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Volume 29 Issue 6 | June, July & August 2024

Gloria Blizzard and Jesse Ryan talk on saving calypso; fiftieth anniversary reprise of the Frog Bog sound walk (bet no-one's said that before!); Gregory Oh on the necessity of failure and curatorial choices that break down barriers; fanfares for an uncommon man at the RCM; and festivals galore in our 20th annual summer green pages; plus a summer's worth of music in our listening room. All this and more!

Gloria Blizzard and Jesse Ryan talk on saving calypso; fiftieth anniversary reprise of the Frog Bog sound walk (bet no-one's said that before!); Gregory Oh on the necessity of failure and curatorial choices that break down barriers; fanfares for an uncommon man at the RCM; and festivals galore in our 20th annual summer green pages; plus a summer's worth of music in our listening room. All this and more!

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VOLUME <strong>29</strong> NO 6<br />

JUNE, JULY & AUGUST <strong>2024</strong><br />

MUSIC! LISTINGS<br />

live and livestreamed<br />

STORIES<br />

profiles, previews<br />

and interviews<br />

RECORD REVIEWS<br />

and Listening Room<br />

THE GREEN PAGES<br />

20th Annual Summer<br />

Music Guide<br />

Gregory Oh


KINDRED SPIRITS ORCHESTRA<br />

Krissan Alexander | Music Director<br />

16 th<br />

season<br />

<strong>2024</strong>-2025<br />

Kristian Alexander<br />

Winona Zelenka<br />

Annalee Patipatanakoon<br />

James Parker<br />

Roman Borys<br />

DANCES AND DREAMS<br />

Saturday, October 19, <strong>2024</strong> at 8 p.m.<br />

Flato Markham Theatre<br />

Tchaikovsky, The Sleeping Beauty suite<br />

Dvořák, Cello concerto<br />

Winona Zelenka | cello<br />

Lalo, Symphony in G minor<br />

_____________________________________________<br />

IMPRESSIONS OF THE SEA<br />

Saturday, December 7, <strong>2024</strong> at 8 p.m.<br />

Flato Markham Theatre<br />

Tchaikovsky, The Nutcracker suite<br />

Saint-Saëns, Piano concerto No. 5<br />

Vanessa Yu | piano<br />

Debussy, La mer<br />

_____________________________________________<br />

KALEIDOSCOPIC SENTIMENTS<br />

Saturday, February 8, 2025 at 8 p.m.<br />

Flato Markham Theatre<br />

Ravel, Valses nobles et sennmentales<br />

Gershwin, Rhapsody in blue<br />

Michael Berkovsky | piano<br />

Scriabin, The Poem of ecstasy<br />

_____________________________________________<br />

A NIGHT AT THE OPERA<br />

Saturday, March 8, 2025 at 8 p.m.<br />

Lorem Ipsum<br />

Meridian Arts Centre - George Weston Recital Hall<br />

Bizet, Carmen suite No. 2<br />

Bartók, Violin concerto No. 1<br />

Heng-Han Hou | violin<br />

Bruckner, Symphony No. 6<br />

_____________________________________________<br />

GODS AND GRIFFONS<br />

Saturday, March <strong>29</strong>, 2025 at 8 p.m.<br />

Cornell Recital Hall<br />

Kulesha, Concerto for piano trio and strings<br />

(world première) | Gryphon Trio<br />

Stravinsky, Apollon musagète<br />

_____________________________________________<br />

POEMS AND PORTRAITS<br />

Saturday, May 10, 2025 at 8 p.m.<br />

Meridian Arts Centre - George Weston Recital Hall<br />

Debussy, Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune<br />

Bartók, Piano concerto No. 1<br />

Dmitri Levkovich | piano<br />

Shostakovich, Symphony No. 7<br />

________________________________________<br />

VERDI’S REQUIEM<br />

Saturday, <strong>June</strong> 21, 2025 at 8 p.m.<br />

Meridian Arts Centre - George Weston Recital Hall<br />

Verdi, Messa da requiem<br />

Orpheus choir, Resound choir, soloists<br />

Michael Berkovsky<br />

Heng-Han Hou<br />

Vanessa Yu<br />

Dmitri Levkovich<br />

Daniel Vnukowski<br />

905.305.7469<br />

FlatoMarkhamTheatre.ca<br />

416.366.7723<br />

TicketMaster.ca<br />

905.604.8339<br />

KSOrchestra.ca


An agency of the Government of Ontario<br />

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SAMUEL<br />

MARIÑO


<strong>29</strong>06_Summer24_cover.indd 1<br />

<strong>2024</strong>-05-27 3:09 PM<br />

<strong>Volume</strong> <strong>29</strong> No 6 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong><br />

ON OUR COVER<br />

VOLUME <strong>29</strong> NO 6<br />

JUNE, JULY & AUGUST <strong>2024</strong><br />

MUSIC! LISTINGS<br />

live and livestreamed<br />

STORIES<br />

profiles, previews<br />

and interviews<br />

RECORD REVIEWS<br />

and Listening Room<br />

THE GREEN PAGES<br />

20th Annual Summer<br />

Music Guide<br />

The ideal of classical music is a perfect reproduction, like a<br />

photograph. I’m not sure that serves everybody. I’m not sure<br />

it’s great for the audience, and I know it’s not great for the<br />

artists. If we just allowed people to be imperfect, perhaps<br />

classical music would not only be more interesting but more<br />

welcoming. We’d rather show the audience something new<br />

rather than something they know they like, in a place where<br />

you can be comfortable and be yourself.<br />

The third volume of Histoires de<br />

guitares features 16 historic guitars<br />

from David Jacque’s collection, each<br />

played on a repertoire highlighting<br />

their unique characters<br />

PHOTO: ADAM COISH<br />

Gregory Oh<br />

Adam Coish’s photo of Gregory Oh was taken<br />

in Toronto’s Rush Lane, off Graffiti Alley. See page 18.<br />

8 FOR OPENERS 1 | The Power of<br />

Tens | DAVID PERLMAN<br />

STORIES & INTERVIEWS<br />

10 IN CONVERSATION | Saving<br />

Calypso | GLORIA BLIZZARD<br />

14 PROFILE | Hail and farewell:<br />

the RCM’s Peter Simon |<br />

ANDREW SCOTT<br />

16 SOUND ART | Fifty years of<br />

Frog Bog Soundwalk |<br />

ANDREW TIMAR<br />

18 IN WITH THE NEW | Embracing<br />

failure - in conversation with<br />

Gregory Oh | WENDALYN BARTLEY<br />

<br />

2nd volume of the series, discover<br />

Images retrouvées - a delightful<br />

take on Debussy’s work with new<br />

arrangements for piano and cello,<br />

mixing rare and famous pieces<br />

11<br />

Among the 15 best Canadian<br />

pianists of all time (CBC), David<br />

Jalbert returns with the 2nd volume<br />

of his Prokofiev complete sonatas,<br />

consolidating the success of the<br />

series<br />

ALL ALBUMS ARE AVAILABLE,<br />

DISCOVER THEM NOW<br />

VISIT OUR<br />

WEBSITE<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> | 5


The WholeNote<br />

VOLUME <strong>29</strong> NO 6<br />

SUMMER <strong>2024</strong><br />

EDITORIAL<br />

Publisher/Editor in Chief | David Perlman<br />

publisher@thewholenote.com<br />

Managing Editor | Paul Ennis<br />

editorial@thewholenote.com<br />

Recordings Editor | David Olds<br />

discoveries@thewholenote.com<br />

Listings Editor | John Sharpe<br />

listings@thewholenote.com<br />

SOCIAL MEDIA<br />

Danial Jazaeri, Colin Story<br />

social@thewholenote.com<br />

SALES, MARKETING & MEMBERSHIP<br />

Concert & Event Advertising / Membership | Karen Ages<br />

members@thewholenote.com<br />

Production & Operations | Jack Buell<br />

jack@thewholenote.com<br />

Advertising Art<br />

adart@thewholenote.com<br />

WEBSITE / SYSTEMS<br />

Kevin King<br />

systems@thewholenote.com<br />

CIRCULATION<br />

Sheila McCoy & Chris Malcolm<br />

circulation@thewholenote.com<br />

SUBSCRIPTIONS<br />

subscriptions@thewholenote.com<br />

$48 + HST (6 issues)<br />

single copies and back issues $8<br />

*international - additional postage applies<br />

WholeNote Media Inc.<br />

Centre for Social Innovation<br />

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Phone 416-323-2232 | Fax 416-603-4791<br />

Instagram @the_wholenote<br />

Facebook & Twitter @theWholenote<br />

thewholenote.com<br />

STORIES &<br />

INTERVIEWS<br />

20 MAINLY CLUBS, MOSTLY JAZZ |<br />

Summer time & the definitions<br />

go out the window |<br />

COLIN STORY<br />

22 MUSIC THEATRE | The lighter,<br />

brighter side … and beyond |<br />

JENNIFER PARR<br />

26 CLASSICAL AND BEYOND |<br />

Fellows and mentors: the<br />

warp and the weft |<br />

DAVID PERLMAN<br />

28 CLASSICAL AND BEYOND |<br />

Fellowship and mentoring --<br />

further reflections |<br />

MICHAEL ZARATHUS-COOK<br />

28 EARLY MUSIC | Purcell’s Fairy<br />

Queen | STEPHANIE CONN<br />

31 ROUNDUP | Early, World,<br />

Opera and Choral |<br />

WHOLENOTE STAFF<br />

34 FROM UP HERE | Hi you!<br />

(yes, you) | SOPHIA PERLMAN<br />

35 THE GREEN PAGES |<br />

20th Annual Summer<br />

Music Guide<br />

23<br />

LISTINGS<br />

42 EVENTS BY DATE<br />

Live and/or online<br />

53 MAINLY CLUBS<br />

54 UNDATED EVENTS & ETCETERAS<br />

DISCOVERIES:<br />

RECORDINGS REVIEWED<br />

56 Editor’s Corner | DAVID OLDS<br />

58 Strings Attached | TERRY ROBBINS<br />

61 Vocal<br />

63 Classical and Beyond<br />

66 Modern and Contemporary<br />

71 Jazz and Improvised Music<br />

75 Pot Pourri<br />

76 Something in the Air |<br />

KEN WAXMAN<br />

77 Jazz from the Archives |<br />

STUART BROOMER<br />

78 What we’re listening to<br />

this month<br />

Circulation Statement - March 26, <strong>2024</strong><br />

7000 printed & distributed<br />

Canadian Publication Product<br />

Sales Agreement 1263846<br />

ISSN 14888-8785 WHOLENOTE<br />

Publications Mail Agreement #40026682<br />

WholeNote Media Inc. accepts no responsibility or<br />

liability for claims made for any product or service<br />

reported on or advertised in this issue.<br />

COPYRIGHT © <strong>2024</strong> WHOLENOTE MEDIA INC<br />

WN<br />

WHOLENOTE<br />

MEDIA INC.<br />

6 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Roman Borys,<br />

Artistic & Executive Director<br />

<strong>2024</strong>-25 SEASON<br />

CELEBRATING<br />

CHAMBER MUSIC<br />

STRINGS<br />

Quartetto di Cremona Thursday, October 24, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Miró Quartet Thursday, November 14, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Gryphon Trio with<br />

Lara St. John, violin;<br />

Aviva Chernick, vocalist<br />

Thursday, December 5, <strong>2024</strong><br />

JACK Quartet Thursday, January 30, 2025<br />

Isidore Quartet Thursday, March 27, 2025<br />

PIANO<br />

Marc-André Hamelin Tuesday, November 26, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Rachel Fenlon<br />

soprano & piano<br />

Tuesday, February 11, 2025<br />

Illia Ovcharenko Tuesday, March 4, 2025<br />

Janina Fialkowska Tuesday, March 18, 2025<br />

WHAT MAKES IT GREAT? ®<br />

Rob Kapilow<br />

explores Beethoven A Major<br />

Sonata with Cheng 2 Duo<br />

Rob Kapilow<br />

explores the Beethoven<br />

Archduke Trio with Gryphon Trio<br />

Sunday, November 10, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Sunday, April 13, 2025<br />

Strings and Piano series concerts take place at Jane Mallett Theatre, 7:30 pm (NEW Start time!)<br />

What Makes It Great? ® series concerts take place at George Weston Recital Hall, 3:00 pm<br />

