm), 13(12pm & 3pm), 14(12pm<br />

& 3pm).<br />

● 1:00: Brampton On Stage. RENT Presented<br />

by Brampton Music Theatre. See Apr 4. Also<br />

Apr 6(7:30pm), 7(1pm).<br />

● 2:00: Marilyn I. Walker School of Fine<br />

and Performing Arts. Student Solo Recitals,<br />

Spring <strong>2024</strong>. Andrew Hayes, organ. St. Thomas’s<br />

Anglican Church, 99 Ontario St., St.<br />

Catharines. 905-688-0722 or boxoffice@<br />

firstontariopac.ca. Free.<br />

● 2:00: Shen Yun Performing Arts. Shen<br />

Yun. See Apr 2. Also Apr 6(7:30), 7(2:00).<br />

● 2:00: Show One Productions. The Tragedy<br />

of Hamlet: Prince of Denmark. See Apr 3. Also<br />

Apr 6(8pm), 7(2pm).<br />

● 3:00: Don Wright Faculty of Music. Symphonic<br />

Band Concert: Emblems of Spring.<br />

Katahj Copley: Riptides; Alfred Reed: The<br />

Hounds of Spring; Percy Grainger: Ye Banks<br />

and Braes O’ Bonnie Doon; Roger Cichy:<br />

Divertimento; E. E. Begley: National Emblem.<br />

Shawn Cabot, music director. Paul Davenport<br />

Theatre, Talbot College, Western University,<br />

1151 Richmond St. N., London. 519-661-3767<br />

or www.music.uwo.ca/events. Free.<br />

● 3:00: TYT Theatre. The Hunting of the<br />

Snark. See Apr 5. Also Apr 7(12pm & 3pm),<br />

13(12pm & 3pm), 14(12pm & 3pm).<br />

● 4:00: Music Toronto. Celebration of Small<br />

Ensembles. Includes a short stretch and chat<br />

between sets. Refreshments will be available<br />

Celebration of<br />

Small Ensembles<br />

<strong>April</strong> 6, 4pm<br />

Shhh! Ensemble<br />

Obsidiana Duo<br />

APERTURE ROOM<br />

340 Yonge Street<br />

music-toronto.com<br />

for purchase. Shhh! Ensemble & Obsidiana<br />

Duo. Aperture Room, Thornton-Smith Building,<br />

340 Yonge St. www.musictoronto.com.<br />

$40(single); $20(st/arts).<br />

● 4:00: Friends of Music at St. Thomas’s.<br />

Elinor Frey: Cello Suites of Bach. Bach: Cello<br />

Suites Nos. 1, 4 & 5. St. Thomas’s Anglican<br />

Church, 383 Huron St. www.stthomas.on.ca<br />

or 416-483-5488. Pay What You Wish ($40<br />

suggested). 3:15pm: Pre-recital talk. See<br />

also Apr 7.<br />

● 4:30: Beach United Church. Jazz & Reflection<br />

with The Octokats. Works by Henry Mancini.<br />

140 Wineva Ave. 416-691-8082 or www.<br />

beachunitedchurch.com. Pay what you can.<br />

● 6:00: St. Paul’s United Church (Dundas).<br />

Piano Concert. Works by Bach, Mozart, Prokofiev,<br />

Scott Joplin, Herbie Hancock, and<br />

others. Benjamin Schmaltz, piano. <strong>29</strong> Park St.<br />

W., Dundas. 403-437-8267. $25; $20(sr/st);<br />

$10(12 & under).<br />

● 7:30: Brampton On Stage. RENT Presented<br />

by Brampton Music Theatre. See Apr 4. Also<br />

Apr 7(1pm).<br />

● 7:30: Cuckoo’s Nest Folk Club. Teilhard<br />

Frost. Chaucer’s Pub, 122 Carling St., London.<br />

519-319-5847 or folk@iandavies.com or www.<br />

ticketscene.ca. $25.<br />

● 7:30: Don Wright Faculty of Music. Choral<br />

Concert: Western University Singers -<br />

Part(ing) Songs. Von Kuster Hall, Music Building,<br />

Western University, 1151 Richmond St. N.,<br />

London. 519-661-3767 or www.music.uwo.ca/<br />

events. Free.<br />

● 7:30: London Symphonia. A Bohemian Life.<br />

Debussy: Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune;<br />

Scott Good: Lasker-Schüler Songs (first performance);<br />

Dvořák: Symphony No.8 in G.<br />

Midori Marsh, soprano; London Symphonia;<br />

Tania Miller, conductor. Metropolitan United<br />

Church, 468 Wellington St., London. 226-270-<br />

0910 or www.londonsymphonia.ca. $70(premium);<br />

$52(adult); $22(st).<br />

● 7:30: Oakville Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Heaven. Verdi: Overture to La forza del destino;<br />

Verdi: “O don fatale” from Don Carlo;<br />

Berlioz: La Mort de Cléopâtre; Leokadiya<br />

Kashperova: Symphony in b (Canadian premiere).<br />

Guest: Stephanie Yelovich, mezzo.<br />

Oakville Centre for the Performing Arts,<br />

130 Navy St., Oakville. www.oakvillecentre.<br />

ca/whats-on/upcoming-events/heaven or<br />

905-338-4161. From $35. Also Apr 7.<br />

● 7:30: Scarborough Philharmonic Orchestra.<br />

Beethoven and Brahms. Brahms: Violin<br />

Concerto in D Op.77; Beethoven: Symphony<br />

No.4 in B-flat Op. 60. Tiffany Yeung, violin;<br />

Ronald Royer, conductor. Salvation Army<br />

Scarborough Citadel, 2021 Lawrence Ave. E.,<br />

Scarborough. 647-482-7761 or www.spo.ca/<br />

event/beethoven-and-brahms. $35; $30(sr);<br />

$15(st).<br />

● 7:30: Shen Yun Performing Arts. Shen Yun.<br />

See Apr 2. Also Apr 7(2:00).<br />

● 7:30: Upper Canada Brass. Tenor Horn<br />

Sheona White in Voice of the Horn. Hermann<br />

Bellstedt: Capriccio Brilliante; Erik<br />

Leidzen: The Old Rustic Bridge; Philip Harper:<br />

Beauty Within; Kevin Lau: Impressions; and<br />

other works. Upper Canada Brass. Guest:<br />

Sheona White, tenor horn. St. Mary’s Anglican<br />

Church, 10030 Yonge St., Richmond Hill.<br />

www.uppercanadabrass.ca or 705-792-5766<br />

or www.eventbrite.ca/e/85091<strong>29</strong>52547. $25;<br />

$20(sr/st); Free(ages 12 and under).<br />

● 8:00: FabCollab. F for Flamenca. Flamenco<br />

dance and music. Irene La Sentío, dancer;<br />

Antonia Jiménez, guitar; Laura Marchal,<br />

singer; Nasrine Rahmani, percusion; Tamar<br />

Ilana, singer; Lia Grainger, dancer; Virgina<br />

Castro, dancer. Paradise Theatre, 1006 Bloor<br />

St. W. 647-768-5288 or www.fabcollab.ca/<br />

fforfamilia. $44.50.<br />

● 8:00: Kindred Spirits Orchestra. Wind<br />

Symphonies. Stravinsky, Symphonies of Wind<br />

Instruments; Stravinsky: Concerto for Piano<br />

and Wind Instruments; Hindemith: Konzertmusik<br />

for Piano, Brass and Harps Op.49.<br />

Henry From, piano; Kristian Alexander, conductor.<br />

Cornell Recital Hall, 3201 Bur Oak<br />

Ave., Markham. 905-787-8811. $30-$40;<br />

$22.50-$30(sr); $15-$20(full time student or<br />

18 and under).<br />

● 8:00: Royal Conservatory of Music. Global<br />

Music Series: Ladysmith Black Mambazo.<br />

Koerner Hall, TELUS Centre, 273 Bloor St. W.<br />

416-408-0208; rcmusic.com/performance.<br />

From $65.<br />

● 8:00: Show One Productions. The Tragedy<br />

of Hamlet: Prince of Denmark. See Apr 3. Also<br />

Apr 7(2pm).<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 37


LIVE OR ONLINE | Apr 1 to Jun 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

● 8:00: Toronto Consort. Madrigal Mania.<br />

See Apr 5. POSTPONED.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. R.<br />

Strauss’s Don Quixote. See Apr 3.<br />

Sunday <strong>April</strong> 7<br />

● 12:00 noon: TYT Theatre. The Hunting<br />

of the Snark. See Apr 5. Also Apr 7(3pm),<br />

13(12pm & 3pm), 14(12pm & 3pm).<br />

● 1:00: Brampton On Stage. RENT Presented<br />

by Brampton Music Theatre. See Apr 4.<br />

● 1:30: Friends of Music at St. Thomas’s.<br />

Elinor Frey: Cello Suites of Bach. Bach: Cello<br />

Suites Nos. 2, 3 & 6. St. Thomas’s Anglican<br />

Church, 383 Huron St. www.stthomas.on.ca<br />

or 416-483-5488. Pay What You Wish ($40<br />

suggested). See also Apr 6.<br />

● 2:00: Royal Conservatory of Music. Mazzoleni<br />

Masters Series: ARC Ensemble: The<br />

Viennese in Los Angeles. Korngold: Piano<br />

Quintet in E Op.15; Kanitz: Works. Mazzoleni<br />

Concert Hall, TELUS Centre, 273 Bloor St. W.<br />

416-408-0208 or www.rcmusic.com/performance.<br />

$25.<br />

● 2:00: Shen Yun Performing Arts. Shen<br />

Yun. See Apr 2.<br />

● 2:00: Show One Productions. The Tragedy<br />

of Hamlet: Prince of Denmark. See Apr 3.<br />

● 2:30: VOICEBOX: Opera in Concert. La battaglia<br />

di Legnano. Music by Giuseppe Verdi.<br />

With English Surtitles. Julia McVicar, Scott<br />

Rumble, Sebastian Belcourt; Opera in Concert<br />

Chorus; Robert Cooper, chorus director;<br />

Helen Becqué. music director & piano.<br />

Jane Mallett Theatre, St. Lawrence Centre<br />

for the Arts, 27 Front St. E. www.operainconcert.com<br />

or 416-366-7723 or 1-800-708-6754.<br />

From $45.<br />

● 3:00: Dundas Concert Band. <strong>2024</strong>: A Music<br />

Odyssey. Concert Band Instruments including<br />

the English Horn. This concert recognizes<br />

the Eclipse, happening the following day. It<br />

also celebrates the 150th anniversary of Gustav<br />

Holst. Holst: First Suite in E-flat for Military<br />

Band; Jacob de Haan: Ross Roy; Space<br />

and Beyond - recognizing the Eclipse Apr.8;<br />

Highlights from Chess; Star Trek: Into Darkness.<br />

St. Paul’s United Church, <strong>29</strong> Park St.<br />

W., Dundas. 905 523-9500. Free. Donations<br />

gratefully accepted. Receipts will be given for<br />

$10 or more.<br />

● 3:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. Special 4-hands Team from WLU.<br />

Scriabin: 24 Preludes; Schumann: Allegro<br />

in b Op.8; Karol Rathaus: Zwei Stücke aus<br />

dem Ballett “Der letzte Pierrot”; Ming Hsiu<br />

Yen: Two Old Postcards from Formosa.<br />

Joseph Ferreti & Elaine Lau, piano. Keffer<br />

Memorial Chapel, Wilfrid Laurier University,<br />

75 University Ave. W., Waterloo. 519-569-<br />

1809 or www.ticketscene.ca/kwcms. $30;<br />

$20(st).<br />

● 3:00: TYT Theatre. The Hunting of the<br />

Snark. See Apr 5. Also Apr 13(12pm & 3pm),<br />

14(12pm & 3pm).<br />

● 3:00: Uxbridge Chamber Choir. The<br />

Grand Finale. Past and present choir members<br />

reassembled to present “Greatest Hits”.<br />

Works by Mozart, Vivaldi, Willan, Fauré, Barber,<br />

and others. SATB choir; Tom Baker, director;<br />

Ian Sadler, organ. St. Paul’s Anglican<br />

Church, 59 Toronto St. S., Uxbridge. 416-931-<br />

0640. $25.<br />

● 4:00: FabCollab. F for Familia. Flamenco<br />

dance and music. Kiyo Asaoka, dancer; Rocío<br />

Conde, singer; Ana Lía, singer; Matt Sellick,<br />

guitar; Ten Ten Music Collective. BSMT 254,<br />

254 Lansdowne Ave. 647-768-5288 or www.<br />

fabcollab.ca/fforfamilia. $25(standing room),<br />

$35(middle seats).<br />

● 4:00: FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre.<br />

Hear! Here! with Mark Lalama Trio.<br />

FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre, Robertson<br />

Theatre, 250 St. Paul St., St. Catharines.<br />

905-688-0722; boxoffice@firstontariopac.ca.<br />

$35; $186(table of 6).<br />

● 4:30: The Emmet Ray. Alex Lakusta Quintet.<br />

Works by Mingus, Hubbard, Silver, and<br />

others. 924 College St. reso@erbar.ca.<br />

$10(with advance reservations); $15(at door).<br />

● 7:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Blue Suede<br />

Tunes - Frankie Moreno. Avalon Theatre<br />

(Fallsview Casino), 6380 Fallsview Blvd., Niagara<br />

Falls. ticketmaster.ca. From $51. Also<br />

Apr 8(3pm), 9(3pm), 10(3pm & 8:30pm).<br />

● 7:30: Oakville Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Heaven. Verdi: Overture to La forza del destino;<br />

Verdi: “O don fatale” from Don Carlo;<br />

Berlioz: La Mort de Cléopâtre; Leokadiya<br />

Kashperova: Symphony in b (Canadian premiere).<br />

Guest: Stephanie Yelovich, mezzo.<br />

Oakville Centre for the Performing Arts,<br />

130 Navy St., Oakville. www.oakvillecentre.<br />

ca/whats-on/upcoming-events/heaven or<br />

905-338-4161. From $35. Also Apr 6.<br />

● 7:30: The Jeffery Concerts. Calidore<br />

String Quartet. St. John the Evangelist Anglican<br />

Church, 280 St. James St., London.<br />

jefferyconcerts@gmail.com or www.jefferyconcerts.com<br />

or www.Grandtheatre.com<br />

or 519-672-8800 or in person at the Grand<br />

Theatre Box Office, 471 Richmond St. $40;<br />

Free(st).<br />

Monday <strong>April</strong> 8<br />

● 3:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Blue Suede<br />

Tunes - Frankie Moreno. See Apr 7. Also<br />

Apr 9(3pm), 10(3pm & 8:30pm).<br />

● 7:30: Don Wright Faculty of Music. Contemporary<br />

Music Studio: Con Certo. Von<br />

Kuster Hall, Music Building, Western University,<br />

1151 Richmond St. N., London. 519-661-<br />

3767 or www.music.uwo.ca/events. Free.<br />

Tuesday <strong>April</strong> 9<br />

● 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.<br />

Instrumental/Vocal Series: Stories from the<br />

Front Lines of Music & Medicine. Combining<br />

storytelling, chamber music alongside vocal<br />

repertoire, invitingaudiences into a music<br />

therapist’s experience of working withindividuals<br />

with life-limiting illnesses. Pulse<br />

members: Dr. Andrew Ascenzo, cello & Dr.<br />

SarahRose Black, music therapist. With narration<br />

by an oncology/palliative care music<br />

therapist. Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre,<br />

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts,<br />

145 Queen St. W. www.coc.ca/free-concertseries.<br />

Free. Tickets required.<br />

● 12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation.<br />

Lunchtime Chamber Music: Violin Recital.<br />

Satchi Kanashiro, violin. Yorkminster Park<br />

Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167<br />

or www.yorkminsterpark.com. Free. Donations<br />

welcome.<br />

● 1:00: St. James Cathedral. Tuesday Organ<br />

Recital. Peter Merrick, organ. Cathedral<br />

Church of St. James, 106 King St. E. 416-364-<br />

7865 or www.stjamescathedral.ca/recitals.<br />

Free. Donations encouraged.<br />

● 3:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Blue Suede<br />

Tunes - Frankie Moreno. See Apr 7. Also<br />

Apr 10(3pm & 8:30pm).<br />

● 7:30: FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre.<br />

Classic Albums Live: The Police - Synchronicity.<br />

FirstOntario Performing Arts<br />

Centre, Partridge Hall, 250 St. Paul St., St.<br />

Catharines. 905-688-0722; boxoffice@<br />

firstontariopac.ca. $59; $49(members).<br />

● 7:30: Smoke Show BBQ & Brew. Tuesday<br />

Horns: Live and in Person! Music by Blood,<br />

Sweat & Tears, Lighthouse, Stevie Wonder,<br />

and others. Smoke Show BBQ and Brew,<br />

744 Mount Pleasant Rd. 416-901-7469. Performing<br />

every second Tuesday.<br />

Wednesday <strong>April</strong> 10<br />

● 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.<br />

Instrumental Series: Chamber Connections.<br />

Winners of The Glenn Gould Chamber Music<br />

Competition. Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre,<br />

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing<br />

Arts, 145 Queen St. W. www.coc.ca/free-concert-series.<br />

Free. Tickets required.<br />

● 12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.<br />

Noonday Organ Recital. Michelle M. Chung,<br />

organ. 1585 Yonge St. www.yorkminsterpark.<br />

com. Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 3:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Blue Suede<br />

Tunes - Frankie Moreno. See Apr 7. Also<br />

Apr 10(8:30pm).<br />

● 7:30: FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre.<br />

Béla Fleck & Abigail Washburn. FirstOntario<br />

Performing Arts Centre, Partridge Hall,<br />

250 St. Paul St., St. Catharines. 905-688-<br />

0722; boxoffice@firstontariopac.ca. $69;<br />

$59(members).<br />

● 8:30: Fallsview Casino Resort. Blue Suede<br />

Tunes - Frankie Moreno. See Apr 7.<br />

Thursday <strong>April</strong> 11<br />

● 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.<br />

Dance Series: Highlights from Anne of Green<br />

Gables – The Ballet®. Ballet Jörgen presents<br />

highlights from its newest full-length ballet.<br />

Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre, Four<br />

Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts,<br />

145 Queen St. W. www.coc.ca/free-concertseries.<br />

Free. Tickets required.<br />

● 12:00 noon: Metropolitan United Church.<br />

Noon at Met. Joshua Duncan Lee, organ.<br />

Metropolitan United Church, 56 Queen St. E.<br />

416-363-0331 x226. Freewill donation.<br />

● 6:00: Arraymusic. Prepared Guitar<br />

Workshop with Nilan Perera. Array Space,<br />

155 Walnut Ave. 416-532-3019. PWYC. Four<br />

week course to <strong>April</strong> 11; Bring an electric guitar<br />

and amplifier. Also Mar 21, 28, Apr 4.<br />

● 7:30: Opera Atelier. All Is Love. Works by<br />

Handel, Lully, Purcell, Rameau, Hahn and<br />

others. Measha Brueggergosman-Lee, soprano;<br />

Eric da Silva, Artist of Atelier Ballet;<br />

Colin Ainsworth, tenor; Jesse Blumberg,<br />

baritone; Douglas Williams, bass-baritone;<br />

Karen White, soprano and others. Tafelmusik;<br />

David Fallis, music director. Koerner<br />

Hall, TELUS Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-703-<br />

3767 x700; Opera Atelier.com. From $55. Also<br />

Apr 12(2:30pm), 13(7:30pm), 14(2:30pm).<br />

● 7:30: Shen Yun Performing Arts. Shen<br />

Yun. FirstOntario Concert Hall, 1 Summers<br />

Ln., Hamilton. 1-877-663-7469 or tickets@fldfca.org<br />

or 1-855-416-1800. From $100. Also<br />

Apr 12(7:30).<br />

● 8:00: Brampton On Stage. Hype. Performers:<br />

J. O. Mairs, Ghostboyrj, Crooks. The Rose<br />

Brampton, 1 Theatre Lane, Brampton. 905-<br />

874-2800. $10.<br />

● 8:00: Old Mill Toronto. Jaymz Bee’s<br />

Caravan of Music. A fundraiser curated by<br />

Jaymz Bee. 24 bands performing across<br />

12 rooms, with over 100 talented musicians,<br />

attendees will enjoy a diverse range of<br />

musical styles, including jazz, soul, blues, pop,<br />

and more. 21 Old Mill Rd. www.unisonfund.ca/<br />

events. $40. Supporting The Unison Fund.<br />

Friday <strong>April</strong> 12<br />

● 12:10: Music at St. Andrew’s. Noon Time<br />

Recital. Brahms: Fantasie Op.116; Schubert:<br />

Sonata in a; and works by Scriabin, Kuzmenko,<br />

and Debussy. Adrian Tsui, piano. St.<br />

Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, 73 Simcoe<br />

St. 416-593-5600 x220. Free. Donations<br />

welcome.<br />

● 2:30: Opera Atelier. All Is Love. See Apr 11.<br />

Also Apr 13(7:30pm), 14(2:30pm).<br />

● 6:00: North York Central Library. Open<br />

Mic at the Library: North York Edition. Music,<br />

poetry & storytelling. Are you a musician,<br />

poet, or storyteller? If so, then you are invited<br />

to share your talents at the North York Central<br />

Library Open Mic. Guitar, piano & djembe<br />

provided. 7 minutes for each performance.<br />

For adults, teens, and seniors. North York<br />

Central Library Auditorium, 5120 Yonge St.<br />

Sign-up is at 5:30pm. For more information,<br />

contact the Language, Literature & Fine Arts<br />

Department at 416-395-5639. Free.<br />

● 7:00: Jazz at Durbar. Rebecca Enkin Trio.<br />

Rebecca Enkin, vocals; Mike Allen, guitar;<br />

Bassam Bishara, vocals & oud. Durbar Indian<br />

Restaurant, 2469 Bloor St. W. 416-762-4441.<br />

Free. Reservations strongly recommended.<br />

● 7:30: Shen Yun Performing Arts. Shen Yun.<br />

See Apr 11.<br />

● 8:00: Massey Hall. Choir! Choir! Choir!:<br />

Epic 80s Sing-Along! 178 Victoria St. www.<br />

mhrth.com/tickets. $51.<br />

● 8:00: Old Mill Toronto. The Ken Peplowski<br />

Quartet – An Evening of Songs and Stories.<br />

Swing, Dixieland, Traditional Pop, Guitar Jazz,<br />

Jazz Instrument, Mainstream Jazz. 21 Old<br />

Mill Rd. www.oldmilltoronto.com/event/kenpeplowski.<br />

$25. Minimum $30 food & beverage<br />

spend. Restricted to ages 19+. Dinner at<br />

6pm. Show at 8pm.<br />

● 8:00: Sinfonia Toronto. Mozart’s Spring.<br />

Marjan Mozetich: Concerto for Viola with<br />

Strings and Vibraphone; Nina Grigoryan:<br />

Prayer (first performance); Saverio Mercadante:<br />

Flute Concerto in e; Mozart: String<br />

Quartet No.14 in G “Spring” (string orchestra<br />

version). Sharon Wei, viola; Mario Carbotta,<br />

flute; Sinfonia Toronto; Nurhan Arman, conductor.<br />

Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor St.<br />

W. 416-499-0403 or www.sinfoniatoronto.<br />

com. $52; $40(sr); $20(st).<br />

Saturday <strong>April</strong> 13<br />

● 12:00 noon: TYT Theatre. The Hunting of<br />

the Snark. See Apr 5. Also Apr 14(12pm &<br />

3pm).<br />

● 2:00: Living Arts Centre. An Afternoon of<br />

Benny Goodman Music with Toronto All-Star<br />

Band. Featuring Ken Peplowski, clarinet. Living<br />

Arts Centre, RBC Theatre, 4141 Living<br />

Arts Dr., Mississauga. www.livingartscentre.<br />

evenue.net or 905-306-6000. $59.<br />

● 3:00: TYT Theatre. The Hunting of the<br />

Snark. See Apr 5. Also Apr 14(3pm).<br />

● 7:30: Barrie Concerts Association. Sinfonia<br />

Toronto. Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto<br />

No.1 in b-flat Op. 23; and works by Dvořák and<br />

Rachmaninoff. Dmitri Levkovich, piano; Mario<br />

Carbotta, flute; Nurham Arman, conductor.<br />

38 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Hiway Pentecostal Church, 50 Anne St. N.,<br />

Barrie. www.barrieconcerts.org or 705-436-<br />

1232. Up to $55. Livestream: $20; $10(st).<br />

Available for up to 30 days after the concert.<br />

● 7:30: Kingston Symphony. Sax Attack with<br />

Leo P. Kingston Symphony; Leo P (Leo Pellegrino),<br />

baritone saxophone. Grand Theatre,<br />

218 Princess St., Kingston. 613-530-2050 or<br />

www.kingstonsymphony.ca. From $20.<br />

● 7:30: Niagara Symphony Orchestra. NSO<br />

NOW! 4: Classic Rock Radio. FirstOntario Performing<br />

Arts Centre, Partridge Hall, 250 St.<br />

Paul St., St. Catharines. 905-688-0722 or<br />

boxoffice@firstontariopac.ca. $75(regular);<br />

$100(diamond); $52(arts worker with valid<br />

id); $46(35 under 35); $<strong>29</strong>(student-university/college<br />

with valid id); $24(youth 18 and<br />

under with valid id).<br />

● 7:30: Opera Atelier. All Is Love. See Apr 11.<br />

Also Apr 14(2:30pm).<br />

● 7:30: Stratford Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Brahms Violin Concerto with Sarah Pratt.<br />

Beethoven: Egmont Overture Op.84; Brahms:<br />

Violin Concerto in D Op.77; Beethoven: Symphony<br />

No.1 in C Op.21. Guest: Sarah Pratt, violins;<br />

William Rowson, conductor. Avondale United<br />

Church, 194 Avondale Ave., Stratford. 519-271-<br />

0990; info@stratfordsymphonyorchestra.ca.<br />

$45; $15(st); Free(under 12).<br />

● 7:30: Trinity Bach Project. Bach and Tallis.<br />

Tallis: Lamentations of Jeremiah I and<br />

selected motets; Bach: Cantata BWV 131 “Aus<br />

der Tiefen” and Motet BWV 228 “Fürchte<br />

dich nicht”; Arvo Pärt: The Deer’s Cry. Ten<br />

voices with Nicholas Nicolaidis, conductor;<br />

Aaron James, organ; Daniel Brielmaier, oboe;<br />

Felix Deák, cello; Matt Antal, viola. Little Trinity<br />

Anglican Church, 425 King St. E. 306-250-<br />

4256. Pay what you can. Suggested: $30;<br />

$20(st); Free(child). One-hour concert with<br />

no intermission.<br />

● 8:00: Healey Willan Singers. Spring<br />

Delights. Fauré/Messager: Messe des<br />

pêcheurs de Villerville; and works by Brahms,<br />

Mendelssohn, Mozart, and others. Ellen<br />

Meyer, piano; Conrad Gold, organ; Ron Cheung,<br />

conductor. St. Martin-in-the-Fields<br />

Anglican Church, 151 Glenlake Ave. 416-519-<br />

0528. $20; $15(sr/st). Cash only.<br />

● 9:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Lonestar.<br />

OLG Stage at Fallsview Casino, 6366 Stanley<br />

Ave., Niagara Falls. www.ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$70.20-$81.50.<br />

● 9:30: MRG Live. An Evening with Mars Hotel<br />

- Canada’s Premier Grateful Dead Tribute.<br />

Annabel’s, 200 Princes Blvd. www.admitone.<br />

com/events/mars-hotel-toronto-9330264.<br />

$27.50. Early bird price: $20 until Jan 15.<br />

Ages 19+.<br />

Sunday <strong>April</strong> 14<br />

● 11:00am: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Relaxed Concert: Bhangra & Beyond.<br />

Designed to be more welcoming to the neurodiverse<br />

community, including those on the<br />

autism spectrum, those with sensory and<br />

communications disorders, ADHD, learning<br />

disabilities, or dementia, or those who simply<br />

prefer a more relaxed concert experience.<br />

Daniel Bartholomew-Poyser, conductor.<br />

Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-<br />

3375. From $23. Regular concerts at 1:30pm<br />

& 4pm.<br />

● 12:00 noon: TYT Theatre. The Hunting of<br />

the Snark. See Apr 5. Also Apr 14(3pm).<br />

● 1:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Bhangra<br />

& Beyond. Daniel Bartholomew-Poyser,<br />

conductor. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St.<br />

416-598-3375. From $30. Also 4pm. Relaxed<br />

Concert at 11am.<br />

● 2:30: Opera Atelier. All Is Love. See Apr 11.<br />

● 3:00: Magisterra Soloists. Magisterra at<br />

the Museum: The Glorious Voice of Russell<br />

Braun. Songs for baritone and piano with violin<br />

or cello by Beethoven, Spohr, Brahms, and<br />

John Estacio. Guests: Russell Braun, baritone;<br />

Carolyn Maule, piano. Museum London,<br />

421 Ridout St. N., London. www.magisterra.<br />

com. $35; $30(sr); $15(st); $10(under 10).<br />

● 3:00: Orchestra Toronto. A Brave New<br />

World. Hindemith: Symphonic Metamorphosis<br />

on themes by Carl Maria von Weber;<br />

Dvořák: Cello Concerto in b Op.104. Winona<br />

Zelenka, cello; Michael Newnham, conductor.<br />

George Weston Recital Hall, Meridian Arts<br />

Centre, 5040 Yonge St. 416-467-7142 or www.<br />

ticketmaster.ca. From $14. Pre-concert chat<br />

at 2:15pm.<br />

● 3:00: TYT Theatre. The Hunting of the<br />

Snark. See Apr 5.<br />

10TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON!<br />

The<br />

Flute Street<br />

Concerto<br />

and<br />

the<br />

Folk<br />

Song<br />

PRESENTS<br />

SUNDAY, APRIL 14, 4PM<br />

www.flutestreet.ca<br />

● 4:00: Flute Street. Tenth Anniversary Season:<br />

The Concerto and the Folk Song. Works<br />

by Handel, Vivaldi, Vaclav Nelhybel (Canadian<br />

premiere), John Rutter, and Kelly Via. Joshua<br />

McFaul, bass-baritone; Robin Davis, organ;<br />

Nancy Nourse, artistic director; Isaac Page,<br />

conductor. Church of St. Peter and St. Simonthe-Apostle,<br />

525 Bloor St. E. 416-462-9498 or<br />

www.flutestreet.ca. Pay what you can (cash<br />

only) - $20-$30 suggested.<br />

● 4:00: Toronto Classical Singers. Morning<br />

and Evening - In the Afternoon. Schubert:<br />

Mass in C D.452; Mozart: Vesperae solennes<br />

de confessore (Solemn Vespers for a Confessor)<br />

K.339. Kendra Dyck, soprano, Catharin<br />

Carew, mezzo: Ross Mortimer, tenor; Alan<br />

Macdonald, baritone; Toronto Classical Singers<br />

& Players; Jurgen Petrenko, conductor.<br />

Christ Church Deer Park, 1570 Yonge St. 416-<br />

986-8749. $30.<br />

● 4:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Bhangra<br />

& Beyond. Daniel Bartholomew-Poyser,<br />

conductor. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe<br />

St. 416-598-3375. From $30. Also 1:30pm.<br />

Relaxed Concert at 11am.<br />

● 7:00: Ancestral Harmonies. Hildegard<br />

Meets Maestro Irshad Khan. Chants by Hildegard<br />

of Bingen, traditional ragas, and original<br />

compositions by Irshad Khan. Irshad Khan,<br />

ANCESTRAL<br />

HARMONIES <strong>2024</strong><br />

HILDEGARD<br />

MEETS MAESTRO<br />

IRSHAD KHAN<br />

A unique collaboration<br />

of chants and ragas<br />

SUNDAY APRIL 14<br />

sitar; Andrea Gerhardt, voice; Sadaf Amini,<br />

Iranian santur; Pedram Khavarzamini, tonbak.<br />

Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, Jeanne Lamon<br />

Hall, 427 Bloor St. W. 647-979-1898 or<br />

andrea-gerhardt.ticketleap.com/ancestralharmonies-<strong>2024</strong>.<br />

$25. Cash only at door.<br />

● 7:30: Brampton On Stage. The Jazz Mechanics<br />

and The Brampton Concert Band with<br />

Special Guest Liberty Silver. The Rose Brampton,<br />

1 Theatre Lane, Brampton. 905-874-<br />

2800. From $20.<br />

Tuesday <strong>April</strong> 16<br />

● 12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation.<br />

Lunchtime Chamber Music: Rising Stars<br />

Recital. Featuring students from the Glenn<br />

Gould School at the Royal Conservatory of<br />

Music. Yorkminster Park Baptist Church,<br />

1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167 or www.yorkminsterpark.com.<br />

Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 1:00: St. James Cathedral. Tuesday Organ<br />

Recital. Michael Pirri, organ. Cathedral<br />

Church of St. James, 106 King St. E. 416-364-<br />

7865 or www.stjamescathedral.ca/recitals.<br />

Free. Donations encouraged.<br />

● 5:30: Canadian Opera Company. Jazz Series:<br />

Chamber Swing. Drew Jurecka Trio:<br />

Drew Jurecka, violin; Clark Johnson, string<br />

bass; Ewen Farncombe, piano. Richard Bradshaw<br />

Amphitheatre, Four Seasons Centre<br />

for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W.<br />

www.coc.ca/free-concert-series. Free. Tickets<br />

required.<br />

● 8:00: Brampton On Stage. This Is Brampton:<br />

B-Jazzed - Salsa in the Spring. Carmen<br />

Spada and The B-Jazzed Band. The Rose<br />

Brampton, 1 Theatre Lane, Brampton. 905-<br />

874-2800. From $20.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Pops:<br />