SUBSCRIPTIONS<br />

AVAILABLE AT :<br />

www.music-toronto.com<br />

SAVE UP TO<br />

30%<br />

NAE FUND<br />

Riki Turofsky and<br />

Charles Petersen


The WholeNote<br />

VOLUME <strong>29</strong> NO 6<br />

SUMMER <strong>2024</strong><br />

IN THIS EDITION<br />

STORIES AND INTERVIEWS<br />

Wendalyn Bartley, Gloria Blizzard, Stephanie Conn,<br />

Jennifer Parr, David Perlman, Sophia Perlman,<br />

Andrew Scott, Colin Story, Andrew Timar,<br />

Michael Zarathus-Cook<br />

CD Reviewers<br />

Sophie Bisson, Stuart Broomer, Max Christie,<br />

Daniel Foley, Edwin Gailits, Raul da Gama, Janos<br />

Gardonyi, Richard Haskell, Fraser Jackson, Tiina<br />

Kiik, Kati Kiilaspea, Lesley Mitchell-Clarke, Cheryl<br />

Ockrant, David Olds, Ted Parkinson, Ivana Popovic,<br />

Allan Pulker, Terry Robbins, Michael Schulman,<br />

Andrew Scott, Andrew Timar, Yoshi Maclear Wall,<br />

Ken Waxman, Matthew Whitfield<br />

Proofreading<br />

David Olds, John Sharpe<br />

Listings Team<br />

John Sharpe, Gary Heard, Sophia Perlman,<br />

Colin Story<br />

Design Team<br />

Kevin King, Susan Sinclair<br />

Circulation Team<br />

Dave Bell, John Bentley, Jack Buell, Peter Chisholm,<br />

Jane Dalziel, Bruno Difilippo, Carl Finkle, Vito<br />

Gallucci, James Harris, Bob Jerome, Marianela<br />

Lopez, Miguel Brito-Lopez, Chris Malcolm, Sheila<br />

McCoy, Lorna Nevison, Janet O’Brien, Kathryn<br />

Sabo, Tom Sepp, Angie Todesco<br />

DEADLINES<br />

Weekly Online Listings Updates<br />

6pm every Tuesday for weekend posting<br />

for <strong>Volume</strong> 30 No. 1, SEPTEMBER <strong>2024</strong><br />

Print listings deadline:<br />

6pm Tuesday, <strong>August</strong> 6, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Print advertising, reservation deadline:<br />

6pm Tuesday, <strong>August</strong> 13, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Web advertising can be booked at any time<br />

PUBLICATION DATES<br />

OUR 30th ANNIVERSARY SEASON<br />

will include six print editions:<br />

September <strong>2024</strong> (Aug 27);<br />

October & November (Oct 1);<br />

December & January 2025 (Nov 26);<br />

February & March (Jan 28);<br />

April & May (Apr 1);<br />

Summer (<strong>June</strong> 3)<br />

Printed in Canada<br />

Couto Printing & Publishing Services<br />

an Ontario government agency<br />

un organisme du gouvernement de l’Ontario<br />

FOR OPENERS<br />

The Power<br />

of Tens<br />

Trust me, there’s always a bunch of dickering and bickering that<br />

goes on, mostly behind closed doors, between the purists and the<br />

pragmatists, when an arts organization is teetering on the edge of<br />

a significant anniversary of one kind or another. Do you start the hype<br />

right from the beginning of the season in which the milestone event will<br />

happen? Or do you wait for the exact anniversary date of the thing?<br />

The arithmetic purists will argue till they are purple that to start bragging about your<br />

“hundredth” (for example) right at the beginning of your 100th season is jumping the gun<br />

or worse: “You don’t invite people to come sing happy birthday with you when you are<br />

cutting the placental cord, you sing happy birthday when the first anniversary of cutting<br />

the cord rolls around.”<br />

The pragmatists (usually the ones who have to fill in the grant applications and/or<br />

answer to the organization’s board of directors) will argue that if you wait for the clock<br />

to tick over to the end of the magic 10th or 20th or 30th, etc., you run the risk that by the<br />

actual anniversary date (the completion of the 30th year for example) everyone who is<br />

anyone will be at the cottage by then, and if they can’t afford to get away won’t be be able<br />

to pay big bucks for the thing you are planning either.<br />

My own view? If you intend to use the fact that you’ve hit some magic multiple of ten as<br />

a way of asking the people who love what you do to demonstrate their love in even more<br />

tangible ways, you had better hit the ground running, right from day one!<br />

So, for example, this coming September will mark the start of The WholeNote’s 30th<br />

season of publishing, and we intend to start harping on that fact right from the day we<br />

publish <strong>Issue</strong> No.1 of <strong>Volume</strong> 30 (right around this coming Labour Day). And, yes, you’d<br />

better believe we are going to be asking for your support in ways we never have before.<br />

In return we will promise two things: one, that we will, come hell or high water, stay the<br />

course right up until the end of that anniversary year; and two that we will not succumb<br />

to the ridiculous rhetoric of talking about what we intend to do for our “next thirty years.”<br />

That particular piece of drivel drives me nuts –yea verily it doth set my teeth on edge, my<br />

dear dad would have said.<br />

T'KARONTO<br />

For thousands of years before European settlement, T’karonto (The Meeting Place)<br />

was part of the traditional territory of many Nations, including the Mississaugas<br />

of the Credit River, the Anishinaabe, the Chippewa, the Haudenosaunee, and the<br />

Wendat peoples, and remains their home to this day, as it now is for many diverse First<br />

Nations, Inuit and Metis peoples.<br />

This Meeting Place lies within the territory governed by the Sewatokwa’tshera’t (Dish<br />

with One Spoon) treaty between the Anishinaabe, Mississaugas and Haudenosaunee<br />

– a Treaty which bound them to share the territory and protect the land. Subsequent<br />

Indigenous Nations and Peoples, and all newcomers are invited into this treaty in the<br />

spirit of peace, friendship, respect and reconciliation. We are grateful to live and work<br />

here, helping spread the word about the healing power of music in this place.<br />

8 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Think about it: as a piece of rhetoric it is only convincing in inverse<br />

proportion to the number of years you’ve been around for. I mean,<br />

really think about it. If you spend your organization’s 100th anniversary<br />

year, for example, talking about what you are planning to do with your<br />

“next 100 years,” at rock bottom, to my ears anyway, you sound, more<br />

than anything else, as though you know you’re not going to be around<br />

to keep your promises so you can say anything you damn well like.<br />

Rule of thumb: when you’ve made it through five years you can<br />

definitely get away with talking about your hopes for “the next five.”<br />

If you make it through ten? Talk about the next five unless some angel<br />

has bought you a building in the meanwhile.<br />

PART OF THE TORONTO SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL<br />

So, fair warning, once we hit <strong>August</strong>, in the lead up to the<br />

September formal launch of our 30th anniversary season, we will<br />

start talking about the things we are going to need from you to get<br />

through that anniversary season so that, if it all works out, we can<br />

look ahead to the year or two after that.<br />

All that being said, despite my more-than-slightly jaded view on the<br />

subject, I was struck and moved by the number of significant anniversaries<br />

that I noticed people latching onto in this issue. Andrew<br />

Timar talks about celebrating the 50th anniversary of his first Frog<br />

Bog sound walk. The Blyth Theatre is celebrating its 50th season with<br />

a remount of The Farm Show – the collectively created play that<br />

ushered in a whole generation of Canadian theatre. And rounding out<br />

the trio of 50s, the Toronto Arts Council is celebrating its half century<br />

by curating a day of music and more in David Pecaut Square in partnership<br />

with the Luminato Festival.<br />

(Kudos in passing to Luminato as well. Last summer, they hooked<br />

their wagon to “Walk with Amahl” partnering in organizing parades<br />

with grassroots coalitions across the GTA to welcome Amahl – a<br />

12-foot-tall puppet of a ten-year old Syrian refugee girl who continues<br />

to walk the world. This year they have built on that kind of creative<br />

thinking by the beautifully simple expedient of inviting different<br />

organizations to co-curate each of the days of free events at David<br />

Pecaut Square that are at the heart of the festival.)<br />

Great lives – theme and variations: the power of ten and its<br />

multiples play out slightly differently in the music world when the<br />

anniversaries being commemorated are not to do with the number of<br />

years an organization has survived, but anniversaries of the pantheon<br />

of “greats” whose creative output is the organization’s bread and<br />

butter. In the classical world these anniversaries seem like no-brainers<br />

for thematic exploitation, but the list of those composers who can<br />

sustain a whole festival’s worth, let alone an entire season is, to revert<br />

to a variation on my earlier formula, inversely proportional to the size<br />

of the hall that must be filled.<br />

And the anniversary ship can only come round every so often<br />

without becoming tediously formulaic, especially since anniversaries<br />

of deaths are much less appealing to audiences. Take J.S. Bach<br />

for example: born in 1685, his 350th birthday won’t come around till<br />

2035. And even with the most careful planning, fate can interfere with<br />

the best-laid plans. “Beethoven at 250” rolled around in 2020, and we<br />

all know where the 2020 concert season went.<br />

There are, of course, creative exceptions to the rule: Previous TSO<br />

Music Director, Peter Oundjian initiated “Mozart@249” in 2004/2005,<br />

setting up a kind of cheeky countdown to the main event. And then<br />

followed up after the de rigeur Mozart@250 with Mozart@251 etc. for<br />

a full decade.<br />

So there’s still some mileage in the “great lives” anniversary game,<br />

but not as much, perhaps, as the players of the game might think.<br />

After all the phrase “True history is the lives of great men” was<br />

penned, without much fear of contradiction by Joseph Johnson in<br />

1862. But I’m not sure how many people would have celebrated the<br />

150th anniversary of its writing in 2012.<br />

David Perlman can be reached at publisher@thewholenote.com<br />

JUL 11 - AUG 3<br />

Vadym Kholodenko,<br />

piano<br />

Kerson Leong, violin<br />

with TSM Festival<br />

Orchestra<br />

Jonathan Crow, Artistic Director<br />

Concerts at Koerner Hall<br />

Opening Night!<br />

Georgia Burashko,<br />

soprano in<br />

The Fairy Queen<br />

Canadian Brass<br />

Buy tickets now!<br />

For Full Festival line up visit<br />

TOSUMMERMUSIC.COM<br />

416.408.0208<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> | 9


IN CONVERSATION<br />

SAVING<br />

CALYPSO<br />

BY GLORIA BLIZZARD<br />

“Calypso is the most important music in the world,”<br />

says musician Jesse Ryan of the music originating in the twin island<br />

nation of Trinidad and Tobago. We talk via screens as I interview him<br />

for this article. We are both in Toronto, and share common origins and<br />

ideas. We agree that calypso shares an ancestral musical and cultural<br />

thread with all diasporic cultures that originated in Africa and spread<br />

throughout the world – to Cuba, to the French- and English-speaking<br />

Caribbean and to Brazil – via the chattel slavery system. We both<br />

recognize that calypso as a form, speaks to and about power, culture,<br />

social dynamics and the evolution of a people. Ryan surprises me<br />

however when he says, “Because of its sheer popularity between the<br />

40s and the 70s, it deeply influenced other forms; in the U.S. in the<br />

50s and 60s, it rivalled rock ’n’ roll. Every club had regular calypsothemed<br />

events.”<br />

I said calypso sweeping the place like if she come outta space<br />

My, my calypso sweeping the place like if she come outta space<br />

I can remember rock and roll had the whole place under control<br />

Since calypso leave Trinidad rock and roll really suffering bad<br />

— The Mighty Sparrow, No More Rocking and Rolling (1958)<br />

Jewelled Peacock masquerader Errol Payne, from Toronto's<br />

first Caribana parade in 1967. This year's Toronto Caribbean<br />

Carnival Grand Parade is on Saturday, <strong>August</strong> 3.<br />

Origins<br />

“It is an important political music and culture of music because<br />

it came out of a people who did not have one identity … it became<br />

the expression of the collective identity for people of Trin-Tobago,”<br />

Ryan says. Between the 1400s and 1800s the two islands changed<br />

hands many times as different industries caught Western Europe’s<br />

attention. Initially, the Indigenous Taino population were forced<br />

to dive for pearls and then dig for gold. When European interest<br />

turned toward the more lucrative sugar, the Dutch brought enslaved<br />

Africans to the island and built six sugar factories. The French soon<br />

followed with both free and enslaved people and then the Spanish<br />

arrived. Eventually the British took over. At certain points there were<br />

Indigenous Taino (formerly referred to as Carib), a few Dutch and a<br />

French-speaking majority, all living under Spanish law. The islands<br />

were eventually taken over by the British.<br />

“Calypso comes out of all that. The tyranny of chattel slavery of<br />

Africans kidnapped and brought to the islands to manpower the<br />

industry and colonial rule. That’s the environment that led to the<br />

formation of calypso. In addition, there’s other history that comes<br />

later on with the arrival of the indentured Indian and Chinese<br />

The Mighty Sparrow: No More Rocking and Rolling<br />

Lord Invader: Calypso in New York<br />

Calypso Rose: Calypso Queen<br />

10 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


populations. With calypso, there’s also the South American influence<br />

that came through Venezuela.”<br />

Calypsonians sing under cover of a sobriquet. In the documentary<br />

Calypso Dreams, calypsonian and academic, the Mighty Chalkdust<br />

explains, “Calypso is a poor man’s newspaper, the people’s spokesman,<br />

let de people know what time it is, what going on behind they back.”<br />

However, “it’s not the singer saying, it is the title. Like a colonial judge<br />

in an English wig who give a sentence, makes a proclamation – it is the<br />

wig doing it, not the man.” Mighty Sparrow, Atilla the Hun, Lord Blakie,<br />

Lord Melody and Sir Lancelot can say what an ordinary person cannot.<br />

Music and Identity<br />

Every Sunday, both in Trinidad and here in Canada, in the family<br />

home with my parents and brothers, the house was filled with the<br />

sounds of music – all day. My father had primary access to the record<br />

or compact disc or cassette player – whatever the thing with the<br />

speakers attached at the time. He often played calypso for hours.<br />

I gathered its importance, not just by how much aural space it<br />

took up in the home, but by the fact that my otherwise very busy<br />

father would, with sheer delight, happily explain the lyrics to me. He<br />

would deconstruct the political commentary, the sexual innuendo,<br />

the economic and social and cultural histories and the clever turns<br />

of phrase. He explained the impact of the American military base on<br />

the island in the lyrics of Rum and Coca Cola by Lord Invader (with<br />

melody by Venezuelan composer Lionel Belasco). He explained what<br />

happened when they left in Sparrow’s song Jean and Dinah.<br />

He was always amazed and so proud and would delight at the cleverness<br />

and truths nestled within “Dan is the man in the van,” as Sparrow<br />

sings on the uselessness of colonial education that taught people on the<br />

island nothing of their own history. “It make me a stupidy,” he sang. My<br />

father would grin gleefully at Lord Blakie’s raucous laugh, following a<br />

particularly scandalous insight. He showed me what calypsonian David<br />

Rudder said in the documentary Calypso Dreams, “the laugh fools<br />

people, under the laugh is a blade.” My father’s greatest legacy to me, is<br />

the love and appreciation for this art form.<br />

Women calypsonians joined in later on in this predominantly<br />

male-originated field. Calypso Rose and others eventually gave some<br />

clever, funny, joyful, insights on politics and culture, as well as some<br />

discerning licks back to the men. Traditional calypso has often been a<br />

way through suffering, sometimes cutting, sometimes light, ironic and<br />

gleeful. And yes, sometimes, it’s all fun and games.<br />

“Fire fire in she wire wire, ay yai yai, oi oi oi” sang my little brother,<br />

still a toddler, joyfully one Sunday morning in church. The family was<br />

busy sitting and standing, chanting and then singing as is common in<br />

the Catholic mass. That moment we all stood and at this new opportunity<br />

to sing, he joined in in full voice with this familiar refrain. “Fire<br />

fire in she wire wire,” from the Queen of Calypso herself.<br />

Global dialogues<br />

Britain positioned itself as the mother country for colonial subjects<br />

and then was somewhat surprised when said subjects showed up on<br />

her shores, looking for<br />

new life opportunities.<br />

“London is the place<br />

for me,” sang Lord<br />

Kitchener smiling<br />

for the reporters and<br />

cameras who were<br />

there to meet him as<br />

he disembarked SS<br />

Empire in 1948.<br />

London would go on<br />

to become a centre for<br />

the form. Traditional<br />

calypso as Ryan<br />

prefers to call it, (or ole<br />

time calypso, a Trini<br />

might say), contains<br />

embedded social<br />

Jesse Ryan<br />

commentary, clever<br />

turns of phrase and, amongst the chipping and the intoxicating singalong<br />

melodies and rhythms, sophisticated solos and arrangements. In<br />

London, Lord Kitchener and others, made recordings with some of the<br />

best jazz musicians of the day.<br />

However, even while recording and performing, Lord Kitchener<br />

became disenchanted by the struggle with racism in Britain and wrote,<br />

So boys, if you brown they say you can stick around<br />

If you white, well everything’s alright<br />

If your skin is dark, no use to try<br />

You got to suffer until you die.<br />

With this new positioning, “Kitch” as he was affectionately known,<br />

was also singing “Africa My Home,” as Caribbean people and people<br />

within the pan-African movement dug into histories beyond the<br />

imposed colonial ones.<br />

I want to come back home, gyal I tired roam<br />

The Mighty Dollar<br />

Some of the best-known calypso artists are not the originators of<br />

calypso at all. Gloria written by the Mighty Bomber, Ryan’s grandfather,<br />

was on the American musician Harry Belafonte’s first album, which<br />

sold a million copies. The Mighty Bomber and many other calypsonians<br />

felt unrecognized or improperly compensated for their compositions.<br />

When infuriated originators went to New York to get some recourse,<br />

despite the commercial worth and cultural influence of their work<br />

they were rarely successful. It was a complex scenario in that they also<br />

had to listen as their sound, commentary and turns of phrase were<br />

turned into something lighter – “brandy mixed with water,” sang<br />

Chalkdust in Misconceptions, referring to North American versions<br />

of calypso. The sordid boon is that the form became well-known<br />

LENARD ISHMAEL<br />

Lord Kitchener: London Is the Place for Me<br />

The Mighty Bomber: Gloria<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> | 11


LENARD ISHMAEL<br />

Kaiso Street Collective<br />

far beyond the borders of the tiny twin island nation due to these<br />

recordings. Still, there are many absent narratives around calypso,<br />

many disappeared artists, composers, many lost or barely remembered<br />

works.<br />

Toronto and the Kaiso Street Society<br />

Toronto became another calypso hub, when in the 1950s immigration<br />

opened up in Canada and people from the Caribbean travelled to<br />

Canada. The Caribana annual parade, instituted by Trinidadians in the<br />

city, fashioned itself after the festivities in their homeland. The Mighty<br />

Bomber was commissioned to write a calypso for Expo 67. Calypso<br />

also had a significant presence in Montreal where Lord Caressa<br />

worked for a couple years with the CBC as a broadcaster, and where<br />

the Carifête celebration soon became established.<br />

Toronto is also the location of the Kaiso Street Society – a group<br />

that includes Deborah Maitland, Aurora Banjath, Natasia Morris<br />

and Kadijah Simpson. Founded and directed by Jesse Ryan, it has a<br />

mandate to investigate, and honour, document, promote and educate<br />

around traditional Calypso to ensure it is preserved and holds its place<br />

in the global musical lexicon.<br />

“One of the reasons why I’m so passionate about this is that I really<br />

think that traditional calypso is one of the most important musics ever<br />

created,” says Ryan. The group is ensuring the original art form has<br />

its historical place in modern music. The initiative is in part inspired<br />

by Ryan’s questioning why he grew up not knowing about calypso’s<br />

deep connection to jazz, or why he did not know much about Frankie<br />

Francis who recorded several jazz-infused albums including one with<br />

the RCA All Stars Orchestra in 1964, or why the great album, Doctor<br />

Kitch recorded by Lord Kitchener in 1963, featuring brilliant horn<br />

arrangements and improvised solos, is still not more broadly known.<br />

“I think [it is] actually one of the only forms of music that documents<br />

its own history,” says Ryan.<br />

They mean to license we mouth, they don’t want we talk<br />

— King Radio, Sedition Law (1940)<br />

“At the time, anything the British considered to be lewd or anything<br />

that invited people to scrutinize British law were deemed seditious<br />

and both were illegal,” says Ryan. This calypso, commenting on<br />

the times, was ironically banned. Calypso was a space for thinking,<br />

communicating, commenting and reminding people of themselves in<br />

environments that would obliterate them.<br />

Rock back<br />

With a focus on the four global hubs of calypso – Trinidad and<br />

Tobago, London, New York and Toronto – the Kaiso Street Society<br />

documents where the music has thrived, influenced and created<br />

cultural evolutions. As the group brings into the light the imagination,<br />

memory and spirit of resistance embodied in the music, it reframes<br />

calypso as music for social change.<br />

Kaiso aims to research, archive, share and teach the histories,<br />

legacies, the deep cross pollination globally that has taken place<br />

during the last 200 years, highlighting global connections and impact.<br />

In the works are plans to continue research, host workshops, create<br />

listening libraries, and a tour, in 2025, of the Kaiso Street Collective,<br />

an ensemble, made up of some of Toronto’s best improvisers and<br />

composers.<br />

Every music has its pop genre, and soca has elements of the traditional<br />

form; however it rarely shares traditional calypso’s musical<br />

gravitas, social and political commentary, or its clever turns of phrase.<br />

From early Superblue’s joyful What’s the time mister wolf, bacchanal<br />

time! to the infectious 2018, Afrobeats-influenced Year for Love by<br />

Voice, to the <strong>2024</strong> winning road march, Mical Teja’s DNA - “han’ up<br />

in the air, madness everywhere, it in we DNA … we in de road way,<br />

tell dem freedom in we dna”, soca’s fast tempos and simple lyrics<br />

are what we will now hear at the annual parade on Toronto’s streets.<br />

“Soca can take care of itself,” says Ryan. It does not need saving.<br />

Remembering calypso’s legacy is part of Kaiso’s vision. Within<br />

the unique musical contribution of traditional calypso is a powerful<br />

living history. And in the spirit of Lord Relator’s PSA Sip and Chat on<br />

responsible drinking – “if you can’t do it, don’ bother come drink my<br />

rum” – as we move close to Toronto Caribbean Carnival and jump up<br />

to the sounds of soca, let’s remember to look backwards and inwards<br />

to the original music. Let’s listen to de ole time calypso and remember<br />

the great masters and mistresses of the form.<br />

Gloria Blizzard writes on music, dance, culture and is the author<br />

of Black Cake, Turtle Soup, and Other Dilemmas<br />

12 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


FREE CONCERT, PART OF THE CHOIR & ORGAN SERIES<br />

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thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> | 13


PROFILE<br />

<strong>June</strong> 14, 2005: the groundbreaking<br />

celebration for the TELUS Centre<br />

and Koerner Hall. In the hard<br />

hats (l-r) are Florence Minz, Peter<br />

Simon and Darrren Entwistle.<br />

HAIL AND FAREWELL The RCM’s Peter Simon<br />

BY ANDREW SCOTT<br />

COURTESY ROYAL CONSERVATORY<br />

The sound of trumpets bookended a wonderful<br />

Koerner Hall May 23 evening that balanced<br />

solemnity, joyful retrospect, and reflections on a<br />

professional life well lived. The occasion: the retirement<br />

of Dr. Peter Simon following an extraordinary career as<br />

President & CEO of The Royal Conservatory of Music.<br />

First it was Hail to the Chief,<br />

as played solo by Andrew<br />

McCandless, principal trumpeter<br />

of the Toronto Symphony<br />

Orchestra. Here, the dynamic<br />

range and clarion call-like melody<br />

of James Sanderson’s 1812 regal<br />

composition (most frequently<br />

performed at Presidential<br />

Inaugurations) managed to set an<br />

appropriate tone of reverence for<br />

the celebrant, but also imbued<br />

a “tongue in cheek” playfulness<br />

Dr. Peter Simon to the musical proceedings that<br />

would carry through the evening.<br />

A few hours and several extraordinary performances, speeches,<br />

videos and former Prime Ministerial acknowledgments later, it was<br />

Jens Lindemann’s turn, accompanied by Robi Botos; the trumpet/<br />

piano duo capped off the evening with a poignant rendition of Oscar<br />

STUART LOWE<br />

Peterson’s great composition, Hymn to Freedom.<br />

As the final held notes faded in the gorgeous acoustic hall that<br />

Simon envisioned, fundraised for and successfully willed to fruition,<br />

the musical portion of the evening felt appropriately conclusive, while<br />

still holding out a world of possibility. For a man who shaped the RCM<br />

around “a deeply held and profound belief that the arts are the most<br />

powerful means through which you can develop individual lives and,<br />

by extension, build a more cohesive society,” as he told the WholeNote<br />

earlier this month, it was a fitting finale – a profound musical statement<br />

honouring someone who has used the arts to develop both<br />

his own life and that of others, and who has left this city’s musical<br />

community and landscape more cohesive and robust than how he<br />

found it some 33 years earlier.<br />

Born in Hungary in 1949, Simon and family fled the country<br />

following the 1956 Hungarian revolution, temporarily finding safety<br />

in an Austrian refugee camp before coming to Canada in 1957. Soon,<br />

Simon began studying at Toronto’s Royal Conservatory of Music with<br />

famed pedagogue and composer Boris Berlin, whose “ABC” educational<br />

books on piano fundamentals have moulded millions of young<br />

musical minds worldwide. For Simon, this early instruction was a<br />

twofold formative experience.<br />

First, it offered a point of entry into a world of classical music studies:<br />