The Music of Star Wars. Steven Reineke, conductor.<br />

Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-<br />

598-3375. From $62. Also Apr 17(2pm).<br />

Wednesday <strong>April</strong> 17<br />

● 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.<br />

Dance Series: Surrendered Spirits. This program<br />

is influenced and inspired by the impact<br />

of familial displacement and upbringing as<br />

children of racialized, marginalized, and<br />

immigrant families. The work encompasses<br />

the relationship of two femme, queer, black,<br />

and brown women who face each other seeking<br />

to heal the inherited ancestral and familial<br />

TORONTO CLASSICAL SINGERS & TORONTO CLASSICAL PLAYERS<br />

JURGEN PETRENKO, CONDUCTOR<br />

MORNING AND EVENING – IN THE AFTERNOON<br />

SCHUBERT<br />

MASS IN C<br />

MOZART<br />

VESPERS K. 339<br />

KENDRA DYCK, SOPRANO<br />

CATHARIN CAREW, MEZZO SPORANO<br />

ROSS MORTIMER, TENOR<br />

ALAN MACDONALD, BARITONE<br />

4:00 PM APRIL 14, <strong>2024</strong><br />

CHRIST CHURCH DEER PARK , 1570 YONGE STREET AT HEATH<br />

TICKETS $30: TORONTOCLASSICALSINGERS.CA/TICKETS<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 39


LIVE OR ONLINE | Apr 1 to Jun 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

wounds. dance Immersion. Richard Bradshaw<br />

Amphitheatre, Four Seasons Centre<br />

for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W.<br />

www.coc.ca/free-concert-series. Free. Tickets<br />

required.<br />

● 12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.<br />

Noonday Organ Recital. Ryan Baxter, organ.<br />

1585 Yonge St. www.yorkminsterpark.com.<br />

Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 2:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Pops:<br />

The Music of Star Wars. See Apr 16.<br />

● 3:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. The Simon<br />

& Garfunkel Story. Fallsview Casino Resort,<br />

Avalon Theatre, 6380 Fallsview Blvd., Niagara<br />

Falls. 1-877-833-3110 or www.ticketmaster.<br />

ca. From $45. Also Apr 18(3pm & 8:30pm),<br />

19(9pm), 20(3pm & 9pm), 21(3pm & 7pm).<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber<br />

Music Society. Jui-Sheng Li, Piano. Scriabin:<br />

24 Preludes; Schumann: Allegro in b Op.8;<br />

Karol Rathaus: Zwei Stücke aus dem Ballett<br />

“Der letzte Pierrot”; Ming Hsiu Yen: Two Old<br />

Postcards from Formosa. First United Church<br />

(Waterloo), 16 William St. W., Waterloo. 519-<br />

569-1809 or www.ticketscene.ca/kwcms.<br />

CANCELLED.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Shape Note Singers. Sacred<br />

Harp Singing. Shape note music selections<br />

from the Sacred Harp tunebook. Singing<br />

is participatory, not a performance. No<br />

experience necessary. All are welcome and<br />

there are books to borrow. Friends House,<br />

60 Lowther Ave. 647-838-8764. Pay what you<br />

can. Also <strong>May</strong> 15, Jun 19, Jul 17, Aug 21, Sep 18,<br />

Oct 16, Nov 20 & Dec 18.<br />

● 8:00: Flato Markham Theatre. Kiran Ahluwalia.<br />

171 Town Centre Blvd., Markham.<br />

905-305-7469; flatomarkhamtheatre.ca.<br />

$58(regular); $68(prime); $15(YTX).<br />

● 8:00: Royal Conservatory of Music. International<br />

Orchestras Series: The Philadelphia<br />

Orchestra with Yannick Nézet-Séguin. Price:<br />

Symphony No.4 in d; Rachmaninov: Symphony<br />

No.2 in e Op.27. Koerner Hall, TELUS Centre,<br />

273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208 or www.<br />

rcmusic.com/performance. SOLD OUT.<br />

Thursday <strong>April</strong> 18<br />

● 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.<br />

Instrumental Series: <strong>2024</strong> Toronto Summer<br />

Music Festival Preview. Jonathan Crow, artistic<br />

director. Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre,<br />

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts,<br />

145 Queen St. W. www.coc.ca/free-concertseries.<br />

Free. Tickets required.<br />

● 12:00 noon: Metropolitan United Church.<br />

Noon at Met: University of Toronto Piano<br />

Showcase. Metropolitan United Church,<br />

56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331 x226. Freewill<br />

donation.<br />

● 3:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. The<br />

Simon & Garfunkel Story. See Apr 17. Also<br />

Apr 18(8:30pm), 19(9pm), 20(3pm & 9pm),<br />

21(3pm & 7pm).<br />

● 7:30: Harbourfront Centre. Torque Contemporary<br />

Dance Series: Swan Lakes +<br />

Minus 16. Performed by Gauther Dance/<br />

Dance Theaterhaus Stuttgart. Fleck Dance<br />

Theatre, Harbourfront Centre, 235 Queens<br />

Quay W. www.harbourfrontcentre.com. From<br />

$<strong>29</strong>. Also Apr 19 & 20.<br />

● 7:30: Soundstreams. Variations on Goldberg<br />

Variations (Keyed Up! #1). Works by<br />

Grabowsky, Sokolovic and others. Paul<br />

Grabowsky, piano. Jane Mallett Theatre,<br />

Toronto Centre for the Arts, 27 Front St. E.<br />

416-504-1282 or www.Soundstreams.ca.<br />

From $25.<br />

● 8:30: Fallsview Casino Resort. The<br />

Simon & Garfunkel Story. See Apr 17. Also<br />

Apr 19(9pm), 20(3pm & 9pm), 21(3pm &<br />

7pm).<br />

Friday <strong>April</strong> 19<br />

● 12:10: Music at St. Andrew’s. Noon Time<br />

Recital. Dane Ko, piano. St. Andrew’s Presbyterian<br />

Church, 73 Simcoe St. 416-593-5600<br />

x220. Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 7:30: Harbourfront Centre. Torque Contemporary<br />

Dance Series: Swan Lakes +<br />

Minus 16. See Apr 18. Also Apr 20.<br />

● 7:30: Monday Morning Singers. Begone,<br />

Dull Care. St. Paul’s Anglican Church,<br />

59 Toronto St. S., Uxbridge. 416-452-6549 or<br />

www.mondaymorningsingers.com. $25.<br />

● 7:30: Soundstreams. RBC Bridges (Keyed<br />

Up! #2). New works. Jane Mallett Theatre,<br />

Toronto Centre for the Arts, 27 Front St. E.<br />

416-504-1282 or www.Soundstreams.ca.<br />

From $25.<br />

● 8:00: Brampton On Stage. Kiran Ahluwalia.<br />

The Rose Brampton, 1 Theatre Lane, Brampton.<br />

905-874-2800. From $20.<br />

● 8:00: Flato Markham Theatre. Jeans ‘n<br />

Classics: An Innocent Man - The Music of<br />

Billy Joel. Jean Meilleur, vocals/guitar; John<br />

Regan, piano; 40 piece orchestra. 171 Town<br />

Centre Blvd., Markham. 905-305-7469;<br />

flatomarkhamtheatre.ca. $78(regular);<br />

$83(prime); $15(YTX).<br />

● 8:00: Old Mill Toronto. Sammy Jackson.<br />

Jazz and rhythm & blues. 21 Old Mill Rd. www.<br />

oldmilltoronto.com/event/sammy-jackson.<br />

$20. Minimum $30 food & beverage spend.<br />

Restricted to ages 19+. Dinner at 6pm. Show<br />

at 8pm.<br />

● 8:00: Royal Conservatory of Music. Special<br />

Performances: John Pizzarelli and<br />

Caity Gyorgy. Koerner Hall, TELUS Centre,<br />

273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208 or www.<br />

rcmusic.com/performance. From $60.<br />

● 8:00: Tafelmusik. Bohemian Rhapsody:<br />

Benda & Haydn. Benda: Violin Concerto in A;<br />

Stamitz: Symphony in d; Haydn: Cello Concerto<br />

in C; Works by Lully, Purcell, Handel,<br />

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY<br />

Directed by<br />

Zefira Valova<br />

<strong>April</strong> 19–21<br />

Jeanne Lamon Hall,<br />

Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre<br />

tafelmusik.org<br />

Elmer<br />

Iseler<br />

Singers<br />

Lydia Adams, Conductor<br />

Sat. Apr 20, <strong>2024</strong> @ 4:00pm<br />

Eglinton St. George’s United Church<br />

Triple Choir Splendour<br />

Sonic Light<br />

Mass for Double Choir by Frank Martin<br />

including works by<br />

MacMillan, Whitacre, Gjeilo and Daley<br />

ELMER ISELER SINGERS<br />

Lydia Adams, conductor<br />

VIVA CHAMBER SINGERS<br />

Carol Ratzlaff, conductor<br />

CHROMA VOCAL ENSEMBLE<br />

Mitchell Pady, conductor<br />

416-217-0537 elmeriselersingers.com<br />

40 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Piatti, Bach, Vivaldi, and Jonathan Woody.<br />

Zefira Valova, guest director and violin; Keiran<br />

Campbell, cello; Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra.<br />

Jeanne Lamon Hall, Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre,<br />

427 Bloor St. W. www.tafelmusik.org/<br />

bohemian or 416-964-6337. From $47. Also<br />

Apr 20(8pm) & 21(3pm).<br />

● 9:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. The<br />

Simon & Garfunkel Story. See Apr 17. Also<br />

Apr 20(3pm & 9pm), 21(3pm & 7pm).<br />

Saturday <strong>April</strong> 20<br />

● 10:30am: Toronto Mendelssohn Choir.<br />

Singsation: Harmonizing Resistance – The<br />

Power of Music in Social Change. Music is<br />

a powerful vehicle of expression that has<br />

inspired political and cultural change across<br />

the world. This Singsation workshop session<br />

will explore songs of resistance, their cultural<br />

context, and personal connections to these<br />

songs through storytelling and singing with<br />

TMChoir members. Conducted by TMChoir<br />

Collaborative Pianist, Irene Gregorio. Yorkminster<br />

Park Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge St.<br />

www.tmchoir.org. $10.<br />

● 2:30: Heliconian Club. Hel’s Belles - Compositions<br />

by Heliconian Club Members. Works<br />

by Taivi Alexander, Jana Skarecky, Kye Marshall,<br />

and Maria Soulis. Janet Catherine Dea,<br />

soprano & Caitlin Holland, soprano. Heliconian<br />

Hall, 35 Hazelton Ave. 416-922-3618<br />

or www.torontoheliconianclub.wildapricot.<br />

org/event-5390306. $30 at door or online;<br />

Free(child 12 and under accompanied by an<br />

adult).<br />

● 3:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. The<br />

Simon & Garfunkel Story. See Apr 17. Also<br />

Apr 20(9pm), 21(3pm & 7pm).<br />

● 4:00: Elmer Iseler Singers. Triple Choir<br />

Splendour: Sonic Light. Frank Martin: Mass<br />

for Double Choir; and works by MacMillan,<br />

Whitacre, Gjeilo and Daley. Elmer Iseler Singers<br />

(Lydia Adams, conductor); VIVA Chamber<br />

Singers (Carol Ratzlaff, conductor); and<br />

Chroma Vocal Ensemble (Mitchell Pady, conductor).<br />

Eglinton St. George’s United Church,<br />

35 Lytton Blvd. www.elmeriselersingers.com<br />

or 416-217-0537. $45; $40(sr); $25(under 30).<br />

● 7:30: Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra.<br />

Rachmaninoff & Tchaikovsky. Jiang: Flowing<br />

Waters; Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto No.3;<br />

Tchaikovsky: Symphony No.6. Kevin Chen,<br />

piano; Mateusz Molęda, conductor. FirstOntario<br />

Concert Hall, 1 Summers Ln., Hamilton.<br />

905-526-7756; boxoffice@hpo.org. $20-$80.<br />

6:30pm pre-concert talk.<br />

● 7:30: Harbourfront Centre. Torque Contemporary<br />

Dance Series: Swan Lakes +<br />

Minus 16. See Apr 18.<br />

● 7:30: Oakville Chamber Orchestra. Spring<br />

Concert. Johann Strauss II: Voices of Spring<br />

Waltz Op.410; Schumann: Symphony No.1 in<br />

B-flat Op.38 “Spring”; Mozart: Piano Concerto<br />

No.18 in B-flat K.456. Sunny Zhai, piano. St.<br />

John's United Church (Oakville), 262 Randall<br />

St., Oakville. www.oakvillechamber.org/program-4-spring-symphony.<br />

From $20. Also<br />

Apr 21(3pm).<br />

● 7:30: Soundstreams. 6 Pianos 12 Hands<br />

(Keyed Up! #3). Reich: Music for Six Pianos;<br />

Works by Riley, Ristic, Sokolovic and Louie.<br />

Jane Mallett Theatre, Toronto Centre for the<br />

Arts, 27 Front St. E. 416-504-1282 or www.<br />

Soundstreams.ca. From $25.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Beach Chorale. W. A. Mozart:<br />

Requiem. Toronto Beach Chorale; Leanne<br />

Kaufman, soprano; Deborah Overes, contralto;<br />

Jacob Abrahamse, tenor; Matthew<br />

Cassils, bass-baritone; Chamber Orchestra;<br />

Mervin W. Fick, conductor. Knox Presbyterian<br />

Church, 630 Spadina Ave. www.torontobeachchorale.com.<br />

$30; $15(youth).<br />

● 7:30: Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus of<br />

North America. Ukraine Lives! George<br />

Weston Recital Hall, Meridian Arts Centre,<br />

5040 Yonge St. 416-366-7723 or 1-800-708-<br />

6754 or www.tolive.com or www.ticketmaster.ca.<br />

From $60.<br />

● 8:00: Acoustic Harvest. Boreal’s Spring<br />

Show with Katherine Wheatley, Tannis Slimmon<br />

& Angie Nussey. St. Paul’s United<br />

Church, 200 McIntosh St., Scarborough.<br />

www.acousticharvest.ca or 416-7<strong>29</strong>-7564.<br />

$30.<br />

● 8:00: Cathedral Bluffs Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Orchestra Concert. Smetana: The Moldau<br />

from Má vlast; John Williams: Tuba<br />

Concerto; Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade<br />

Op.35. Jennifer Stephen, tuba; Martin<br />

MacDonald, conductor. P.C. Ho Theatre,<br />

Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Toronto,<br />

5183 Sheppard Ave. E., Scarborough. 416-<br />

879-5566 or www.cathedralbluffs.com.<br />

From $25.<br />

● 8:00: Royal Conservatory of Music. Global<br />

Music Series: Oumou Sangaré. Koerner Hall,<br />

TELUS Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-<br />

0208 or www.rcmusic.com/performance.<br />

From $45.<br />

● 8:00: Tafelmusik. Bohemian Rhapsody:<br />

Benda & Haydn. See Apr 19. Also<br />

Apr 21(3pm).<br />

● 8:00: Trinity Bach Project. Bach and<br />

Schütz. Bach: Motet BWV 227 “Jesu, meine<br />

Freude”; Schutz: “Selig sind die Toten” and<br />

other motets; Monteverdi: Cantate Domino;<br />

Bruckner: Locus iste; Bach: Selected movements<br />

of Suites Nos.1 & 2 for unaccompanied<br />

cello. Ten-voice choir with Nicholas Nicolaidis,<br />

conductor; Felix Deák, cello; Aaron James,<br />

organ. St. John the Evangelist Church (Hamilton),<br />

320 Charlton Ave. W., Hamilton. 306-<br />

250-4256. Pay what you can. Suggested: $30;<br />

$20(st); Free(child). One-hour concert with<br />

Toronto Beach Chorale<br />

Mervin W Fick - Conductor<br />

W A Mozart<br />

Requiem<br />

Saturday, <strong>April</strong> 20, <strong>2024</strong> at 7:30pm<br />

Knox Presbyterian Church<br />

630 Spadina Avenue, Toronto<br />

no intermission.<br />

● 9:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. The<br />

Simon & Garfunkel Story. See Apr 17. Also<br />

Apr 21(3pm & 7pm).<br />

Sunday <strong>April</strong> 21<br />

● 1:15: Mooredale Concerts. Music & Truffles<br />

KIDS. Cheng² Duo. Walter Hall, Edward<br />

Johnson Building, University of Toronto,<br />

80 Queen’s Park. 416-922-3714 x103; 647-988-<br />

2012 (eve/wknd). $25.<br />

● 2:00: HCA Dance Theatre. Serenade to<br />

Humanity: A Duet of Passion and Harmony.<br />

Works by Alice Ho, Beethoven, and Schubert.<br />

La Fiammata: Linda Ruan & Charissa Van,<br />

pianos. 126 James St. S., Hamilton. 905-528-<br />

4020 or www.hcadancetheatre.com/shopstandard.<br />

From $15.<br />

● 2:00: Metropolitan United Church. “Shine<br />

On”: Celebrating the 90th Anniversary of<br />

the Metropolitan Silver Band. Metropolitan<br />

United Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-<br />

0331 x226 or www.metband.ca. $25; $15(sr);<br />

$10(st); Free(children under 12).<br />

● 2:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Evgeny Kissin,<br />

Piano & Matthias Goerne, Baritone.<br />

60 Simcoe St. www.tickets.mhrth.com.<br />

From $51.<br />

● 3:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. The<br />

Simon & Garfunkel Story. See Apr 17. Also<br />

Apr 21(7pm).<br />

● 3:00: Oakville Chamber Orchestra. Spring<br />

Concert. See Apr 20.<br />

● 3:00: Royal Conservatory of Music. Piano<br />

Concerts Series: Richard Goode. Beethoven:<br />

Bagatelles No.6-11 Op.119, Piano Sonata No.30<br />

in E Op.109, 33 Variations on a Waltz by Anton<br />

Diabelli Op.120. Koerner Hall, TELUS Centre,<br />

273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208 or www.<br />

rcmusic.com/performance. From $50.<br />

● 3:00: Tafelmusik. Bohemian Rhapsody:<br />

Benda & Haydn. See Apr 19.<br />

● 3:15: Mooredale Concerts. Cheng² Duo.<br />

Walter Hall, Edward Johnson Building, University<br />

of Toronto, 80 Queen’s Park. 416-922-<br />

3714 x103; 647-988-2012 (eve/wknd). $55;<br />

$50(sr); $30(st).<br />

● 7:00: Brampton On Stage. Re-Imagined - A<br />

Theatre Concert. Lester B. Pearson Theatre,<br />

150 Central Park Dr., Brampton. 905-874-<br />

2800. From $20.<br />

● 7:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. The Simon<br />

& Garfunkel Story. See Apr 17.<br />

● 7:30: Cuckoo’s Nest Folk Club. Joe Crookston.<br />

Chaucer’s Pub, 122 Carling St., London.<br />

519-319-5847 or folk@iandavies.com or www.<br />

ticketscene.ca. $25.<br />

Monday <strong>April</strong> 22<br />

● 5:00: Canadian Opera Company. Opera<br />

Lab: The Art of Appearance. For youth aged<br />

16 to 28. An interactive workshop in which<br />

you’ll learn how designers create characters<br />

and enhance storytelling through costumes<br />

and wigs! Includes an in-depth discussion<br />

and Q&A session with COC’s Head of Costumes,<br />

Sandra Corazza, and Wigs & Makeup<br />

Supervisor, Sharon Ryman, before participants<br />

attending the Don Pasquale dress<br />

rehearsal where they can see the sets and<br />

costumes first-hand. Presenters: Sandra<br />

Corazza, Head of Costumes, & Sharon Ryman,<br />

Wigs & Makeup Supervisor. Four Seasons<br />

Centre for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen St.<br />

W. Register at www.coc.ca/OperaLab. $15.<br />

● 6:30: FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre.<br />

Dancers of Damelahamid: Spirit and<br />

Tradition. FirstOntario Performing Arts<br />

Centre, Partridge Hall, 250 St. Paul St., St.<br />

Catharines. 905-688-0722 or boxoffice@<br />

firstontariopac.ca. $20.<br />

Tuesday <strong>April</strong> 23<br />

● 12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation.<br />

Lunchtime Chamber Music: Jialiang Zhu &<br />

Friends. Works piano and violin. Jialiang Zhu<br />

& friends. Yorkminster Park Baptist Church,<br />

1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167 or www.yorkminsterpark.com.<br />

Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 1:00: St. James Cathedral. Tuesday Organ<br />

Recital. Bill O’Meara, organ. Cathedral<br />

Church of St. James, 106 King St. E. 416-364-<br />

7865 or www.stjamescathedral.ca/recitals.<br />

Free. Donations encouraged.<br />

● 7:30: Royal Conservatory of Music. Discovery<br />

Series: GGS New Music Ensemble.<br />

Samy Moussa: Kammerkonzert for a large<br />

ensemble; Iannis Xenakis: Phlegra for 11<br />

instruments. Temerty Theatre, Telus Centre,<br />

273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208 or www.<br />

rcmusic.com/performance. Free.<br />

● 8:00: Friends in Art. Italia da Favola (Fairytale<br />

Italy). Trio La Scala di Seta: Bianca<br />

D’amore, soprano; Giacomo Celluci, piano;<br />

Pasquale Di Giannantonio, guitar & actor.<br />

Joseph D. Carrier Art Gallery, 901 Lawrence<br />

Ave. W. www.friendsinart.ca. $45.<br />

● 8:00: Reid’s Distillery. Gypsy Jazz. Experience<br />

the magic of Gypsy Swing! Let the soulful<br />

melodies of guitars, violins, and upbeat<br />

rhythms transport you to a world of joy and<br />

excitement of Django Reinhardt’s music.<br />

32 Logan Ave. www.reidsdistillery.com.<br />

Wednesday <strong>April</strong> 24<br />

● 12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.<br />

Noonday Organ Recital. Aaron James, organ.<br />

1585 Yonge St. www.yorkminsterpark.com.<br />

Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 1:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Young<br />

People’s Concert: Bhangra & Beyond. Daniel<br />

Bartholomew-Poyser, conductor. Roy<br />

Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375.<br />

From $30.<br />

● 8:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. George<br />

Thorogood & The Destroyers - Bad All Over<br />

the World - 50 Years of Rock. OLG Stage at<br />

Fallsview Casino, 6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 41


LIVE OR ONLINE | Apr 1 to Jun 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Falls. ticketmaster.ca. From $70.<br />

● 8:00: Royal Conservatory of Music. Chamber<br />

& String Concerts Series: Daniel Hope<br />

- Irish Roots. Koerner Hall, TELUS Centre,<br />

273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208; rcmusic.com/<br />

performance. From $55.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Brilliant<br />

Bach. Bach: Concerto for Two Violins &<br />

String Orchestra BWV 1043; Bach: Concerto<br />

for Three Violins & String Orchestra BWV<br />

1064R; Bach: Concerto for Oboe BWV 1059R;<br />

Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No.4 BWV 1049;<br />

Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No.2 BWV 1047.<br />

Yolanda Bruno, violin; Eri Kosaka, violin; Clare<br />

Semes, violin; Kelly Zimba Lukić, flute; Leonie<br />

Wall, flute, Sarah Jeffrey, oboe; Jonathan<br />

Crow, leader & violin. Roy Thomson Hall,<br />

60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. From $35. Also<br />

Apr 25(8pm - RTH), 27(8pm - RTH), 28(3pm -<br />

George Weston Recital Hall).<br />

Thursday <strong>April</strong> 25<br />

● 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.<br />

Instrumental Series: Ebony and Ivory. Solo<br />

piano works by Samuel Coleridge-Taylor. Luke<br />

Welch, piano. Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre,<br />

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing<br />

Arts, 145 Queen St. W. www.coc.ca/free-concert-series.<br />

Free. Tickets required.<br />

● 12:00 noon: Metropolitan United Church.<br />

Noon at Met. Jonathan Oldengarm, organ.<br />

Metropolitan United Church, 56 Queen St. E.<br />

416-363-0331 x226. Freewill donation.<br />

● 1:00: St. James Cathedral. Early Music<br />

at St. James: Lazzolli Baroque. Cathedral<br />

Church of St. James, 106 King St. E. 416-364-<br />

7865 or www.stjamescathedral.ca/recitals.<br />

Free. Donations encouraged.<br />

● 7:00: FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre.<br />

The Circle - Indigenous Songwriters’<br />

Showcase. FirstOntario Performing Arts<br />

Centre, Cairns Recital Hall, 250 St. Paul St.,<br />

St. Catharines. 905-688-0722 or boxoffice@<br />

firstontariopac.ca. PWYC.<br />

● 8:00: Brampton On Stage. Colin James<br />

Trio. Rose Theatre, 1 Theatre Ln., Brampton.<br />

905-874-2800. From $20.<br />

● 8:00: Esprit Orchestra. Sonic Universe.<br />

R. Murray Schafer: Adieu Robert Schumann,<br />

for mezzo and orchestra; John Adams: Harmonielehre.<br />

Krisztina Szabó, mezzo; Alex<br />

Pauk, conductor. Koerner Hall, TELUS Centre,<br />

R. Murray Schafer<br />

Adieu Robert Schumann<br />

for mezzo soprano & orchestra<br />

(1976)<br />

Thu Apr 25<br />

SONIC UNIVERSE<br />

espritorchestra.com<br />

273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208 or www.<br />

espritorchestra.com or www.rcmusic.com/<br />

events-and-performances/esprit-orchestrapresents-sonic-universe.<br />

From $20. 7:15pm -<br />

Pre-concert chat.<br />

● 8:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Godsmack<br />

Vibez Tour. OLG Stage at Fallsview Casino,<br />

6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara Falls. www.ticketmaster.ca.<br />

Pricing TBA.<br />

● 8:00: TO Live. Murmuration by Le Patin<br />

Libre. Fifteen ice-mavericks combine the athletic<br />

virtuosity of competitive figure skaters,<br />

the choreographic intelligence of contemporary<br />

dancers, and the physical instinct for<br />

flocking. Leaside Memorial Community Gardens,<br />

Bert F. Grant Rink, 1073 Millwood Rd.<br />

www.universe.com/events/murmuration-byle-patin-libre-tickets-YDBF01<br />

or www.tolive.<br />

com. $25; $15(under 12). Also Apr 26(8pm),<br />

27(4pm & 8pm), 28(2pm).<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Brilliant<br />

Bach. Also Apr 24 (8pm - RTH), 27(8pm -<br />

RTH), 28(3pm - George Weston Recital Hall).<br />

Friday <strong>April</strong> 26<br />

● 12:10: Music at St. Andrew’s. Noon Time<br />

Recital. Works by Saint-Saëns, Paganini,<br />

Debussy, and David Jaeger. Jialiang Zhu,<br />

piano; Julia Mirzoev, violin. St. Andrew’s Presbyterian<br />

Church, 73 Simcoe St. 416-593-5600<br />

x220. Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 5:00: New Music Concerts. What Is the<br />

Real Sound of Toronto? Sandeep Bhagwati,<br />

Chair. Participants: Anthony R. Green, Parmela<br />

Attarwala, Dylan Robinson, and Patty<br />

Chan. Canadian Music Centre, 20 St. Joseph<br />

St. www.eventbrite.com/e/future-resonance-festival-what-is-the-real-sound-oftoronto-ticket.<br />

Free. 5pm: Panel Discussion.<br />

6:30pm: Reception.<br />

● 7:30: Canadian Opera Company. Don<br />

Pasquale. Music by Gaetano Donizetti. Misha<br />

Kiria (Don Pasquale); Joshua Hopkins (Dr.<br />

Malatesta); Simone Osborne (Norina); Santiago<br />

Ballerini (Ernesto); and other soloists.<br />

Canadian Opera Company Chorus & Orchestra;<br />

Jacques Lacombe, conductor; Renaud<br />

Doucet & André Barbe, stage direction. Four<br />

Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts,<br />

145 Queen St. W. 416-363-8231 or 1-800-<br />

250-4653 or tickets@coc.ca. From $55. Also<br />

<strong>May</strong> 2, 4, 8, 10, 12 (2pm), 18 (4:30 pm).<br />

● 7:30: Friends in Art. In Cibo Musica (Food in<br />

Music). A black-tie, sit-down dinner and performance<br />

event. Trio La Scala di Seta: Bianca<br />

D’amore, soprano; Giacomo Celluci, piano;<br />

Pasquale Di Giannantonio, guitar & actor.<br />

Joseph D. Carrier Art Gallery, 901 Lawrence<br />

Ave. W. www.friendsinart.ca. $150. Cocktail<br />

reception at 6pm.<br />

● 7:30: Scarborough Philharmonic Orchestra.<br />

Prelude to Hope. Maghan McPhee,<br />

soprano; Danielle MacMillan, mezzo; Odin<br />

Quartet; Kate Royer, clarinet; Gilles Thibodeau,<br />

horn; Lisa Tahara, piano; Ronald Royer,<br />

conductor. Heliconian Hall, 35 Hazelton Ave.<br />

647-482-7761 or www.spo.ca. Pay What You<br />

Can.<br />

● 8:00: Old Mill Toronto. Raoul and The Big<br />

Time. Jazz and rhythm & blues. 21 Old Mill Rd.<br />

www.oldmilltoronto.com/event/raoul-andthe-big-time.<br />

$25. Minimum $30 food & beverage<br />

spend. Restricted to ages 19+. Dinner<br />

at 6pm. Show at 8pm.<br />

● 8:00: Royal Conservatory of Music. Music<br />

Mix Series: Alex Cuba & Raul Midón. Koerner<br />

Hall, TELUS Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-<br />

0208; rcmusic.com/performance. From $50.<br />

● 8:00: TO Live. Murmuration by Le Patin<br />

Libre. See Apr 25. Also Apr 27(4pm & 8pm),<br />

28(2pm).<br />

Saturday <strong>April</strong> 27<br />

● 2:00: Avenue Road Music & Performance<br />

Academy. Revolution Through Music. Chopin:<br />

Mazurka Op.63 No.3 & Mazurka Op.30 No.2;<br />

Rachmaninoff: Etude Tableaux Op.39 No.5;<br />

Silvestrov: Silent Songs No.1; Shervin<br />

Hajipour: Ba’de Ma (arranged by Ricker Choi;<br />

Rweski: People United Will Never Be Defeated<br />

(excerpts); and other works. Ricker Choi,<br />

piano. Avenue Road Music and Performance<br />

Academy, Gordon Lightfoot Concert Hall,<br />

460 Avenue Rd. www.avenueroadmusic.com<br />

or info@avenueroadmusic.com or 416-922-<br />

0855. Pay what you can or donation.<br />

● 3:00: 5 at the First. Szivi Saxophone Quartet.<br />

Chase Griffin, soprano saxophone; Paula<br />

Kokot, alto saxophone; Lexi Graham, tenor<br />

saxophone; Glimmer Ng, baritone saxophone.<br />

First Unitarian Church, 170 Dundurn St. S.,<br />

Hamilton. 905-399-5125. $20; $15(sr); $5(st/<br />

unwaged); free(under 12).<br />

● 3:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Toronto Symphony Youth Orchestra: Titan - A<br />

Celebration of the TSYO’s 50th Anniversary.<br />

Mahler: Symphony No.1; and other works.<br />

Ciyan Bryson, bassoon; Simon Rivard, conductor.<br />

Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-<br />

598-3375. From $34.<br />

● 4:00: TO Live. Murmuration by Le Patin<br />

Libre. See Apr 25. Also Apr 27(8pm), 28(2pm).<br />

● 7:00: Beach United Church. Spring Fling<br />

with Special Guest Barbra Lica. 140 Wineva<br />

Ave. 416-691-8082 or www.beachunitedchurch.com.<br />

$40; $15(child). A fundraiser for<br />

Beach United Church.<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. A Mystical Evening: Music for Violin<br />

and Harp. Saint-Saëns: Fantaisie for violin<br />

and harp; Caroline Lizotte: Partita Op.52; Arvo<br />

Pärt: Spiegel im Spiegel; Piazzolla: Café 1930.<br />

Lori Gemmel, harp; Sheila Jaffe, violin & viola.<br />

Keffer Memorial Chapel, Wilfrid Laurier University,<br />

75 University Ave. W., Waterloo. 519-<br />

569-1809 or www.ticketscene.ca/kwcms.<br />

$20; $10(st).<br />

● 7:00: Singing Together <strong>2024</strong>. A Multicultural<br />

Choral Concert. Cantemos - Upper Canada<br />

Choristers; Chinese Canadian Choir of<br />

Toronto; Colourful Voices Choir; Coro San<br />

Marco; Joyful Singers; La Petite Musicale of<br />

Toronto; Shevchenko Choir; St. Paschal Baylon’s<br />

Church Children Choir; Yangtze River<br />

Performing Arts. St. Paschal Baylon Church,<br />

92 Steeles Ave. W., Thornhill. 416-931-1439.<br />

$20.<br />

● 7:30: Brampton On Stage. The Rose<br />

Orchestra: Strolling into Summer. Rose Theatre,<br />

1 Theatre Ln., Brampton. 905-874-2800.<br />

From $15.<br />

● 7:30: Duke Ellington Society - Toronto<br />

Chapter. Martin Loomer’s Orange Devils:<br />

Celebrating the 125th Anniversary of Duke<br />

Ellington’s Birth. Al Green Theatre, Miles<br />

Nadal JCC, 750 Spadina Ave. www.eventbrite.ca.<br />

$50.<br />

● 7:30: Mississauga Chamber Singers. Fauré’s<br />

Requiem. Fauré: Requiem Op.48 and<br />

other late-19th-century French choral works.<br />

Christ First United Church, 151 Lakeshore Rd.<br />

W., Mississauga. 647-549-4524. $30; $15(7-<br />

18); free(under 7).<br />

● 7:30: Royal Conservatory of Music. Discovery<br />

Series: GGS Piano Showcase. Works for<br />

two pianos and piano four hands. Mazzoleni<br />

Concert Hall, TELUS Centre, 273 Bloor St. W.<br />

416-408-0208 or www.rcmusic.com/performance.<br />

$20.<br />

● 7:30: Scarborough Philharmonic Orchestra.<br />

Songs of Hope. Works by Ronald Royer,<br />

Ted Runcie, Rachel McFarlane, Bruno<br />

Degazio, Daniel Mehdizadeh, Leela Gilday, and<br />

others. Maghan McPhee, soprano; Danielle<br />

MacMillan, mezzo; Odin Quartet; Kate Royer,<br />

clarinet; Gilles Thibodeau, horn; Lisa Tahara,<br />

piano; Ronald Royer, conductor. St. Paul<br />

L'Amoureaux Anglican Church, 3333 Finch<br />

Ave. E., Scarborough. 647-482-7761 or www.<br />

spo.ca/event/songs-of-hope. $35; $30(sr);<br />

$15(st).<br />

● 7:30: The Jeffery Concerts. Jaeden Izik-<br />

Dzurko, Piano. Scriabin: Sonata No.5 Op.53;<br />

Liszt: Sonata in b S.178; Chopin: Scherzo No.1<br />

in b Op.20; Chopin: Scherzo No.2 in b-flat<br />

Op.31; Chopin: Scherzo No.3 in c-sharp Op.39.<br />

Wolf Performance Hall, 251 Dundas St., London.<br />

jefferyconcerts@gmail.com or www.<br />

jefferyconcerts.com or www.Grandtheatre.<br />

com or 519-672-8800 or in person at the<br />

Grand Theatre Box Office, 471 Richmond St.<br />

$40; Free(st).<br />

<strong>April</strong> March 27, 8pm 16th<br />

George 7:30pm Weston<br />

VERDI<br />

SCHUBERT<br />

Recital Hall<br />

WINTERREISE<br />

REQUIEM<br />

For more information<br />

visit tmchoir.org<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Mendelssohn Choir. Verdi’s<br />