Simon would first go on to the Juilliard School, then ultimately earn his<br />

doctorate in piano performance at the University of Michigan under<br />

the tutelage of Leon Fleisher. But perhaps more profoundly, he would<br />

have learned that musical ideas could have a global impact. Years later,<br />

on taking the reins of the RCM institution as President and CEO on<br />

September 1, 1991 Simon quickly began to work on this: continuing to<br />

14 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


underscore the importance of the conservatory locally and provincially,<br />

while at the same time fostering nationals and international connections.<br />

Speaking about the RCM of <strong>2024</strong>, Simon states, “You have to<br />

remember that more than half the people who are working inside<br />

the walls [of the RCM] are working on programs for people outside of<br />

the walls. We’re designing curriculum, creating individual programs,<br />

operating the examinations and creating the publishing. We work<br />

with 30,000 teachers across Canada and the US, and there has to be a<br />

place where these ideas and networks are created. The people in our<br />

building drive national and international connections.”<br />

One got a sense during the Thursday night celebratory event of<br />

the national and international connections that have been forged<br />

and conversations that have been advanced at and by the RCM. There<br />

was a bounty of video testimonials from around the globe about the<br />

profound impact that both Simon and the RCM have had internationally,<br />

underscored by a brilliant first-half performance by the Royal<br />

Conservatory Orchestra, fresh off<br />

their Carnegie Hall debut, demonstrating<br />

aptly why this RCM flagship<br />

ensemble has become a feeder<br />

group for many of the greatest<br />

orchestras around the world.<br />

A difference of kind<br />

In his earlier conversation with<br />

The WholeNote, Simon was asked<br />

to comment on whether his vision<br />

for the RCM, as well as its Glenn<br />

Gould School training programs,<br />

had suffered in the past because as<br />

a conservatory it was not a degreegranting<br />

institution. “The development<br />

of a gifted musician requires<br />

The WholeNote, Vol. 15 No 1,<br />

a profound and fundamentally<br />

September 2009<br />

different approach than the kind<br />

of structures one would find in a university,” was his reply. “It is far<br />

more personal and is very much oriented to [a relationship with] the<br />

instrumental teacher. The support that students need is personal [from]<br />

someone who knows and understands them. You are really nurturing<br />

somebody. Not educating, but nurturing. What is needed is mentorship<br />

as opposed to instruction.”<br />

Daisy-chaining these philosophical ideas together underscores the<br />

RCM’s mentorship based “culture of support”. Nowhere was this more<br />

in evidence than in the symbiotic relationship of pedagogy and architecture<br />

which led, in 2009, to the opening of Koerner Hall, housed in<br />

the TELUS Centre for Performance and Learning. Understanding that<br />

masterclasses – the opportunity for Gould and RCM students to have<br />

valuable facetime and instruction from world-class musicians – was<br />

a crucial component of the RCM’s pedagogical model, the creation of<br />

Koerner Hall, and subsequent world-class concert programming by<br />

Executive Director Mervon Mehta, created opportunities for students<br />

to learn from the finest visiting artists, as well as offering rich listening<br />

opportunities for Toronto audiences.<br />

“We probably do more here in terms of master classes because it is<br />

important for students to have contact with international artists and<br />

Koerner Hall affords us that opportunity,” Simon says. [Masterclasses]<br />

give you a very clear perspective of where you are in relation to the<br />

career that you seek. There are no illusions. When a student hears<br />

[American classical pianist and 2013 MacArthur “genius” grant recipient]<br />

Jeremy Denk playing and then giving a lesson, it becomes clear that Denk<br />

is an incredible pianist and musician, and that’s the standard.”<br />

Excellence and transformation<br />

Many musical standard bearers attended the May 23 event. Just as<br />

geography was traversed in terms of international acknowledgments<br />

and well wishes, the musical styles on display were a deftly negotiated<br />

journey. Music most often classified under the wide umbrella term of<br />

“classical” was principally featured (including fine video performances<br />

by Simon’s wife, Dianne Werner, as well as Simon himself). But jazz<br />

was admirably represented as well by a solo performance of George<br />

Michael Koerner and Dr. Peter Simon in Koerner Hall<br />

and Ira Gershwin’s warhorse I Got Rhythm, in solo piano form, by the<br />

aforementioned Botos (the RCM’s inaugural Jazz Artist-in-Residence).<br />

Further, with a nod to Duke Ellington’s famous 1962 aphorism that<br />

there are only two kinds of music (“good music and the other kind,”)<br />

the always wonderful mélange of sounds, inspiration and traditions<br />

that is the unclassifiable Art of Time Ensemble backed up former<br />

Barenaked Ladies front person Steven Page (singing the Beatles, no<br />

less) demonstrating that the only constant in the evening’s programming<br />

was musical excellence.<br />

This is not surprising. Musical excellence, rather than hewing to<br />

an orthodoxy of style, has long been a central tenet of the RCM, the<br />

Glenn Gould and the Oscar Peterson School of Music, as well as the<br />

musical offerings presented at Koerner. This is not happenstance.<br />

After assuming the leadership at the RCM, Simon strove to “bring the<br />

conservatory to an international level, respected in every way, and to<br />

have the kind of structure that is both unique, but appropriate for a<br />

conservatory within a society. Canada needed a school at the highest<br />

level internationally so that people did not automatically go off to<br />

Juilliard or somewhere else. We have that now.”<br />

Such bullish declarations of ambition and open acknowledgments<br />

of meritocratic excellence feel somehow out of date today. But Simon<br />

makes no apologies. By brazenly celebrating excellence, trumpeting<br />

the RCM’s gilded legacy, and putting supreme talent on a magnificent<br />

stage, the RCM that Simon built continues to show the potential of<br />

human accomplishment.<br />

“There is the social aspect as well,” Simon continues. “The study of<br />

music is really important to society. It’s music that connects people. It’s<br />

music that in the end, especially with young children, is transformational<br />

for developing an emotional life psyche and the emotional awareness that<br />

is so important as we go forward and [try to] understand others.”<br />

Acknowledging, as the evening’s master of ceremonies Denise<br />

Donlon did so eloquently, that the need to understand others within<br />

our broader society feels perhaps more urgent now than at any time<br />

before, the diversity of the evening’s music, participants and offerings<br />

offered up a hopeful beacon of societal possibility. And as the<br />

COURTESY ROYAL CONSERVATORY<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> | 15


post-concert crowd retired to Koerner Hall’s glass-enclosed second<br />

floor lobby bar for good cheer and the musical offerings of guitarist<br />

Michael Occhipinti and his terrific group, the unifying and efficacious<br />

results of Simon’s articulated values and vision were on full display.<br />

“It comes down to will. I am 100% for music and for the arts, the<br />

thirst for excellence in that [domain] and my belief in its power. On<br />

this I will rarely, if ever, compromise in any way. In terms of programming<br />

philosophy, there is always a balance of things that is required, of<br />

course, but excellence is always number one. Because otherwise…why?”<br />

Important final words indeed. Not only in relation to the May 23<br />

event, but for the RCM that, starting in September, must continue<br />

under the leadership of Simon’s successor Alexander Brose (who on<br />

the night proved himself, in equal parts, both a capable singer and<br />

potentially charismatic fundraiser, with On the Street Where You Give<br />

– a craftily manipulated version of Lerner and Loewe’s timeless lyric)<br />

to reach out to the larger society that exists beyond the confines of the<br />

RCM’s hallowed and historic Bloor Street walls.<br />

SOUND ART<br />

Andrew Scott is a Toronto-based jazz guitarist (occasional<br />

pianist/singer) and professor at Humber College, who contributes<br />

regularly to The WholeNote’s DISCoveries record reviews.<br />

MY PIECE OF THE CITY<br />

A scene from the Regent Park musical The Journey<br />

Daniel Taylor<br />

My Piece of the City is a new program that assists small cultural<br />

organizations and individual artists financially, helping them<br />

present concerts and events in Koerner Hall. It's an initiative of<br />

The Royal Conservatory of Music, in partnership with The Daniels<br />

Corporation, inspired by a desire to foster inclusivity, diversity,<br />

and equitable access. Full details are available at rcmusic.com/<br />

performance/my-piece-of-the-city. Applications opened May 15,<br />

<strong>2024</strong> and will close <strong>July</strong> 1, <strong>2024</strong> for projects, events and concerts<br />

occurring between September 1, <strong>2024</strong> and <strong>August</strong> 31, 2025.<br />

Songs from The Journey is a new theatrical production that will<br />

debut on <strong>June</strong> 20, <strong>2024</strong> at 8pm in Koerner Hall and will raise<br />

funds for this program.<br />

With narration, spoken word, music, and dance it features<br />

the greatest hits from a musical called The Journey which was<br />

performed at Daniels Spectrum in Regent Park between 2013<br />

and 2018 that chronicled the transformation of Regent Park into<br />

a vibrant, thriving community. An homage to the resilience of<br />

the Regent Park community, this new production reflects the<br />

profound impact of community involvement in shaping the future<br />

of urban spaces.<br />

Fifty Years of<br />

Frog Bog Soundwalk<br />

Soothing Whispers of Nature:<br />

Sounding Ontario Spring<br />

Wetlands<br />

ANDREW TIMAR<br />

Beginning in the early 1970s I began a series of nature<br />

sound-walks, field expeditions, interspecies sonic<br />

meditations, explorations and mediated threshold<br />

music performances. They eventually coalesced under<br />

the banner “Frog Bog.” Its novelty attracted media<br />

attention back then. I took musicians on Frog Bog sound<br />

fieldwalks, and played my field recordings in concert halls<br />

in music and modern dance settings. Excerpts found their<br />

way onto albums, like the 1981 Jon Hassell and Brian Eno<br />

track These Times.<br />

After several dormant decades, overlapping impulses and emerging<br />

research reactivated my interest in the Frog Bog. For example, in his<br />

best-selling 2005 book Last Child in the Woods… American journalist<br />

Richard Louv coined the phrase “Nature-Deficit Disorder” for what he<br />

deemed “human costs of alienation from nature.” He’s been pointing<br />

ever since to research on attention disorders, obesity, a dampening of<br />

creativity and depression as problems associated with a nature-deficient<br />

childhood (and adulthood).<br />

Concerned by shrinking Ontario Greenbelt wetlands, eager to get<br />

back to the rich sounds of nature in the springtime and inspired by<br />

16 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


DEWI MINDEN<br />

L to R: “Jamming at the Frog Pond” (Ann Farrell in<br />

the Sunday Star, May 28, 1978) If memory serves,<br />

the journalist conducted the interview in Queen’s<br />

Park, the Star photographer asking me to pose<br />

against a large tree. Yes, that’s a toy frog on my right<br />

shoulder. No, I don’t play the clarinet, it was a prop.<br />

Playing suling gambuh at Frog Bog Soundwalk<br />

Presquile Provincial Park, May <strong>2024</strong><br />

renewed interest in the soundscape projects I<br />

inaugurated five decades ago, I decided to go<br />

back into the field and get my boots and ears wet<br />

again. This time out I chose to sound out the state<br />

of frog population choruses along the shores of<br />

Lake Ontario’s Presqu’ile Provincial Park during<br />

the height of the spring mating season. According<br />

to Brighton, ON composer and musician Graham<br />

Flett, frog groups throughout the area were already<br />

vocally active in April – historically a week or<br />

two early. Was this yet another local reflection of<br />

global warming?<br />

On two consecutive early May Sundays, along<br />

with intrepid colleagues Graham Flett and Dewi<br />

Minden, I led Frog Bog Soundwalks at three<br />

secluded sites. The evenings were peaceful, dark, cool, misty, foggy<br />

– decidedly frog-friendly conditions. We encountered no fellow<br />

humans. Dewi captured the look and sound of our first exploratory<br />

Frog Bog Soundwalk in this suitably dark video clip.<br />

WESTBEN<br />

CELEBRATING 25 YEARS<br />

OF MUSIC IN NATURE<br />

SUMMER FESTIVAL<br />

<strong>June</strong> 14 to <strong>August</strong> 4, <strong>2024</strong><br />