Requiem. Teiya Kasahara 笠 原 貞 野 , soprano;<br />

Rose Naggar-Tremblay, mezzo; Andrew<br />

Haji, tenor; Matthew Treviño, bass; Toronto<br />

Mendelssohn Choir; Members of the Toronto<br />

Symphony Orchestra; Jean-Sébastien Vallée,<br />

conductor. George Weston Recital Hall, Meridian<br />

Arts Centre, 5040 Yonge St. www.tmchoir.<br />

org. From $25. Also Apr 30(Koerner Hall).<br />

● 8:00: Mississauga Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Pops: Symphonic Pops. From The Beatles<br />

to Queen, Metallica to Michael Jackson,<br />

this concert will feature your favourite pop<br />

music in symphonic form. Complementing<br />

the orchestra will be an all-star band comprised<br />

of some of Canada’s finest musicians,<br />

and a roster of fantastic soloists. Living Arts<br />

Centre, Hammerson Hall, 4141 Living Arts Dr.,<br />

Mississauga. www.mississaugasymphony.ca<br />

or 905-306-6000. From $40.<br />

● 8:00: New Music Concerts. Swara Sutras<br />

Goes Electric. Suzuki: New Work for Tablas<br />

42 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


and Electronics (World Premiere); Boucher:<br />

New Work for Métis Fiddle and Electronics<br />

(World Premiere); Radford: New Work for<br />

Bamboo Flute, Percussion, Kora and Electronics<br />

(World Premiere); Staniland: New<br />

Work for Guzheng and Electronics (World<br />

Premiere); Swara Sutras Ensemble: Group<br />

Compositions. Gurpreet Chana, tabla; Alyssa<br />

Delbaere-Sawchuk, Métis fiddle; Lasso Sanou,<br />

bamboo flute; Lina Cao, guzheng. St. George<br />

by the Grange Church, 30 Stephanie St. 416-<br />

961-9594. TBA. 7:30 pm pre-concert chat.<br />

● 8:00: Royal Conservatory of Music.<br />

Quiet Please, There’s a Lady on Stage Series:<br />

Lizz Wright & Sanah Kadoura. Koerner<br />

Hall, TELUS Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-<br />

0208 or www.rcmusic.com/performance.<br />

From $45.<br />

● 8:00: TO Live. Murmuration by Le Patin<br />

Libre. See Apr 25. Also Apr 28(2pm).<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Brilliant<br />

Bach. Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St.<br />

416-598-3375. From $35. Also Apr 24 (8pm -<br />

RTH), 25(8pm - RTH), 28(3pm - George Weston<br />

Recital Hall).<br />

Sunday <strong>April</strong> 28<br />

● 8:00am: New Music Concerts. How to<br />

Inhabit These Different Temporalities? with<br />

Śabdagatitāra. Bhagwati: How to Inhabit<br />

These Different Temporalities? for Seven<br />

Musicians. Aga Khan Museum, 77 Wynford<br />

Dr. 416-961-9594. TBA. Full day installation.<br />

Times TBA.<br />

● 2:00: CAMMAC Toronto Region. Reading<br />

for Singers and Instrumentalists of Ralph<br />

Vaughan Williams’ A Sea Symphony. Samuel<br />

Tak-Ho Tam, conductor. Christ Church<br />

Deer Park, 1570 Yonge St. www.cammac.ca/<br />

toronto. $15; $10(members).<br />

● 2:00: TO Live. Murmuration by Le Patin<br />

Libre. See Apr 25.<br />

● 2:30: Barrie Concerts Association.<br />

Beethoven Rebooted. VC2 Cello Duo:<br />

Amahl Arulanandam & Bryan Holt. Bethel<br />

Community Church, 128 St. Vincent Street,<br />

Barrie. www.barrieconcerts.org or 705-436-<br />

1232. Up to $35. Livestream: $20; $10(st).<br />

Available for up to 30 days after the concert.<br />

● 2:30: Georgian Music. Beethoven<br />

Rebooted. VC2, cello duo. Bethel Community<br />

Church, 128 St. Vincent Street, Barrie. www.<br />

barrieconcerts.org. $35; $10(st). Livestream:<br />

$20; $10(st).<br />

● 3:00: Amici Chamber Ensemble. Diasporic<br />

Bridges. Christos Hatzis: Anaktoria; TJ<br />

Anderson: Shouts for Cello and Piano; Serouj<br />

Kradjian: Bachianas Bossa-Tangos; Gideon<br />

Klein: String Trio; Serouj Kradjian: Rondo alla<br />

libanesa; and works by Alexina Louie, Robert<br />

Sierra, Anna Sokolovic, and Florence B. Price.<br />

Guest Artists: Rebecca Cuddy, mezzo; Aline<br />

Morales, soprano; Erika Raum, violin; Barry<br />

Shiffman, violin; Anwar Kuhrshid, sitar; Naghmeh<br />

Farahmand, percussion; Amici Chamber<br />

Ensemble: Joaquin Valdepenas, clarinet;<br />

David Hetherington, cello; Serouj Kradjian,<br />

piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, Jeanne Lamon<br />

Hall, 427 Bloor St. W. www.amiciensemble.<br />

com/diasporic-bridges. $50; $30(under 30);<br />

$100(donor/VIP).<br />

● 3:00: Metropolitan United Church. Gala<br />

Hymn Festival. Massed choir, brass quintet,<br />

organ, and piano. Metropolitan United<br />

Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331 x226.<br />

Freewill donation.<br />

● 3:00: Royal Conservatory of Music. Chamber<br />

& String Concerts Series: Dover Quartet<br />

& Leif Ove Andsnes. Turina: La oración<br />

del torero Op.34 (The Bullfighter’s Prayer);<br />

Dohnányi: Piano Quintet No.2 in e-flat Op.26;<br />

Brahms: Piano Quintet in f Op.34. Koerner<br />

Hall, TELUS Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-<br />

0208 or www.rcmusic.com/performance.<br />

From $60.<br />

● 3:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Brilliant<br />

Bach. George Weston Recital Hall,<br />

Meridian Arts Centre, 5040 Yonge St. 416-<br />

598-3375. From $54. Also Apr 24(8pm - RTH),<br />

25(8pm - RTH), 27(8pm - RTH).<br />

● 4:00: Achill Choral Society. Illuminare.<br />

Elaine Hagenburg: Illuminare (Ontario premiere);<br />

Elaine Hagenburg: O Love; Paul Halley:<br />

Song for Canada; Stephen Hatfield: All Too<br />

Soon. Nancy Dettbarn, collaborative pianist.<br />

Westminster United Church, 247 Broadway<br />

Ave., Orangeville. www.achill.ca or 647-712-<br />

3039. $30; $15(st).<br />

● 4:00: Friends in Art. Inno All’amore<br />

(Hymn to Love). Trio La Scala di Seta: Bianca<br />

D’amore, soprano; Giacomo Celluci, piano;<br />

Pasquale Di Giannantoni0, guitar & actor.<br />

Joseph D. Carrier Art Gallery, 901 Lawrence<br />

Ave. W. www.friendsinart.ca. $45.<br />

● 4:00: Rezonance Baroque Ensemble. Madness<br />

and Meaning. Works by Handel, Barbara<br />

Strozzi, Antonio Sartorio, and others.<br />

Emily Klassen, soprano; Rezonance Baroque<br />

Ensemble. St. David’s Anglican Church,<br />

49 Donlands Ave. www.rezonanceensemble.<br />

com/concerts. $30; $20(st).<br />

● 4:00: Silent Revue. The Phantom of the<br />

Opera. A 1925 silent film screening from<br />

the US with live musical accompaniment.<br />

Director: Rupert Julian. Cast: Lon Chaney,<br />

Norman Kerry, Mary Philbin. Live accompaniment<br />

by Tania Gill. Curated by Alicia Fletcher.<br />

Revue Cinema, 400 Roncesvalles Ave. 416-<br />

531-9950 or info@revuecinema.ca. $17;<br />

$14(Bronze/Loyalty Members, st/sr); $13(Silver<br />

Members); Free(Gold/Individual/Family<br />

Members).<br />

SUNDAY 28 APRIL AT 4<br />

Choral Evensong<br />

plus at 4:45 p.m.<br />

THE BEST OF<br />

THE BARD<br />

Drama, poetry and music with<br />

St. Olave’s Arts Guild<br />

● 4:00: St. Olave’s Anglican Church. Best of<br />

the Bard. Opens with Choral Evensong for St.<br />

George, a religious service. Followed directly<br />

by a special feature at 4:45pm with St. Olave’s<br />

Arts Guild presenting short extracts from<br />

William Shakespeare’s drama, poetry, music,<br />

and songs to mark his birth on St. George’s<br />

Day in 1564. 360 Windermere Ave. www.You-<br />

Tube.com/StOlavesAnglicanChurch or 416-<br />

769-5686. Contributions appreciated. LIVE<br />

OR ONLINE.<br />

● 4:00: The Edison Singers. Warm Breath<br />

of Spring: Folksongs & Spirituals. Celebrating<br />

the long traditions of folk music and spirituals,<br />

with commentary about the songs, by<br />

our singers. The Edison Singers; Noel Edison,<br />

conductor. St. Mark’s Anglican Church,<br />

41 Byron St., Niagara-on-the-Lake. www.<br />

theedisonsingers.com/performances or 226-<br />

384-9300. $45; $25(st/18 and under). Also<br />

<strong>May</strong> 4(Toronto) & <strong>May</strong> 5(Elora).<br />

● 7:00: INNERchamber Inc. Signing Off.<br />

Brahms: String Quintet No.2 in G Op.111;<br />

Shostakovich: String Quartet No.15 in e-flat<br />

Op.144. Sharon Wei, viola; Julie Baumgartel,<br />

violin; Andrew Chung, violin; Jody Davenport,<br />

viola; Ben Bolt-Martin, cello. Factory<br />

163, 163 King St., Stratford. tickets@innerchamber.ca.<br />

$45; $30(arts workers/st).<br />

5:30pm - Pre-show dinner. A light meal is<br />

available to in-person patrons.<br />

● 7:30: Cuckoo’s Nest Folk Club. Bill Garrett<br />

& Sue Lothrop with Paul Mills. Chaucer’s<br />

Pub, 122 Carling St., London. 519-319-5847<br />

or folk@iandavies.com or www.ticketscene.<br />

ca. $25.<br />

Monday <strong>April</strong> <strong>29</strong><br />

● 7:00: Array/ECCG Gamelan. Evergreen<br />

Club Contemporary Gamelan Monthly<br />

Meetup. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-<br />

532-3019. Free.<br />

Tuesday <strong>April</strong> 30<br />

● 12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation.<br />

Lunchtime Chamber Music: Violin Recital.<br />

Hee-Soo Yoon, violin. Yorkminster Park Baptist<br />

Church, 1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167 or<br />

www.yorkminsterpark.com. Free. Donations<br />

welcome.<br />

● 1:00: St. James Cathedral. Tuesday Organ<br />

Recital. Chris Dawes, organ; Daniel Rubinoff,<br />

saxophone. Cathedral Church of St.<br />

James, 106 King St. E. 416-364-7865 or www.<br />

stjamescathedral.ca/recitals. Free. Donations<br />

encouraged.<br />

● 7:00: FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre.<br />

360 Allstars. FirstOntario Performing<br />

Arts Centre, Cairns Recital Hall, 250 St. Paul<br />

St., St. Catharines. 905-688-0722; boxoffice@firstontariopac.ca.<br />

$30.<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. Brahms’ Third Symphony (4-hands<br />

piano). Angela Park and Stephan Sylvestre,<br />

4-hands piano. Keffer Memorial Chapel, Wilfrid<br />

Laurier University, 75 University Ave. W.,<br />

Waterloo. 519-569-1809 or www.ticketscene.ca/kwcms.<br />

$30; $20(st).<br />

<strong>April</strong> March 30, 8pm 16th<br />

Koerner 7:30pm Hall<br />

VERDI<br />

SCHUBERT<br />

WINTERREISE<br />

REQUIEM<br />

For more information<br />

visit tmchoir.org<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Mendelssohn Choir. Verdi’s<br />

Requiem. Koerner Hall, TELUS Centre,<br />

273 Bloor St. W. www.tmchoir.org. From $25.<br />

Also Apr 27(George Weston Recital Hall).<br />

Wednesday <strong>May</strong> 1<br />

● 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.<br />

Instrumental Series: Reflections with<br />

Brahms and Debussy. Cathy Yang, piano;<br />

Simon Tetzlaff, cello. Richard Bradshaw<br />

Amphitheatre, Four Seasons Centre for the<br />

Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W. www.<br />

coc.ca/free-concert-series. Free. Tickets<br />

required.<br />

● 12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.<br />

Noonday Organ Recital. William Maddox,<br />

organ. 1585 Yonge St. www.yorkminsterpark.<br />

com. Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 7:30: Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra.<br />

Intimate & Immersive: Suspended Doorways.<br />

Maevskiy: New Work; Shahi: Suspended<br />

Doors; Jacobs: New Work; Sokolovic:<br />

...and I need a room to receive five thousand<br />

people with raised glasses...; Livingston:<br />

Noyade; Derksen: Rebellion; and other works.<br />

Gemma New, conductor. The Cotton Factory,<br />

270 Sherman Ave. N., Hamilton. 905-526-<br />

7756; boxoffice@hpo.org. $40.<br />

● 7:30: Royal Conservatory of Music. Academy<br />

Chamber Orchestra. Chamber orchestra<br />

repertoire and Senior winners of the<br />

Concerto Competition. Koerner Hall, TELUS<br />

Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208 or<br />

www.rcmusic.com/performance. Free.<br />

● 8:00: Flato Markham Theatre. MOTUS O<br />

dance theatre: Confessions of a Professional<br />

Dancer. 171 Town Centre Blvd., Markham.<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 43


LIVE OR ONLINE | Apr 1 to Jun 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

905-305-7469; flatomarkhamtheatre.ca.<br />

$48(regular); $58(prime); $15(YTX).<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Brahms’s First. Alison Yun-Fei Jiang: New<br />

Work (World première/TSO Commission);<br />

Von Bingen, Hildur Guðnadóttir, Missy Mazzoli<br />

& Sarah Kirkland Snider (arr. Jarkko<br />

Riihimäki): enargeia (North American première);<br />

Brahms: Symphony No.1. Emily<br />

D’Angelo, mezzo; Gustavo Gimeno, conductor.<br />

Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-<br />

3375. From $35. Also <strong>May</strong> 2.<br />

Thursday <strong>May</strong> 2<br />

● 12:00 noon: Metropolitan United Church.<br />

Noon at Met. Henry From, piano. Metropolitan<br />

United Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-<br />

0331 x226. Freewill donation.<br />

WOMEN’S MUSICAL CLUB OF TORONTO<br />

MAY 2, <strong>2024</strong> | 1.30 PM<br />

JOYCE EL-KHOURY<br />

AND<br />

SEROUJ KRADJIAN<br />

416-923-7052 | wmct.on.ca<br />

● 1:30: Music in the Afternoon. Joyce El-<br />

Khoury and Serouj Kradjian. Bellini: La ricordanza;<br />

Vaga luna; Per pietà, bell’idol mio; Liszt:<br />

Pace non trovo; I’ vidi in terra angelici costumi;<br />

Fauré: Les Roses d’Ispahan; Bizet:<br />

Adieux de l’hôtesse arabe; Delibes: Les Filles<br />

de Cadix; Lebanese Song Collection, and<br />

other works. Joyce El-Khoury, soprano; Serouj<br />

Kradjian, piano. Walter Hall, Edward<br />

Johnson Building, University of Toronto,<br />

80 Queen’s Park. 416-923-7052 X1 or www.<br />

wmct.on.ca. $50; free(st with ID at door).<br />

● 2:30: Serenata Singers. Sing Me A Love<br />

Song. Celebrating the many moods of love.<br />

Carl Strommen: Danny Boy; Steven Decesare:<br />

Loch Lomond; Elton John & Tim Rice:<br />

Can You Feel The Love Tonight?; Mark Hayes:<br />

You Raise Me Up; Jay Althouse: Shenandoah.<br />

Michael Morgan, director. Scarborough<br />

Bluffs United Church, 3739 Kingston Rd.,<br />

Scarborough. www.serenatasingers.ca or<br />

416-449-4053. $20; Free(12 and under). Also<br />

<strong>May</strong> 3(7:30pm).<br />

● 7:00: Burlington Performing Arts Centre.<br />

Canadian Contemporary Dance Theatre:<br />

Teasing Gravity. Burlington Performing Arts<br />

Centre - Main Theatre, 440 Locust St., Burlington.<br />

www.burlingtonpac.ca/events or<br />

905-568-1600. .<br />

● 7:30: Canadian Opera Company. Don<br />

Pasquale. See Apr 26. Also <strong>May</strong> 4, 8, 10, 12<br />

(2pm), 18 (4:30 pm).<br />

● 7:30: FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre.<br />

X (Dix) by Côté Danse. FirstOntario Performing<br />

Arts Centre, Partridge Hall, 250 St.<br />

Paul St., St. Catharines. 905-688-0722 ; or<br />

www.boxoffice@firstontariopac.ca. $45;<br />

$39(members).<br />

● 8:00: Flato Markham Theatre. Matthew<br />

Whitaker. 171 Town Centre Blvd., Markham.<br />

905-305-7469 or www.flatomarkhamtheatre.<br />

ca. $68(regular); $78(prime); $15(YTX).<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Brahms’s First. See <strong>May</strong> 1.<br />

● 8:30: Fallsview Casino Resort. Straight<br />

No Chaser. OLG Stage at Fallsview Casino,<br />

6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$45.85-$70.20.<br />

Friday <strong>May</strong> 3<br />

● 12:10: Music at St. Andrew’s. Noon Time<br />

Recital. Works by Mozart, Chopin, Mozetich,<br />

Ravel, and Liszt. Yuling Chen, piano; Elena<br />

Wang, piano; Cathy Wang, piano. St. Andrew’s<br />

Presbyterian Church, 73 Simcoe St. 416-593-<br />

5600 x220. Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 7:00: Art Gallery of Ontario. Tafelmusik:<br />

Making Herself Heard. Works of Élisabeth<br />

Jacquet de la Guerre, Isabella Leonarda,<br />

Marianne Martinez, and the enigmatic Mrs.<br />

Philarmonica. Geneviève Gilardeau, violin;<br />

Cristina Zacharias, violin; Michael Unterman,<br />

cello; Charlotte Nediger, harpsichord. Art Gallery<br />

of Ontario, Walker Court, 317 Dundas St.<br />

W. www.ago.ca/events/tafelmusik-makingherself-heard.<br />

A seated performance free<br />

with general admission. Also Apr 4.<br />

● 7:30: Canadian Opera Company. Medea.<br />

Music by Luigi Cherubini. Sondra Radvanovsky<br />

/ Chiara Isotton (<strong>May</strong> 15 & 17) (Medea);<br />

Matthew Polenzani (Giasone); Janai Brugger<br />

(Glauce); and other soloists. Canadian Opera<br />

Company Chorus & Orchestra; Lorenzo Passerini,<br />

conductor; Sir David McVicar, stage<br />

director. Four Seasons Centre for the Performing<br />

Arts, 145 Queen St. W. 416-363-8231<br />

or 1-800-250-4653 or tickets@coc.ca. From<br />

$55. Also <strong>May</strong> 5(2pm), 9, 11, 15, 17.<br />

● 7:30: Confluence Concerts. Dichterliebe:<br />

Whose Love? A reimagining of Robert Schumann’s<br />

romantic song cycle in its pure form,<br />

from a gender inclusive perspective. Teiya<br />

Kasahara 笠 原 貞 野 , vocalist; David Eliakis,<br />

piano. Heliconian Hall, 35 Hazelton Ave. www.<br />

bemusednetwork.com/events. $25. Also<br />

<strong>May</strong> 4. Pre-concert chat at 6:45pm.<br />

● 7:30: Serenata Singers. Sing Me A Love<br />

Song. Celebrating the many moods of love.<br />

Carl Strommen: Danny Boy; Steven Decesare:<br />

Loch Lomond; Elton John & Tim Rice:<br />

Can You Feel The Love Tonight?; Mark Hayes:<br />

You Raise Me Up; Jay Althouse: Shenandoah.<br />

Michael Morgan, director. Scarborough<br />

Bluffs United Church, 3739 Kingston Rd.,<br />

Scarborough. www.serenatasingers.ca or<br />

416-449-4053. $20; Free(12 and under). Also<br />

<strong>May</strong> 2(2:30pm).<br />

● 8:00: Flato Markham Theatre. Elton Rohn.<br />

171 Town Centre Blvd., Markham. 905-305-<br />

7469; flatomarkhamtheatre.ca. $65(prime);<br />

$60(regular).<br />

● 8:00: Old Mill Toronto. The Bettys. Swing,<br />

cabaret, Motown, 80s rock. 21 Old Mill Rd.<br />

www.oldmilltoronto.com/event/the-bettys.<br />

$20. Minimum $30 food & beverage spend.<br />

Restricted to ages 19+. Dinner at 6pm. Show<br />

at 8pm.<br />

● 8:00: Royal Conservatory of Music. Royal<br />

Conservatory Orchestra Series: Peter Oundjian,<br />

Stewart Goodyear and the Royal Conservatory<br />

Orchestra. Murphy: Curiosity,<br />

Genius, and the Search for Petula Clark;<br />

Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 5 in E-flat<br />

Op.73 (“Emperor”); Tchaikovsky: Symphony<br />

No.5 in e Op.64. Koerner Hall, TELUS Centre,<br />

273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208 or www.<br />

rcmusic.com/performance. From $25.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Consort. Strike the Lute. Co-<br />

Artistic Direction by Marc Lewon & Esteban<br />

La Rotta. Works by Conrad Paumann. Esteban<br />

La Rotta and Marc Lewon, lutes. Trinity-St.<br />

Paul’s Centre, Jeanne Lamon Hall, 427 Bloor<br />

St. W. www.torontoconsort.org or 416-964-<br />

6337. From $20. Also <strong>May</strong> 4. POSTPONED.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Operetta Theatre. El<br />

huésped del sevillano (The Guest at the Inn).<br />

Music by Jacinto Guerrero. Canadian premiere.<br />

Soloists: Tonatiuh Abrego, Diana Di<br />

Mauro, Lucia Santilly, and Stuart Graham;<br />

Kate Carver, conductor. Jane Mallett Theatre,<br />

St. Lawrence Centre for the Arts, 27 Front St.<br />

E. 416-366-7723 or 1–800-708-6754 or www.<br />

tolive.com. From $75. Also <strong>May</strong> 4 & 5.<br />

Saturday <strong>May</strong> 4<br />

● 10:00am: Metropolitan United Church.<br />

Organ Masterclass by Professor Kola<br />

Owolabi, Notre Dame University. Metropolitan<br />

United Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-<br />

0331 x226. Free.<br />

● 2:00: Avenue Road Music & Performance<br />

Academy. Across Borders. Debussy: Cello<br />

Sonata L.135; Sibelius: Malinconia Op.20;<br />

Ulrich Menzefricke: Afterglow; Brahms:<br />

Cello Sonata No.2 in F Op.99; Wienawski:<br />

Scherzo tarantelle Op.16. Simon Tetzlaff,<br />

cello; Cathy Yang, piano. Avenue Road Music<br />

and Performance Academy, Gordon Lightfoot<br />

Concert Hall, 460 Avenue Rd. www.<br />

avenueroadmusic.com or info@avenueroadmusic.com<br />

or 416-922-0855. Pay what you<br />

can or donation.<br />

● 3:00: The Cellar Singers. HMS Pinafore.<br />

By Gilbert and Sullivan. St. James’ Anglican<br />

Church, 58 Peter St. N., Orillia. 905-830-<br />

3039. $30.<br />

● 4:00: Flato Markham Theatre. 360 ALL-<br />

STARS. 171 Town Centre Blvd., Markham.<br />

905-305-7469 or www.flatomarkhamtheatre.<br />

ca. $58(regular); $68(prime); $15(YTX). Also<br />

8pm.<br />

Celebration of<br />

Small Ensembles<br />

<strong>May</strong> 4, 4pm<br />

Gentileschi<br />

Baroque<br />

Rilian Trio<br />

APERTURE ROOM<br />

340 Yonge Street<br />

music-toronto.com<br />

● 4:00: Music Toronto. Celebration of Small<br />

Ensembles. Includes a short stretch and chat<br />

between sets. Refreshments will be available<br />

for purchase. Gentileschi Baroque & Rilian<br />

Trio. Aperture Room, Thornton-Smith Building,<br />

340 Yonge St. www.musictoronto.com.<br />

$40(single); $20(st/arts).<br />

● 4:00: The Edison Singers. Warm Breath<br />

of Spring: Folksongs & Spirituals. Celebrating<br />

the long traditions of folk music and spirituals,<br />

with commentary about the songs, by<br />

our singers. The Edison Singers; Noel Edison,<br />

conductor. Church of St. Peter and St.<br />

Simon-the-Apostle, 525 Bloor St. E. www.<br />

theedisonsingers.com/performances or 226-<br />

384-9300. $45; $25(st/18 and under). Also<br />

Apr 28(Niagara-on-the-lake) & <strong>May</strong> 5(Elora).<br />

● 7:00: North Halton Community Singers.<br />

Spring Concert: What a Wonderful World.<br />

Featuring a musical tribute to the planet<br />

Earth. Members of the North Halton Community<br />

Singers. Christian Reformed Church,<br />

11611 Trafalgar Rd., Georgetown. 647-203-<br />

7795. $25.<br />

● 7:30: Canadian Opera Company. Don<br />

Pasquale. See Apr 26. Also <strong>May</strong> 8, 10, 12<br />

(2pm), 18 (4:30 pm).<br />

● 7:30: Confluence Concerts. Dichterliebe:<br />

Whose Love? See <strong>May</strong> 3. Pre-concert chat<br />

at 6:45pm.<br />

● 7:30: Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra.<br />

Gemma Conducts Beethoven 9. Balfour:<br />

Mamachimowin; Vivier: Lonely Child;<br />

Beethoven: Symphony No.9. Gemma New,<br />

conductor. FirstOntario Concert Hall,<br />

1 Summers Ln., Hamilton. 905-526-7756;<br />

boxoffice@hpo.org. $20-$80. 6:30pm preconcert<br />

talk.<br />

● 7:30: Karen Schuessler Singers. Secrets<br />

of Old South. A night of song, story and laughter<br />

with host and storyteller, Adam Corrigan<br />

Holowitz, as he shares the secrets of one of<br />

London’s beloved neighbourhoods, Old South.<br />

Performers: Adam Corrigan Holowitz, Denise<br />

Pelley, and Steve Holowitz. Wesley-Knox<br />

United Church, 91 Askin St., London. 519-<br />

681-81<strong>29</strong>. $25; $10(st); Free(ages 6-13 when<br />

accompanied by an adult). No intermission.<br />

● 7:30: London Symphonia. An Elegant Fire.<br />

Haydn: Symphony No.6 in D Hob.I/6; C. P. E.<br />

Bach: Cello Concerto in A; C. P. E. Bach: Symphony<br />

in D; Boccherini: Cello Concerto in D;<br />

Boccherini: Excerpt from Sinfonia No.4 in d<br />

Op.12. Elinor Frey, cello soloist and leader;<br />

London Symphonia. Metropolitan United<br />

Church, 468 Wellington St., London. 226-270-<br />

0910 or www.londonsymphonia.ca. $70(premium);<br />

$52(adult); $22(st).<br />

● 7:30: Soundstreams. Grandma’s Shawl.<br />

Works by Stefania Turkevych, Lesya Dychko,<br />

Oleksandra Fedyshyn, Alla Zagaykevych,<br />

Anna Pidgorna, Ian Cusson, and Andrew<br />

Balfour. Natalya Gennadi, soprano; Kristine<br />

Dandavino, mezzo; Jo Greenaway, piano;<br />

Oleksandra Fedyshyn, violin. Redwood Theatre,<br />

1300 Gerrard Ave. E. www.rcmusic.<br />

com/events-and-performances/soundstreams-presents-grandmas-shawl.<br />

$26.20.<br />

● 7:30: The Isabel Voices. A Night on Broadway.<br />

Isabel Bader Centre for the Performing<br />

Arts, Jennifer Velva Bernstein Performance<br />

Hall, 390 King St. W., Kingston. www.<br />

queensu.ca/theisabel/whats-on. $30;<br />

$25(sr); $15(st). Livestream: Pay What You<br />

Can Donation $10/$25/$35/$50/$100/$200.<br />

LIVE & LIVESTREAM.<br />

● 7:30: Yorkminstrels Show Choir.<br />

44 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Celebrating 50 Years of Song and Dance.<br />

St. George on Yonge Anglican Church,<br />

5350 Yonge St., North York. info@yorkminstrels.com.<br />

$20.<br />

● 8:00: Flato Markham Theatre. 360 ALL-<br />

STARS. 171 Town Centre Blvd., Markham.<br />

905-305-7469; flatomarkhamtheatre.ca.<br />

$58(regular); $68(prime); $15(YTX). Also<br />

4pm.<br />

● 8:00: Royal Conservatory of Music. Quiet<br />

Please, There’s a Lady on Stage Series: Stacey<br />

Kent Trio & Alison Young Trio. Koerner Hall,<br />

TELUS Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-<br />

0208; rcmusic.com/performance. From $45.<br />

● 8:00: Sinfonia Toronto. Viva Violins /<br />

Bach to Tchaikovsky. Bach: Double Violin<br />

Concerto in d BWV 1043; Malcolm Arnold:<br />

Concerto for Two Violins (first Toronto performance);<br />

Stanley Grill: Artemis, Her Silver<br />

Bow (first performance); Tchaikovsky: Serenade<br />

for Strings in C Op.48. Christos Galileas,<br />

violin; Jannis Georgiadis, violin; Sinfonia<br />

Toronto; Nurhan Arman, conductor. George<br />

Weston Recital Hall, Meridian Arts Centre,<br />

5040 Yonge St. 416-499-0403 or www.sinfoniatoronto.com.<br />

$52; $40(sr); $20(st).<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Consort. Strike the Lute. See<br />

<strong>May</strong> 3. POSTPONED.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Operetta Theatre. El<br />

huésped del sevillano (The Guest at the Inn).<br />

See <strong>May</strong> 3. Also <strong>May</strong> 5.<br />

● 9:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Billy Ray<br />

Cyrus + FIREROSE. OLG Stage at Fallsview<br />

Casino, 6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara Falls.<br />

ticketmaster.ca. From $70.<br />

Sunday <strong>May</strong> 5<br />

● 2:00: Canadian Opera Company. Medea.<br />

See <strong>May</strong> 3. Also <strong>May</strong> 9, 11, 15, 17.<br />

Z<br />

647-450-9806. From $20. Also <strong>May</strong> 17(8pm).<br />

● 2:30: Niagara Symphony Orchestra. NSO<br />

Classic 5: Mahler’s Symphony No.2. Jocelyn<br />

Frank, soprano; Beste Kalendar, mezzo; Buffalo<br />

Philharmonic Chorus; Laura Secord S.S.<br />

Choir. FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre,<br />

Partridge Hall, 250 St. Paul St., St. Catharines.<br />

905-688-0722; boxoffice@firstontariopac.ca.<br />

$15.64-$82.90.<br />

● 3:00: Metropolitan United Church. Gala<br />

Organ Recital. Works by Guilmant, Widor,<br />

Laurin, and others. Kola Owolabi, Notre<br />

Dame University, organ. Metropolitan United<br />

Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331 x226.<br />

$20 at door.<br />

● 3:00: West Plains United Church. Live!@<br />

WestPlains: Corey Gemmell, Violin; Benjamin<br />

Smith, Piano. Triumph Over Tragedy - Works<br />

by Mozart, Schumann, Ysaÿe, and Poulenc.<br />

Corey Gemmell, violin; Benjamin Smith, piano.<br />

549 Plains Rd. W., Burlington. 905-320-<br />

4989 or www.westplains.ca or westplainsconcerts@gmail.com.<br />

PWYC or $30; $20(st);<br />

$10(ages 10 & under); $15(Livestream). Tickets<br />

include access to livestream video for 30<br />

days. LIVE & LIVESTREAM.<br />

● 3:30: Toronto Chamber Choir. The Bard,<br />

Reimagined (Kaffeemusik). Music inspired<br />

by the plays and sonnets of William Shakespeare.<br />

Toronto Chamber Choir; Lucas Harris,<br />

artistic director. Church of the Redeemer,<br />

162 Bloor St. W. 416-922-4948 or www.torontochamberchoir.ca.<br />

Pay what you choose:<br />

$30, $20, $5.<br />

● 4:00: The Edison Singers. Warm Breath<br />

of Spring: Folksongs & Spirituals. Celebrating<br />

the long traditions of folk music and spirituals,<br />

with commentary about the songs, by<br />

our singers. The Edison Singers; Noel Edison,<br />

conductor. Knox Presbyterian Church (Elora),<br />

51 Church St., Elora. www.theedisonsingers.<br />

com/performances or 226-384-9300. $45;<br />

$25(st/18 and under). Also Apr 28(Niagaraon-the-lake)<br />

& <strong>May</strong> 4(Toronto).<br />

● 7:30: Cuckoo’s Nest Folk Club. Streetlight<br />

Cadence. Chaucer’s Pub, 122 Carling St., London.<br />

519-319-5847 or folk@iandavies.com or<br />

www.ticketscene.ca. $25.<br />

● 8:00: Markham Concert Band. MCB Rocks<br />

Again. Flato Markham Theatre, 171 Town Centre<br />

Blvd., Markham. 905-305-7469; flatomarkhamtheatre.ca.<br />

$10-$26.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Operetta Theatre. El<br />

huésped del sevillano (The Guest at the Inn).<br />

See <strong>May</strong> 3.<br />

Monday <strong>May</strong> 6<br />

● 2:30: Orchestra Kingston. Lord of the<br />

Rings. Howard Shore: Lord of the Rings Trilogy<br />

and works by Wagner, Walton, Rimsky-Korsakov,<br />

Cameron, Mendelssohn, and<br />

Mascagni. Guests: Canta Arya School for<br />

Strings. The Spire/Sydenham Street United<br />

Church, 82 Sydenham St., Kingston. manager.orchestrakingston@gmail.com.<br />

$25;<br />

$20(sr/st); Free(16 & under).<br />

● 7:00: High Notes Avante Productions Inc.<br />

High Notes Gala for Mental Health. Shiner/<br />

Taheri: We All Have a Story (world premiere);<br />

Milhaud: Scaramouche; and a variety of programming<br />

including dance & spoken word.<br />

Dan Hill, Ron Korb, Ernesto Ramirez, Nova<br />

Sounds, and Evan Carter. Richmond Hill Centre<br />

for the Performing Arts, 10268 Yonge St.,<br />

Richmond Hill. 905-787-8811. $40; $20(st);<br />

$65(VIP, includes drink voucher and La Rocca<br />

dessert and artist meet & greet with Luba<br />

Goy). Supporting High Notes Avante’s free<br />

music lessons and other programming for<br />

people touched by mental illness.<br />

Tuesday <strong>May</strong> 7<br />

● 12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation.<br />

Lunchtime Chamber Music: Flute Recital.<br />

Gillian Derer, flute. Yorkminster Park Baptist<br />

Church, 1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167 or<br />

www.yorkminsterpark.com. Free. Donations<br />

welcome.<br />

● 1:00: St. James Cathedral. Tuesday Organ<br />

Recital. William Lupton, organ. Cathedral<br />

Church of St. James, 106 King St. E. 416-364-<br />

7865 or www.stjamescathedral.ca/recitals.<br />

Free. Donations encouraged.<br />

● 3:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. 5th Dimension.<br />

Avalon Theatre (Fallsview Casino),<br />

6380 Fallsview Blvd., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$45.85-$75.85. Also <strong>May</strong> 8(3pm<br />