26 concerts of jazz, broadway, pop, rock, classical and<br />

artists from Alderville and Curve Lake First Nations<br />

Getting ready for the 50th anniversary Frog Bog Soundwalk<br />

DEWI MINDEN<br />

Jeremy Dutcher &<br />

Forest Bathing <strong>July</strong> 6<br />

Angela Hewit<br />

<strong>July</strong> 18<br />

At the second event I was inspired to play suling gambuh (long, low<br />

bamboo ring flute from Bali, Indonesia) and other sound makers in<br />

response to the sonic beauty all around: sunset bird calls and swirling<br />

frog choruses. It’s a kind of interspecies sonic performance I’ve dubbed<br />

“music-adjacent.” While Graham played melodica in the spirit of<br />

Threshold Music, Dewi made documentary audio recordings and stills.<br />

To my surprise they’ve garnered interest in unexpected places. On<br />

my personal Facebook page Indonesian musician Tatang Sobari said<br />

the video clip reflects, “…a truly extraordinary natural music. Negative<br />

murmurs which defeat the soul disappear, replaced by soothing whispers<br />

of natural music.” Mexican modern dancer Marina Acevedo<br />

exclaimed, “…what a great sensation arises in the body from that<br />

unique and diverse sound environment!”<br />

While my awareness of and interaction with what I call Frog Bog<br />

extends just over 50 years, the phenomenon itself has been a regular<br />

feature of our Southern Ontario spring soundscape for at least 4,000. As<br />

Acevedo cannily observed, such rich sonic environments are experienced<br />

by the entire body as we walk through it with care and respect. We listen<br />

with all our senses, with everything that makes us human - with an<br />

awareness of all our relations and our responsibility to uphold them.<br />

Andrew Timar is a musician, composer, music journalist and<br />

sound explorer with curious ears. Active in and outside Toronto<br />

since the 1970s, he has recently been nominated for the Anugerah<br />

Kebudayaan Indonesia award for four decades of service to<br />

Indonesian music in Canada.<br />

New Zealand String Quartet<br />

<strong>July</strong> 19 & 20<br />

Colin Ainsworth & New Zealand<br />

String Quartet <strong>July</strong> 2<br />

Gerald Finley<br />

<strong>July</strong> 31<br />

Sarah Slean<br />

<strong>July</strong> 21<br />

Jackie Richardson & Joe Sealy<br />

present Africville Stories<br />

<strong>August</strong> 4<br />

FOR INFORMATION & TICKETS VISIT WESTBEN.CA<br />

CAMPBELLFORD, ON<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> | 17


IN WITH THE NEW<br />

EMBRACING FAILURE:<br />

In conversation with<br />

GREGORY OH<br />

WENDALYN BARTLEY<br />

In my previous WholeNote story, I wrote about<br />

the three-day Keyed-Up Festival, produced by<br />

Soundstreams, which ran from April 18-20. I was<br />

fortunate to attend two of the three concerts, both of<br />

which featured captivating displays of multiple keyboards<br />

on stage. The April 20 concert was particularly striking,<br />

with six grand pianos all lined up to perform works by<br />

composers such as Steve Reich, Terry Riley and André<br />

Ristic. One performer who navigated with remarkable<br />

ease amongst the black and white keys was pianist, music<br />

director and concert programmer Gregory Oh.<br />

ADAM COISH<br />

Among the many concerts taking place over the summer months,<br />

especially at various music festivals in Toronto and throughout Ontario,<br />

Gregory Oh’s <strong>August</strong> 3 performance at Stratford Summer Music stood<br />

out to me for its challenging and provocative description. The performance,<br />

titled Lessons in Failure, combines spoken word and piano works<br />

in a courageous and humorous reveal of the embarrassing moments<br />

and disastrous failures he has experienced throughout his career. Not<br />

something many performers are eager to admit.<br />

In a delightful and engaging interview, he filled me in on the<br />

original roots for this performance. While he was artist in residence<br />

with the Soulpepper Theatre Company in 2017, he was asked to<br />

create a short performance piece, and came up with a work centred<br />

around his experience of auditioning for the keyboard position at<br />

the Toronto Symphony. Despite the hundreds of hardworking hours<br />

preparing, he knew within the first 30 seconds of the audition he had<br />

lost it. What happened? He had chosen, confidently, to play Chopin’s<br />

Étude Op.10, No.5 known as the “Black Key Etude” without using the<br />

music, as he had been playing it all his life. At the end of the very first<br />

phrase, however, “my brain took a wrong turn,” he said, as he found<br />

himself questioning whether the next note was a C natural or C flat.<br />

This humbling moment became the centrepiece of the Soulpepper<br />

performance, in which he first took on the role of storyteller before<br />

transitioning to piano performer to play the Étude. His honesty<br />

resulted in audiences being profoundly moved.<br />

Oh believes this was because the topic of failure is not something<br />

that is usually addressed, especially in the world of classical music<br />

where the focus is more on heroism, success and perfection. But, he<br />

feels, “there is a correlation between creativity and failure, and they<br />

seem to go hand in hand. That’s what I teach my students.”<br />

From that starting point, Oh began delving into other areas in his<br />

life where he has experienced failure, such as in relationships with<br />

teachers, family members, and even within the university curriculum.<br />

An invitation to perform at the Scotia Festival in Halifax served as a<br />

catalyst for beginning to create a long-form performance centred on<br />

failure, culminating in a full theatre production, which he is developing<br />

with the assistance of a dramaturge, stage director and designer.<br />

Even though music and theatre are different art forms, there’s a<br />

connection. “As much as we try<br />

to deny it and think of music as a<br />

pure form, playing a concert is also<br />

a piece of theatre. We walk out in a<br />

certain way and wear a costume.”<br />

Collaborating with theatre artists<br />

this way will help him bridge the<br />

gap between theatre and music, to<br />

create a unified experience for the<br />

audience.<br />

During Lessons in Failure, he<br />

will be playing pieces by Lizst,<br />

Bach, Brahms and of course the<br />

Chopin Étude. He’s most excited<br />

about a piece by Thomas Wiggins,<br />

a blind American slave who<br />

during the 19th century was one<br />

Blind Tom Wiggins - from the<br />

documentary Blind Tom: slave<br />

piano prodigy (“Into The Music,"<br />

ABC National Radio, 2012)<br />

18 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


of the best-known and successful performing pianists. Wiggins had<br />

an incredible capacity to hear a piece once and then play it back. The<br />

piece Oh will be performing is one Wiggins wrote at age 16, and, Oh<br />

told me, it’s nothing like anything people have heard before. “This is<br />

the piece that seems to have the biggest impact on people,” Oh says.<br />

Even though his show will only be performed on one one night in<br />

Stratford, it will also be played at this year’s Sound Symposium in<br />

St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, and more performances are<br />

in the planning stages for the future, including a possible theatre run.<br />

During our conversation, Oh also articulated his broader views<br />

about classical music in general, which he says “is all about barriers<br />

and elitism. The ideal of classical music is a perfect reproduction, like<br />

a photograph. I’m not sure that serves everybody. I’m not sure it’s<br />

great for the audience, and I know it’s not great for the artists.” He<br />

admitted he prefers listening to student recitals rather than professional<br />

performances because “that’s where anything can happen.<br />

There’s a sense of wonder present. If we just allowed people to be<br />

imperfect, perhaps classical music would not only be more interesting<br />

but more welcoming.”<br />

Summer Music in the Garden<br />

Summer Music in the Garden's<br />

co-curator Rebecca Cuddy<br />

This desire to create a<br />

welcoming environment is<br />

also behind his programming<br />

choices as ongoing curator of<br />

Harbourfront’s Summer Music<br />

in the Garden. This year the<br />

programming has an additional<br />

dimension: the addition<br />

of Rebecca Cuddy as co-curator.<br />

“Rebecca and I are very different<br />

in a lot of ways, which is part of<br />

what makes our collaboration so<br />

fruitful,” he says. “She is dynamically<br />

thoughtful, has brought a<br />

lot of great programming ideas,<br />

and her perspective has helped<br />

me locate some of my blind spots. Sometimes programming can be a<br />

single vision, but Summer Music in the Garden is very much a team<br />

effort. Rebecca’s fingerprints are all over this season, as are those of<br />

producer Miriam Schachter and Nathalie Bonjour.”<br />

Like the diverse food tents that were once part of the Harbourfront<br />

experience, the concerts provide the opportunity for first encounters<br />

with music that people may not have had exposure to before, while<br />

still feeling at home. “We’d rather show the audience something new<br />

Kondo: Three Songs of the Elderberry Tree / Duo Holz<br />

rather than something they know they like,” he says. This is more<br />

than including pretty melodies or an easy-to-navigate facility, but<br />

rather “a place where you can be comfortable and be yourself. It’s also<br />

about considering how Toronto can be represented and who better to<br />

focus on than the incredible artists that live here?”<br />

The programming will span everything from “IndigiDivas” to<br />

Georgian polyphonic music, to African drumming and dancing, to<br />

the U of T percussion ensemble, gospel and country music, Arabic<br />

jazz, and western classical with the National Youth Orchestra. Two<br />

newly commissioned pieces will also be performed during the festival’s<br />

season. Cellist Rachel Mercer, a past member of the piano quartet<br />

Ensemble Made in Canada, will premiere a new work by Halifaxbased<br />

cellist and composer India Bailey who combines composed and<br />

improvised music. The other new commission at Summer Music in<br />

the Garden will be performed by Duo Holz, made up of Aysel Taghu-<br />

Zada (violin and viola) and Michael Murphy (percussion and shō)<br />

who have made the performing of new Canadian works part of their<br />

creative mandate.<br />

More Summer Music<br />

Ian Cusson: It will be a busy summer season for composer Ian<br />

Cusson. Beginning on <strong>June</strong> 16, his new work for orchestra titled<br />

Ikiru will be premiered by the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, and<br />

in <strong>July</strong>, two of his chamber works will be featured in concerts at<br />

the Toronto Summer Music Festival. On <strong>July</strong> 15, the New Orford<br />

String quartet will premiere an as yet untitled new work, and on<br />

<strong>July</strong> 30, selections from his 2019 work Le Récital des Anges will be<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> | 19


MAINLY CLUBS, MOSTLY JAZZ<br />

JOHN ARANO<br />

Ian Cusson<br />

performed in a vocal concert by soprano Elisabeth St-Gelais with<br />

Louise Pelletier on piano.<br />

Music Mondays: Jumping over to the Music Mondays series at Holy<br />

Trinity Church behind the Eaton Centre, now in its 34th year, on<br />

<strong>July</strong> 22, the Obsidian Duo, made up of pianist Roland Tapia and mezzo<br />

soprano Camila Montefusco, has put together an intriguing program<br />

of music honouring ancestral stories and the topic of belonging.<br />

One of the featured composers on this program is, once again, Ian<br />

Cusson whose music will be presented alongside works by Alice<br />

Ping Yee Ho and Jeff Smallman, each representing cultures that have<br />

shaped Canada.<br />

Finally, returning to events happening during the month of <strong>June</strong>,<br />

the groundbreaking piano quartet Ensemble Made in Canada will also<br />

be featured at a New Music Concerts performance on <strong>June</strong> 12, with<br />

works by Franco Donatoni, Linda Catlin Smith, Sandeep Bhagwati,<br />

Vivian Fung and Nicolas Gilbert. And at the Luminato Festival, a daylong<br />

event on <strong>June</strong> 8 curated by Wavelength Music will include music<br />

by the NYC experimental composer and trombonist Peter Zummo<br />

who combines minimalism with “a whole lot more.”<br />

Wendalyn Bartley is a Toronto-based composer and electro-vocal<br />

sound artist. sounddreaming@gmail.com<br />

SUMMER<br />

TIME<br />

& the definitions go<br />

out the window<br />

COLIN STORY<br />

Every year in Toronto – at least for this west coast<br />

transplant – summer seems to arrive all at once. Parkas<br />

transform into t-shirts; boots to sandals; a pervasive<br />

dread that winter shall never end is replaced by a cautious<br />

optimism that a few brief moments of respite are at least<br />

theoretically possible. The summer has many of the same<br />

delights to offer as the regular season for the dedicated<br />

music patron, but festival season also offers the appealing<br />

prospect of being jolted out of one’s usual routines.<br />

There is a perennial question that swirls around the lineups of<br />

major summer jazz festivals, for example, one that routinely gets<br />

asked by musicians, jazz fans, and by just about everyone with a<br />

laptop and a social media account: but is it jazz? (For an interesting<br />

and thought-provoking read, check out the comment section from<br />

a May 8 post by the Instagram account Jazz Memes, which features<br />

appearances from a number of prominent jazz musicians discussing<br />

this very subject.)<br />

Without wading so far into this quagmire that my editor is tempted<br />

to excise this introduction, I would suggest that plurality seems to<br />

be a trend that many festivals are embracing this summer, and that<br />

creative programming choices which serve a number of overlapping<br />

community interests can yield exciting results. Below, check out a<br />

round-up of four Ontario festivals with both breadth and depth, all of<br />

which feature some of the best in Canadian music.<br />

DOUG KERR<br />

Church of the Holy Trinity<br />

Something Else! Festival – <strong>June</strong> 20-23<br />

Taking place in Hamilton, this year’s Something Else! Festival<br />

continues its mandate to present “creative music, newer traditions<br />

in jazz, improvised music, the avant-garde, experimental sounds<br />

and adventurous art forms from all disciplines.” A DIY festival with<br />

an open spirit, ticketed festival shows take place at St. Cuthbert’s<br />

Presbyterian Church, with free shows at the Hamilton Public Library,<br />

and on the street, near the Jimmy Thompson Memorial Pool. (There<br />

are worse places to be, at the beginning of the summer, than listening<br />

to the Shuffle Demons in a pool.)<br />

Something Else! has a number of excellent shows on the docket,<br />

including a triple-bill on Thursday, <strong>June</strong> 20th at St. Cuthbert’s<br />

featuring festival opener Earth Wind + Choir, an adventurous vocal<br />

ensemble led by Sarah Good, Ugly Beauties, the incredible trio of<br />

pianist Marilyn Lerner, cellist Matt Brubeck and drummer Nick Fraser,<br />

as well as Gayle Young, whose unique compositions and self-made<br />

instruments close out the evening. On Saturday, <strong>June</strong> 22nd another<br />

20 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


16 UNMISSABLE<br />

CONCERTS<br />

INCLUDING<br />

Something Else Festival: The Shuffle Demons<br />

triple bill at HPL: the duo of Sakina Abdou and Dave Rempis, Torontobased<br />

violinist Aline Homzy’s Étoile magique and saxophonist<br />

Caroline Davis in duo format with guitarist Wendy Eisenberg.<br />

TD Toronto Jazz Festival – <strong>June</strong> 21-30<br />

Ontario’s preeminent jazz festival, the Toronto Jazz Festival returns<br />

in its now-customary format, with a number of free outdoor shows<br />

throughout the Yorkville area, with stages on Avenue Road, on<br />

Cumberland, and in the Victoria College area of U of T, off of Charles.<br />

Ticketed shows will be taking place at some of the city’s most prominent<br />

(and comfortable) soft-seat venues, including Meridian Hall, Koerner<br />

Hall, and The Concert Hall. (Smaller, more intimate ticketed shows<br />

will also be taking place, in venues such as The Pilot and The Rex.)<br />

Highlights from this year’s ticketed offerings include the funky,<br />

gospel-influenced stylings of keyboardist Cory Henry (at The Concert<br />

Hall on <strong>June</strong> <strong>29</strong>), the classic New Orleans ensemble Preservation Hall<br />

Jazz Band (also at The Concert Hall, on <strong>June</strong> 22), and Toronto-based<br />

singer Amanda Martinez (<strong>June</strong> 26, at Koerner Hall).<br />

At Jazz Bistro, playing two sets per night on <strong>June</strong> 28 and <strong>29</strong>, catch<br />

Superblue, the new group from vocalist Kurt Elling and guitarist/<br />

bassist Charlie Hunter. Elling will likely be a familiar name to<br />

WholeNote readers; Hunter may not, though<br />

it is not for lack of appearances. Playing<br />

hybrid guitars on which he simultaneously<br />

crafts funky bass lines, chords, and melodies,<br />

Hunter has been a mainstay on the American<br />

jam band scene, as well as on recordings<br />

with the likes of John Mayer, D’Angelo and<br />

Snarky Puppy.<br />

A worthy show not yet on the schedule:<br />

a performance from the winner of the<br />

Toronto Arts Foundation’s Breakthrough Jazz<br />

Artist Award, which has traditionally been<br />

featured on one of the Toronto Jazz Festival’s<br />

free outdoor stages. This year’s finalists are<br />

drummer Sanah Kadoura, clarinetist Virginia<br />

MacDonald, and pianist Dánae Olano.<br />

Stratford Summer Music – <strong>July</strong> 18-<strong>August</strong> 11<br />

A unique festival, Stratford Summer<br />

Music takes place, as the name suggests,<br />

in sunny Stratford, ON and features classical,<br />

jazz, Celtic music, mariachi and more.<br />

Performances take place at venues such as the<br />

ORDER YOUR<br />

TICKETS TODAY!<br />

brottmusic.com | 905.525.7664<br />

From top: Sarah Kadoura, Virgina MacDonald<br />

and Dánae Olano: finalists for the Toronto Arts<br />

Foundation's Breakthrough Jazz Artist Award.<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> | 21


MUSIC THEATRE<br />

Stratford Jazz Academy<br />

Avondale Theatre, Revival House, Jobsite Brewing Company and, my<br />

personal favourite, The MusicBarge, a small (but literal) barge moored<br />

on the Avon River, with free early-afternoon performances.<br />

Stratford Summer Music also features two unique educational<br />

opportunities for young musicians. The Jazz Academy, led by bassist<br />

Jodi Proznick, drummer Jim Doxas, saxophonist Kelly Jefferson<br />

and pianist Florian Hoefner, is designed for students interested in<br />

improving their improvising, ensemble playing and performance<br />

skills. The Vocal Academy, meanwhile, is split into three separate<br />

streams: Art Song with Kimberly Barber, The Solo Cantatas of J.S. Bach<br />

with Daniel Lichti, and Musical Theatre with Marcus Nance.<br />

Westben Summer Festival – <strong>June</strong> 14-<strong>August</strong> 4<br />

One of Canada’s most charming summer concert destinations,<br />

Westben is a multifaceted performance centre in Campbellford,<br />

Ontario that hosts artist residencies, produces digital programs, and<br />

conjures gourmet food and drink offerings for guests. Rather than a<br />

condensed week (or weekend) of all-day events, their summer offerings<br />

extend throughout <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> and early <strong>August</strong>, with a wide range<br />

of musical styles represented. Westben’s three venues are the Barn, a<br />

400-seat theatre housed in, you guessed, an old barn, Willow Hill, an<br />

amphitheatre by the site’s willow tree and pond, and The Campfire, a<br />

small, casual stage set up by, well, a campfire.<br />

On <strong>July</strong> 14, at 2pm in the Barn, check out the Performer Composer<br />

Residency Concert, which will showcase the collaborative work of<br />

<strong>2024</strong>’s ten residents, exploring the theme of “Music of Many Gardens.”<br />

Another unique Westben offering: the Sounds in Nature – Forest<br />

Bathing event, which takes place on <strong>July</strong> 6 at nearby Mary West Nature<br />

Reserve. Available in the early evening before concerts, this nature<br />

walk is led by Ewa Bednarczuk, a trained guide from the Nature<br />

Conservancy of Canada. Following this event, song carrier, composer,<br />

activist and ethnomusicologist Jeremy Dutcher – winner of a Polaris<br />

Music Prize and a Juno Award for Indigenous Artist of the Year – will<br />

perform at the Willow Hill amphitheatre.<br />

Colin Story is a jazz guitarist, writer and teacher based in Toronto.<br />

He can be reached at www.colinstory.com, and on Instagram and X<br />

(formerly Twitter).<br />

The Barn at Westben Summer Festival<br />

The lighter,<br />

brighter side …<br />

and beyond<br />

JENNIFER PARR<br />

Summer is almost here, the time to go outside to<br />

enjoy the sunny weather, to go on holiday, and,<br />

when school is out, to head to the cottage with the<br />

extended family ...<br />

’Tis typically the season to indulge in lighthearted theatrical<br />

fare, ideally with music and dancing and lots of comedic charm.<br />

In Toronto the three Mirvish-hosted shows are a case in point: a<br />

national tour of Wicked, Tina – The Tina Turner Musical, the return<br />

of Mean Girls, and even – to start off the season – an extension to<br />

the run of Dav Pilkey’s Dogman the Musical for younger children<br />

and their parents at the smaller CAA Theatre. (Visit mirvish.com<br />

for details.) And around the province the story is the same, with the<br />

revival of classic and jukebox musicals taking the stage, alongside<br />

concerts and comedies promising enjoyment whether you are<br />

looking to escape from the city or take a break from the cottage.<br />

Drayton, Tweed, Blyth and Fourth Line<br />

There used to be an umbrella organisation of Ontario “summer<br />

stock” theatres that made it easy to find a theatre near you, but<br />

although this has ceased to be (along with the great service organisation<br />

Theatre Ontario which was closed down shortly before COVID<br />

hit). The theatres themselves still exist, though, and some new ones<br />

have popped up. Drayton Entertainment shares productions such as<br />

22 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


In Dear Rita! by Cape Breton playwright Lyndsay Kyte, with co-creator<br />

Mike Ross as music director and arranger, “Rita” is portrayed collectively<br />

by the actor-musicians channelling MacNeil through her stories and<br />

music. Dear Rita! plays Tweed, <strong>June</strong> 5-8, then Bancroft, <strong>June</strong> 12-16.<br />

CHARLOTTETOWN FESTIVAL PRODUCTION, 2021<br />

Fiddler on the Roof, Beehive, Jersey Boys and Peter Pan the Panto<br />

among its six different locations. Relative newcomer Tweed Theatre<br />

and Company in Tweed and Bancroft, will be presenting the Ontario<br />

premiere of Dear Rita! the East Coast hit celebrating the life of singer<br />

Rita McNeil. drayton entertainment.com tweedandcompany.com<br />

The Blyth Festival celebrating its 50th season this year of<br />

presenting all-Canadian and area-inspired plays, will be presenting a<br />

new adaptation of The Farm Show (which first inspired the creation<br />

of the festival). Blyth will also, from mid-<strong>August</strong> to early September,<br />

host Onion Skins & Peach Fuzz: The Farmerettes, fresh off its<br />

world premiere at 4th Line Theatre in Millbrook, Monday through<br />

Saturday, from <strong>July</strong> 1-20. 4th Line has a proud 30 year history of<br />

its own, presenting 42 original plays based on regional history and<br />

culture. blythfestival.com 4thlinetheatre.on.ca<br />

COURTESY BONNIE SITTER<br />

Onion Skins & Peach Fuzz: The Farmerettes by playwright Alison Lawrence,<br />

tells real people's stories. It’s based on the book of the same name by<br />

Bonnie Sitter and Shirleyan English. Sitter found this photo among her<br />

late husband’s documents. On the back it said ‘Farmerettes 1946.’ The<br />

three teenagers in the photo worked on the Sitter Family farm on the<br />

outskirts of Thedford, ON., growing onions, celery and peppermint.<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> | 23


RAFEH MAHMUD<br />

DJ Me Time, the creator of<br />

R.A.V.E (Luminato Festival)<br />

New and experimental<br />

While cozy musicals and<br />

comedies rule the summer,<br />

at the same time new and<br />

experimental work still has<br />

its place and is often found<br />

in a festival context. In<br />

<strong>June</strong> the Luminato Festival<br />

in Toronto is showcasing<br />

a wide variety of music,<br />

dance and cross-genres<br />

performance including<br />

R.A.V.E. by Me Time –<br />

one of Toronto’s favourite<br />

underground DJs – which<br />

is causing excitement<br />

as the latest Outside the<br />

March immersive project.<br />

It is a DJ-led show/<br />

experience, and the first<br />

ever performance at the Downsview Airport Lands new arts and<br />

culture venue. R.A.V.E. (Real Audio Visual Experience) is described<br />

as a “dance party, a theatre show, a rave opera for desperate times:<br />

parody meets autobiography: Black Panther meets Severance, Oprah<br />

meets Daft Punk,” all on a dance floor with performers in the midst<br />

of audience/dancers. <strong>June</strong> 9-16. luminatofestival.com/accesshub<br />

Also in <strong>June</strong>, an exciting new play adapting some of 13th century<br />

mystic poet Rumi’s greatest work is taking over the courtyard at the<br />

Aga Khan Museum in Don Mills with a site-specific and immersive<br />

production filled with singing and an original score by John Gzowski.<br />

Written by Rouvan Silogix, Rafeh Mahmud & Ahad Lakhani The<br />

Caged Bird Sings is a re-imagination of Rumi’s Masnavi in which<br />

the audience surrounds a surreal cage within a cage in which two<br />

star-crossed lovers and scientists Rumi and Jin share a cell with<br />

Sal, a mysterious vagrant. As the three characters navigate their<br />

new-found reality and reconcile their past lives they are haunted<br />

by ghosts and demons of their own making, with Sufi mysticism<br />

infusing their search for wisdom and a potential escape from the<br />

cages around them. This Modern Times world premiere is presented<br />

the Aga Khan Museum in association with Theatre ARTaud from<br />

<strong>June</strong> 10-26. agakhanmuseum.org/programs/caged-bird<br />

On the less radical side of new creation but nevertheless a<br />

surprising entry to the summer season is The Last Timbit at the<br />

Elgin Theatre, appearing for a very short run of five performances<br />

The Caged Bird Sings (Aga Khan Museum) features Navtej<br />

Sandhu (below), Mikaela Lily Davies and Rouvan Silogix<br />

ANN BAGGLEY<br />

From left: Henry Firmston, as Nigel Bottom; Starr Domingue, as Bea; and<br />

Mark Uhre as Nick Bottom, in Stratford Festival’s Something Rotten!<br />

from <strong>June</strong> 26-30. A collaboration between Tim Hortons and Come<br />