& 8:30pm).<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. An Unusual Trio: Viola, Oboe, Piano.<br />

Loeffler: Two Rhapsodies; Klughardt: Schifflieder;<br />

Beethoven: Trio in B-flat Op.11 (arr. for<br />

English horn, piano, and viola). Judith Souman,<br />

viola; David Vanbiesbrouck, oboe; Beth<br />

Ann de Sousa, piano. First United Church,<br />

16 William St. W., Waterloo. 519-569-1809 or<br />

www.ticketscene.ca/kwcms. $20; $10(st).<br />

● 7:30: FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre.<br />

The Trans-Canada Highwaymen. Steven<br />

Paige, Chris Murphy, Craig Northey, Moe<br />

Berg. FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre,<br />

Partridge Hall, 250 St. Paul St., St. Catharines.<br />

905-688-0722; boxoffice@firstontariopac.ca.<br />

$59; $49(members).<br />

Wednesday <strong>May</strong> 8<br />

● 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.<br />

Vocal Series: Les Adieux. Charlotte Siegel and<br />

GALA for<br />

MENTAL HEALTH<br />

● 2:00: Toronto Children’s Chorus. True Colours:<br />

Let Your Light Shine! Zimfira Poloz, conductor.<br />

George Weston Recital Hall, Meridian<br />

Arts Centre, 5040 Yonge St. www.torontochildrenschorus.com/performances.<br />

● 2:00: Trinity-St. Paul’s United Church.<br />

Tango for Two. A new concert-opera with original<br />

music and libretto by Jonathan Kravtchenko.<br />

Antonina Laskarzhevska, soprano;<br />

Bohdan Kirieiev, baritone. Jeanne Lamon<br />

Hall, Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor<br />

St. W. www.eventbrite.com/e/tango-fortwo-may-5-<strong>2024</strong>-tickets-781421882887<br />

or<br />

“<br />

Anniversary<br />

Celebration<br />

MONDAY MAY 6TH, 7:00pm<br />

Richmond Hill Centre for Performing Arts<br />

highnotesavante.ca • 905.787.8811<br />

#WEALLHAVEASTORY #MUSICISMEDICINE<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 45


LIVE OR ONLINE | Apr 1 to Jun 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Queen Hezumuryango, COC Ensemble Studio<br />

Artists. Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre,<br />

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts,<br />

145 Queen St. W. www.coc.ca/free-concertseries.<br />

Free. Tickets required.<br />

● 12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.<br />

Noonday Organ Recital. Sharon L. Beckstead,<br />

organ. 1585 Yonge St. www.yorkminsterpark.<br />

com. Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 3:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. 5th Dimension.<br />

See <strong>May</strong> 7. Also <strong>May</strong> 8(8:30pm).<br />

● 7:30: Canadian Opera Company. Don<br />

Pasquale. See Apr 26. Also <strong>May</strong> 10, 12 (2pm),<br />

18 (4:30 pm).<br />

● 8:30: Fallsview Casino Resort. 5th Dimension.<br />

See <strong>May</strong> 7.<br />

Thursday <strong>May</strong> 9<br />

● 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.<br />

Instrumental Series: Chopin, Poetry, and<br />

Death. Chopin: Piano Sonata No.2 in b-flat;<br />

and selected Preludes, Mazurkas, Nocturnes,<br />

and Polonaises. Ludmil Angelov,<br />

piano. Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre, Four<br />

Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts,<br />

145 Queen St. W. www.coc.ca/free-concertseries.<br />

Free. Tickets required.<br />

● 12:00 noon: Metropolitan United Church.<br />

Noon at Met. Parker Clements, baritone;<br />

Dakota Scott-Digout, piano. Metropolitan<br />

United Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331<br />

x226. Freewill donation.<br />

● 7:30: Canadian Opera Company. Medea.<br />

See <strong>May</strong> 3. Also <strong>May</strong> 11, 15, 17.<br />

● 8:00: Art of Time Ensemble. Both Sides<br />

Now. New arrangements of 14 of Joni Mitchell’s<br />

classics. Art of Time Ensemble with<br />

Hawksley Workman, Sarah Slean, Jasmyn,<br />

Abigail Lapell, and Gregory Hoskins. Harbourfront<br />

Centre Theatre, 235 Queens Quay W.<br />

416-973-4000. From $39. Also <strong>May</strong> 10(8pm)<br />

& 11(8pm).<br />

● 8:00: Burlington Performing Arts Centre.<br />

The Transcanada Highwaymen. Burlington<br />

Performing Arts Centre - Main Theatre,<br />

440 Locust St., Burlington. www.burlingtonpac.ca<br />

or 905-681-6000. From $69.50.<br />

● 8:00: Royal Conservatory of Music.<br />

21C Music Festival Series: Kronos Quartet:<br />

Five Decades. Works by Lizée, Riley, Rini<br />

and Vrebalov. Koerner Hall, TELUS Centre,<br />

273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208 or www.<br />

rcmusic.com/performance. From $21.<br />

● 8:00: TO Live. Eve Egoyan: Longing and<br />

Belonging. Music by Armenian composers.<br />

George Weston Recital Hall, Meridian<br />

Arts Centre, 5040 Yonge St. 416-366-7723 or<br />

www.tolive.com. $45.25-$56.75.<br />

Friday <strong>May</strong> 10<br />

● 12:10: Music at St. Andrew’s. Noon Time<br />

Recital. Works by William Bolcom, Chopin,<br />

and Franck. Jin Lee Youn, violin; Su Jeon<br />

Higuera, piano. St. Andrew’s Presbyterian<br />

Church, 73 Simcoe St. 416-593-5600 x220.<br />

Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 7:00: Sinfonia Ancaster. Unabashedly<br />

Romantic Featuring Valerie Tryon. Grieg:<br />

Piano Concerto in a Op.16; Tchaikovsky: Symphony<br />

No.2 in c Op.17. Valerie Tryon, piano;<br />

Sinfonia Ancaster; Jeffrey Pollock, music director<br />

& conductor. Ancaster Memorial Arts<br />

Centre, Peller Hall, 357 Wilson St. E., Ancaster.<br />

www.sinfoniaancaster.com or 905-304-<br />

3232. $25; $20(sr); $15(under 25).<br />

● 7:30: Canadian Opera Company. Don<br />

Pasquale. See Apr 26. Also <strong>May</strong> 12 (2pm), 18<br />

(4:30 pm).<br />

● 7:30: Friends of Music at St. Thomas’s.<br />

Mezzopiano: Histoires naturelles - An Animated<br />

Feature. Ravel: Histoires naturelles;<br />

Poulenc: Le Bestiaire; and other works. St.<br />

Thomas’s Anglican Church, 383 Huron St.<br />

www.stthomas.on.ca or 416-483-5488. Pay<br />

What You Wish ($40 suggested).<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Tchaikovsky<br />

+ Brahms. Julia Mermelstein: New<br />

Work (<strong>May</strong> 10 only. World première/TSO<br />

Commission); Christina Volpini: New Work<br />

(<strong>May</strong> 11 only. World première/TSO Commission);<br />

Brahms: Violin Concerto; Tchaikovsky:<br />

Symphony No.4 (performed side by side with<br />

Toronto Symphony Youth Orchestra). Frank<br />

Peter Zimmermann, violin; Toronto Symphony<br />

Youth Orchestra; Gustavo Gimeno, conductor.<br />

Roy Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-<br />

3375. From $35. Also <strong>May</strong> 11(8pm).<br />

● 7:30: Upper Canada Choristers/Cantemos.<br />

New Beginnings. Celebrating the 30th<br />

anniversary of Upper Canada Choristers.<br />

Gwyneth Twyford: We’ll Live in Harmony<br />

(world premiere); David Archibald: To Greet<br />

the Sun (world premiere); Matthew Secaur:<br />

Little Robin (world premiere); Laurie Evan<br />

Fraser: Heartshine – Brilla Corazón (world<br />

premiere); and other works. Upper Canada<br />

Choristers; Cantemos; Boys’ Choir of<br />

Maurice Cody Junior Public School; Hye<br />

Won (Cecilia) Lee, piano; Laurie Evan Fraser,<br />

conductor. Grace Church on-the-Hill,<br />

300 Lonsdale Rd. www.uppercanadachoristers.org<br />

or info@uppercanadachoristers.org<br />

or 416-256-0510. $25 via Eventbrite or at the<br />

door; Free(children under 16 with an adult).<br />

Free streaming at www.uppercanadachoristers.org.<br />

Donations are welcome. LIVE &<br />

STREAMED.<br />

● 8:00: Art of Time Ensemble. Both Sides<br />

Now. See <strong>May</strong> 9. Also <strong>May</strong> 11(8pm).<br />

● 8:00: Etobicoke Philharmonic Orchestra.<br />

Lightning, Storms and the Quiet City. Elfrieda<br />

Andrée: Overture in G Minor; Copland:<br />

Quiet City; Mendelssohn: Hebrides Overture<br />

Op.26; Brahms: Symphony No.2 in D Op.73;<br />

Jonah Gallas: Lightning. Cris Sewerin, oboe;<br />

Sam Cancellara, trumpet; Matthew Jones,<br />

conductor. Martingrove Collegiate Institute,<br />

50 Winterton Dr., Etobicoke. www.eporchestra.ca/season/2324/lightning-storms-andthe-quiet-city.<br />

$30; $25(sr); $15(st); Free(12<br />

and under).<br />

● 8:00: Exultate Chamber Singers. Home<br />

in the 6ix–Part 2! Premiere of a new work by<br />

Andrew Balfour, as well as music by Shireen<br />

Abu Khader, Larysa Kuzmenko, and John<br />

Beckwith. Mark Ramsay, artistic Director<br />

and conductor; Mira Jung, piano. Calvin Presbyterian<br />

Church, 26 Delisle Ave. 416-971-<br />

92<strong>29</strong> or www.exultate.net/performances.<br />

Pay What You Wish: $5, $20, $40 or over. Tax<br />

receipt. 7:15pm: Pre-chat chat with Toronto<br />

composers.<br />

● 8:00: Old Mill Toronto. “A Night in Vegas”<br />

with Micah Barnes, Billy Newton-Davis and<br />

Stu Harrison. Pop, R&B, Broadway, Country,<br />

MAY 11 • 3 pm<br />

All Saints Kingsway<br />

Anglican Church<br />

Rock, Jazz, Gospel. 21 Old Mill Rd. www.oldmilltoronto.com/event/a-night-in-vegas.<br />

$25. Minimum $30 food & beverage spend.<br />

Restricted to ages 19+. Dinner at 6pm. Show<br />

at 8pm.<br />

● 8:00: Royal Conservatory of Music.<br />

Chamber & String Concerts Series: Brentano<br />

Quart, Jonathan Biss & Joseph<br />

Conyers. Schubert: Piano Quintet in A D.667<br />

op.posth.114 (“The Trout”); Beethoven: String<br />

Quartet No.13 in B-flat Op.130. Koerner Hall,<br />

TELUS Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-<br />

0208 or www.rcmusic.com/performance.<br />

From $45.<br />

TRANSFORMATIONS<br />

Directed by<br />

Kristian Bezuidenhout<br />

<strong>May</strong> 10–12<br />

Jeanne Lamon Hall,<br />

Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre<br />

tafelmusik.org<br />

● 8:00: Tafelmusik. Transformations: Bach<br />

& Rameau. Handel: Trio Sonata in G; Purcell:<br />

Ayres for the Theatre; Bach: Harpsichord<br />

Concerto in g; and works by Rameau. Kristian<br />

Bezuidenhout, guest director and harpsichord;<br />

Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra.<br />

Jeanne Lamon Hall, Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre,<br />

427 Bloor St. W. www.tafelmusik.org/transformations<br />

or 416-964-6337. From $47. Also<br />

<strong>May</strong> 11(8pm) & 12(3pm).<br />

● 8:00: TO Live. Kaha:wi Dance Theatre’s<br />

SKéN:NEN. Bluma Appel Theatre, St. Lawrence<br />

Centre for the Arts, 27 Front St. E. 416-<br />

366-7723 or www.tolive.com. From $30. Also<br />

<strong>May</strong> 11.<br />

Saturday <strong>May</strong> 11<br />

● 2:00: Toronto City Opera. Macina Competition.<br />

Features eight competition winners.<br />

Church of the Redeemer, 162 Bloor St.<br />

W. www.tickettailor.com/events/torontocityopera/1171496.<br />

General admission: $20.<br />

● 3:00: Church of St. Peter and St. Simonthe-Apostle.<br />

Can We Sing the Darkness to<br />

Light? - Music of Hope and Reflection. Haydn:<br />

Mass in the Time of War; Kyle Pederson: Can<br />

We Sing the Darkness to Light?; John Rutter:<br />

Hymn to the Creator of Light; Charles Wood:<br />

Hail Gladdening Light. Choir of St. Peter and<br />

St. Simon-the-Apostle and Instrumentalists<br />

from Arcady; Robin Davis, conductor.<br />

525 Bloor St. E. 416-923-8714 or www.eventbrite.ca/manage/events/852630238997/tickets.<br />

$30; Free(under 15).<br />

● 3:00: Etobicoke Philharmonic Orchestra.<br />

Music for Moms. Elfrieda Andrée: Overture<br />

in G Minor; Copland: Quiet City; Mendelssohn:<br />

Hebrides Overture Op.26; Brahms: Allegro<br />

46 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


from Symphony No.2 in D Op.73; Jonah Gallas:<br />

Lightning. Cris Sewerin, oboe; Sam<br />

Cancellara, trumpet; Matthew Jones, conductor.<br />

All Saints Kingsway Anglican Church,<br />

2850 Bloor St. W. www.eporchestra.ca/season/2324/music-for-moms.<br />

$20; $10(child).<br />

Opera Salon<br />

OIC's 50th<br />

Birthday Party<br />

Saturday, <strong>May</strong> 11, <strong>2024</strong> 4 pm<br />

The Edward Jackman Centre<br />

(947 Queen Street East, Toronto)<br />

Tickets: $25<br />

416-366-7723 | 1-800-708-6754<br />

operainconcert.com<br />

● 4:00: VOICEBOX: Opera in Concert.<br />

VOICEBOX Opera Salon: Opera in Concert’s<br />

50th Birthday Party. Celebrating OIC’s 50th<br />

Anniversary in an intimate setting. Edward<br />

Jackman Centre, 947 Queen St. E., 2nd Floor.<br />

416-366-7723 or 1-800-708-6754 or www.<br />

operainconcert.com or www.tolive.com. $25.<br />

RE-SCHEDULED FROM MAR 9.<br />

● 7:00: Peterborough Singers. St Matthew’s<br />

Passion. Janelle Lucyk, soprano; Ian<br />

Sabourin, counter tenor; Adam Bishop, tenor;<br />

Alex Dobson, bass; Ian Sadler, organ; Christopher<br />

Bagan, harpsichord; Felix Deák, cello/<br />

continuo; chamber orchestra. Emmanuel<br />

United Church (Peterborough), 534 George<br />

St. N., Peterborough. 705-745-1820 or www.<br />

peterboroughsingers.com. $40; $10(st).<br />

● 7:00: Vesnivka Choir. Spring Concert.<br />

Feauturing traditional music reflecting spring<br />

and summer rituals from both Ukrainian and<br />

Indigenous cultures, including multimedia<br />

elements. Vesnivka Choir; Toronto Ukrainian<br />

Male Chamber Choir. Guests: Red Sky<br />

Performance. Runnymede United Church,<br />

432 Runnymede Rd. Contact Nykola Parzei<br />

at 416-246-9880. Tickets available through<br />

Eventbrite or at the door. $25; Free(child<br />

under 16).<br />

● 7:30: Canadian Opera Company. Medea.<br />

See <strong>May</strong> 3. Also <strong>May</strong> 15, 17.<br />

● 7:30: Chorus York. Spring Treasures. Special<br />

Guest: Luminis Choir. St. Mary’s Anglican<br />

Church, 10030 Yonge St., Richmond Hill.<br />

www.chorusyork.ca or 905-884-7922. $25,<br />

Free(12 yr & under).<br />

● 7:30: Kingston Choral Society. Choral<br />

Masterworks. Rheinburger: Stabat Mater;<br />

Vivaldi: Gloria in D. Ian Juby, conductor &<br />

music director; Charlotte Stewart-Juby,<br />

soprano; Colleen Renihanm mezzo. The<br />

Spire/Sydenham Street United Church,<br />

82 Sydenham St., Kingston. www.kingstonchoralsociety.ca.<br />

$30(adults/sr); $20(st);<br />

Free(16 and under).<br />

● 7:30: Milton Philharmonic Orchestra.<br />

Renewal. Rossini: Overture to The Barber of<br />

Seville; Mendelssohn: Incidental Music to A<br />

Midsummer Night’s Dream; and music from<br />

Jurassic Park, Star Trek Through the Years,<br />

Star Wars, and other works. FirstOntario<br />

Arts Centre Milton, 1010 Main St. E., Milton.<br />

905-878-6000. $30; $25; $15(st/child).<br />

● 7:30: Oriana Singers. A Tribute to Gordon<br />

Lightfoot. Marking the first anniversary<br />

of Gordon Lightfoot’s passing. Guest artists:<br />

Toast. Lynn James, artistic director; Robert<br />

Grandy, accompanist. Port Hope United<br />

Church, 34 South St., Port Hope. www.orianasingers.com.<br />

$30(door); $25(adv);<br />

$10(st).<br />

● 7:30: Orpheus Choir of Toronto. The Notebooks<br />

of Leonardo da Vinci. Jocelyn Hagen:<br />

The Notebooks of Leonardo DaVinci. Eglinton<br />

St. George’s United Church, 35 Lytton Blvd.<br />

416-420-9660 or www.orpheuschoirtoronto.<br />

com. $45; $35(sr); $20(st).<br />

● 7:30: Scarborough Philharmonic Orchestra.<br />

Saint-Saëns: "The Egyptian". Saint-<br />

Saëns: Piano Concerto No.5 in F Op.103 "The<br />

Egyptian"; Dvořák: Symphony No.6 in D Op.<br />

60. Vanessa Yu, piano; Ronald Royer, conductor.<br />

Salvation Army Scarborough Citadel,<br />

2021 Lawrence Ave. E., Scarborough. 647-<br />

482-7761 or www.spo.ca/event/egyptian. $35;<br />

$30(sr); $15(st).<br />

● 7:30: St. James Cathedral. Haydn: Nelson<br />

Mass & Te Deum. Also works by Mozart,<br />

Wesley and others. Choir of St. James Cathedral<br />

with orchestra; Thomas Bell, conductor.<br />

Cathedral Church of St. James, 106 King St. E.<br />

416-364-7865 or www.stjamescathedral.ca<br />

or info@stjamescathedral.ca. $30.<br />

● 7:30: VOCA Chorus of Toronto. Earth,<br />

Sea & Sky III. Works by Andrew Balfour, Ola<br />

Gjeilo, Sarah Quartel, Sherryl Sewepagaham,<br />

Scott Macmillan, and others. Alex Cheung,<br />

violin / fiddle; Suhashini Arulanandam,<br />

violin; Laurence Schaufele, viola, mandolin;<br />

Sybil Shanahan, cello; Jamie Drake, percussion;<br />

Jenny Crober, conductor; Dakota Scott-<br />

Digout, collaborative pianist. Eastminster<br />

United Church, 310 Danforth Ave. 416-947-<br />

8487. $30; $15(st).<br />

● 8:00: Acoustic Harvest. The Healing Garden<br />

Fundraiser. Featuring Stephen Fearing.<br />

St. Paul’s United Church, 200 McIntosh St.,<br />

Scarborough. www.acousticharvest.ca or<br />

416-7<strong>29</strong>-7564. $30.<br />

● 8:00: Alliance Française de Toronto. Eternal<br />

Cities by The Masmoudi Quartet. Blending<br />

Mediterranean-African musical traditions.<br />

Mohamed Masmoudi, oud/double bass/classical<br />

guitar & other musicians. Spadina<br />

Theatre, Alliance Française de Toronto,<br />

24 Spadina Rd. www.alliance-francaise.ca.<br />

$20; $15(sr/st).<br />

● 8:00: Art of Time Ensemble. Both Sides<br />

Now. See <strong>May</strong> 9.<br />

● 8:00: Greater Toronto Philharmonic<br />

Orchestra. Broadway Classics. Music from<br />

Les Misérables, Miss Saigon, Peter Pan: The<br />

Return; Sunday in the Park with George, The<br />

Phantom of the Opera, and The Sound of<br />

Music. Jeff Madden, Stephanie Brandt, Daniela<br />

(Ella) Boich, vocalists; Charles Cozens,<br />

conductor & arranger. Isabel Bader Theatre,<br />

93 Charles St. W. www.gtpo.ca or 647-238-<br />

0015. $35-$45. NOTE: Venue has changed.<br />

● 8:00: Kindred Spirits Orchestra. Per<br />

Aspera ad Astra. Falla: The Three-Cornered<br />

Hat Suites Nos.1 & 2; Chopin: Piano Concerto<br />

No.2 in f Op.21; Tchaikovsky: Symphony<br />

HAYDN:<br />

NELSON MASS & TE DEUM<br />

with choral music by Mozart, Wesley and others<br />

The Choir of<br />

St. James Cathedral<br />

in concert<br />

with orchestra<br />

Thomas Bell<br />

CONDUCTOR<br />

SCAN FOR<br />

TICKETS<br />

HERE:<br />

SATURDAY, MAY 11<br />

7:30PM<br />

St. James Cathedral,<br />

Toronto<br />

Tickets: $ 30<br />

FOR MORE INFORMATION:<br />

E: info@stjamescathedral.ca<br />

T: 416-364-7865<br />

W: stjamescathedral.ca<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 47


Kindred Spirits Orchestra<br />

Krissan Alexander | Music Director<br />

PER ASPERA AD ASTRA<br />

LIVE OR ONLINE | Apr 1 to Jun 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

No.5 in e Op.64. Ludmil Angelov, piano; Daniel<br />

Vnukowski, host; Kristian Alexander, conductor.<br />

Meridian Arts Centre, 5040 Yonge St.,<br />

North York. 905-787-8811. $30-$40; $22.50-<br />

$30(sr); $15-$20(full time student or 18 and<br />

under). 7:10pm: Prélude pre-concert recital.<br />

7:20pm: pre-concert talk. Intermission discussion<br />

and Q&A with Ludmil Angelov and<br />

Daniel Vnukowski. Post-concert reception.<br />

● 8:00: Royal Conservatory of Music. Jazz<br />

Concerts Series: The Jon Cowherd Trio &<br />

Larnell Lewis & Joy Lapps. Koerner Hall,<br />

TELUS Centre, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-<br />

0208 or www.rcmusic.com/performance.<br />

From $40.<br />

● 8:00: Tafelmusik. Transformations: Bach &<br />

Rameau. See <strong>May</strong> 10. Also <strong>May</strong> 12(3pm).<br />

● 8:00: TO Live. Kaha:wi Dance Theatre’s<br />

SKéN:NEN. See <strong>May</strong> 10.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Tchaikovsky<br />

+ Brahms. See <strong>May</strong> 10(7:30pm).<br />

Sunday <strong>May</strong> 12<br />

● 2:00: Canadian Opera Company. Don<br />

Pasquale. See Apr 26. Also <strong>May</strong> 18 (4:30 pm).<br />

● 3:00: Burlington Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Symphonic Fairy Tales. Rimsky-Korsakov:<br />

Scheherazade Op.35; Tchaikovsky: Waltz from<br />

Sleeping Beauty Op.66; Prokofiev: Peter and<br />

the Wolf Op.67; Humperdinck: Overture to<br />

Hansel and Gretel. Trevor Copp, mime; Christopher<br />

Gray, narrator. Burlington Performing<br />

Arts Centre, 440 Locust St., Burlington. 905-<br />

681-6000 or www.burlingtonsymphony.ca.<br />

$15-$50.<br />

● 3:00: Tafelmusik. Transformations: Bach &<br />

Rameau. See <strong>May</strong> 10.<br />

Monday <strong>May</strong> 13<br />

● 7:00: Array/ECCG Gamelan. Evergreen<br />

Club Contemporary Gamelan Monthly<br />

Meetup. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-<br />

532-3019. Free.<br />

● 7:30: West Toronto Community Choir.<br />

Singing Across the Generations. A mix of pop,<br />

folk, musical theatre and oldies. Roncesvalles<br />

United Church, 214 Wright Ave. westtorontocommunitychoir@gmail.com.<br />

Free.<br />

Tuesday <strong>May</strong> 14<br />

● 12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation.<br />

Lunchtime Chamber Music: Piano Recital.<br />

Joyce Zhang, piano. Yorkminster Park Baptist<br />

Church, 1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167 or<br />

www.yorkminsterpark.com. Free. Donations<br />

welcome.<br />

● 1:00: St. James Cathedral. Tuesday Organ<br />

Recital. Jonghee Yoon, organ. Cathedral<br />

Church of St. James, 106 King St. E. 416-364-<br />

7865 or www.stjamescathedral.ca/recitals.<br />

Free. Donations encouraged.<br />

● 5:30: Canadian Opera Company. Instrumental<br />

Series: Dream. Tim Beattie, guitar.<br />

Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre, Four<br />

Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts,<br />

145 Queen St. W. www.coc.ca/free-concertseries.<br />

Free. Tickets required.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Community Orchestra.<br />

We Danced All Night! Saint-Saëns: Danse<br />

macabre Op.40; Shostakovich: Jazz Suite<br />

No.2; Dvořák: Slavonic Dances; Loewe:<br />

Excerpts from My Fair Lady; Berlioz: Excerpts<br />

from Symphonie fantastique. Nicolo Arrigo:<br />

artistic director & conductor. East End United<br />

Church, 310 Danforth Ave. 416-358-0783.<br />

Admission by donation.<br />

Wednesday <strong>May</strong> 15<br />

● 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.<br />

Vocal Series: Over the Sea and Back Again.<br />

Time-honoured songs paired with contemporary<br />

Canadian works in a celebration of the<br />

past, present, and future of classical song,<br />

including music by Cecilia Livingston, COC<br />

Composer-in-Residence. Simone Osborne,<br />

soprano. Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre,<br />

Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts,<br />

145 Queen St. W. www.coc.ca/free-concertseries.<br />

Free. Tickets required.<br />

● 12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.<br />

Noonday Organ Recital. Christopher Dawes,<br />

organ. 1585 Yonge St. www.yorkminsterpark.<br />

com. Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. Brahms’ Fourth Symphony (4-hands<br />

piano). Angela Park and Stephan Sylvestre,<br />

4-hands piano. Keffer Memorial Chapel, Wilfrid<br />

Laurier University, 75 University Ave. W.,<br />

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48 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Waterloo. 519-569-1809 or www.ticketscene.ca/kwcms.<br />

$30; $20(st).<br />

● 7:30: Amadeus Choir of Greater Toronto.<br />

Haydn’s Creation. Celebrates the 50th anniversary<br />

season. Amadeus Choir; Midori<br />

Marsh, soprano; Andrew Haji, tenor; Tyler<br />

Duncan, baritone; Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

George Weston Recital Hall, Meridian<br />

Arts Centre, 5040 Yonge St. www.amadeuschoir.com/haydns-creation.<br />

From $42.<br />

● 7:30: Canadian Opera Company. Medea.<br />

See <strong>May</strong> 3. Also <strong>May</strong> 17.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Shape Note Singers. Sacred<br />

Harp Singing. Shape note music selections<br />

from the Sacred Harp tunebook. Singing<br />

is participatory, not a performance. No<br />

experience necessary. All are welcome and<br />

there are books to borrow. Friends House,<br />

60 Lowther Ave. 647-838-8764. Pay what you<br />

can. Also Jun 19, Jul 17, Aug 21, Sep 18, Oct 16,<br />

Nov 20 & Dec 18.<br />

● 8:00: Payadora Tango Ensemble. A Night<br />

of Tango with Payadora. Classic and modern<br />

tango, originals, and South American folk<br />

music. Rebekah Wolkstein, violin & vocals;<br />

Drew Jurecka, bandoneon/violin/mandolin;<br />

Robert Horvath, piano; Joe Phillips, doublebass<br />

& guitar; Elbio Fernandez, vocals. Jazz<br />

Bistro, 251 Victoria St. 416-363-5<strong>29</strong>9. $25.<br />

Also Jul 17, Sep 18, Nov 13.<br />

● 8:00: TO Live. John Coltrane: Legacy.<br />

Joe Lavano, saxophone; Toronto Symphony<br />

Orchestra. Meridian Hall, 1 Front St. E. 416-<br />

366-7723; tolive.com. $50-$110.<br />

Thursday <strong>May</strong> 16<br />

● 12:00 noon: Metropolitan United Church.<br />

Noon at Met. John Paul Farahat, organ.<br />

Metropolitan United Church, 56 Queen St. E.<br />

416-363-0331 x226. Freewill donation.<br />

● 8:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Itzhak Perlman,<br />

Violin & Rohan De Silva, Piano. 60 Simcoe St.<br />

www.tickets.mhrth.com. From $99.<br />

Friday <strong>May</strong> 17<br />

● 12:10: Music at St. Andrew’s. Noon Time<br />

Recital. Bach: Suites for Solo Cello. Mansur<br />

Kadirov, cello. St. Andrew’s Presbyterian<br />

Church, 73 Simcoe St. 416-593-5600 x220.<br />

Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 7:30: Canadian Opera Company. Medea.<br />

See <strong>May</strong> 3.<br />

● 7:30: TO Live/Glatz Concerts. Disney’s<br />

Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the<br />

Black Pearl Live In Concert. Music by Klaus<br />

Badelt and Hans Zimmer. Film screening with<br />

live orchestra. Toronto Symphony Orchestra;<br />

Evan Mitchell, conductor. Meridian Hall,<br />

1 Front St. E. 416-366-7723 or www.tolive.<br />

com/Event-Details-Page/reference/Amadeus-<strong>2024</strong>.<br />

From $39. Also <strong>May</strong> 18.<br />

● 8:00: Flato Markham Theatre. Ballet Jörgen’s<br />

Anne of Green Gables - The Ballet.<br />

171 Town Centre Blvd., Markham. 905-305-<br />

7469; flatomarkhamtheatre.ca. $68(regular);<br />

$78(prime); $15(YTX). Also <strong>May</strong> 18(2pm).<br />

● 8:00: Trinity-St. Paul’s United Church. Tango<br />

for Two. A new concert-opera with original<br />

music and libretto by Jonathan Kravtchenko.<br />

Antonina Laskarzhevska, soprano; Bohdan<br />

Kirieiev, baritone. Jeanne Lamon Hall, Trinity-St.<br />

Paul’s Centre, 427 Bloor St. W. www.eventbrite.<br />

com/e/tango-for-two-may-5-<strong>2024</strong>-tickets-781421882887<br />

or 647-450-9806. From $20.<br />

● 8:30: Fallsview Casino Resort. TLC. OLG<br />

Stage at Fallsview Casino, 6366 Stanley Ave.,<br />

Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca. From $76.<br />

Saturday <strong>May</strong> 18<br />

● 2:00: Flato Markham Theatre. Ballet Jörgen’s<br />

Anne of Green Gables - The Ballet. See<br />

<strong>May</strong> 17.<br />

● 3:00: 5 at the First. String Extravaganza<br />

XII. Scott St. John & Csaba Koczo, violins;<br />

Caitlin Boyle & Theresa Rudolph, violasRachel<br />

Desoer & Rachel Mercer, cellos. First Unitarian<br />

Church, 170 Dundurn St. S., Hamilton.<br />

905-399-5125. $20; $15(sr); $5(st/unwaged);<br />

free(under 12).<br />

● 4:30: Canadian Opera Company. Don<br />

Pasquale. See Apr 26.<br />

● 7:00: TO Live/Glatz Concerts. Disney’s Pirates<br />

of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black<br />

Pearl Live In Concert. See <strong>May</strong> 17.<br />

● 7:30: Barrie Concerts Association.<br />

Pianofest. Eveleyn Liang, piano; Henry From,<br />

piano; and Elijah Orlenko, piano. Hiway Pentecostal<br />

Church, 50 Anne St. N., Barrie. www.<br />

barrieconcerts.org. Live: $35; $10(st).<br />

Livestream: $20; $10(st). Available for up to<br />

30 days after the concert.<br />

● 9:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Diana Ross.<br />

OLG Stage at Fallsview Casino, 6366 Stanley<br />

Ave., Niagara Falls. www.ticketmaster.ca.<br />

From $88.<br />

● 9:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Joey Fatone<br />

& AJ McLean: A Legendary Night. OLG Stage<br />

at Fallsview Casino, 6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara<br />