From Away producer Michael Rubinoff, the show is being created<br />

to celebrate the 60th anniversary of “Tim’s” and the producers have<br />

recruited a starry group of Canadian musical theatre artists to bring<br />

their dream show to life – starting with Rubinoff himself. Nick Green<br />

(who wrote the recent hit Casey and Diana) has written the script<br />

and sister team Anika and Britta Larsen of Life After have written the<br />

music and lyrics. The cast is led by Canadian Broadway stars Jake<br />

Epstein, Chilina Kennedy and Sara Farb, as well as Stratford and<br />

Shaw regulars Andrew Broderick, DeAnn deGruijter, Dante Prince<br />

and Kimberly-Ann Truong. The show’s plot is inspired by a real 2010<br />

snowstorm that was so bad that some drivers, including a mother and<br />

daughter, had to take refuge at a roadside Tim Hortons. I have to admit<br />

that I am curious to see this show. Will it have the “legs” to go beyond<br />

this short initial run? Tickets are available through Ticketmaster.<br />

In <strong>July</strong> the Toronto Fringe Festival will be the place to go to find<br />

new experimental music theatre among the many productions<br />

chosen by lottery and performed at various venues around the city:<br />

fringetoronto.com. And in <strong>August</strong> the curated SummerWorks festival<br />

is always a hotbed and showcase of experimentation and new<br />

creation: summerworks.ca.<br />

Stratford and Shaw<br />

Meanwhile, all summer long, and in some cases already under<br />

way, are musicals and music-themed events at Ontario’s two biggest<br />

festivals, in Stratford and Niagara-on-the-Lake.<br />

At the Stratford Festival, along with this year’s core Shakespearean<br />

productions (Twelfth Night, Romeo and Juliet and Cymbeline) is<br />

the 2015 Broadway Hit Something Rotten! playing from April 16 to<br />

October 27, and already garnering great word of mouth. It’s surprising<br />

that this very silly but very entertaining musical is only making its<br />

Stratford debut now, as Shakespeare himself is a featured character<br />

with a wicked solo titled “Hard Being the Bard.” As the show begins,<br />

it is 1595, and brothers Nick and Nigel Bottom are in the midst of<br />

writing Richard II for their struggling theatre company only to find<br />

that Shakespeare is now writing his own version. After they lose<br />

their funding Nigel turns to the nephew of Nostradamus to find out<br />

what the next hit of the future will be. Nostradamus predicts it will be<br />

something new - “a musical” - where actors<br />

stop talking and suddenly burst into song.<br />

Nigel is dubious about this idea but decides<br />

to give it a go … and many shenanigans<br />

ensue including some wonderful mash ups<br />

of Shakespearean and musical plots.<br />

Who better to direct this combination<br />

than Donna Feore who has directed so many<br />

musicals on Stratford’s Festival Theatre stage?<br />

The acting company is also very strong and<br />

excitingly shines a star-making spotlight<br />

on Jeff Lillico in the role of Shakespeare<br />

Jeff Lillico<br />

24 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


(a role for which Christian Borle won a Tony award on Broadway).<br />

Always strong in whatever role he plays, whether in straight plays or<br />

musicals, this should make Lillico’s rank as a leading man clear to all.<br />

Another actor who is always excellent but hasn’t had the acclaim<br />

until last year’s Casey and Diana at Stratford is Sean Arbuckle. Like<br />

Lillico, he has always been a guarantee of quality in performance<br />

in second leads and supporting roles, until his leading performance<br />

last season catapulted him up a rung. This season we can see<br />

him in the leading role of George in La Cage aux Folles directed<br />

by Thom Allison at the Avon Theatre from May 6 to October 26.<br />

stratfordfestival.ca<br />

Over at the Shaw Festival, acclaimed actor Tom Rooney, already<br />

regarded as one of the country’s top actors, particularly in classic<br />

comedy, is taking on the iconic role of Henry Higgins in one of the<br />

most beloved musicals of the golden age, Lerner and Lowe’s My<br />

Fair Lady. Based, of course, on George Bernard Shaw’s hit play<br />

Pygmalion about a cockney flower girl caught up in a bet between<br />

phonetics professor Higgins and his best friend Colonel Pickering,<br />

this should be exciting as Rooney actually began his training and<br />

career singing, and this role needs an actor capable of great nuance<br />

in both dialogue and song. Kristi Frank, who was wonderful two<br />

seasons ago in the Shaw’s White Christmas will be playing Eliza.<br />

MFL plays from May 4 to December 22 in the Festival Theatre.<br />

The Shaw will also be presenting a new “play with songs”<br />

adaptation of Frances Hodgson Burnett’s classic novel The Secret<br />

Garden created by music director Paul Sportelli and director Jay<br />

Turvey running May 31 to October 13 in the Royal George Theatre,<br />

and the summer season will be sprinkled throughout with musical<br />

events and cabarets in the popular Spiegeltent and around the<br />

festival grounds. shawfest.com<br />

Jennifer Parr is a Toronto-based director dramaturge,<br />

fight director and acting coach, brought up from a young age on<br />

a rich mix of musicals, Shakespeare and new Canadian plays.<br />

Jennifer Parr is a Toronto-based Kristi director Frank as Eliza dramaturge, Doolittle, with fight<br />

director and acting coach, brought Gabriella up from Sundar a young Singh age (Ensemble), on a rich<br />

mix of musicals, Shakespeare in My Fair and Lady new (Shaw Canadian Festival, <strong>2024</strong>) plays.<br />

DAVID COOPER<br />

VALERIE KUINKA<br />

General &<br />

Co-Artistic Director<br />

TICKETS<br />

$<br />

15 – $ 37.50<br />

HALIBURTON<br />

TO LEARN MORE & PURCHASE<br />

TICKETS VISIT OUR WEBSITE<br />

RICHARD MARGISON<br />

Co-Artistic Director<br />

SEASON PASSES<br />

AVAILABLE!<br />

RICHARD MARGISON MASTERCLASSES<br />

Thursday, <strong>July</strong> 25 th , Friday 26 th , Saturday 27 th<br />

7:30-9:00pm | St. George’s Anglican Church<br />

OPERAS<br />

HighlandsOperaStudio.com | BOX OFFICE 1-855-455-5533<br />

MASTERCLASSES<br />

MISHAABOOZ’S REALM<br />

Thursday, <strong>August</strong> 15 th , 17 th | 7:30-9:30pm | NLPAP<br />

Experience this powerful & moving work<br />

COMMISSIONED by HOS in 2017 and WRITTEN<br />

in HALIBURTON COUNTY! Combining opera with<br />

First Nation singers and instrumentalists, created<br />

for HOS by Cree First Nation composer, Andrew<br />

Balfour, Mishaabooz’s Realm takes us on a journey<br />

through Creation, Colonization, and ultimately<br />

Hope for the Future. Post-performance chat with<br />

creators/ performers.<br />

IL BARBIERE DI SIVIGLIA<br />

(THE BARBER OF SEVILLE) BY GIOACCHINO ROSSINI<br />

<strong>August</strong> 22 nd , 24 th , 26 th | 7:30-10:45pm | NLPAP<br />

Pre-performance chat @ 6:30pm<br />

<strong>August</strong> 25 th | 2:00-5:15pm | NLPAP<br />

(Opera: in Italian with English Surtitles)<br />

From Bugs Bunny cartoons to movie soundtracks, Il<br />

barbiere di Siviglia (The Barber of Seville) is one of<br />

the world’s most popular Italian comic operas. Join<br />

Count Almaviva, his beloved Rosina, the conniving,<br />

old Doctor Bartolo, and the resourceful barber,<br />

Figaro, for the hilarious antics that follow!<br />

PROGRAMMING/CASTING SUBJECT TO CHANGE<br />

CONCERTS<br />

OPERA TO BROADWAY<br />

Thursday, <strong>August</strong> 1 st | 7:30-9:00pm<br />

St. George’s Anglican Church<br />

POP GOES THE OPERA<br />

Wednesday, <strong>August</strong> 7 th | 7:30-9:00pm<br />

Abbey Gardens<br />

HOMECOMING:<br />

HOS ALUMNI CONCERT<br />

Monday, <strong>August</strong> 19 th | 7:30-9:00pm<br />

St. George’s Anglican Church<br />

PAY-WHAT-YOU-CAN EVENTS:<br />

WHY CHOOSE OPERA?<br />

Monday, <strong>July</strong> <strong>29</strong> th | 7:30-8:45pm<br />

Abbey Gardens<br />

MUSIC ON THE WATER<br />

Saturday, <strong>August</strong> 10 th | 6:00-7:00pm<br />

Mountain Lake, Fairfield Bay, Minden<br />

(Water access only)<br />

CASUAL SONG SOIRÉE<br />

Monday, <strong>August</strong> 12 th | 7:30-8:45pm<br />

St. George’s Anglican Church<br />

CONCERT:<br />

CELEBRATING POP TO OPERA!<br />

Friday, <strong>August</strong> 16 th | 7:30-9:00pm<br />

Lauren Margison, Nils Wanderer,<br />

Jennifer Szeto (piano)<br />

Northern Lights Pavilion<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> | 25


CLASSICAL AND BEYOND<br />

FELLOWS AND MENTORS:<br />

The Warp and<br />

Weft of Toronto<br />

Summer Music<br />

BY DAVID PERLMAN<br />

If I were talking only to long-time readers of this<br />

magazine right now, I would suggest you do some<br />

online homework before carrying on with reading<br />

this story, by heading off to one particular spot on the<br />

Toronto Summer Music (TSM) website. Once you arrived,<br />

I’d ask you to scroll your way up through the two lists of<br />

musicians you’ll find there – the alumni of the TSM’s two<br />

Academy programs (chamber and vocal music) from 2012<br />

to 2023. (The lists are easy to find even if you don’t have a<br />

link: just go to “Alumni” under the tab “Academy.”)<br />

The object of the exercise? To see how many names jump out at<br />

you from the two lists, either because of what they have done musically<br />

since then, or (way better in terms of bragging rights) because you<br />

were in the audience when, for example, cellist Cameron Crozman<br />

played a recital during the 2013 Festival and you can still remember<br />

turning to Steve or Jane right there and then and saying “now there’s<br />

one to watch.”<br />

Silver Creek: The Academy alumni lists on the website only go back<br />

to 2012, so far. But the idea of an urban summer festival being only<br />

as good as the extent to which it creates opportunities for mentoring<br />

and fellowship goes all the way back to TSM’s humble beginnings.<br />

It started in 2004/2005, as a four-or-five concert series presented by<br />

something called the Silver Creek Foundation, with a concurrent oneor-two<br />

week series of chamber music workshops. The concerts were<br />

in Walter Hall, in the University of Toronto Faculty of Music Edward<br />

Johnson Building, and mostly featured artists who were faculty<br />

members or frequent guests in that building. The workshops were<br />

held in the same building and most of the attendees were local music<br />

students. The musicians giving the concerts were for the most part<br />

also the musicians running the workshops.<br />

It was an appropriately cautious start for a festival that knew from<br />

the beginning it wanted to be there for the long haul: tip-toeing in<br />

where even angels feared to venture – namely trying to get a classical-based<br />

summer music festival up and running in a city which<br />

“Within each of us lies a voice that is full of imagination and creativity. At<br />

the <strong>2024</strong> Festival, Voices Within, we welcome artists from around the<br />

world to share their artistry with us, and to let us experience the world<br />

as they see it through their musical voices and instruments .... from<br />

the strong voices of masters resonating with experience to the bright<br />

voices of emerging artists ringing with hope.” — Jonathan Crow<br />

had proved over and again that the people most likely to support such<br />

an enterprise during the “regular” season had cottages to go to, and<br />

couldn’t wait to get out of town.<br />

Twenty years later, Silver Creek’s modest series of chamber music<br />

workshops has flowered into a full-blown Academy, drawing around<br />

30 career-edge musicians, on fully funded felllowships, to emerging<br />

artist programs (EAPs) in either chamber or vocal music. The<br />

competition to get in is fierce. And Silver Creek’s four or five evening<br />

concerts at Walter Hall in 2004 have become 26 well-publicized and<br />

well-attended mainstage concerts. And to the delight of TSMs most<br />

loyal attendees, these 26 concerts float in a sea of other performances<br />

waiting to be discovered, including recitals by the fellows in the emerging<br />

artist programs, where the performers and repertoire can’t be<br />

announced well in advance, for the simple reason that learning of<br />

new repertoire, and the forging of ad hoc chamber musical relationships<br />

with people you may just have met, is fundamental to the whole<br />

idea of musical fellowship.<br />

ReGeneration: somewhere between the thrill of top-flight performance<br />

by masters of their musical craft and the adrenaline-fuelled<br />

rush of recitals by academy attendees is something the TSM calls the<br />

ReGeneration series – a wonderful weaving of academy and festival.<br />

This season it consists of a series of eight Walter Hall concerts – three<br />

in each of TSM’s first two weeks, and two in the finals week – in<br />

which fellows and mentors perform together.<br />

I don’t know how long the series has had that name but it has been<br />

there in practice at least as far back as 2009. I recall that the Beaux Arts<br />