Falls. www.ticketmaster.ca. From $71.<br />

Sunday <strong>May</strong> 19<br />

● 3:00: Trio Arkel. Chamber Music Concert.<br />

Brahms: Piano Quartet in g Op.25; Janáček:<br />

Selected movements from On an Overgrown<br />

Path; Beethoven: Trio No.3 in c Op.1 No.3.<br />

Marie Bérard, violin; Rémi Pelletier, viola;<br />

Winona Zelenka, cello. Guest: David Louie,<br />

piano. Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre, Jeanne Lamon<br />

Hall, 427 Bloor St. W. www.eventbrite.ca or<br />

admin@trioarkel.com or 647-2<strong>29</strong>-6918. $40.<br />

Monday <strong>May</strong> 20<br />

● 3:00: Zula Presents. Something Else! Creative<br />

Music Series: Sophie Agnel & John<br />

Butcher + IPE Ceramix. Sophie Agnel, piano;<br />

John Butcher, saxophone; Imaginary Percussion<br />

Ensemble: Germaine Liu, Joe Sorbara,<br />

and Mark Zurawinski, percussion. With ceramic<br />

artist Chiho Tokita, ceramic artist. St.<br />

Cuthbert’s Presbyterian Church, 2 Bond St.<br />

N., Hamilton. Advance tickets at www.eventbrite.com/cc/2023-24-something-else-series-2783859<br />

or www.somethingelsefestival.<br />

com. From $15.<br />

Tuesday <strong>May</strong> 21<br />

● 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.<br />

Instrumental Series: Early Music Exploration.<br />

Join artists from The Toronto Consort<br />

in an exploration of early music with<br />

ties tocontemporary societal values. Richard<br />

Bradshaw Amphitheatre, Four Seasons Centre<br />

for the Performing Arts, 145 Queen St. W.<br />

www.coc.ca/free-concert-series. Free. Tickets<br />

required.<br />

● 12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation.<br />

Lunchtime Chamber Music: Ragtime! Autumn<br />

Debassige, mezzo; Angus Sinclair, piano.<br />

Yorkminster Park Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge<br />

St. 416-922-1167 or www.yorkminsterpark.<br />

com. Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 1:00: St. James Cathedral. Tuesday Organ<br />

Recital. Organ soloist TBA. Cathedral Church<br />

of St. James, 106 King St. E. 416-364-7865<br />

or www.stjamescathedral.ca/recitals. Free.<br />

Donations encouraged.<br />

● 8:00: Tapestry Opera. Iron Chef<br />

d’Orchestre. A mix of classical and opera.<br />

Jennifer Tung, co-host; Keith Klassen, cohost;<br />

Krisztina Szabó, mezzo. Theatre Passe<br />

Muraille, 16 Ryerson Ave. 416-504-75<strong>29</strong>. Pay<br />

what you can $25, $45, or $65.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Pops: Respect - A Tribute to Aretha Franklin.<br />

Shaleah Adkisson, vocalist; Blaine Alden<br />

Krauss, vocalist; Tamika Lawrence, vocalist;<br />

Dina Gilbert, conductor. Roy Thomson Hall,<br />

60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. From $62. Also<br />

<strong>May</strong> 22(2pm & 8pm).<br />

Wednesday <strong>May</strong> 22<br />

● 12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.<br />

Noonday Organ Recital. Jeremy Tingle,<br />

organ. 1585 Yonge St. www.yorkminsterpark.<br />

com. Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 2:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Pops:<br />

Respect - A Tribute to Aretha Franklin. See<br />

<strong>May</strong> 21. Also <strong>May</strong> 22(8pm).<br />

● 8:00: Tapestry Opera. Le Kitchen Party. A<br />

mix of classical and opera. Julianne Gallant,<br />

host; Jacques Arsenault, tenor; Marie Andrée<br />

Gaudet, violin; Pierre-André Doucet, piano.<br />

Theatre Passe Muraille, 16 Ryerson Ave. 416-<br />

504-75<strong>29</strong>. Pay what you can $25, $45, or $65.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Pops:<br />

Respect - A Tribute to Aretha Franklin. See<br />

<strong>May</strong> 21.<br />

Thursday <strong>May</strong> 23<br />

● 12:00 noon: Metropolitan United Church.<br />

Noon at Met. Simon Farintosh, guitar. Metropolitan<br />

United Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-<br />

363-0331 x226. Freewill donation.<br />

● 7:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. 54•40, The<br />

Watchmen & The Pursuit of Happiness. OLG<br />

Stage at Fallsview Casino, 6366 Stanley Ave.,<br />

Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca. From $65.<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. Guelph Festival Trio. Beethoven:<br />

Piano Trio in E-Flat Op.1 No.1; Charlotte<br />

Bray: Those Secret Eyes and That Crazed<br />

Smile; Schubert: Trio No.1 in B-flat Op.99.<br />

Sadie Fields, violin; Paul Pulford, cello; Ken<br />

Gee, piano. Keffer Memorial Chapel, Wilfrid<br />

Laurier University, 75 University Ave. W.,<br />

Sunday, <strong>May</strong> 19, <strong>2024</strong> 3pm<br />

Brahms Piano Quartet in G Minor/<br />

Janáček/ On an Overgrown Path,<br />

selections/ Beethoven Trio in C Minor<br />

Guest Artist:<br />

David Louie, Piano<br />

Waterloo. 519-569-1809 or www.ticketscene.ca/kwcms.<br />

$30; $20(st).<br />

● 8:00: Musical Stage Company. Canadian<br />

Festival of New Musicals: After the Rain. Book<br />

by Rose Napoli. Music & Lyrics by Suzy Wilde.<br />

A double bill with Cowboy Tempest Cabaret.<br />

Berkeley Street Theatre, 26 Berkeley St.<br />

www.my.canadianstage.com/overview/9023.<br />

$22. Also <strong>May</strong> 25(3:30pm).<br />

● 8:00: Musical Stage Company. Canadian<br />

Festival of New Musicals: Cowboy<br />

Tempest Cabaret. Book by Niall McNeil,<br />

Lucy McNulty & Anton Lipovetsky. Music<br />

by Anton Lipovetsky. Lyrics by Niall McNeil.<br />

A double bill with After the Rain. Berkeley<br />

Street Theatre, 26 Berkeley St. www.<br />

my.canadianstage.com/overview/9023. $22.<br />

Also <strong>May</strong> 25(3:30pm).<br />

Friday <strong>May</strong> 24<br />

● 12:10: Music at St. Andrew’s. Noon Time<br />

Recital: Between Worlds. Works by Kevin Lau,<br />

Bartók, Ravel, and Kapustin. Melody Chan,<br />

piano; Alvin Tran, violin. St. Andrew’s Presbyterian<br />

Church, 73 Simcoe St. 416-593-5600<br />

x220. Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 7:30: Cuckoo’s Nest Folk Club. Tom Lewis.<br />

Chaucer’s Pub, 122 Carling St., London. 519-<br />

319-5847 or folk@iandavies.com or www.<br />

ticketscene.ca. $25.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Game On! Featuring soundtracks from an<br />

unprecedented lineup of blockbuster video<br />

game titles including Guild Wars 2, World of<br />

Warcraft, The Witcher 3, Bioshock, Assassin’s<br />

Creed, and many others, Game On! combines<br />

gorgeous symphonic arrangements with<br />

stunning, never-before-seen HD video. Roy<br />

Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375 or<br />

www.tso.ca. From $67. Also <strong>May</strong> 25.<br />

● 8:00: Musical Stage Company. Canadian<br />

Festival of New Musicals: In Real Life.<br />

Book & Lyrics by Nick Green. Music & Lyrics<br />

by Kevin Wong. Berkeley Street Theatre,<br />

26 Berkeley St. www.my.canadianstage.com/<br />

overview/9023. $31. Also <strong>May</strong> 25(8pm) &<br />

26(2pm).<br />

● 8:00: Old Mill Toronto. Fifth Element Jazz<br />

Quintet. Jazz, swing, ballad, Latin and hard<br />

bop. Nina Richmond, vocals; Jack Gelbloom,<br />

piano; Ron Johnston, bass; Glenn Anderson,<br />

Season Sponsors<br />

Trinity St. Paul's Centre<br />

https://trioarkel.eventbrite.ca<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 49


LIVE OR ONLINE | Apr 1 to Jun 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

drums; Dave Coules, tenor sax. 21 Old Mill<br />

Rd. www.oldmilltoronto.com/event/fifth-element.<br />

$30. Minimum $30 food & beverage<br />

spend. Restricted to ages 19+. Dinner at 6pm.<br />

Show at 8pm.<br />

Collegiate Institute; and VIVA’s inaugural<br />

Composition Competition winner. Trinity-St.<br />

Paul’s Centre, Jeanne Lamon Hall, 427 Bloor<br />

St. W. 416-788-8482. $25.<br />

● 7:00: Common Thread Community Chorus.<br />

Sing On! 25th Anniversary Concert. Guest<br />

artists: Anne Lederman & Ian Bell. Church<br />

of the Redeemer, 162 Bloor St. W. www.commonthreadchorus.ca.<br />

$35; $20(under 12).<br />

Pay what you can at the door.<br />

● 7:03: London Symphonia. Transformed.<br />

Ireland: Dowland Suite (arr. Shawn Spicer);<br />

Poulenc: Suite française (arr. Scott Harrison);<br />

Byrd: Earl of Oxford’s March (arr. Shawn<br />

Spicer); Praetorius/Tielman Susato: Danses<br />

from Terpsichore (arr. Shawn Spicer); Ives:<br />

Variations on America (arr. Scott Harrison);<br />

and other works. Shawn Spicer, trumpet;<br />

Brass and Winds of London Symphonia.<br />

Metropolitan United Church (London),<br />

468 Wellington St., London. 226-270-0910 or<br />

www.londonsymphonia.ca. $70(premium);<br />

$52(adult); $22(st).<br />

Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Toronto,<br />

5183 Sheppard Ave. E., Scarborough. 416-<br />

879-5566 or www.cathedralbluffs.com.<br />

From $25.<br />

● 8:00: Mississauga Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Season Finale Masterworks: Alpine<br />

Symphony. R. Strauss: An Alpine Symphony<br />

Op.64. Living Arts Centre, Hammerson Hall,<br />

4141 Living Arts Dr., Mississauga. www.mississaugasymphony.ca<br />

or 905-306-6000.<br />

From $40.<br />

● 8:00: Musical Stage Company. Canadian<br />

Festival of New Musicals: In Real Life.<br />

Book & Lyrics by Nick Green. Music & Lyrics<br />

by Kevin Wong. Berkeley Street Theatre,<br />

26 Berkeley St. www.my.canadianstage.com/<br />

overview/9023. $31. Also <strong>May</strong> 24(8pm) &<br />

26(2pm).<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Bach Festival. The Game of<br />

Threes. Bach: Concerto for Three Violins in D<br />

BWV 1064R; Bach: Violin Concerto in a BWV<br />

1041; Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No.3 in<br />

G BWV 1048. Adrian Butterfield, violin; Patricia<br />

Ahern, violin; Cristina Zacharias, violin;<br />

John Abberger, oboe; The Toronto Bach Festival<br />

Orchestra. Eastminster United Church,<br />

310 Danforth Ave. www.torontobachfestival.<br />

org/<strong>2024</strong>-festival. Single tickets available Apr 4.<br />

Saturday <strong>May</strong> 25<br />

● 12:00 noon: SING! The Toronto International<br />

Vocal Arts Festival. Free Concert.<br />

Distillery Historic District, 55 Mill St. www.<br />

singtoronto.com or 416-524-8123. Free.<br />

Common Thread<br />

Community Chorus<br />

presents<br />

SING ON!<br />

25TH ANNIVERSARY CONCERT<br />

FEATURING GUEST ARTISTS<br />

Anne Lederman<br />

and Ian Bell<br />

SAT. MAY 25, <strong>2024</strong>, 7pm<br />

Church of the Redeemer<br />

162 Bloor Street West<br />

TICKETS: $35 / UNDER 12: $20<br />

Pay-what-you-can available at the door<br />

To purchase tickets, visit<br />

commonthreadchorus.ca<br />

● 12:00 noon: Toronto Bach Festival. Organ<br />

Recital. Bach: Toccata and Fugue in d BWV<br />

565; Bach: An Wasserflüssen Babylon, BWV<br />

653bÀ 2 Clav. e Pedale doppio; Johann Adam<br />

Reinken: An Wasserflüssen Babylon; Buxtehude:<br />

Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern<br />

BuxWV 223; Bach: Wie schön leuchtet der<br />

Morgenstern BWV 739; Bach: Prelude and<br />

Fugue in C BWV 547. Aaron James, organ. St.<br />

Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, 73 Simcoe St.<br />

www.torontobachfestival.org/<strong>2024</strong>-festival.<br />

Single tickets available Apr 4.<br />

● 1:00: Metropolitan United Church. Demonstrations<br />

of Canada’s largest pipe organ<br />

as part of Doors Open Toronto. Metropolitan<br />

United Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331<br />

x226. Freewill donation.<br />

● 3:30: Musical Stage Company. Canadian<br />

Festival of New Musicals: After the Rain. Book<br />

by Rose Napoli. Music & Lyrics by Suzy Wilde.<br />

A double bill with Cowboy Tempest Cabaret.<br />

Berkeley Street Theatre, 26 Berkeley St.<br />

www.my.canadianstage.com/overview/9023.<br />

$22. Also <strong>May</strong> 25(3:30pm).<br />

● 3:30: Musical Stage Company. Canadian<br />

Festival of New Musicals: Cowboy Tempest<br />

Cabaret. Book by Niall McNeil, Lucy McNulty<br />

& Anton Lipovetsky. Music by Anton Lipovetsky.<br />

Lyrics by Niall McNeil. A double bill<br />

with After the Rain. Berkeley Street Theatre,<br />

26 Berkeley St. www.my.canadianstage.com/<br />

overview/9023. $22. Also <strong>May</strong> 25(3:30pm).<br />

● 4:00: Toronto Bach Festival. Kaffeehaus.<br />

Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F BWV<br />

1046 (select movements); Bach: Hunt Cantata<br />

BWV 208. Yeree Suh, soprano; Ellen<br />

McAteer, soprano; Charles Daniels, tenor;<br />

Jesse Blumberg, bass; The Toronto Bach Festival<br />

Orchestra; With special guestRH Thomson;<br />

John Abberger, director. Church of the<br />

Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. www.torontobachfestival.org/<strong>2024</strong>-festival.<br />

Single tickets available<br />

Apr 4. Also 8pm.<br />

● 5:00: St. Elizabeth Scola Cantorum. Vespers<br />

Spring Concert. Works by Pachelbel,<br />

Bach, Canniciari, and Eleanor Daley. Imre<br />

Olah, conductor. St. Elizabeth of Hungary<br />

Roman Catholic Church, 432 Sheppard Ave. E.<br />

416-606-4144. Freewill offering.<br />

● 6:00: VIVA Singers Toronto. Poetry<br />

in Motion. Featuring all 7 of VIVA’s youth<br />

and adult choirs; Dancers from Oakwood<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Mendelssohn Choir. Take the<br />

Podium Conducting Symposium. The annual<br />

Choral Conducting Symposium returns this<br />

season under the leadership of Artistic Director<br />

Jean-Sébastien Vallée and invites emerging<br />

conductors and those who wish to refine<br />

their skills to participate in a five-day series<br />

of workshops and masterclasses with<br />

Jean-Sébastien. Participants will have the<br />

opportunity to conduct the 140 voices of the<br />

Toronto Mendelssohn Choir and the 24-voice<br />

professional TMSingers in rehearsals<br />

throughout the week and in the concluding<br />

public performance, which is live-streamed.<br />

Repertoire: Gabriel Fauré’s Requiem in d<br />

Op.48; Frank Martin’s Mass for Double Choir.<br />

Additional works by Lili Boulanger and Mel<br />

Bonis and a new commission by our composer-in-residence,<br />

Tracy Wong. Yorkminster<br />

Park Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge St. www.<br />

tmchoir.org. TBA.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Game<br />

On! See <strong>May</strong> 24.<br />

● 8:00: Cathedral Bluffs Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Orchestra Concert. Bruch: Violin Concerto<br />

in d Op.26; Mahler: Symphony No.1<br />

in D “Titan”. Joelle Kriger, violin; Martin<br />

MacDonald, conductor. P.C. Ho Theatre,<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Bach Festival. Kaffeehaus.<br />

Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 1 in F BWV<br />

1046 (select movements); Bach: Hunt Cantata<br />

BWV 208. Yeree Suh, soprano; Ellen<br />

McAteer, soprano; Charles Daniels, tenor;<br />

Jesse Blumberg, bass; The Toronto Bach Festival<br />

Orchestra; With special guestRH Thomson;<br />

John Abberger, director. Church of the<br />

Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. www.torontobachfestival.org/<strong>2024</strong>-festival.<br />

Single tickets available<br />

Apr 4. Also 4pm.<br />

Sunday <strong>May</strong> 26<br />

● 12:00 noon: SING! The Toronto International<br />

Vocal Arts Festival. Free Concert.<br />

Kew Gardens, 2075 Queen St. E. www.singtoronto.com<br />

or 416-524-8123. Free.<br />

● 1:00: Toronto Bach Festival. Annual Lecture:<br />

Bach’s Music Library and Its Influence<br />

on His Style. A special lecture via live stream<br />

from Germany will examine the music found<br />

in Bach’s personal library, and discuss how<br />

this collection demonstrates the composer’s<br />

familiarity with a significant expanse of European<br />

music history, from Palestrina to Pergolesi.<br />

Christian Wolff, presenter. Eastminster<br />

United Church, 310 Danforth Ave. www.<br />

torontobachfestival.org/<strong>2024</strong>-festival. Single<br />

tickets available Apr 4.<br />

● 2:00: CAMMAC Toronto Region. Reading<br />

for singers and instrumentalists of Marc-<br />

Antoine Charpentier’s Te Deum in D H146.<br />

Nathan Gritter, conductor. Christ Church<br />

Deer Park, 1570 Yonge St. www.cammac.ca/<br />

50 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


toronto. $15; $10(members).<br />

● 2:00: Metropolitan United Church. Metropolitan<br />

Silver Band Concert as part of Doors<br />

Open Toronto. Metropolitan United Church,<br />

56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331 x226. Freewill<br />

donation.<br />

● 2:00: Musical Stage Company. Canadian<br />

Festival of New Musicals: In Real Life.<br />

Book & Lyrics by Nick Green. Music & Lyrics<br />

by Kevin Wong. Berkeley Street Theatre,<br />

26 Berkeley St. www.my.canadianstage.com/<br />

overview/9023. $31. Also <strong>May</strong> 24(8pm) &<br />

25(8pm).<br />

● 3:00: Metropolitan United Church. Demonstrations<br />

of Canada’s largest pipe organ<br />

as part of Doors Open Toronto. Metropolitan<br />

United Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331<br />

x226. Freewill donation.<br />

● 4:00: Toronto Bach Festival. How Brightly<br />

Shines. Johann Schelle: Gott, sende dein<br />

Licht; Johann Kuhnau: Wie schön leuchtet der<br />

Morgenstern; Bach: Wie schön leuchtet der<br />

Morgenstern BWV 1; Bach: Es wartet alles auf<br />

dich BWV 187. Yeree Suh and Sinéad White,<br />

sopranos; Daniel Taylor and Nicholas Burns,<br />

altos; Charles Daniels and Shane Hanson,<br />

tenors; Jesse Blumberg and Martin Gomes,<br />

basses;The Toronto Bach Festival Orchestra;<br />

John Abberger, director. Eastminster United<br />

Church, 310 Danforth Ave. www.torontobachfestival.org/<strong>2024</strong>-festival.<br />

Single tickets available<br />

Apr 4.<br />

● 4:00: Wychwood Clarinet Choir. Southern<br />

Rhythms. Pujol: Suite Buenos Aires; Jobim:<br />

No More Blues; Jobim: Quiet Nights of Quiet<br />

Stars; Luigi Denzal: Funiculi, Funicula; Robert<br />

Sjölin: Plaza de Cataluna; Luiz Bonfa: Manha<br />

de Carnaval. Wychwood Clarinet Choir; Tim<br />

Phelan, guitar; Michele Jacot, director &<br />

clarinet solo. St. Michael and All Angels Anglican<br />

Church, 611 St. Clair Ave. W. www.wychwoodclarinetchoir.ca.<br />

$25; $15(sr/st).<br />

● 7:00: INNERchamber Inc. Meditations.<br />

Raymond Luedeke: Aurora; Barbara Pentland:<br />

Trance; Isaac Albéniz: Mallorca; Jean-<br />

Michel Damase: Trio for flute, cello and harp.<br />

Liesel Deppe, flute; Julia Seager-Scott, harp;<br />

Ben Bolt-Martin, cello. Factory 163, 163 King<br />

St., Stratford. tickets@innerchamber.ca.<br />

$45; $30(arts workers/st). 5:30pm - Preshow<br />

dinner. A light meal is available to inperson<br />

patrons.<br />

● 7:30: SING! The Toronto International<br />

Vocal Arts Festival. Countermeasure<br />

with Quayside Voices. Redwood Theatre,<br />

1300 Gerrard Ave. E. www.singtoronto.com<br />

or 416-524-8123. $40.<br />

Monday <strong>May</strong> 27<br />

● 7:00: Apocryphonia. Strozz-ulana! Madrigals<br />

by Barbara Strozzi & Maddalena<br />

Casulana. Diapente Renaissance Vocal<br />

Quintet: Jane Fingler, soprano; Peter Koniers,<br />

countertenor; Alexander Cappellazzo,<br />

tenor; Martin Gomes, bass. Heliconian Hall,<br />

35 Hazelton Ave. 514-378-2558. Pay What You<br />

Can: suggested $20-$30.<br />

● 8:00: SING! The Toronto International<br />

Vocal Arts Festival. SING! from Home - Aca-<br />

Film Festival and Concert. www.singtoronto.<br />

com or 416-524-8123. Free. ONLINE.<br />

● 8:00: Summerhill Orchestra. In Concert.<br />

Schumann: Overture to Manfred Op.115;<br />

Sibelius: Violin Concerto in d Op.47. Jonathan<br />

Crow, violin; Natalie Wong, concertmaster;<br />

Sarah John, conductor. Church of the Holy<br />

Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. summerhillorchestra@<br />

gmail.com or www.summerhillorchestra.<br />

wordpress.com. From $20.<br />

Tuesday <strong>May</strong> 28<br />

● 12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation.<br />

Lunchtime Chamber Music: Flute Recital.<br />

Hannah Silverberg, flute. Yorkminster Park<br />

Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167<br />

or www.yorkminsterpark.com. Free. Donations<br />

welcome.<br />

● 1:00: St. James Cathedral. Tuesday Organ<br />

Recital. Jennifer Goodine, organ. Cathedral<br />

Church of St. James, 106 King St. E. 416-364-<br />

7865 or www.stjamescathedral.ca/recitals.<br />

Free. Donations encouraged.<br />

● 7:30: SING! The Toronto International<br />

Vocal Arts Festival. Art Battle with Beatsync<br />

and Beatboxer Scott Jackson. The Great Hall,<br />

1087 Queen St. W. www.singtoronto.com or<br />

416-524-8123. Ticket prices to be announced.<br />

Wednesday <strong>May</strong> <strong>29</strong><br />

● 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.<br />

Instrumental Series: Tell Me a Story. Dustin<br />

Peters: Ekphrasis, for celesta and ensemble<br />

(world premiere); Stravsinky: Dunbarton<br />

Oaks; Haydn: Symphony No.60 in C Hob.I/60<br />

“Il Distratto”. Artists of the COC Orchestra.<br />

Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre, Four<br />

Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts,<br />

145 Queen St. W. www.coc.ca/free-concertseries.<br />

Free. Tickets required.<br />

● 7:30: SING! The Toronto International<br />

Vocal Arts Festival. Ruach Singers. Beach<br />

Hebrew Institute, 109 Kenilworth Ave. www.<br />

singtoronto.com or 416-524-8123. Free.<br />

Advance ticket required.<br />

● 7:30: SING! The Toronto International<br />

Vocal Arts Festival. Pressgang Mutiny Singalong.<br />

Saulter Street Brewery, 31 Saulter St.,<br />

Suite #1. www.singtoronto.com or 416-524-<br />

8123. Free.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

James Ehnes + An American in Paris. Guillaume<br />

Connesson: “Celephais” from The<br />

Cities of Lovecraft (Canadian première);<br />

Bernstein: Serenade (after Plato’s Symposium);<br />

Poulenc: Suite from Les biches; Gershwin:<br />

An American in Paris. James Ehnes,<br />

violin; Stéphane Denève, conductor. Roy<br />

Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375.<br />

From $35. Also <strong>May</strong> 30 & Jun 1.<br />

Thursday <strong>May</strong> 30<br />

for violin & cello; Martinu: Madrigals for violin<br />

and viola; Dvořák: String Quartet No.10<br />

in E-flat Op.51. Museum London, 421 Ridout<br />

St. N., London. www.magisterra.com. $35;<br />

$30(sr); $15(st); $10(under 10).<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

James Ehnes + An American in Paris. See<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>29</strong>. Also Jun 1.<br />

Friday <strong>May</strong> 31<br />

● 12:10: Music at St. Andrew’s. Noon Time<br />

Recital. Luke Welch, piano. St. Andrew’s Presbyterian<br />

Church, 73 Simcoe St. 416-593-5600<br />

x220. Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 7:30: Canadian Children’s Opera Company.<br />

The Hobbit. Music by Dean Burry. Based on<br />

the book by J. R. R. Tolkien. Harbourfront<br />

Centre Theatre, 235 Queens Quay W. www.<br />

canadianchildrensopera.com/thehobbit.<br />

$40; $30(sr); $25(18 years and younger/arts<br />

workers/school & community groups). Please<br />

contact CCOC for student group pricing. Also<br />

Jun 1(3pm & 7:30pm); Jun 2(3pm).<br />

● 8:00: Old Mill Toronto. Julie Michels. Jazz.<br />

21 Old Mill Rd. www.oldmilltoronto.com/<br />

event/julie-michels. $20. Minimum $30 food<br />

& beverage spend. Restricted to ages 19+.<br />

Dinner at 6pm. Show at 8pm.<br />

● 8:00: SING! The Toronto International<br />

Vocal Arts Festival. Celebration of Asian<br />

Heritage Concert. Asian Riffing Trio; Two.H,<br />

beatboxer, and others. Redwood Theatre,<br />

1300 Gerrard Ave. E. www.singtoronto.com<br />

or 416-524-8123. $40.<br />

A HANDEL<br />

CELEBRATION<br />

Directed by<br />

Ivars Taurins<br />

<strong>May</strong> 31–June 2<br />

Jeanne Lamon Hall,<br />

Trinity-St. Paul’s Centre<br />

tafelmusik.org<br />

<strong>May</strong> 26, 4 pm<br />

SOUTHERN<br />

RHYTHMS<br />

MICHELE JACOT,<br />

Conductor<br />

Guest Artist:<br />

TIM PHELAN,<br />

Guitar<br />

wychwoodclarinetchoir.ca<br />

● 12:00 noon: Canadian Opera Company.<br />

Vocal Series: Les Adieux. Ariane Cossette<br />

and Alex Hetherington, Ensemble Studio Artists.<br />

Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre, Four<br />

Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts,<br />

145 Queen St. W. www.coc.ca/free-concertseries.<br />

Free. Tickets required.<br />

● 12:00 noon: Metropolitan United Church.<br />

Noon at Met. Mark Valenti, piano. Metropolitan<br />

United Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-<br />

0331 x226. Freewill donation.<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber<br />

Music Society. Piano Recital. Program to<br />

be announced. Mark Valenti, piano. Venue<br />

TBA. 519-569-1809 or www.ticketscene.ca/<br />

kwcms. $30; $20(st).<br />

● 7:00: Magisterra Soloists. Magisterra at<br />

the Museum: Bohemian Rhapsody. Fibich:<br />

Theme and Variations; Martinu: Duo No.1<br />

● 8:00: Tafelmusik. A Handel Celebration.<br />

Arias, duets, and choruses from Solomon,<br />

Hercules, Semele, and Judas Maccabeus.<br />

Amanda Forsythe, soprano; Thomas Hobbs,<br />

tenor; Tafelmusik Chamber Choir; Tafelmusik<br />

Baroque Orchestra; Ivars Taurins, director.<br />

Koerner Hall, TELUS Centre, 273 Bloor<br />

St. W. www.tafelmusik.org/handel-celebration<br />

or 416-408-0208. $48. Also Jun 1(8pm)<br />

& 2(3pm).<br />

Saturday June 1<br />

● 3:00: Canadian Children’s Opera Company.<br />

The Hobbit. See <strong>May</strong> 31. Also Jun 1(7:30pm);<br />

Jun 2(3pm).<br />

● 4:00: Music Toronto. Celebration of Small<br />

Ensembles. Includes a short stretch and chat<br />

between sets. Refreshments will be available<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 51


LIVE OR ONLINE | Apr 1 to Jun 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Celebration of<br />

Small Ensembles<br />

June 1, 4pm<br />

Canadian Chamber<br />

Orchestra<br />

Ladom Ensemble<br />

APERTURE ROOM<br />

340 Yonge Street<br />

music-toronto.com<br />

for purchase. Canadian Chamber Orchestra<br />

& Ladom Ensemble. Aperture Room, Thornton-Smith<br />

Building, 340 Yonge St. www.<br />

musictoronto.com. $40(single); $20(st/arts).<br />

● 4:00: SING! The Toronto International<br />

Vocal Arts Festival. Great North Battle Beatboxers,<br />

Workshops, and Competition. Two.H,<br />

beatboxer & River, beatboxer. El Mocambo,<br />

464 Spadina Ave. www.singtoronto.com or<br />

416-524-8123. Ticket prices to be announced.<br />

● 4:00: SING! The Toronto International<br />

Vocal Arts Festival. SING! with Pride! Singing<br />

Out and Tempo Choirs plus special guests.<br />

Redwood Theatre, 1300 Gerrard Ave. E. www.<br />

singtoronto.com or 416-524-8123. $40.<br />

● 7:30: Canadian Children’s Opera Company.<br />

The Hobbit. See <strong>May</strong> 31. Also Jun 2(3pm).<br />

● 7:30: Etobicoke Centennial Choir. Musica<br />

del sur. Gorgeous melodies and infectious<br />

Bossa Nova rhythms of Latin American music<br />

from composers including Carlos Jobim,<br />

Moisés Simon and Raphael Hernandez.<br />

Runnymede United Church, 432 Runnymede<br />

Rd. 416-779-2258 or www.etobicokecentennialchoir.ca.<br />

$30.<br />

● 7:30: Jubilate Singers. Requiems. Faure:<br />

Requiem Op.48; Aharon Harlap: Requiem. Jubilate<br />

Singers; York Chamber Ensemble. Christ<br />

Church Deer Park, 1570 Yonge St. 416-485-<br />

1988 or www.jubilatesingers.ca. $35; $25(sr);<br />

$15(st/arts workers). Also Jun 2(4pm). St.<br />

Paul’s Anglican Church, Newmarket.<br />

FASCINATING<br />

RHYTHM<br />

SATURDAY, JUNE 1, <strong>2024</strong><br />

AT 7:30 PM<br />

ANNEXSINGERS.COM<br />

● 7:30: The Annex Singers. Fascinating<br />

Rhythm. Works by Hildegard von Bingen,<br />

Monteverdi, Gershwin, McGlynn, Balfour, and<br />

others. Alejandro Céspedes and Michelle Colton,<br />

percussion; Maria Case, artistic director.<br />

Grace Church on-the-Hill, 300 Lonsdale<br />

Rd. www.annexsingers.com. From $15. LIVE<br />

& STREAMED.<br />

BACK TO<br />

● 8:00: SoundCrowd. Back to Broadway<br />

Live. A cappella arrangements of songs from<br />

Broadway hits like Wicked, Spamalot, Les<br />

Misérables, Sound of Music, and Guys and<br />

Dolls. Isabel Bader Theatre, 93 Charles St.<br />

W. 647-970-1397 www.soundcrowd.ca. $35.<br />

Tickets on sale Apr 1.<br />

● 8:00: Tafelmusik. A Handel Celebration.<br />

See <strong>May</strong> 31. Also Jun 2(3pm).<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

James Ehnes + An American in Paris. See<br />

<strong>May</strong> <strong>29</strong>.<br />

● 8:00: Voices Chamber Choir. All-Night<br />

Vigil. Rachmaninoff: All-Night Vigil Op.37. Ron<br />

Cheung, conductor. St. Martin-in-the-Fields<br />

Anglican Church, 151 Glenlake Ave. 416-519-<br />

0528. $20; $15(sr/st). Cash only.<br />

Sunday June 2<br />

● 3:00: Canadian Children’s Opera Company.<br />

The Hobbit. See <strong>May</strong> 31.<br />

● 3:00: Tafelmusik. A Handel Celebration.<br />

See <strong>May</strong> 31.<br />

10TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON!<br />

Flute Street<br />

Jubilate<br />

singers<br />

PRESENTS<br />

Crossing<br />

the<br />

Bridge<br />

SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 4PM<br />

www.flutestreet.ca<br />

● 4:00: Flute Street. Tenth Anniversary Season:<br />

Crossing the Bridge. Cecila McDowall:<br />

Crossing the Bridge; Gregory Lee Newsome:<br />

Corruscating; Alexandra Molnar-Suhajda:<br />

Voices of the Deep; Kelly Via: Meditation<br />

on Abide with Me. Nancy Nourse, artistic<br />

Requiems<br />

GABRIEL FAURÉ &<br />

AHARON HARLAP<br />

Christ Church Deer Park,<br />

Toronto, Sat June 1, 7:30<br />

St. Paul’s Anglican Church,<br />

Newmarket, Sun June 2, 4:00<br />

www.jubilatesingers.ca<br />

director; Isaac Page, conductor. Church of St.<br />

Peter and St. Simon-the-Apostle, 525 Bloor<br />

St. E. 416-462-9498 or www.flutestreet.<br />

ca. Pay what you can (cash only) - $20-$30<br />

suggested.<br />

● 4:00: Jubilate Singers. Requiems. Faure:<br />

Requiem Op.48; Aharon Harlap: Requiem.<br />

Jubilate Singers; York Chamber Ensemble.<br />

St. Paul’s Anglican Church, 227 Church St.,<br />

Newmarket. 416-485-1988 or www.jubilatesingers.ca.<br />

$35; $25(sr); $15(st/arts<br />

workers). Also Jun 1(7:30pm). Christ Church<br />

Deer Park, Toronto.<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber<br />

Music Society. Piano Recital. Program to be<br />

announced. Peter Vinograde, piano. Keffer<br />

Memorial Chapel, Wilfrid Laurier University,<br />

75 University Ave. W., Waterloo. 519-569-<br />

1809 or www.ticketscene.ca/kwcms. $30;<br />

$20(st).<br />

Tuesday June 4<br />

● 12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation.<br />

Lunchtime Chamber Music. Bedford Trio.<br />

Yorkminster Park Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge<br />

St. 416-922-1167 or www.yorkminsterpark.<br />

com. Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 1:00: St. James Cathedral. Tuesday Organ<br />

Recital. Paul Jenkins, organ. Cathedral<br />

Church of St. James, 106 King St. E. 416-364-<br />

7865 or www.stjamescathedral.ca/recitals.<br />

Free. Donations encouraged.<br />

Wednesday June 5<br />

● 12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.<br />

Noonday Organ Recital. Dan Norman, organ.<br />

1585 Yonge St. www.yorkminsterpark.com.<br />

Free. Donations welcome.<br />

Thursday June 6<br />

● 12:00 noon: Metropolitan United Church.<br />

Noon at Met. Manuel Piazza, organ. Metropolitan<br />

United Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-<br />

0331 x226. Freewill donation.<br />

● 8:00: Royal Conservatory of Music.<br />

Chamber & String Concerts Series: Hilary<br />

Hahn with Andreas Haefliger. Brahms:<br />

Violin Sonata No. 1 in G Op.78 (“Regensonate”),<br />

Violin Sonata No.2 in A Op.100<br />

(“Thun” or “Meistersinger”), Violin Sonata<br />

No. 3 in d Op.108. Koerner Hall, TELUS Centre,<br />

273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208 or www.<br />

rcmusic.com/performance. From $70.<br />

Friday June 7<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Mendelssohn’s<br />

Violin. Ian Cusson: New Work<br />

(World première/Art of Healing Program<br />

Commission in Partnership with CAMH);<br />

Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto; Bartók: Divertimento<br />

for String Orchestra; Mozart: Symphony<br />

No.38 K.504 “Prague”. Randall Goosby,<br />

violin; Gustavo Gimeno, conductor. Roy Thomson<br />

Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. From<br />

$35. Also Jun 8(8pm) & 9(3pm).<br />

● 8:00: Old Mill Toronto. Alison Young. Jazz.<br />

21 Old Mill Rd. www.oldmilltoronto.com/<br />

event/alison-young. $20. Minimum $30 food<br />

& beverage spend. Restricted to ages 19+.<br />

Dinner at 6pm. Show at 8pm.<br />

52 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Ongoing, On Demand & Other<br />

FILMS<br />

● Apr 28 4:00: Silent Revue. The Phantom of<br />

the Opera. A 1925 silent film screening from<br />

the US with live musical accompaniment.<br />

Director: Rupert Julian. Cast: Lon Chaney,<br />

Norman Kerry, Mary Philbin. Live accompaniment<br />

by Tania Gill. Curated by Alicia Fletcher.<br />

Revue Cinema, 400 Roncesvalles Ave. 416-<br />

531-9950 or info@revuecinema.ca. $17;<br />

$14(Bronze/Loyalty Members, st/sr); $13(Silver<br />

Members); Free(Gold/Individual/Family<br />

Members).<br />

LIVE REHEARSAL<br />

& PERFORMANCE OPPORTUNITIES<br />

● A New Quartet is an emerging Toronto<br />

area ensemble that rehearses traditional<br />

repertoire and writes new music. The quartet<br />

is currently seeking saxophone players<br />

and composers. For details please visit www.<br />

anewquartet.net.<br />

● The Choralairs is a non-audition, adult<br />

choir that welcomes new members in September<br />

and January. Rehearsals are on Tuesday<br />

6:45-8-45pm at Edithvale C.C. 131 Finch<br />

Ave. W, Toronto. Please contact Elaine at<br />

choralairs.delighted.720@silomails.com to<br />

RSVP. Check out our new website at www.<br />

Choralairs.com.<br />

● Etobicoke Community Concert Band. Full<br />

rehearsals every Wednesday night at 7:30pm.<br />

309 Horner Ave. Open to all who are looking<br />

for a great band to join. Text Rob Hunter at<br />

416-878-1730.<br />

● Harmony Singers of Etobicoke. The<br />

women of The Harmony Singers survived<br />

COVID and are regrouping for <strong>2024</strong>! If you’d<br />

like to sing an exciting repertoire of pop, jazz,<br />

folk and light classics, the group will give you<br />

a warm welcome! Rehearsals start in January<br />

on Wednesday nights from 7:15 to 9:30<br />

p.m. at Richview United Church in Etobicoke.<br />

Contact Conductor Harvey Patterson<br />

at: theharmonysingers@ca.com or call<br />

416-239-5821.<br />

● New Horizons Band of Toronto. All levels<br />

from beginners to advanced for brass, woodwind,<br />

and percussion instruments. Weekly<br />

classes led by professional music teachers.<br />

Loaner instrument provided to each new<br />

registrant in the beginners’ program. Visit<br />

www.newhorizonsbandtoronto.ca.<br />

● North Toronto Community Band. Openings<br />

for drums, clarinets, trumpets, trombones,<br />

French horns. Rehearsals held at Willowdale<br />

Presbyterian Church 38 Ellerslie Ave.<br />

(just north of Mel Lastman Square). Monday<br />

evenings 7:30-9:30 pm. Contact ntcband@<br />

gmail.com.<br />

DO YOU DRIVE?<br />

Do you love The WholeNote?<br />

Share the love and earn a little money!<br />

Join our circulation team, and deliver<br />

6 times a year. Currently<br />

seeking circulation associates<br />

for the GTA.<br />

Interested?<br />

Contact:<br />

circulation@thewholenote.com<br />

● Open Mic at the Library: North York<br />

Library: Open Mic. (Music, Poetry & Storytelling).<br />

Musicians, poets, and storytellers<br />

are invited to come share your talents at the<br />

North York Central Library open mic! Acoustic<br />

guitar & piano provided. 7 minutes performance.<br />

For adults, seniors and teens. No<br />

registration required. Sign-up is at 5:30pm.<br />

For more information, contact the Language,<br />

Literature & Fine Arts Department at<br />

416-395-5639. <strong>2024</strong> Sessions: Fri, Apr 12,<br />

6-7:30pm. North York Central Library -<br />

5120 Yonge St. Auditorium (2 nd Floor).<br />

● Strings Attached Orchestra, North York.<br />

All string players (especially viola, cello,<br />

bass) are welcome. Mondays 7 to 9 p.m.<br />

from Sep to Jun. Email us first at info.stringsattached@gmail.com<br />

to receive music and<br />

other details or visit our website at www.<br />

stringsattachedorchestra.com for more<br />

information.<br />

● Toronto Mendelssohn Choir. Singsation.<br />

See listing page 41.<br />

● Toronto Shape Note Singers. Sacred<br />

Harp Singing. Shape note selections from<br />

the Sacred Harp tunebook.Singing is participatory,<br />

not a performance. No experience<br />

necessary. All are welcome and there are<br />

books to borrow. Monthly on the third Wednesday<br />

from Feb 21 to Dec 8, <strong>2024</strong>. Friends<br />

House, 60 Lowther Ave. 647-838-8764. Pay<br />

what you can.<br />

ONGOING EVENTS<br />

● Trinity College, University of Toronto.<br />

Evensong. Traditional Anglican choral music.<br />

Trinity College Chapel Choir; Thomas Bell, director<br />

of music; Peter Bayer, organ scholar.<br />

Trinity College Chapel, University of Toronto,<br />

6 Hoskin Ave. 416-978-2522 or Trinity College.<br />

Free. Evensong is sung every Wednesday at<br />

5:15pm in the beautiful Trinity College chapel<br />

during term time.<br />

● Encore Symphonic Concert Band. Monthly<br />

Concert Band Concert. The first Thursday of<br />

every month at 11am. 35-piece concert band<br />

performing band concert music, pop tunes,<br />

jazz standards (2 singers) and the occasional<br />

march. Trinity Presbyterian Church<br />

York Mills, 2737 Bayview Ave. www.encoreband.ca.<br />

$10.<br />

Saturday<br />

<strong>April</strong> 20<br />

10:30 am<br />

ONLINE EVENTS<br />

● Arts@Home. A vibrant hub connecting<br />

Torontonians to arts and culture. Designed to<br />

strengthen personal and societal resilience<br />

through the arts. www.artsathome.ca.<br />

● North Toronto Community Band. Openings<br />

for clarinet, trumpet, trombone, tuba<br />

and auxiliary percussion. Rehearsals held at<br />

Willowdale Presbyterian Church 38 Ellerslie<br />

Ave. (just north of Mel Lastman Square).<br />

Monday evenings 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Contact<br />

ntcband@gmail.com.<br />

BUSINESS<br />

CLASSIFIEDS<br />

Economical and visible!<br />

Promote your services<br />

& products to our<br />

musically engaged readers,<br />

in print and on-line.<br />

BOOKING DEADLINE: TUESDAY MAY 14<br />

advertising@thewholenote.com<br />

A vacation<br />

for your dog!<br />

Barker Avenue Boarding<br />

in East York<br />

call or text 416-574-5250<br />

Free listings:<br />

listings@thewholenote.com<br />

15% off your 1st clean<br />

If you can read this,<br />

thank a music teacher.<br />

MosePianoForAll.com<br />

AUDITION<br />

Apply to sing with Canada’s<br />

most renowned choir.<br />

Learn more at tmchoir.org<br />

● Recollectiv. For anyone living with cognitive<br />

challenges from Alzheimer’s, dementia, traumatic<br />

brain injury, stroke or PTSD. The group<br />

meets weekly to rediscover the joy of making<br />

music. Community members and music students<br />

are welcome to this fun, rewarding and<br />

inter-generational experience. Sessions take<br />

place from 2 to 3pm (with sound checks and<br />

socializing at 1:30pm). Please contact recollectiv@gmail.com<br />

for more information.<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 53


Bebop Joe’s Coffee House<br />

960 Queen St W. 416-534-5<strong>29</strong>8<br />

A cozy spot with great vibes, Bebop Joe’s Coffee<br />

House is the place for Armenian coffee,<br />

collectible vinyl, and live jazz on Queen Street.<br />

BSMT 254<br />

254 Lansdowne Ave. 416-801-6325<br />

bsmt254.com<br />

A cozy music venue with an underground<br />

vibe, BSMT 254 has a wide variety of shows,<br />

from jazz to hip-hop to DJ nights.<br />

Burdock<br />

1184 Bloor St. W. 416-546-4033<br />

burdockto.com<br />

A sleek music hall with exceptional sound<br />

and ambience, featuring a draft list of housemade<br />

brews.<br />

Cameron House<br />

408 Queen St. W. 416-703-0811<br />

thecameron.com<br />

An intimate, bohemian bar with ceiling<br />

murals & nightly performances from local<br />

roots acts on 2 stages.<br />

Capone’s Cocktail Lounge<br />

1573 Bloor St. W. 416-534-7911<br />

caponestoronto.com<br />

A self-described perfect marriage of an<br />

intimate cocktail den and comfortable neighbourhood<br />

bar, with live music Wednesday<br />

through Sunday.<br />

Castro’s Lounge<br />

2116 Queen St. E. 416-699-8272<br />

castroslounge.com<br />

Featuring an ever-changing selection of specialty<br />

beers, Castro’s hosts a variety of local<br />

live music acts, including bluegrass, jazz,<br />

rockabilly, and alt-country.<br />

C’est What<br />

67 Front St. E. 416-867-9499<br />

cestwhat.com<br />

A haven for those who appreciate real cask<br />

ale, draught beer from local Ontario breweries,<br />

and live music.<br />

Drom Taberna<br />

458 Queen St. W. 647-748-2099<br />

dromtaberna.com<br />

A heartfelt homage to the lands that stretch<br />

from the Baltic to the Balkans to the Black<br />

Sea, with a wide variety of music.<br />

MAINLY CLUBS<br />

The Old Mill’s legacy - over a century of live music history - continues in<br />

The Old Mill Jazz Lounge, where the golden age of jazz is still alive and<br />

well. At 9 Old Mill Rd. in Etobicoke, steps from the Old Mill subway.<br />

Emmet Ray, The<br />

924 College St. 416-792-4497<br />

theemmetray.com<br />

A whisky bar with a great food menu, an everchanging<br />

draft list, and live jazz, funk, folk and<br />

more in the back room.<br />

Golden Pigeon Beer Hall, The<br />

424 Parliament St. 416-392-1039<br />

goldenpigeonbar.com<br />

A classic beer hall with sophisticated food offerings,<br />

Golden Pigeon features a weekly Tuesday<br />

jazz night, as well as other special events.<br />

Grossman’s Tavern<br />

379 Spadina Ave. 416-977-7000<br />

grossmanstavern.com<br />

One of the city’s longest-running live music<br />

venues, and Toronto’s self-described “Home<br />

of the Blues.”<br />

Hirut Cafe and Restaurant<br />

2050 Danforth Ave. 416-551-7560<br />

hirut.ca<br />

A major destination for delicious and nutritious<br />

Ethiopian cuisine, with monthly jazz<br />

residencies and jam sessions.<br />

Hugh’s Room<br />

<strong>29</strong>6 Broadview Ave. 647-960-2593<br />

hughsroom.com<br />

A dedicated listening room with an intimate<br />

performing space, great acoustics, and<br />

an attentive audience, Hugh’s Room recently<br />

made the move to their new permanent home<br />

on Broadview Avenue.<br />

Jazz Bistro, The<br />

251 Victoria St. 416-363-5<strong>29</strong>9<br />

jazzbistro.ca<br />

In an historic location, Jazz Bistro features<br />

great food, a stellar wine list, and world-class<br />

jazz musicians in airy club environs.<br />

Jazz Lounge – See Old Mill, The<br />

Jazz Room, The<br />

Located in the Huether Hotel, 59 King St. N.,<br />

Waterloo. 226-476-1565<br />

kwjazzroom.com<br />

A welcoming music venue dedicated to the<br />

best in jazz music presentations, and home to<br />

the Grand River Jazz Society, which presents<br />

regular series throughout the year.<br />

Lula Lounge<br />

1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307<br />

lula.ca<br />

Toronto’s mecca for salsa, jazz, afro-Cuban,<br />

and world music, with Latin dance classes<br />

and excellent food and drinks.<br />

Manhattans Pizza Bistro & Music Club<br />

951 Gordon St., Guelph 519-767-2440<br />

manhattans.ca<br />

An independently owned neighbourhood restaurant<br />

boasting a unique dining experience<br />

that features live music almost every night<br />

of the week.<br />

Mekan Toronto<br />

817 Queen St. W. 647-901-6280<br />

mekantoronto.com<br />

A new Queen St. spot with an emphasis on lively<br />

music, good times, and Turkish culture, Mekan<br />

features world music, jazz, swing, and more.<br />

Mezzetta Restaurant<br />

681 St. Clair Ave. W. 416-658-5687<br />

mezzettarestaurant.com<br />

With a cozy atmosphere and a menu of Middle-Eastern<br />

cuisine, Mezzetta hosts music on<br />

Wednesday evenings.<br />

Monarch Tavern<br />

12 Clinton St. 416-531-5833<br />

themonarchtavern.com<br />

With a café/cocktail bar on the main floor and<br />

a pub with microbrews upstairs, Monarch<br />

Tavern regularly hosts indie, rock, and other<br />

musical genres on its stage.<br />

Nice Bistro, The<br />

117 Brock St. N., Whitby. 905-668-8839<br />

nicebistro.com<br />

A French restaurant with Mediterranean flair,<br />

Nice Bistro hosts ticketed live music events<br />

once every month or so.<br />

Old Mill, The<br />

21 Old Mill Rd. 416-236-2641<br />

oldmilltoronto.com<br />

Jazz Lounge:<br />

An updated space in the Old Mill’s main dining<br />

room, the Jazz Lounge features an updated<br />

sound system, a new shareable menu, and listenable<br />

straightahead jazz.<br />

Oud and the Fuzz, The<br />

21 Kensington Ave. 647-283-9136<br />

With a focus on Armenian-inspired food and<br />

cocktails, The Oud and the Fuzz regularly presents<br />

a wide variety of musical genres, as<br />

well as poetry nights, themed Arabic events,<br />

and more.<br />

Pamenar<br />

307 Augusta Ave.<br />

cafepamenar.com<br />

One of the city’s best third-wave coffee shops<br />

by day and bar by night, Pamenar hosts live<br />

music, DJs, comedy, and more.<br />

Pilot Tavern, The<br />

22 Cumberland Ave. 416-923-5716<br />

thepilot.ca<br />

With over 75 years around Yonge and Bloor,<br />

the Pilot is a multi-level bar that hosts live jazz<br />

on Saturday afternoons.<br />

Poetry Jazz Café<br />

1078 Queen St W. 416-599-5<strong>29</strong>9<br />

poetryjazzcafe.com<br />

A sexy, clubby space, Poetry hosts live jazz,<br />

hip-hop, and DJs nightly on Queen St. West.<br />

Reposado Bar & Lounge<br />

136 Ossington Ave. 416-532-6474<br />

reposadobar.com<br />

A chic, low-light bar with top-shelf tequila,<br />

Mexican tapas, and live music.<br />

Reservoir Lounge, The<br />

52 Wellington St. E. 416-955-0887<br />

reservoirlounge.com<br />

Toronto’s self-professed original swingjazz<br />

bar and restaurant, located in a historic<br />

speakeasy near St. Lawrence Market, with<br />

live music four nights a week.<br />

Rev, La<br />

2848 Dundas St. W. 416-766-0746<br />

larev.ca<br />

La Rev offers their guests and authentic taste<br />

of comida casera (Mexican homestyle cooking),<br />

and a welcoming performance space<br />

featuring some of Toronto’s most talented<br />

musicians.<br />

Rex Hotel Jazz & Blues Bar, The<br />

194 Queen St. W. 416-598-2475<br />

therex.ca<br />

With over 60 shows per month of Canadian<br />

and international groups, The Rex is Toronto’s<br />

longest-running jazz club, with full bar and<br />

kitchen menu.<br />

Sauce on Danforth<br />

1376 Danforth Ave. 647-748-1376<br />

sauceondanforth.com<br />

With Victorian lighting, cocktails, and an<br />

extensive tap and bottle list, Sauce on Danforth<br />

has live music Tuesday through Saturday<br />

(and sometimes Sunday).<br />

The Senator Winebar<br />

249 Victoria St 416 364-7517<br />

thesenator.com<br />

An intimate, upscale French-inspired bistro<br />

with live music serving hearty, delicious comfort<br />

food alongside a curated selection of<br />

wine and cocktails.<br />

Smokeshow BBQ and Brew<br />

744 Mt. Pleasant Rd 416-901-7469<br />

Smokeshowbbqandbrew.com<br />

A laid-back venue with an emphasis on barbecue<br />

and beer, Smokeshow hosts cover artists<br />

and original music Thursday through Sunday,<br />

with Bachata lessons on Tuesdays and Karaoke<br />

on Wednesdays.<br />

Tapestry<br />

224 Augusta Ave.<br />

In the space formerly occupied by Poetry,<br />

Tapestry features jazz, electronic music, soul,<br />

and more.<br />

Tranzac<br />

<strong>29</strong>2 Brunswick Ave. 416-923-8137<br />

tranzac.org<br />

A community arts venue dedicated to supporting,<br />

presenting, and promoting creative<br />

and cultural activity in Toronto, with<br />

live shows in multiple rooms every day of<br />

the week.<br />

54 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


THE WHOLENOTE<br />

MUSICAL WHO’S WHO<br />

<strong>2024</strong> CHORAL<br />

DIRECTORY<br />

Our 22nd annual “Canary Pages” choral directory is now<br />

available online, for readers interested in choirs, and for choirs<br />

wanting to make themselves known to our readers! If you are<br />

looking for a choir to join, support or listen to, you will find<br />

choirs of all skill levels and genres in the directory, across the<br />

GTA and in other parts of Ontario. You’ll need to go online<br />

(thewholenote.com/canary) for detailed profiles, but we’ve<br />

provided some “teaser” information below to get you interested.<br />

We will continue adding profiles online as they come in,<br />

up till the end of June, so please check back periodically. And<br />

for choirs interested in joining our Canary Pages, please email<br />

canary@thewholenote.com<br />

Achill Choral Society<br />

“Love to sing choral music? Join our<br />

vibrant musical community lead by generous,<br />

knowledgeable professionals. We<br />

have been singing in the Caledon, Dufferin<br />

and South Simcoe areas for almost<br />

40 years.”<br />

achill.ca<br />

Amadeus Choir of Greater Toronto<br />

“Led by Kathleen Allan, the award-winning<br />

90-voice Amadeus Choir has<br />

enlivened Toronto’s arts community for<br />

more than 50 years through an annual<br />

concert series, guest performances and<br />

special events.”<br />

amadeuschoir.com<br />

Bel Canto Singers<br />

“A four-part community choir whose repertoire<br />

includes classical masters, Broadway<br />

and movie tunes, opera choruses and<br />

pop songs.”<br />

belcantosingers.ca<br />

Canadian Celtic Choir<br />

“Canadian Celtic Choir sings “Songs To<br />

Touch Your Heart and Warm Your Spirit.”<br />

Our SATB auditioned choir has over 50<br />

members and has been singing together<br />

since 1996.”<br />

celticchoir.ca<br />

Cantabile Chamber Singers<br />

“Cantabile Chamber Singers is a nonprofit,<br />

Toronto-based chamber choir,<br />

formed in 2006 by artistic director<br />

Cheryll Chung with the purpose of raising<br />

social awareness through music.”<br />

cantabilechambersingers.com<br />

Chorus York<br />

“A mixed voice community choir for<br />

adults of all ages, based in Richmond Hill,<br />

Ontario. We strive to inspire the growth<br />

and enjoyment of choral music in our<br />

community through the performance of<br />

repertoire from Bach to Broadway, Show<br />

Tunes to Classical.”<br />

chorusyork.ca<br />

City Choir<br />

“A non-auditioned SATB choir devoted to<br />

all types of choral singing.”<br />

citychoir.ca<br />

Common Thread Community Chorus<br />

“Common Thread Community Chorus is<br />

a non-audition chorus that promotes a<br />

sense of community by performing joyful<br />

and empowering music.”<br />

commonthreadchorus.ca<br />

Cummer Avenue United Church Choir<br />

“Cummer Ave United Church choir is a<br />

group of volunteer singers, supported by<br />

professional section-leads, that provides<br />

strong musical leadership for Sunday<br />

morning worship services throughout<br />

the year.”<br />

cummeravenueuc.ca<br />

Echo Women’s Choir<br />

“Echo is a 30-voice, non-auditioned community<br />

choir in the heart of downtown<br />

Toronto, with a strong, varied, and vibrant<br />

singing culture accessible to all.”<br />

echochoir.ca<br />

The Edison Singers<br />

“Ground-breaking, nostalgic, classical,<br />

spiritual... The Edison Singers is a fully<br />

professional chamber choir led by internationally-acclaimed<br />

Artistic Director and<br />

Conductor, Dr. Noel Edison.”<br />

theedisonsingers.com<br />

Elmer Iseler Singers<br />

“Elmer Iseler Singers is a 20-singer professional<br />

choir based in Toronto under the<br />

artistic direction of Lydia Adams.”<br />

elmeriselersingers.com<br />

Etobicoke Centennial Choir<br />

“Etobicoke Centennial Choir is dedicated<br />

to celebrating the art and joy of choral<br />

singing with vibrant and diverse musical<br />

performances to enrich and engage our<br />

community.”<br />

etobicokecentennialchoir.ca<br />

Exultate Chamber Singers<br />

“A welcoming group of skilled, musical<br />

singers with a wide-ranging repertoire<br />

and a commitment to the development of<br />

singers, composers, and conductors both<br />

within Exultate and in the larger choral<br />

community.”<br />

exultate.net<br />

Harbourfront Chorus<br />

“Friendly community choir.”<br />

facebook.com/harbourfrontchorus<br />

Healey Willan Singers<br />

“Friendly, fun and welcoming: A closeknit<br />

group of women that love to sing and<br />

make music together.”<br />

healeywillansingers.com<br />

Jubilate Singers<br />

“A mixed-voice auditioned choir specializing<br />

in world music sung in original languages,<br />

orchestral choral works and<br />

20-21C choral pieces. Director: Isabel<br />

Bernaus.”<br />

jubilatesingers.ca<br />

Karen Schuessler Singers<br />

“MISSION: Enriching lives through choral<br />

excellence and community engagement…<br />

VISION: Creating an environment where<br />

hearts are lifted, souls are deepened and<br />

spirits are raised. VALUES: Excellence<br />

Integrity Innovative Audience-friendly.”<br />

kssingers.com/#/kss/2<br />

Leaside United Church Choirs<br />

“Music is central to worship at Leaside<br />

United Church. The rich music program<br />

includes the Chancel Choir and the Junior<br />

Choir.”<br />

leasideunited.org<br />

London Pro Musica Choir<br />

“London Pro Musica Choir’s current season<br />

is titled “Taking Root,” a grateful<br />

acknowledgement of our London community,<br />

the natural world, ancient wisdom,<br />

and our choir’s rich history. We look<br />

forward to taking this musical journey<br />

together.”<br />

londonpromusica.ca<br />

Metropolitan United Choirs<br />

“We’re a fun-loving, semi-professional and<br />

family-like liturgical and concert choir,<br />

who sing rep from Lassus to Bach to Lady<br />

Gaga.”<br />

metunited.org<br />

Milton Choristers<br />

“A non auditioned Adult Community choir<br />

in Milton.”<br />

miltonchoristers.com<br />

Mississauga Chamber Singers<br />

“Mississauga Chamber Singers - a New<br />

Sound in the City!!”<br />

mcsingers.ca<br />

North Halton Community Singers<br />

“Formerly the Georgetown Choral Society,<br />

the NHCS now has a new name, logo<br />

and web site as well as a new approach<br />

to music selection to appeal to a broad<br />

audience.”<br />

northhaltonsingers.ca<br />

Open Voices Community Choir<br />

“Always fun, always quirky, occasionally<br />

beautiful”.<br />

openvoices.ca<br />

Oriana Singers<br />

“A focused, fun-loving choir working<br />

hard to develop musical knowledge<br />

and abilities, and deliver quality choral<br />

programs.”<br />

orianasingers.com<br />

Oriana Women’s Choir<br />

“Oriana explores the possibilities in choral<br />

music for upper voices, and fosters the<br />

creation of new Canadian choral music.<br />

New singers are welcome to join us at any<br />

rehearsal!”<br />

orianachoir.com<br />

Orpheus Choir of Toronto<br />

“Expect something different with the<br />

Orpheus Choir of Toronto.”<br />

orpheuschoirtoronto.com<br />

Pax Christi Chorale<br />

“Experience the deep joys of choral<br />

singing in a diverse and welcoming<br />

community.”<br />

paxchristichorale.org<br />

Peterborough Singers<br />

“In <strong>2024</strong>/25 the Peterborough Singers<br />

will perform Yuletide Cheer, Handel’s<br />

Messiah, Mozart’s Requiem, and the<br />

music of ABBA.”<br />

peterboroughsingers.com<br />

Serenata Singers<br />

“A friendly, welcoming group of retirees<br />

of all ages, singing a wide variety of choral<br />

music. Professional Music Leadership,<br />

rehearsing during the daytime. Auditions<br />

are of an informal nature. Check our Website<br />

and Facebook for more details.”<br />

serenatasingers.ca<br />

SoundCrowd<br />

“Are you a fan of Pitch Perfect? Does harmonizing<br />

with people bring you joy? Then<br />

this is the group for you!”<br />

soundcrowd.ca<br />

St. Elizabeth Scola Cantorum<br />

“A Hungarian choir whose repertoire<br />

ranges from early Baroque to contemporary<br />

choral music. Sight reading abilities<br />

and a knowledge of Hungarian are<br />

assets.”<br />

facebook.com/<br />

StElizabethScolaCantorum<br />

Tafelmusik Chamber Choir<br />

“The Tafelmusik Chamber Choir, specializing<br />

in historically informed performances<br />

of baroque and classical repertoire,<br />

was formed in 1981 as a complement to the<br />

Tafelmusik Orchestra. Under the direction<br />

of its founder, Ivars Taurins, the choir<br />

has been praised for its clarity, nuance, and<br />

brilliance.”<br />

tafelmusik.org<br />

Toronto Beach Chorale<br />

“A vital musical presence in the Beach,<br />

Toronto Beach Chorale conducted by<br />

Mervin W Fick continues to enhance its<br />

reputation for artistic excellence, performing<br />

a growing and rich repertoire.”<br />

torontobeachchorale.com<br />

Toronto Chamber Choir<br />

“Toronto Chamber Choir: Bringing new<br />

light to early music.”<br />

torontochamberchoir.ca<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 55


Toronto Children’s Chorus<br />

“The Toronto Children’s Chorus consists<br />

of seven choirs: four Training Choirs<br />

ages 6-12 and three Main Choirs ages<br />

12-18. Through exceptional choral training<br />

and performance experiences, we<br />

inspire growth, teamwork, and artistic<br />

excellence in our choristers. We foster<br />

collaboration, peer leadership, self-discipline,<br />

creativity and a lifelong passion for<br />

music.”<br />

torontochildrenschorus.com<br />

Toronto Choral Society<br />

“The Toronto Choral Society embraces<br />

the history and diversity of our city<br />

through our concerts. We present 3 or 4<br />

concerts a year.”<br />

torontochoralsociety.org<br />

Toronto Classical Singers<br />

“With its exuberant approach, TCS celebrates<br />

the choral tradition with the<br />

complex sonority of large choir with professional<br />

orchestra.”<br />

torontoclassicalsingers.ca<br />

Toronto Mendelssohn Choir<br />

“Marking its 130th anniversary, the<br />

Toronto Mendelssohn Choir stands as<br />

one of Canada’s most celebrated choral<br />

groups.”<br />

tmchoir.org<br />

Toronto Welsh Male Voice Choir<br />

“Fun, tours, camaraderie... Come & Join<br />

our choir, we are seeking new members<br />

to enhance the choir!!”<br />

torontowelshchoir.com<br />

Univox Choir<br />

“Univox Choir is a mixed-voice non-auditioned<br />

community choir for young adults.”<br />

voxchoirs.com<br />

Upper Canada Choristers<br />

“Excellence, community service, diversity,<br />

fun - these are our touchstones.”<br />

uppercanadachoristers.org<br />

Vesnivka Choir<br />

“We are a friendly inclusive community<br />

choir that performs Ukrainian classical,<br />

sacred and traditional folk repertoire.<br />

Join us for a unique singing experience!”<br />

vesnivka.com<br />

VIVA Singers Toronto<br />

“VIVA Singers Toronto is a not-for-profit<br />

family of choirs with a mandate to give<br />

members, ages four through adult, the<br />

opportunity to achieve artistic excellence<br />

in a singer-centred, collaborative choral<br />

community.”<br />

vivasingerstoronto.com<br />

VOCA Chorus of Toronto<br />

“VOCA is a dynamic, auditioned ensemble<br />

which performs a wide range of repertoire<br />

in collaboration with superb guest<br />

artists.”<br />

vocachorus.ca<br />

Voices Chamber Choir<br />

“Unique programming that inspires and<br />

nourishes our hearts and minds.”<br />

voiceschoir.com<br />

The Wayne Gilpin SINGERS<br />

“Beautiful melodies, rocking sax solos,<br />

inspired new jazz arrangements of Handel’s<br />

Messiah, gospel, show tunes, spirituals<br />

- if any of this appeals to you, check<br />

us out.”<br />

waynegilpinsingers.com<br />

West Toronto Community Choir<br />

“Our vibe is fun and social, with a focus<br />

on community engagement and shared<br />

music-making. We have a mix of seasoned<br />

choristers and novices, and there are no<br />

auditions.”<br />

westtorontocommunitychoir.com<br />

Windsor Classic Chorale<br />

“Founded in 1977 by director emeritus<br />

Richard Householder, the Windsor Classic<br />

Chorale has become a core component<br />

of the local arts community, dedicated<br />

to achieving artistic excellence by maintaining<br />

a high level of musicianship with<br />

a rich palette of ambitious choral works.<br />

The “WCC” considers it a privilege to perform<br />

in the Windsor-Essex County community.<br />

Their love for choral music is what<br />

brings them together.”<br />

windsorclassicchorale.org<br />

Yorkminstrels Show Choir<br />

“A warm, fun-loving and welcoming<br />

group, bringing the music of Broadway,<br />

oldies, contemporary and seasonal songs<br />

into the community.”<br />

theyorkminstrelsshowchoir.weebly.com<br />

THE WHOLENOTE<br />

SUMMER MUSIC<br />

EDUCATION<br />

DIRECTORY<br />

Our 23rd annual directory of summer music education is now available<br />

online, for readers interested in summer music education, and for<br />

summer music education programs wanting to reach interested readers.<br />

The directory accepts profiles for summer music music educational<br />

opportunities at all levels of skill, from day camps to extended residential<br />

programs, across Ontario and beyond. We will continue to add programs to<br />

the directory up till the end of June.<br />

Interested readers will need to go online (thewholenote.com/summered)<br />

for detailed profiles, but we’ve provided some “teaser” information below<br />

to get you interested. People or organisations offering programs should<br />

contact Karen Ages at karen@thewholenote.com for information on how to<br />

join the directory.<br />

CAMMAC Music Centre<br />

“Pair your summer vacation fun with a<br />

unique musical experience in the heart of<br />

the Laurentians. Eight one-week immersive<br />

programs feature a wide variety of<br />

classes & activities for amateur musicians<br />

of all ages and levels.”<br />

cammac.ca/en/summer-music-retreats<br />

Canadian Opera Company<br />

Summer Music Camps<br />

“Create, Compose, Design, Perform!<br />

Explore music and the performing arts<br />

through our innovative and engaging<br />

Summer Music Camps held at the Four<br />

Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts!”<br />

coc.ca/learn/summercamps<br />

Eastman School of Music<br />

Summer@Eastman<br />

“The Eastman School of Music Summer at<br />

Eastman program offers students and the<br />

community an individualized and worldclass<br />

music education experience.”<br />

summer.esm.rochester.edu<br />

Guitar Workshop Plus<br />

“GWP is much more than just a guitar<br />

camp or summer music camp. You’ve<br />

seen the rest … Now come learn from the<br />

best! Tuition options include day and overnight<br />

options.”<br />

guitarworkshopplus.com<br />

Interprovincial Music Camp<br />

“IMC - the highlight of a young musician’s<br />

summer!”<br />

campimc.ca<br />

JazzWorks Annual Composers’<br />

Symposium & Jazz Camp<br />

“Join JazzWorks’ residential summer Jazz<br />

Camp and take your musicianship to the<br />

next level!”<br />

jazzworkscanada.com<br />

Kodály Certification Program<br />

Levels I & II<br />

“Participants will strengthen their personal<br />

musicianship and pedagogical skills,<br />

with content grounded in a contemporary<br />

understanding of the philosophy inspired<br />

by Zoltán Kodály.”<br />

music.uwo.ca/outreach/music-education/<br />

kodaly-certification-program.html<br />

Lake Field Music<br />

“A music camp for adults to play, sing,<br />

and be inspired in a collegial environment.<br />

Stay on campus and immerse yourself<br />

in workshops, ensembles, choirs, and<br />

performances.”<br />

lakefieldmusic.ca<br />

Music at Port Milford<br />

“Joyful focused chamber music study on<br />

the shores of Lake Ontario.”<br />

musicatportmilford.org<br />

Stratford Summer Music’s<br />

Jazz Academy<br />

“Calling all budding jazz cats! Join us for<br />

Stratford Summer Music’s Jazz Academy<br />

to hone your skills alongside some of the<br />

leading jazz musicians in the country.”<br />

stratfordsummermusic.ca/education/<br />

the-stratford-summer-jazz-academy<br />

Stratford Summer Music’s<br />

Vocal Academy<br />

“Exciting news for singers everywhere!<br />

Stratford Summer Music’s Vocal Academy<br />

is an opportunity for singers to work<br />

through repertoire with professionals at<br />

the top of their game.”<br />

stratfordsummermusic.ca/education/<br />

vocal-academy<br />

JOIN US IN<br />

JULY FOR<br />

MUSIC<br />

CAMPS!<br />

coc.ca/Camps<br />

SummerStage: The Magic Flute<br />

“An exciting line-up of summer opera by<br />

No Strings Theatre and Opera by Request<br />

featuring Mozart’s The Magic Flute at the<br />

Farm plus other opera excerpts!”<br />

nostringstheatre.com<br />

Summer Vocal Intensive<br />

“3-Day Vocal Intensive for High School<br />

Singers at Western University’s Don<br />

Wright Faculty of Music featuring workshops,<br />

tours, lessons, training seminars<br />

and masterclasses! Culminating with<br />

a Finale Concert, the program introduces<br />

students to the Don Wright Faculty of<br />

Music, faculty members, facilities, resources,<br />

library and campus at large.”<br />

music.uwo.ca/outreach/<br />

vocal-intensive.html<br />

56 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


DISCOVERIES | RECORDINGS REVIEWED<br />

DAVID OLDS<br />

Although you will not be reading this until <strong>April</strong>, or even <strong>May</strong>, as<br />

I write it is not yet March. While I try to keep on top of the<br />

many, many releases that have come in for consideration since<br />

our last issue, I am also having to consider a number of discs that we<br />

overlooked in the past year. While we will not know the results of the<br />

Juno Awards before we go to press, the nominations have been<br />

recently announced and although we have covered most of discs in<br />

the categories most relevant to The WholeNote, there are a few we<br />

overlooked. You’ll find a couple of these – Caity Gyorgy/Marc<br />

Limacher and Nick Maclean Quartet featuring Brownman Ali – in our<br />

Jazz and Improvised section, and two from the Classical Album of the<br />

Year (soloist) category right here.<br />

Matt Haimowitz is the soloist in the digitalonly<br />

release Thomas de Hartmann – Cello<br />

Concerto Op.57 (Pentatone PTC 5187159<br />

pentatonemusic.com/product/de-hartmann-cello-concerto).<br />

Dennis Russell<br />

Davies conducts the MDR Leipzig RSO in<br />

the first commercial recording of this work<br />

by one of the significant Ukrainian<br />

composers of the first half of the 20th<br />

century. De Hartmann (1885-1956) was an important compositional<br />

voice during his lifetime, but since then his colourful and compelling<br />

music has been largely ignored. This recording is part of a larger<br />

undertaking aimed to remedy that situation, and Haimowitz’s stunning<br />

performance bodes well for the success of the venture (thomasdehartmannproject.com).<br />

The concerto, which reflects the anxiety of<br />

the times, was composed in 1935 and first performed three years later<br />

by Paul Tortelier and the Boston Symphony under Serge Koussevitzky.<br />

Although not himself a Jew, de Hartmann was troubled by the acute<br />

antisemitism of the rising Nazi regime in Germany and the work<br />

incorporates Jewish musical folklore and other Eastern European folk<br />

traditions. Indeed the playful third movement, with its moto-perpetuo<br />

cello line, opens with a (presumably Hungarian) theme that Bartók<br />

would use in sketches for a viola concerto a decade later. The at times<br />

cinematic, 36-minute concerto is an excellent introduction to this<br />

often-overlooked composer, and with the current horrific situation in<br />

Ukraine its rediscovery is a timely reminder of the glorious musical<br />

heritage of that nation.<br />

James Ehnes is the soloist for Carl Nielsen<br />

– Violin Concerto with the Bergen<br />

Philharmonic under Edward Gardner<br />

(Chandos CHSA 5311 chandos.net/products/<br />

catalogue/CHSA%205311). An extended slow<br />

introduction – likened by Paul Griffiths in<br />

the excellent booklet notes to a folk fiddler<br />

playing with “classical elegance,” gently fades<br />

away before an abrupt orchestral explosion<br />

into the Allegro cavallerésco, a “chivalric” episode evoking knights on<br />

horseback. The Poco Adagio begins gently with winds before morphing<br />

into a contemplative violin solo. The final movement is also gentle but<br />

quite mischievous where, in Griffiths’ words “comedy is overplayed<br />

[…] making riot of its ebullience. [But] the cadenza goes another way,<br />

back to a moment of drone-accompanied melody, as if this had all been<br />

the dream of a wandering fiddler.” Nielsen began the work in Norway<br />

and Norwegian violinist Vilde Frang has said “I think every violinist<br />

should play this concerto, because you get challenged not only technically,<br />

but also structure-wise. You have to take a bird’s eye view of this<br />

concerto, you need this kind of perspective.” Ehnes seems to have had<br />

no problem attaining this vantage point. He rises to all the challenges<br />

and there are passages that shine like jewels. It’s easy to see why this<br />

performance was short-listed for a Juno.<br />

Gardner also leads the orchestra in a magnificent performance of<br />

Nielsen’s Symphony No.4 “The Inextinguishable” recreating the same<br />

pairing of works that Nielsen conducted in a program in London in<br />

1923, 100 years before this recording was made.<br />

Another one that slipped through the cracks<br />

last year is a fabulous new recording of<br />

Ravel – Daphnis et Chloé complete ballet<br />

(Chandos CHSA 5327 chandos.net/products/catalogue/CHAN<br />

5327) featuring the<br />

Sinfonia of London Chorus and Sinfonia<br />

of London. Director John Wilson used the<br />

COVID-19 lockdown period to prepare a<br />

new performing edition of the ballet that<br />

we are more familiar with from the two suites that the composer<br />

extracted from the near-hourlong original. It was conceived in 1909,<br />

the year Serge Diaghilev brought his Ballet Russe to Paris, as a collaboration<br />

between Ravel, Diaghilev and dancer/choreographer Michel<br />

Folkine. Although there were myriad complications and disagreements<br />

along the way, the project was eventually brought to fruition<br />

culminating in, much to Ravel’s chagrin, only two performances at<br />

the end of the 1912 season. Although Diaghilev did mount three more<br />

performances at the end of the following year, he never thereafter<br />

presented it in Paris. This new recording is accompanied by extensive<br />

notes by Wilson detailing the history of the ballet’s creation and<br />

his own challenges in recreating what he feels is an authentic version<br />

of the historic ballet. There is also a detailed libretto/mis en scene by<br />

Folkine, making a very impressive booklet in three languages totaling<br />

42 pages. The performance is stunning and the recording itself is<br />

immaculate, with a dynamic range that has to be heard to be believed.<br />

thewholenote.com/listening<br />

Monteverdi Vespers of 1610<br />

The Thirteen, Children’s Chorus of<br />

Washington, Dark Horse Consort<br />

Recorded in the sumptuous<br />

acoustic of the Franciscan<br />

Monastery in Washington DC, this<br />

album evokes the sun setting on<br />

the lagoon by St Mark's, Venice.<br />

La sposa dei cantici<br />

Ars Lyrica Houston<br />

A soprano and three countertenors<br />

(including John Holiday) mix<br />

the heavenly with the playful in<br />

Alessandro Scarlatti's divine romp<br />

in the Italian vocal style.<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 57


One more disc lost in the shuffle before we<br />

move on. New Stories features saxophonist<br />

Joseph Lulloff and pianist Yu-Lien The<br />

performing works by colleagues from<br />

Michigan State University, Canadian<br />

Dorothy Chang and Americans David<br />

Biedenbender, Stacy Garrop and Carter<br />

Pann (Blue Griffin Records BGR607 bluegriffin.com).<br />

Chang’s lyrical title work is the<br />

earliest on the disc, dating from 2013. The composer says the commission<br />

“was the perfect opportunity to explore the combination of<br />

Eastern and Western influences in my music, a composition puzzle I<br />

was grappling with at the time.” Biedenbender’s one-movement<br />

Detroit Steel is an unaccompanied work intended to honour “the grit,<br />

strength and resolve of the people of the city.” Garrop’s Wrath is a<br />

follow up to her earlier Tantrum for alto sax and piano, and its three<br />

movement titles – Menace, Shock and Amok – aptly describe the<br />

moods of the piece. At 25 minutes, Pann’s Sonata for Alto Saxophone<br />

and Piano is the most extended and developed work on the disc,<br />

comprising six tracks of varied aspect from the opening This Black Cat<br />

to the closing Lacrimosa in memory of Joel Hastings. Throughout the<br />

disc Lulloff and The rise to every challenge and nuance pitched by the<br />

four composers, from languid and emotive melodies to brash, abrasive<br />

and sometimes jocular outbursts.<br />

And on to more recent arrivals… Another<br />

saxophone disc CONVERGENCE – Music for<br />

Saxophone and Mixed Media (Navona<br />

Records nv6608 navonarecords.com/<br />

catalog/nv6608) features Heidi Radtke in<br />

works for soprano, alto and tenor saxes in a<br />

variety of settings. The eight compositions<br />

– each by a different contemporary<br />

composer – span a plethora of moods and<br />

emotions, from raucous and playful, to morose and meditative. The<br />

disc opens with a lush reimagining by Jenni Watson of Debussy’s first<br />

Arabesque in which the sax is surrounded by a gorgeous wash of prerecorded<br />

sounds, primarily those of violin and piano. Two particularly<br />

moving works are Andy Scott’s Wind Telephone, inspired by the 2011<br />

tsunami in Otsuki, Japan and Rahsaan Barber’s Breonna Taylor (How<br />

Many More?), a gentle lament for a Black woman killed by police in<br />

Louisville, KY in 2020. It uses field recordings from Iroquois Park<br />

close to Taylor’s home in which calls of red-winged blackbirds are<br />

prominent. British-born Canadian composer Peter Meecham’s<br />

contemplative 3 Pieces for Solo Saxophone depict “A lonely man, on<br />

the New York subway, playing his saxophone, not for money, but for<br />

himself.” The title work is a 2011 collaboration between Radtke and<br />

Sang Mi Ahn in which the solo saxophone interacts with an electronic<br />

soundtrack generated from sounds made by Radtke’s sax. I might have<br />

expected an hour’s worth of solo” saxophone to be a bit “much of a<br />

muchness,” but to the contrary, Radtke’s compelling playing, the<br />

varying compositional palettes and diverse accompaniments made for<br />

an engaging listening experience throughout.<br />

The Emily Carr String Quartet (emilycarrstringquartet.com)<br />

released its second<br />

album in January. Portraits, a digital release<br />

on Leaf Music “is inspired by the work of<br />

Emily Carr. […] It is through music, one of<br />

the most abstract of art forms, that we can<br />

connect ourselves to her. The rhythm of a<br />

piece can be likened to the movement of<br />

brush strokes. The musical notes can be<br />

described as the pigments of colour chosen<br />

to convey the deep, dark and wild nuances of B.C.’s coastal rainforest.<br />

Musical phrases can begin to suggest Emily’s connection with the land<br />

and the First Nations she was friends with.” Four Canadians – Tobin<br />

Stokes, Jocelyn Morlock, Jared Miller and Iman Habibi – have written<br />

works that reflect their feelings about or inspired by the iconic artist.<br />

Stokes’ Feathers is a nine-movement work with each brief sketch,<br />

with such titles as Nesting, Nightingale and Hummingbirds, prefaced<br />

by a short quotation from the writings of Carr. Morlock’s Big Raven<br />

evocatively reflects Carr’s desire to “bring loneliness to this canvas and<br />

haunting broodiness, quiet and powerful.” Miller was inspired by<br />

another of Carr canvas, Strangled by Growth, which juxtaposes a<br />

human construction (totem pole) with the natural world (forest).<br />

Habibi’s Beloved of the Sky pays homage to the painting of the same<br />

name in the second movement, with impressions of Carr’s depictions<br />

of Forest, her pet monkey Woo and an introspective Self Portrait<br />

completing the work. The disc concludes with Stoke’s suite Klee<br />

Wyck, interpretations of five stories from the book of the same name.<br />

Each of the composers bring their own frame of reference and<br />

personal language to the project and the ensemble successfully<br />

bridges the divides effectively and convincingly, make for a truly<br />

enjoyable disc.<br />

The Fine Arts Quartet was founded in<br />

Chicago in 1946 so of course there have been<br />

personnel changes over the decades. The<br />

current violinists, Ralph Evans and Efim<br />

Boico, have been members since 1982 and<br />

1983 respectively, with violist Gil Sharon and<br />

cellist Niklas Schmidt joining in 2018. The<br />

ensemble is still going strong and has just<br />

released the tenth and final volume of the<br />

complete string quartets (plus other related works) of Antonin Dvořák,<br />

Dvořák – String Quartet No.2; Bagatelles; Rondo (Naxos 8.574513<br />

naxos.com/CatalogueDetail/?id=8.574513). String Quartet No.2 in<br />

B-flat Major was one of three quartets written in 1869 during a period<br />

when Dvořák was markedly influenced by Wagner. He later destroyed<br />

the scores and the quartets were thought to have been lost until sets of<br />

parts were discovered after his death. According to the website<br />

antonin-dvorak.cz/en, although there had been a private performance<br />

in Prague back in 1932, the first public performance of Quartet No.2<br />

was not until September 2021 in that same city by the Zemlinsky<br />

Quartet. This recording of the 50-minute work took place just over a<br />

year later in Marienmunster, Germany. It is hard to tell why it<br />

languished so long without acceptance, or for that matter why it was<br />

rejected by the composer. It’s a lovely and fully developed work, if,<br />

according to Paul Griffiths, a bit “prolix.” [I had to look that up.] The<br />

disc is completed by the humourous Bagatelles of 1878 for two violins,<br />

cello and harmonium (Ryoko Morooka) and the rollicking Rondo in G<br />

Minor from 1891 for cello and piano (Stepan Simonian). With Dvořák<br />

in its rear-view mirror and a discography of some 200 other works<br />

spanning the history of the string quartet genre, I look forward to<br />

seeing what the future holds for this fine (arts) quartet.<br />

The Neave Trio is back again – five reviews<br />

in these pages since 2017 – and their latest, A<br />

Room of Her Own (Chandos CHAN 20238<br />

chandos.net), features four turn-of-the-20th<br />

century composers Lili Boulanger, Cécille<br />

Chaminade, Dame Ethyl Smyth and<br />

Germaine Tailleferre. It’s a bit of misnomer<br />

to designate Tailleferre as turn-of-thecentury<br />

however as she lived and remained<br />

active as a composer until 1983. As a matter of fact, although her Trio<br />

originated in 1917, she reworked the version included here in 1978,<br />

replacing the middle movement and adding a fourth. These new, ebullient<br />

movements add a sunny quality to the work while still maintaining<br />

the characteristic voice she had established some six decades<br />

earlier. Boulanger completed her Deux piéces en trio in 1918, the year<br />

of her untimely death at the age of 24. The first of these is a cheerful,<br />

brief depiction of a spring morning. The second is a sombre, more<br />

extended exploration of a sad evening. The other two trios date from<br />

almost 40 years earlier, both composed in 1880. Chaminade’s Trio<br />

No.1, Op.11 in G Minor is a fetching work in four movements, with a<br />

particularly charming Presto leggiero featuring waterfall-like textures<br />

in the piano. British composer Smyth is the only non-French national<br />

included here and her formative studies took place in Leipzig,<br />

58 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


grounding her firmly in the Austro-German romantic tradition. She<br />

was born one year later than Chaminade, in 1858, and both died in<br />

1944. Her Trio, at 31 minutes the longest offering here, like her<br />

coeval’s is also in a minor key, in this case G Minor. In spite of this<br />

there are many bright moments, especially in the scherzando section<br />

of the second movement and throughout the Scherzo. Presto con brio<br />

third. The Neave Trio in, as always, in top form and is to be<br />

commended for bringing these rarely heard gems to light is such<br />

stellar performances.<br />

Poet and author Robert Priest has been<br />

active on the Toronto scene as long as I<br />

can remember, going back to the early<br />

80s when we were both denizens of Ye<br />

Olde Brunswick House open mic nights.<br />

I’ve often thought of him over the years,<br />

fondly remembering a line (with a tip of<br />

the hat to Allen Ginsberg) “I saw the best<br />

minds of my generation falling off streetcars”<br />

or something to that effect. [Priest tells<br />

me the phrase may have actually been “the best mimes of my generation.”]<br />

He’s obviously been active in the years since, with half a<br />

dozen albums, myriad poetry collections and novels to his credit, as<br />

well as co-writing Alannah Myles’ hit Song Instead of a Kiss. I was<br />

disappointed to miss his recent album launch at Hugh’s Room – I<br />

was asleep at the wheel I guess – but am glad to have received a copy<br />

of People Like You and Me (vesuviusmusic.com/robert-priest). It’s a<br />

combination of spoken word and song, all accompanied by some fine<br />

players from Toronto’s jazz community including Kevin Breit, Alison<br />

Young, Great Bob Scott and George Koller, who also share writing<br />

credits with Priest. The music is diverse, running a gamut of styles.<br />

Most surprising to me is the jazzy torch song You and I and Faraway<br />

co-written with Allen Booth and featuring Young’s honey-dripping<br />

sax, in which Priest turns in a convincing Brian Ferry-esque performance.<br />

Some of the clever turns of phrase I particularly enjoyed were<br />

“In my country we don’t have free speech, but the speech we do<br />

have is really, really cheap” and “I’m so prophetic I get pre-traumatic<br />

stress disorder!” from [I strive for] Outer Peace and “Love is a many<br />

gendered thing” from a tune of the same name. I wish I hadn’t missed<br />

the show!<br />

Concert note: I do intend to be at Priest’s next performance at the<br />

Great Sunday Night Folk Off at the Tranzac on <strong>April</strong> 21 (5pm start).<br />

We invite submissions. CDs, DVDs and comments should<br />

be sent to: DISCoveries, The WholeNote c/o Music Alive,<br />

The Centre for Social Innovation, 720 Bathurst St. Toronto<br />

ON M5S 2R4 or to discoveries@thewholenote.com.<br />

STRINGS<br />

ATTACHED<br />

TERRY ROBBINS<br />

The three French sonatas that form the bulk<br />

of Le Temps retrouvé, the new CD from the<br />

brilliant husband-and-wife duo of violinist<br />

Elena Urioste and pianist Tom Poster, were<br />

all published during the decade 1916-26, a<br />

period of great change in the musical landscape<br />

(Chandos CHAN 20275 chandos.net/<br />

products/catalogue/CHAN%2020275).<br />

Despite initial parental opposition and<br />

a life of domestic upheaval Mélanie, Bonis<br />

(1858-1937) composed a huge amount of music, most of which still<br />

lies unexplored. Her Violin Sonata in F-sharp Minor Op.112 is a<br />

fascinating and profoundly musical work.<br />

Fauré’s Violin Sonata No.2 in E Minor Op.108 from 1916-17 is from<br />

his late, forward-looking period, but those typical sweeping piano<br />

arpeggios and flowing melodies still abound.<br />

Apart from the remarkable Veloce middle movement (literally a<br />

short ride in a fast car) Reynaldo Hahn’s lyrical and warm Violin<br />

Sonata in C Major from 1926 looks back nostalgically to a gentler time.<br />

Lili Boulanger’s popular Nocturne, published in 1914, provides a<br />

suitably dreamy ending to a superb disc.<br />

On A Lionel Tertis Celebration the violist<br />

Timothy Ridout, winner of the 2016 Lionel<br />

Tertis Competition, pays tribute to the<br />

legendary English viola player with an<br />

outstanding 2CD recital featuring compositions<br />

and arrangements by Tertis himself as<br />

well as works by his friends and students.<br />

Frank Dupree is the pianist on CD1, and<br />

James Baillieu on CD2 (harmonia mundi<br />

HMM9053767.77 harmoniamundi.com/en/<br />

What we're listening to this month:<br />

thewholenote.com/listening<br />

BACH: Clavier-Übung III, The<br />

Pedal Settings<br />

Renée Anne Louprette<br />

Built to a 1776 design, Bach would<br />

have recognized this organ.<br />

Featuring revisions in Bach’s own<br />

hand, Louprette's latest album is a<br />

must-have.<br />

Portraits<br />

Emily Carr String Quartet<br />

Portraits is where the arts meet<br />

music. This album is inspired by<br />

Emily Carr's paintings and her<br />

words that gave insight into her<br />

artistic life<br />

People Like You and Me<br />

Robert Priest<br />

The greatest poet/songwriter<br />

since Leonard Cohen teams up<br />

with the cream of modern jazz<br />

musicians to bring you the best of<br />

both worlds.<br />

Upheaval<br />

Janne Fredens & Søren Rastogi<br />

An exceptional project featuring<br />

four compositions for cello and<br />

piano written by female composers<br />

from the first part of the 20th<br />

century.<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 59


albums/a-lionel-tertis-celebration)<br />

Stirring performances of two major works by Tertis students<br />

bookend the recital, York Bowen’s Viola Sonata No.1 in C Minor Op.18<br />

opening CD1 and Rebecca Clarke’s Viola Sonata closing CD2. Sunset<br />

and Hier au Soir are Tertis originals, and there are arrangements by<br />

him of short pieces by Brahms, Schumann, Fauré and Mendelssohn,<br />

as well as by John Ireland and William Wolstenholme.<br />

Other composers represented are Frank Bridge, Eric Coates, Cecil<br />

Forsyth, Vaughan Williams, Bowen and Wolstenholme again, and W.<br />

H. “Billy” Reed of Elgar violin concerto fame, whose lovely Rhapsody<br />

opens CD2. Two Kreisler works close CD1: Ridout’s own arrangement<br />

of Liebeslied; and a stunning performance of Alan Arnold’s arrangement<br />

of the Praeludium and Allegro.<br />

That same tumultuous period is central to<br />

Upheaval, with cellist Janne Fredens and<br />

pianist Søren Rastogi presenting compositions<br />

by four female composers active<br />

around the First World War years (OUR<br />

Recordings 6.220683 ourrecordings.com).<br />

The Dutch pianist and composer<br />

Henriëtte Bosmans (1895-1952), whose<br />

career was disrupted by the Nazi occupation<br />

in the1940s and never recovered, is represented by her 1919 Cello<br />

Sonata in A Minor. The reputation of the prolific Croatian composer<br />

Dora Pejačević (1885-1923) continues to grow following the recent<br />

revival of her terrific Symphony in F-sharp Minor. Her 1913 Cello<br />

Sonata in E Minor Op.35 is a striking and substantial late-Romantic<br />

work, showing the clear influence of Brahms and Dvořák.<br />

Two pieces by the Boulanger sisters, Lili’s Nocturne again and<br />

Nadia’s Trois pièces from 1911 complete an excellent disc full of sensitive<br />

and finely judged playing.<br />

William T. Horton’s fantastic image The Path to the Moon was the<br />

inspiration for the new album from cellist Laura van der Heijden<br />

three unstoppable women<br />

who also composed<br />

#trailblazingwomen #violasonatas<br />

#queercomposers<br />

www.acisproductions.com<br />

and pianist Jâms Coleman, their CD Path<br />

to the Moon including music relating to<br />

the moon and the night, as well as works<br />

evoking mankind’s striving for new heights<br />

(Chandos CHAN 20274 chandos.net/<br />

products/catalogue/CHAN%2020274).<br />

It’s an eclectic program anchored by<br />

three 20th-century sonatas: the 1957 Cello<br />

Sonata by the American George Walker;<br />

Britten’s Sonata Op.65 and Debussy’s 1915<br />

Cello Sonata.<br />

Fittingly, given the singing nature of van der Heijden’s playing,<br />

virtually all of the transcriptions are of vocal music: Korngold’s<br />

Schönste Nacht; Lili Boulanger’s Reflets; Florence Price’s Night;<br />

Britten’s Sonetto XXX; Debussy’s Beau soir; Fauré’s Clair de lune;<br />

Takemitsu’s Will Tomorrow, I Wonder, Be Cloudy or Clear?; and Nina<br />

Simone’s take on Jonathan King’s Everyone’s Gone to the Moon.<br />

Debussy’s Clair de lune ends a lovely disc.<br />

The South Korean double-bassist Mikyung<br />

Sung is the remarkable soloist on The<br />

Colburn Sessions, a brilliant two-disc set<br />

where she is ably supported by pianist<br />

Jaemin Shin, the two having worked<br />

together in the Artist Diploma course<br />

at the Colburn School in Los Angeles in<br />

2017 (Modus Vivendi Media MVM 2301<br />

mikyungbass.bandcamp.com/album/<br />

the-colburn-sessions).<br />

Bottesini’s Tarantella is a dazzling opening track, Sung displaying<br />

stunning facility and clarity. The same composer’s Capriccio di<br />

Bravura and the more lyrical Elegy No.1 are followed by a transcription<br />

of the Meditation from Massenet’s Thaïs. Hindemith’s Sonata for<br />

Double Bass and Piano and the impressive 1967 Sonata for Double<br />

Bass and Piano by Hungarian composer Vilmos Montag (1908-91)<br />

end disc 1.<br />

The second CD is even more impressive, with the Andante from<br />

Rachmaninoff’s Cello Sonata Op.19 sandwiched between two<br />

outstanding sonatas: Mendelssohn’s Cello Sonata No.2 Op.58 with an<br />

astonishing final movement that takes your breath away, and Franck’s<br />

Violin Sonata in A Major in the composer-endorsed transcription for<br />

cello by Jules Delsart, Sung playing direct from the cello part – which<br />

she presumably also does with the Mendelssohn.<br />

Superb playing from both performers is beautifully captured in<br />

single continuous takes live to stereo. Complete performances of the<br />

Hindemith, Mendelssohn and Franck sonatas can be viewed on Sung’s<br />

website, mikyungbass.com.<br />

Wanchi Huang is the violinist on Imagining<br />

Worlds – Music for Solo Violin, a CD that<br />

features new music by composers described<br />

as compelling voices in contemporary<br />

American music (Navona Records NV6592<br />

navonarecords.com/catalog/nv6592).<br />

The recital comprises Adolphus<br />

Hailstork’s rather bland Suite for Solo<br />

Violin, Judith Shatin’s somewhat oppressive<br />

For the Fallen – for Amplified Violin<br />

and Electronics, Meira Warshauer’s Jewish-influenced In Memoriam<br />

and Brach (Blessing), and Jeffrey Mumford’s an expanding distance<br />

of multiple voices, the five movements totaling only 11 minutes. John<br />

Corigliano’s Red Violin Caprices completes the disc.<br />

There’s interesting writing on display here, but only the Corigliano<br />

really leaps out and separates itself from the crowd; it certainly brings<br />

by far the best playing from Huang.<br />

The music of a Brazilian composer who lived from 1943 to<br />

2010 is explored on José Antônio de Almeida Prado Works for<br />

Violin and Cello, a new addition to The Music of Brazil series<br />

featuring violinist Emmanuele Baldini and cellist Rafael Cesario<br />

60 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


(Naxos 8.574459 naxos.com/Search/<br />

KeywordSearchResults/?q=Almeida%20<br />

Prado%20-%20Works%20for%20Violin%20<br />

and%20Cello).<br />

Only two works – Le livre magique de<br />

Xangô from 1985 and Das Cirandas from<br />

1999 – are duets. The 2004 Praeambulum<br />

for solo cello was commissioned as an<br />

intro to Bach’s Cello Suite No.3 in C Major<br />

BWV1009, while The Four Seasons for solo<br />

violin was written for a young performers’ national competition in<br />

1984, each brief movement a study in various violin techniques.<br />

The lyrical and extremely brief – under two minutes – Capriccio für<br />

Constança und Ana Luiza from 1998 and the Solo Violin Sonata from<br />

2000, dedicated to his daughter, one of Brazil’s leading violinists and<br />

the most substantial work on the CD, end a recital of solid performances<br />

but with few real musical high points.<br />

The Trio con Brio Copenhagen, which<br />

celebrates its 25th anniversary this year<br />

performs piano trios by Mieczyslaw<br />

Weinberg and Franz Schubert on The<br />

Passenger, a CD that surveys two young<br />

composers whose compositions offer<br />

poignant reflections on life, mortality<br />

and ethereal beauty (Orchid Classics<br />

ORC100282 orchidclassics.com).<br />

Weinberg was a Polish Jew who fled<br />

Warsaw when the Nazis invaded. His Piano Trio Op.24 was written<br />

in Moscow in 1945 when he was 25; characterized by unrest and<br />

despair, it occupies much the same sound world as that of his friend<br />

Shostakovich. The finale features a waltz that foreshadows his opera<br />

The Passenger, where a waltz links the evil of a concentration camp to<br />

an uncertain future.<br />

Written in 1827, just a year before his early death, Schubert’s Piano<br />

Trio No.2 in E-flat Major Op.100 grew from Schubert’s encounter with<br />

the Swedish song Se solen sjunker, which describes the sinking sun<br />

and all hope being chased away by night’s shadows. The funeral march<br />

of the second movement, based on the song, is the emotional centre of<br />

the work.<br />

The Weinberg work is also heard on Piano<br />

Trios of Weinberg, Auerbach & Dvořák,<br />

a top-notch debut CD by Trio Zimbalist<br />

intended as “a heartfelt response to the<br />

enduring human struggle unfolding around<br />

the world” (Curtis Studio curtis.edu/<br />

curtis-studio).<br />

The album is cast in the spirit of the<br />

What we're listening to this month:<br />

Dumka, a Ukrainian term meaning “thought.” In music, Dumky<br />

were sung by traveling minstrels, and often expressed the laments of<br />

oppressed people. It was this form that Dvořák used as the basis for<br />

his Piano Trio No.4 in E Minor Op.90, “Dumky”, an extensive sixmovement<br />

work that closes the disc.<br />

We have already noted the circumstances surrounding the composition<br />

of the Weinberg trio. Lera Auerbach’s quite brief but striking<br />

three-movement Piano Trio No.1 Op.28 with its impassioned middle<br />

Andante lamentoso movement and eerie and aggressive finale, was<br />

written following her defection from the Soviet Union in 1991. The<br />

Dvořák also fits in here: it is often overlooked that performances of his<br />

works were suppressed in the Czechoslovak Republic for a while<br />

after 1945.<br />

There are two Stravinsky Violin Concerto<br />

CDs this month, one featuring James<br />

Ehnes with the BBC Philharmonic under<br />

Sir Andrew Davis (Chandos CHSA5340<br />

chandos.net/products/catalogue/<br />

CHSA%205340) and the other with Frank<br />

Peter Zimmermann and the Bamberger<br />

Symphoniker under Jakub Hrůša (BIS-2657<br />

prestomusic.com/classical/products/95571<br />

– Igor-stravinsky-bartok-martin).<br />

Written for – and premiered by – Samuel Dushkin in 1932, the<br />

concerto is a four-movement work in Stravinsky’s neo-classical style.<br />

Ehnes is his usual flawless self in a supremely confident performance,<br />

as smooth as ever and with a clear, pure tone, especially in the two<br />

middle Arias. The rest of the Chandos Stravinsky disc is orchestral<br />

music in really fine performances: the Scherzo à la Russe, a showpiece<br />

written for the Paul Whiteman band on the composer’s arrival<br />

in California in the early 1940s; the Suites Nos.1 & 2, arranged from<br />

piano duets from the 1910s; and Apollo Musagète, a ballet in two parts<br />

for strings from 1927-28 that marked a complete rejection of his<br />

previous ballets and a move to pure form.<br />

The Zimmermann disc, on the other<br />

hand, is all violin and orchestra, linking<br />

composers who put down roots in the West<br />

without abandoning their Eastern European<br />

identities. Zimmermann’s Stravinsky<br />

concerto is another outstanding performance,<br />

albeit a fair bit faster than Ehnes: the<br />

Zimmermann timings for the four movements,<br />

which only range from four to six<br />

minutes in length, are a significant 20 to 30<br />

seconds shorter than those of Ehnes. There’s no real sense of a faster<br />

or spikier approach here though, with Ehnes and Davis possibly just<br />

more relaxed in tempo. Dushkin also premiered Bartók’s Rhapsodies<br />

thewholenote.com/listening<br />

The Colburn Sessions<br />

Mikyung Sung<br />

Gorgeously expressive, richly<br />

luminous performances of violin,<br />

cello, and double bass favorites in a<br />

dazzling, virtuosic 2CD album from<br />

Mikyung Sung.<br />

Fire - Flowers<br />

Timothy Shantz<br />

Fire-Flowers brings solace and<br />

comfort to listeners with these<br />

musical works on death and<br />

renewal by Johannes Brahms and<br />

contemporary composer Zachary<br />

Wadsworth<br />

In the Crystalline Vault of Heaven<br />

Margot Rejskind<br />

In The Crystalline Vault of Heaven<br />

captivates their "sublimely<br />

beautiful" music that reflects the<br />

diversity and breadth of choral<br />

music written on the East Coast.<br />

Dall'Abaco and the Art of<br />

Variation<br />

Accademia de' Dissonanti,<br />

Elinor Frey<br />

This new CD explores the art of<br />

variation through world premiere<br />

recordings of two cello trios and<br />

three sonatas.<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 61


Nos.1 & 2, given outstanding performances here, as well as the 1943<br />

New York version with piano of Martinů’s Suite concertante, which<br />

has two versions. The second, heard here, was started in 1938 in Paris<br />

before Martinů left Europe, and completed in New York and orchestrated<br />

in 1945. While still in Paris Martinů apparently wrote three<br />

movements for another version of the suite, one of which – Méditation<br />

– completes a terrific CD.<br />

Eugène Ysaÿe: Rêves features worldpremiere<br />

recordings of two newly discovered<br />

concertos by the Belgian virtuoso<br />

and composer in performances by<br />

Philippe Graffin and the Royal Liverpool<br />

Philharmonic Orchestra under Jean-<br />

Jacques Kantorow (Avie Records AV2650<br />

avie-records.com).<br />

Following the recent discovery of a first<br />

movement of an early Violin Concerto in E<br />

Minor a fully orchestrated second movement and a third movement in<br />

violin and piano score both came to light, the latter being orchestrated<br />

by Ysaÿe expert Xavier Falques to complete the concerto. Composed<br />

in 1884-85 it was apparently intended to establish a new approach<br />

to instrumental technique, which Ysaÿe felt had stagnated since the<br />

works of Vieuxtemps.<br />

It’s not clear why he abandoned the concerto, but in 1893 Ysaÿe<br />

wrote his Poème concertant, a single-movement work imbued with<br />

love for his student Irma Sèthe. Recently discovered in manuscript<br />

form, it was orchestrated by Erika Vega with advice from Falques.<br />

Pianist Marisa Gupta joins Graffin for the 2 Mazurkas de salon<br />

Op.10 and the Rêve d’enfant Op.14 that close a fascinating CD.<br />

There’s a glorious CD of Vaughan Williams<br />

music that would normally be well outside<br />

the limits of this column, but Vaughan<br />

Williams: Retrospect with the London<br />

Choral Sinfonia under Michael Waldron<br />

contains not only some simply beautiful<br />

works for voices and string orchestra<br />

but also a lovely performance of the<br />

Violin Concerto in D Minor – Concerto<br />

Accademico with the always reliable Jack<br />

Liebeck as soloist (Orchid Classics ORC100289 orchidclassics.com).<br />

It’s not a substantial work – only about 16 minutes long – but the<br />

glorious middle movement, which takes up almost half of the work, is<br />

Vaughan Williams at his pastoral best and Liebeck is in his element. As<br />

an added bonus, cellist Thomas Carroll is the lovely soloist in the<br />

world-premiere recording of the composer’s arrangement of Bach’s<br />

Schmücke dich,o liebe Seele.<br />

On ALAS cellist Patrick Langot and violinist<br />

Alexis Cardenas and the Orchestra de<br />

Lutetia under Alejandro Sandler pay<br />

tribute to the Argentinian music so dear to<br />

their hearts by presenting world-premiere<br />

recordings of works by three contemporary<br />

Argentinian composers (Évidence Classics<br />

EVCD108 orchestredelutetia.com/alas).<br />

The title track, the 2021 Alas – fantaisie<br />

for violin, cello and string orchestra by<br />

Gerardo di Giusto (b.1961) is a strong, strident work with malambo<br />

and baguala rhythms, while the atmospheric 2020 Descaminos for<br />

solo cello, string orchestra and percussion by Gabriel Sivak (b.1979)<br />

was inspired by the vast Pampas region. Both works were commissioned<br />

by the orchestra.<br />

The fascinating 1986 Llorando silencios, six Quechua songs for solo<br />

cello by Alejandro Iglesias Rossi (b.1960) evokes ancestral sonorities,<br />

the cello sounding in turn like the traditional instruments the quena,<br />

charango and erke.<br />

The remainder of the CD is given over to the 1953 Variaciones<br />

concertantes Op.23 by Alberto Ginastera, the cello and harp being<br />

joined by various orchestral soloists to develop the thematic material,<br />

with an explosive malambo finale.<br />

In a 1953 essay the Domenico Scarlatti biographer<br />

Ralph Kirkpatrick (who implemented<br />

the K. numbering system) noted<br />

the clear influence of the Spanish guitar on<br />

Scarlatti’s music, and the extent to which<br />

it permeated his keyboard works is beautifully<br />

illustrated on the digital-only release<br />

Scarlatti 12 Sonatas by the two guitarists<br />

Matteo Mela and Lorenzo Micheli (Evidence<br />

EVCD107 soloduo.it).<br />

As Micheli’s booklet notes point out, Scarlatti’s language often<br />

echoes guitar playing, the Hispanic character stemming from timbres,<br />

techniques and stylistic traits derived from the guitar, and the light,<br />

volatile style of writing in the sonatas, most often for two voices is<br />

perfectly suited to the nature of the guitar. The 12 sonatas here are<br />

those numbered K.8, K.24, K.32, K.87, K.99, K.162, K.202, K.386,<br />

K.455, K.466, K.519 and K.531.<br />

Superb transcriptions (uncredited, but by the performers, presumably)<br />

and simply outstanding playing, beautifully recorded, result in a<br />

truly captivating release.<br />

VOCAL<br />

Claudio Monteverdi – Il ritorno d’Ulisse in patria<br />

Soloists; I Gemelli; Emiliano Gonzalez Toro; Mathilde Etienne<br />

Gemelli Factory audiobook (gemelli-factory.com/nos_releases/<br />

il-ritorno-dulisse-in-patria)<br />

! There are as many ways to perform<br />

Claudio Monteverdi’s Il Ritorno d’Ulisse<br />

in Patria as there are performances. The<br />

earliest known score contains just the vocal<br />

parts, the text and the bass line. Even the<br />

instrumental passages indicate nothing<br />

about what instruments are to play. So vital<br />

decisions about basic elements like orchestration<br />

and harmonization must be made.<br />

Terrific recordings have appeared in<br />

recent years – those under Gardiner, Cavina<br />

and Fuget come happily to mind (not to<br />

overlook Harnoncourt’s landmark recording<br />

from 1972). But none for me has matched René Jacobs’ 1992 recording<br />

for momentum and spirit – that is, until this production from I<br />

Gemelli, led by musical director Emiliano Gonzalez Toro and artistic<br />

director Mathilde Etienne (with both performing as singers).<br />

A fine-tuned sense of early Baroque style and an adventurous<br />

sense of theatre have shaped this recording. The cast here is large –<br />

it includes nine tenors! That means remarkably few doublings, so<br />

characters are easily distinguishable. And every performer, whether<br />

singer or instrumentalist, projects the kind of commitment that<br />

gives their time in the spotlight, no matter how brief or extensive,<br />

dramatic impact.<br />

It’s unlikely Monteverdi’s instrumental ensemble for the first<br />

performance in 1640 would have been as large, or as varied.<br />

Historically authentic instruments like the gorgeous triple harp of<br />

Marie-Domitille Murez and the delightful trio of mellifluous cornetts<br />

add colour. But they never swamp the singers, since they are featured<br />

in smaller groups. Instead, they provide vivid counterparts to the<br />

resonant phrases of Giacomo Badoaro’s libretto, a skillful adaption of<br />

the final verses of Homer’s Odyssey.<br />

Monteverdi gives the gods the most florid passages. Emőke Breath as<br />

Minerva ravishes with her lucid elegance. Philippe Jarroussky is an<br />

eloquent Fragilitá Umana (Human Fragility), Juan Sancho an impassioned<br />

Mercurio. Jérôme Varnier’s petulant, vindictive Nettuno captivates<br />

with his rich, agile basso profundo.<br />

62 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Among the mortals, Gonzalez Toro’s Ulisse<br />

is deftly theatrical as he disguises himself<br />

as an old beggar, and affectingly tender as<br />

he pleads with Penelope to recognize him.<br />

Rihaieb Chaib brings highly charged urgency<br />

and a complex range of emotional states to<br />

the role of the faithful Penelope. The exciting<br />

Canadian mezzo-soprano has not been<br />

known for Baroque opera. But that is bound<br />

to change with her powerful performance<br />

here. Right from the opening phrases of her<br />

heart-rending lament, she commands our<br />

empathy. When she does recognize Ulisse<br />

– and they finally sing together – it’s all the<br />

more expressive for the contrast in their<br />

voices. The word “yes” has never sounded<br />

more sensual than in their magnificent duet,<br />

“Yes, my life, yes, my heart, yes!”<br />

I love how Alix Le Saux as Ulisse’s old<br />

nurse Ericleia colours the word “languise”<br />

(languishes). Fulvio Bettini’s virtuosic Iro<br />

delights as he moves from comedy to tragedy.<br />

Zachary Wilder creates a poignant Telemaco,<br />

while Etienne brings playful charm to<br />

Melanto. Her extensive background essays<br />

are bound with the libretto – more than 200<br />

pages in all – with three CDs in an attractive<br />

hardbound case. It’s certainly indicative of<br />

the loving care that has gone into this superb<br />

recording.<br />

Pam Margles<br />

Penitence & Lamentation (Gombert; Byrd;<br />

Tallis; Crecquillon; Ramsey; Muhly; Carver)<br />

Byrd Ensemble; Markdavin Obenza<br />

Scribe Records SRCD12 (byrdensemble.<br />

com/recordings)<br />

! Ten Renaissance<br />

pieces set to religious<br />

texts<br />

expressing, say<br />

the booklet notes,<br />

“guilt and grief”<br />

are movingly<br />

performed by the<br />

Seattle-based Byrd<br />

Ensemble under artistic director Markdavin<br />

Obenza. Four selections are by the a cappella<br />

group’s inspiration, William Byrd. Particularly<br />

affecting are Emendemus in Melius and<br />

Byrd’s elegy for his late friend, Thomas Tallis,<br />

Ye sacred muses. Tallis himself is represented<br />

by two pieces – Absterge Domine and In<br />

jejunio et fletu, the latter darkly solemn, sung<br />

by only one alto, two tenors and two basses.<br />

Nicolas Gombert’s intense Lugebat David<br />

Absalon dramatically sets David’s howling<br />

lament over his rebellious son, while Robert<br />

Ramsey’s How are the mighty fallen effectively<br />

expresses David’s anguish over his<br />

beloved Jonathan. Thomas Crecquillon’s<br />

earnest Pater peccavi presents the Prodigal<br />

Son’s rueful plea to his father. Although only<br />

five to ten singers perform the forementioned<br />

works, the reverberant acoustic creates the<br />

illusion of much larger forces.<br />

American composer Nico Muhly’s Fallings,<br />

especially commissioned for this CD,<br />

involves 12 singers. Set to verses from Isaiah<br />

describing the destruction of Solomon’s<br />

temple, the music is often tumultuous and<br />

discordant, yet not out of place among the<br />

Renaissance works. Ending the CD, 19 singers<br />

– 14 of them tenors and basses – join in the<br />

longest selection, Robert Carver’s grandiloquent,<br />

12-minute O bone Jesu. The maleheavy<br />

sonorities add depth and richness to<br />

this cry for mercy – “O good Jesus, let not<br />

my sin destroy me.” Texts and translations<br />

are included.<br />

Michael Schulman<br />

Wagner – Dei Meistersinger von Nurnberg<br />

Soloists; Orchestra and Chorus of the<br />

Deutsche Oper Berlin; John Flore<br />

Naxos DVD 2.110766-67 (naxos.com/Catalo<br />

gueDetail/?id=2.110766-67)<br />

! Deutsche Oper has always been famous<br />

for thought-provoking, even iconoclastic,<br />

productions so this latest incarnation of<br />

Wagner’s lengthy masterpiece comes to us<br />

certainly as very different from anything<br />

I’ve ever seen<br />

before. The scene<br />

is a Conservatory<br />

with the Masters<br />

as professors, the<br />

Apprentices as<br />

students, all in a<br />

modern setting. The<br />

school is owned by<br />

the wealthy Veit<br />

Pogner (Albert<br />

Posendorfer, bass)<br />

who intends to turn<br />

it over to the public by organizing a singing<br />

contest but stipulating that the winner<br />

must be a Master and should marry his only<br />

daughter Eva (Heidi Stober, soprano). The<br />

contest is held on Midsummer Day and there<br />

are numerous complications, but we all know<br />

the story. In this provocative staging the<br />

music and the text remain unchanged; there<br />

is constant action, and the show is entertaining<br />

throughout. But the question remains<br />

for someone who has never seen/heard<br />

this opera before should I recommend this<br />

production rather than an opulent, glorious<br />

traditional one such as I grew up with?<br />

The directorial team has decided to “remove<br />

the deadweight of previous productions to<br />

get closer to the opera itself” which is all<br />

about music, the composition and delivery of<br />

music. This translates itself into composing a<br />

master song and it all comes together beautifully<br />

in the wonderful third act. The master<br />

song is composed by Walther von Stolzing,<br />

the tenor lead (beautifully sung by the latest<br />

German heldentenor sensation, Klaus Florian<br />

Vogt, who aspires to be a Master and is in<br />

love with Eva. The elderly Hans Sachs (Johan<br />

Reuter, baritone), a Master and the real hero<br />

of the opera, is also in love with Eva but<br />

having to give her up, realizes Walther’s song<br />

is, although different, truly beautiful. He<br />

magnanimously offers advice to improve the<br />

song according to the established rules. The<br />

master song is then baptized (on St. John’s<br />

day) by the glorious quintet Selig wie die<br />

What we're listening to this month:<br />

thewholenote.com/listening<br />

Schubert:<br />

The Complete Impromptus<br />

Gerardo Teissonnière<br />

The acclaimed pianist's second<br />

album for the Steinway & Sons<br />

label brings new and authoritative<br />

interpretations to these beloved<br />

complete impromptus.<br />

Album Leaf: Piano Works<br />

by Felix Mendelssohn<br />

Sophia Agranovich<br />

Ranging from poetic intimacy<br />

and serenity to tragedy and<br />

overwhelming drama, sublime<br />

emotions awakened by<br />

masterpieces on this album stir<br />

the depths of soul<br />

Rachmaninoff<br />

Ian Gindes<br />

Pianist Ian Gindes presents a<br />

captivating elucidation of Sergei<br />

Rachmaninoff’s solo piano works<br />

on RACHMANINOFF, a new album<br />

of discerning artistry!<br />

American Spiritual<br />

Michael Lee<br />

Intersect European Art Music and<br />

American spirituals, featuring<br />

works by Florence Price, Margaret<br />

Bonds, and Robert Nathaniel Dett,<br />

sharing powerful stories of Black<br />

Americans.<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 63


Sonne, with all five principals, and later<br />

Walther wins the contest and Eva’s hand. A<br />

happy ending, indeed.<br />

Deutsche Oper’s giant orchestra pit<br />

much resembles the one at the Bayreuth<br />

Festspielhaus and the large orchestra is led<br />

by John Fiore, an internationally famous<br />

American conductor from Seattle. He is much<br />

praised by the world’s opera houses as a<br />

respected leader with unusual musical sensitivity.<br />

The show was enthusiastically received.<br />

What more can we ask ?<br />

Janos Gardonyi<br />

Fire-Flowers<br />

Luminous Voices; Timothy Shantz<br />

Leaf Music LM275b (leaf-music.ca)<br />

! The Calgarybased<br />

choir<br />

Luminous Voices,<br />

directed by<br />

Timothy Shantz,<br />

is a diverse and<br />

prolific ensemble,<br />

performing<br />

and recording a<br />

range of repertoire<br />

with consistently excellent results.<br />

In 2023 they released Ispiciwin, with music<br />

by Indigenous composers Andrew Balfour,<br />

Sherryl Sewepagaham and Walter MacDonald<br />

White Bear, which is followed now by Fire-<br />

Flowers, featuring Johannes Brahms’ stunning<br />

Requiem.<br />

Originally written for chorus and orchestra,<br />

this performance uses Brahms’ own alternative<br />

version of the full seven-movement work,<br />

performed with piano duet accompaniment,<br />

which gives this rich and robust composition<br />

an introverted and subdued atmosphere.<br />

It also makes the choir’s task much more<br />

challenging, as the warm (and rather more<br />

forgiving) tones of strings and woodwinds are<br />

replaced by the percussive keys and hammers<br />

of the piano. Any indiscretion in pitch or<br />

rhythm would be immediately apparent, and<br />

the lack of asynchronicity is a testament to<br />

Luminous Voices’ collective talent.<br />

In addition to these general hazards, there<br />

are a few notably challenging moments in<br />

Brahms’ Requiem that serve as a barometer<br />

of an ensemble’s skill, including the “Herr, du<br />

bist würdig” fugue at the end of movement<br />

VI. Rather than being in peril, the choir gives<br />

a masterclass in phrasing and fugal execution,<br />

turning potential danger into five minutes of<br />

sonic bliss.<br />

While Brahms is the centrepiece of this<br />

recording, it is bookended by two works by<br />

Zachary Wadsworth, including his dramatic<br />

Battle-Flags with text by Walt Whitman, and<br />

Fire-Flowers, based on an excerpt from Emily<br />

Pauline Johnson’s Flint and Feather. Both<br />

pieces are extraordinarily compelling reflections<br />

on life, loss and hope, and this recording<br />

is highly recommended as what will undoubtedly<br />

be one of the best choral discs of this year.<br />

Matthew Whitfield<br />

In the Crystalline Vault of Heaven<br />

Luminos Ensemble; Dr. Margot Rejskind<br />

Leaf Music LM<strong>29</strong>0 (luminosensemble.com)<br />

! Writing about<br />

second-wave<br />

feminism in 1970,<br />

Carol Hanisch either<br />

created or popularized<br />

the phrase<br />

“the personal is<br />

political.” Since<br />

that time, the<br />

aphorism has expanded in both meaning and<br />

application to point out the shared synergies<br />

and interactions that exist between political<br />

and personal issues. In many ways, the<br />

arts, such as music, have become a lightning<br />

rod for these kinds of conversations. Music<br />

makers in <strong>2024</strong>, whether they like it or not,<br />

are making choices often read as political<br />

simply by the repertoire they choose, venues<br />

at which they perform and the ensemble<br />

company they keep.<br />

The Luminos Ensemble, a terrific<br />

Charlottetown-based choir of 16 East Coast<br />

voices that was formed in 2017 by artistic<br />

Director Dr. Margot Rejskind, seems acutely<br />

aware of this fact. In fact, articulated on their<br />

website is a mission statement and an expansion<br />

of values that suggests that a kind of<br />

Canadian East Coast social justice (albeit one<br />

that is married to beautiful choral voices)<br />

is their very raison d’être. Living the stated<br />

value that PEI voices “deserve to be promoted<br />

and supported,” the ensemble has released a<br />

fine new recording, In the Crystalline Vault<br />

of Heaven that features several tremendous<br />

Atlantic Canadian compositional talents<br />

deserving of wider recognition. While the<br />

title track by Nova Scotia composer Derek<br />

Charke is moving indeed, the work of Prince<br />

Edward Island composers David Buley and<br />

EKR Hammell, who contribute meaningfully<br />

to this recommended recording, was particularly<br />

captivating.<br />

Andrew Scott<br />

Arvo Pärt – Odes of Repentance<br />

Cappella Romana; Alexander Lingas<br />

Cappella Records CR428 (cappellarecords.<br />

com)<br />

! Esteemed senior<br />

Estonian composer<br />

Arvo Pärt’s current<br />

idiomatic musical<br />

style is rooted in<br />

Gregorian chant<br />

and later European<br />

polyphonic liturgical<br />

music, yet<br />

his early career compositional language<br />

embraced 20th century serialism and then<br />

minimalism. In addition, his use of Christian<br />

liturgical texts triggered censure from Soviet<br />

cultural authorities in the 1960s, leading to<br />

a personal reckoning. After years of personal<br />

renunciation, Pärt emerged in the 1970s<br />

with a new compositional style he dubbed<br />

“tintinnabula.”<br />

In an unexpected twist of history, his often<br />

austere, meditative, faith-based music has<br />

found a wide audience in the decades since.<br />

He’s frequently ranked among the world’s<br />

most performed composers, particularly of<br />

choral music. And that’s what we hear on<br />

the Odes of Repentance album: a prayerful<br />

suite of choral works over 12 tracks. The selections<br />

were compiled by Alexander Lingas<br />

the music director of Portland Oregon’s<br />

Cappella Romana, a professional mixed choir<br />

known for its rigorous historically-informed<br />

performances of Orthodox church music.<br />

For example, Cappella Romana hired an Old<br />

Church Slavonic coach to aid in pronouncing<br />

that language for these performances.<br />

Cappella Romana is an ideal match for<br />

Pärt’s sacred music. For example, The Woman<br />

with the Alabaster Box is a Gospel reading;<br />

there are also Orthodox hymns, heartfelt<br />

prayers and psalmody, all capped by Prayer<br />

after the Kanon. The album feels like a timeless<br />

liturgical service, the elegant leanness of<br />

its musical language kept in aesthetic tension<br />

and given additional meaning by the ritual<br />

lyrics and frequent short pauses for silent<br />

reflection.<br />

Andrew Timar<br />

CLASSICAL AND BEYOND<br />

Dall’Abaco and the Art of Variation<br />

Elinor Frey; Accademia De’Dissonanti<br />

Passacaille 1141 (passacaille.be)<br />

! While the term<br />

“supergroup” is<br />

usually applied<br />

to bands like The<br />

Traveling Wilburys<br />

and Temple of the<br />

Dog, the term also<br />

suits the Accademia<br />

de’ Dissonanti,<br />

composed of members who are each gifted<br />

performers in their own right and come<br />

together to make consistently stunning<br />

recordings.<br />

This disc features music by Giuseppe<br />

Clemente Dall’Abaco (1710-1805), and is the<br />

premiere recording of his two cello trios and<br />

three cello sonatas. If the name is unfamiliar,<br />

that is because Dall’Abaco’s compositions<br />

are relatively new to modern audiences:<br />

The musical output of this cellist-composer<br />

has only emerged in recent decades, and its<br />

craftsmanship and charm have won over both<br />

performers and listeners alike.<br />

Born in Brussels, Dall’Abaco spent the<br />

majority of his childhood at the Bavarian<br />

court in Munich, where his father, composer<br />

Evaristo Felice Dall’Abaco, was employed as<br />

Kapellmeister. Throughout the 1730s and<br />

1740s, the cellist’s reputation grew as he<br />

began to travel and perform in important<br />

European cities such as London, York, Paris<br />

64 | <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


and Vienna, eventually becoming renowned<br />

as Europe’s most gifted cellist.<br />

Featuring the equally gifted (and very much<br />

alive) cellists Octavie Dostaler-Lalonde, Elinor<br />

Frey and Eva Lymenstull, as well as harpsichordist<br />

Federica Bianchi and theorbist<br />

Michele Pasotti, each work on this recording<br />

is a delight to listen to. The cello trios are rich<br />

and complex, with intertwining melodic<br />

lines and timbral blends that create fascinating<br />

polyphonic effects. The cello sonatas,<br />

with variations composed by Elinor Frey, are<br />

grin-inducing in their joviality, but never<br />

superficial.<br />

This recording is a revelatory introduction<br />

to one of history’s “newest” composers, and<br />

a welcome return to the masterful musicians<br />

that make up early music’s own supergroup,<br />

the Accademia de’ Dissonanti.<br />

Matthew Whitfield<br />

Concert Note: Elinor Frey performs <strong>April</strong> 6 &<br />

7 for Friends of Music at St. Thomas' Toronto<br />

(Bach Cello Suites); <strong>May</strong> 4 Frey is guest leader<br />

and soloist with London Sinfonia, London<br />

Fantasia<br />

Igor Levit<br />

Sony 19658811642 (igor-levit.com)<br />

! Notated improvisatory<br />

style has<br />

been a facet of<br />

western music<br />

as far back as<br />

the Renaissance<br />

and this two-disc<br />

Sony recording<br />

simply titled<br />

Fantasia featuring pianist Igor Levit in an<br />

attractive exploration of piano repertoire<br />

following this principle spanning a 300-year<br />

period. The Russian-born soloist began his<br />

musical studies at the Salzburg Mozarteum<br />

and in 2005, was the winner of the Arthur<br />

Rubinstein International Piano Master<br />

Competition in Tel Aviv.<br />

An arrangement of the Air from Bach’s<br />

Orchestral Suite No.3 may seem an unusual<br />

opening for a recording of music focusing<br />

on extemporization, but Levit’s interpretation<br />

is refined and understated. In contrast<br />

is the renowned Chromatic Fantasy and<br />

Fugue BWV903, very much a bravura piece<br />

of formidable invention. Levit delivers a<br />

compelling and well-balanced performance,<br />

his phrasing always clearly articulated. Even<br />

more challenging is the Piano Sonata in B<br />

Minor by Liszt, a composition of herculean<br />

difficulties. Levit is seemingly unfazed by the<br />

technical challenges and easily fashions the<br />

ever-contrasting moods into a cohesive whole.<br />

Disc two opens with Berg’s angular and<br />

at times unsetting Piano Sonata Op.1, a<br />

fine example of his early style. Nevertheless,<br />

the magnum opus of the disc and the<br />

set itself is Busoni’s 34-minute Fantasia<br />

Contrappuntistica. The piece is truly substantial<br />

in scope and borrows from several<br />

musical styles involving a subdued and introspective<br />

opening, a complex Bach-like fugue<br />

followed by a dramatic section with dissonant<br />

chordal progressions leading to an unexpectedly<br />

quiet conclusion. Kudos to Levit for tackling<br />

this oddity and making the most of it.<br />

The inclusion of shorter pieces such as<br />

Liszt’s Der Doppelganger and Busoni’s<br />

Nuit de Noel further contribute to a wellbalanced<br />

program.<br />

Richard Haskell<br />

Beethoven – Hammerklavier Sonata;<br />

Stockhausen – Klavierstück X<br />

Marc Ponthus<br />

Bridge Records 9584 (bridgerecords.com)<br />

! The French<br />

pianist Marc<br />

Ponthus is a fascinating<br />

individual,<br />

devoting much of<br />

his career to the<br />

performance of<br />

the 20th century’s<br />

most demanding<br />

avant-garde music. Known for presenting<br />

monographic recitals in which only compositions<br />

by Stockhausen, Boulez or Xenakis<br />

are performed, Ponthus has carved a unique<br />

niche for himself in a pianistic world<br />

overrun by repeated presentations of Mozart,<br />

Schumann and Chopin.<br />

Not that there’s anything wrong with<br />

canonic repertoire, of course, and Ponthus<br />

demonstrates this first-hand with his latest<br />

recording, putting Beethoven’s monolithic<br />

“Hammerklavier” Sonata on the<br />

same program as Stockhausen’s landmark<br />

Klavierstück X. Aside from the fact that both<br />

works are performed on the same instrument,<br />

these pieces – composed nearly 150 years<br />

apart – are decidedly different: one is the<br />

pinnacle of classical sonata form, while the<br />

other is a masterwork of contemporary piano<br />

literature, an eruption of ordered disorder.<br />

Ponthus’ performance of Klavierstück X<br />

is thrilling, his control of this physically and<br />

intellectually demanding score immediately<br />

apparent. (There are so many glissandi<br />

that the pianist is required to wear gloves<br />

with the fingers cut off.) Although the first<br />

impression of this music may be of chaos,<br />

every component of this music is highly<br />

prescribed and structured, and Ponthus<br />

wrestles Stockhausen’s complex ideas into a<br />

profoundly convincing performance.<br />

If the “Hammerklavier” receives a shorter<br />

mention here, it is only because of its status<br />

as one of Beethoven’s most renowned and<br />

striking piano works. Ponthus approaches<br />

this music like a chameleon, and it is difficult<br />

to believe that this is the same person<br />

who was tackling Klavierstück X only a<br />

few moments prior. The rhythmic vitality of<br />

Beethoven’s writing is brought to the forefront<br />

here, and this performance is full of<br />

vigour and bravado, while never becoming a<br />

caricature of itself.<br />

Matthew Whitfield<br />

What we're listening to this month:<br />

thewholenote.com/listening<br />

Messiaen: Turangalîla-Symphony<br />

Toronto Symphony Orchestra,<br />

Gustavo Gimeno, Marc-André<br />

Hamelin, Nathalie Forget<br />

Quite possibly the most unique<br />

musical experience you’ll ever<br />

have — Gustavo Gimeno leads a<br />

21st-century TSO in this all-new,<br />

epic recording.<br />

Recurrence<br />

Saman Shahi<br />

In these five new Canadian<br />

compositions, Recurrence explores<br />

repetition that ripples through<br />

physics, psychology, philosophy,<br />

and economics, evoking curiosity,<br />

perplexity, and awe.<br />

Night And Day<br />

(The Cole Porter Songbook)<br />

Adi Braun<br />

Adi Braun’s love affair with Cole<br />

Porter’s music runs long and deep<br />

- “his music is delicious, naughty,<br />

provocative, sensuous, witty and<br />

devastatingly beautiful”.<br />

Tide Rises<br />

Lauren Bush<br />

The new contemporary vocal jazz<br />

album from Canadian, British-based<br />

vocalist featuring arrangements<br />

of popular standards and brand<br />

new originals. “Highly, unreservedly<br />

recommended." Jazz Views<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>April</strong> & <strong>May</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 65


Schubert – The Complete Impromptus<br />

Gerardo Teissonnière<br />

Steinway & Sons 30220 (steinway.com/<br />

music-and-artists/label/Schubert-thecomplete-impromptus-gerardoteissonnière)<br />

! Impromptu<br />

means “improvised,”<br />

a genre<br />

popular in<br />

19th-century salons.<br />

It seems to be easily<br />

dashed off in one<br />

sitting although<br />

it’s hard to believe<br />

this, given their melodic richness, level of<br />

invention and perfection of form. Schubert’s<br />

eight pieces are part of the curriculum for<br />

any aspiring piano student about grade<br />

eight and up and I tried my hand on at least<br />

three of them. My greatest accomplishment<br />

was Op.90 No.4 in A-flat Major, with those<br />

gorgeous cascades rippling down like water<br />

with a wonderful melody emerging in the left<br />

hand and a passionate Trio I loved playing.<br />

But I must admit that the difference between<br />

amateur and professional pianists being<br />

immeasurable (Somerset Maugham), so this<br />

new issue of The Complete Impromptus, all<br />

eight of them, under two opus numbers (90<br />

& 142) by a pianist critics regard as an artist of<br />

“extraordinary musicianship and rare sensibility,”<br />

Puerto Rican-born American Gerardo<br />

Teissonnière, is most welcome. In fact, the<br />

pianist is having a remarkable career on two<br />

continents, recipient of many awards; this<br />

recording is his second one on the prestigious<br />

Steinway & Sons label.<br />

Some of my favourites are the popular,<br />

very impressive No.2 Op.90 in E-flat Major,<br />

perpetuum mobile-like, light hearted and fast<br />

with an exquisite contrasting Impromptu.<br />

No.3, Op.90 in G-flat Major (with 6 flats) is<br />

relaxed and introspective with a harp-like<br />

mid-register in the right hand that reminds<br />

me of Schubert›s ever-present obsession<br />

with water and a fearsome undercurrent in<br />

the left hand bass.<br />

I loved the most the ambitious Impromptu<br />

No.1 Op.90 in C Minor, with its notable key<br />

change into major in the Trio that›s absolute<br />

heaven, like a dreamy dialogue of questions<br />

and answers. No.3 in B-flat Major Op.142 is<br />

a set of lovely variations on a simple theme<br />

from Rosamunde where the level of invention<br />

is amazing. The final piece is No.4 Op.142<br />

in F Minor, a wild rondo that sums up this set<br />

that gave me a lot of enjoyment in these bleak<br />

winter days.<br />

Janos Gardonyi<br />

Robert Schumann – Piano Works<br />

Llŷr Williams<br />

Signum Classics SIGCD756<br />