Trio, with Menachem Pressler at the helm, was one of the mentoring<br />

ensembles that year, and at some point Pressler was asked about the<br />

dynamic of “playing with beginners” as the questioner put it. “It’s a<br />

good opportunity for them to learn things they don’t yet have in their<br />

heads” is what I remember him saying (or words to that effect), and<br />

then: “It is just as good an opportunity for us to remember what we<br />

have forgotten in our hearts.” Watch for these concerts. Magic happens.<br />

The CCMIB: if I had to pick one concert at this year’s TSM that<br />

captures for me the spirit and intent of what TSM is coming to be, and<br />

why, against the odds, is still around, almost 20 years after it tiptoed<br />

into existence, it wouldn’t be from any of the clusters I’ve talked about<br />

so far. But first, a bit of background.<br />

JAMES IRELAND<br />

26 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


PHOTOS BY DONNA SANTOS<br />

CCMIB Awardees: clockwise from top left, Cameron<br />

Crozman, David Baik, Julia Mirzoev and Gregory Lewis<br />

Every year Canadian classical musicians can compete for the opportunity<br />

to borrow an exceptional instrument from something called the<br />

Canada Council Musical Instrument Bank for three years. They submit<br />

applications and then some of them are invited to audition. “At this<br />

year’s competition, 23 violins and cellos made between the late 17th<br />

century and the early 20th century by famous luthiers like Stradivari,<br />

Gagliano and Pressenda were available,” the Canada Council release<br />

stated, and 32 musicians made it through to the audition stage.<br />

Among the successful applicants this year were four musicians<br />

whose names you will have encountered if you did the online homework<br />

I suggested in the very first paragraph of this story: cellist<br />

Cameron Crozman (TSM in 2013 and 2015); and violinists David Baik<br />

(TSM in 2022, 2023), Gregory Lewis (TSM in 2019) and Julia Mirzoev<br />

(TSM in 2018).<br />

Which brings me finally to the particular concert I’d pick from the<br />

flotilla as speaking to the spirit of TSM: not its flagship event by any<br />

means – that would likely be one of the four Koerner Hall concerts –<br />

but more like a tugboat maybe, tasked with seeing TSM into and out of<br />

safe harbour.<br />

Elora Festival <strong>2024</strong><br />

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Incredible Music, in Ontario’s<br />

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JULY 5 - 20, <strong>2024</strong><br />

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The warp, the weft and the loom: Here’s the writeup that<br />

caught my eye:<br />

“This summer at TSM, David Baik, violin,and Gregory Lewis,<br />

violin, are both performing in the TSM Bach & Vivaldi concert<br />

on <strong>July</strong> 24, at Church of the Redeemer, with Jonathan Crow,<br />

violin, Christopher Bagan, harpsichord and Academy Fellows<br />

from the Chamber Music Institute. The concert is presented in<br />

loving memory of Ji Soo Choi, a TSM Fellow alumna (2017 cohort).<br />

A reception with the artists is included after the performance.<br />

All proceeds from this concert go towards supporting the TSM<br />

Academy. (Tickets are $95, or $50 for those under 35 years of age).”<br />

Jonathan Crow, the hands-on artistic director of TSM, is also,<br />

in all his spare time, the concertmaster of the Toronto Symphony<br />

Orchestra. “Spare time” it is safe to say will be in short supply for him<br />

during the festival, juggling concertizing, mentoring and fellowship.<br />

Harpsichordist Christopher Bagan is a worthy standard bearer for the<br />

U of T Faculty of Music’s role in TSM’s evolution from its Silver Creek<br />

days. The participation of the Academy Fellows is for me, as previously<br />

mentioned, TSM’s most compelling reason to be. And Baik and Lewis<br />

are the bridge between the two roles: former fellows, alumni, somewhere<br />

on the path to mentorship, here for a kind of homecoming.<br />

David Perlman can be reached at publisher@thewholenote.com<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> | 27


CLASSICAL AND BEYOND<br />

EARLY MUSIC<br />

FELLOWSHIP AND MENTORING:<br />

Further Reflections<br />

New Brunswick violinist Katya Poplyansky first participated<br />

as a fellow in the TSM emerging artist program in<br />

the summer of 2018 and returned the following summer.<br />

Q. Looking back to the second time you participated<br />

in the EAP, what do you appreciate the most about what the<br />

program contributed to your artistic growth?<br />

A. I loved the challenge and variety of repertoire, as well as the opportunity<br />

to work and perform alongside the amazing faculty. As an<br />

example, in a few short weeks I was intimately acquainted with the<br />

music of Golijov, Brahms, Copland and Shostakovich to name a few. I<br />

was so grateful to learn and perform this wonderful repertoire …and<br />

understand the importance of balance and hard work.<br />

BO HUANG FACEBOOK<br />

Q. What would be your advice to incoming fellows on making the<br />

most of the opportunity?<br />

A. Try to find moments of peace and solace when you can, whether<br />

that means taking a walk, reading a book, watching a video, having<br />

a tea, anything that brings you calm. These few weeks are so exciting<br />

and busy that they can fly by before you know it. Taking a few<br />

moments for yourself can help you appreciate the beauty of the music<br />

and your colleagues even more.<br />

TSM chamber music EAP mentor, cellist Rachel Mercer, is<br />

Principal Cello of NACO in Ottawa and Co-Artistic Director<br />

of the “5 at the First” Chamber Music Series in Hamilton.<br />

Q. One of the unique features of the EAP as a whole<br />

is the wide age range of the fellows (from 18-35) —<br />

which necessitates a diverse range of musicians at different stages of<br />

their expertise. How does that challenge you as a teacher to be able<br />

to meet different needs of your students?<br />

A. As a life-long learner, I experience the program more like a diverse<br />

mix of musicians across the board, and we are united in our shared<br />

exploration of the music we are to perform at the end of each session.<br />

While I’m the “older” colleague, I feel that every player contributes in<br />

their own unique way. You never know where a moment of insight,<br />

inspiration or clarity will come from, even in works that some of us<br />

may have played many many times!<br />

Q. With students coming from different backgrounds of learning and<br />

stages of their musicianship, how do you go about setting a somewhat<br />

uniform goal/benchmark for these students upon completion<br />

of the program?<br />

A. The opportunity for the performance at the end of each week<br />

is definitely the immediate goal and the fact that these groups can<br />

perform some of the most complex and significant works in the<br />

chamber music repertoire in such a short time is a testament to the<br />

artistic level of the program and its director, Jonathan Crow. But every<br />

group and piece is different, and with each I endeavour to create a<br />

positive atmosphere and cultivate good will.<br />

Compiled and edited by Michael Zarathus-Cook<br />

Michael Zarathus-Cook is Editor-in-Chief of CANNOPY a visual<br />

and performing arts magazine. The interviews quoted here are<br />

from coverage of TSM in the Hubs & Huddles series presented by<br />

CANNOPY. Access the full story by visiting substack.com/@cannopy<br />

and subscribing to Hubs & Huddles.<br />

Purcell was “modern”<br />

and so is this production<br />

Les Arts<br />

Florissants’<br />

Fairy Queen<br />

BY STEPHANIE CONN<br />

William Christie and Les Arts Florissants<br />

are synonymous with skillful, sumptuous<br />

playing. On <strong>July</strong> 11, in the opening<br />

performance of this year’s Toronto Summer Music festival,<br />

audiences here will have a rare chance to hear them<br />

as they present one of Henry Purcell’s delightful semioperas,<br />

The Fairy Queen. It’s part of an international<br />

tour that began last summer, and which takes this<br />

17th-century work to a new level.<br />

This production marks a creative revisiting of this music by Christie<br />

and his ensemble some 35 years after they first recorded it (1989). That<br />

album was instrumental in cementing Christie’s place as a leader in<br />

historically-informed performance. But Christie has said that in his<br />

half-century of interpreting The Fairy Queen this production is the<br />

most unique: the orchestra of Les Arts Florissants is joined by dancers<br />

28 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


A MIRACLE<br />

The Fairy Queen, coming to Toronto Summer Music, pictured<br />

here in the Chaconne: “They shall be as happy as they are<br />

Fair.” At Festival Dans les Jardins de William Christie.<br />

J GAZEAU<br />

from Companie Käfig, directed by French-Algerian hip-hop choreographer<br />

Mourad Merzouki, and the singers are graduates of Les<br />

Jardins des Voix, a training program run by Les Arts Florissants and its<br />

co-directors, Christie and singer/conductor Paul Agnew. The chorus<br />

singers are also called on to move and dance along with Merzouki’s<br />

dancers… and to prove that hip-hop works well with 17th-century art<br />

music. As Agnew has mentioned, Purcell was very modern in his own<br />

time, so why should current interpretations not push boundaries, too?<br />

Purcell’s best-known work is probably the opera Dido and<br />

Aeneas. The Fairy Queen, however, is a semi-opera loosely related<br />

to Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and designed to be<br />

performed alongside it as a series of tableaux or “masques.” These<br />

provided entertainment in between acts of the play, and featured a<br />

similarly magical cast of characters and situations in the woods on a<br />

midsummer nIght.<br />

Although Purcell is one of England’s great and beloved composers,<br />

the music of The Fairy Queen is very French in style at times. There<br />

are a few reasons for this: one of the main ones being King Charles<br />

II’s love of French music, by Lully and his contemporaries. Charles<br />

II even went as far as to establish his own “24 Violins of the King”—<br />

not to be outdone by his cousin Louis XIV’s Vingt-quatre violons du<br />

Roi. Purcell however earns his honorary title of Orpheus Britannicus<br />

because of his deft and playful setting of English texts – in this work<br />

such memorable pieces as One Charming Night, the Drunken Poet<br />

scene with its broad humour, and beautiful instrumental movements<br />

including the joyous Chaconne which draws it to a close.<br />

The Fairy Queen deserves to be more popular and more performed.<br />

The maturity and beauty of this music makes all the more tragic<br />

the fact that Purcell died at age 35, just three years after it was first<br />

performed. As Paul Agnew has said about the challenges of directing<br />

this work, “It’s charming, beautiful, funny, touching, magnificent<br />

music – and if you can communicate a little bit of the love for Purcell’s<br />

music then people should be very touched.”<br />

Stephanie Conn is an ethnomusicologist, editor, and former<br />

producer for CBC Radio Music. With the ensemble Puirt a Baroque<br />

she sang on the 1999 Juno-nominated recording Return of the<br />

Wanderer, and has sung with Tafelmusik, La Chapelle de Québec,<br />

Aradia, and Sine Nomine. In Cape Breton she is active as a traditional<br />

Gaelic singer and piano accompanist. You can find her podcast at<br />

meezstephanie.substack.com/ (also on Spotify or YouTube).<br />

ACIS AND GALATEA<br />

G.F. HANDEL<br />

Oct 24–27, <strong>2024</strong> | Elgin Theatre<br />

Full of sensuality, vivacity and humour,<br />

Handel’s Acis and Galatea is one of the<br />

composer’s most beloved operas.<br />

DAVID AND JONATHAN<br />

M.A. CHARPENTIER<br />

Apr 9–13, 2025 | Koerner Hall<br />

THE OPERA EVENT OF THE YEAR!<br />

Charpentier’s greatest masterpiece,<br />

never before staged in Canada.<br />

SUBSCRIPTIONS ON SALE NOW!<br />

operaatelier.com<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> | <strong>29</strong>


Women in Music: An upcoming collaboration by the AGO and<br />

Tafelmusik will celebrate women in music and the visual arts.<br />

Tafelmusik’s concert in the airy Walker Court will be played by<br />

a quartet drawn from the orchestra and will feature music by<br />

Elisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre, Isabella Leonarda and Marianne<br />

Martinez. The quartet will also introduce us to music composed by<br />

“Mrs. Philarmonica,” a pseudonym for a talented composer who<br />

was clearly influenced by Corelli. Their program complements the<br />

AGO’s exhibition, “Making her Mark: A History of Women Artists in<br />

Europe 1400-1800,” which ends on <strong>July</strong> 1.<br />

Jun 28 7:00: Art Gallery of Ontario. Tafelmusik: Making Herself<br />

Heard. Geneviève Gilardeau, violin; Cristina Zacharias, violin;<br />

Michael Unterman, cello; Charlotte Nediger, harpsichord. 416-979-<br />

6648. A seated performance free with general admission.<br />

Mostly Madrigals: three matinees: Whether they showcase clever<br />

wordplay or bemoan thwarted love, Renaissance madrigals are an<br />

entertaining genre, but it must be said (and I have before!) that they<br />

are even more fun to sing than to hear. Get your madrigal on this<br />

summer at three matinee events touring different locations. A small<br />

vocal ensemble will sing 16th-century secular songs from England,<br />

France and Italy in an outdoor setting, but who will stop you if you<br />

join in? (Bring your own lawn chair!)<br />

Jun 12 1:00: Singout at Woodbine Beach. 1675 Lake Shore Blvd. E. Free.<br />

Jul 12 1:00: Singout at Humber Bay West. Gazebo at 50 Humber Bay<br />

Park Rd. W., Etobicoke. Free. Google “Gazebo at Humber Bay.”<br />

Aug 12 1:00: Singout at Pickering Esplanade Park. 1 The Esplanade,<br />

Pickering. Free.<br />

Music Mondays: Bird-watching grew exponentially in popularity<br />

during the pandemic when, like sourdough-baking, it was an<br />

activity that could be done safely at home. But it’s a different Byrd<br />

EARLY MUSIC ROUNDUP<br />

Walker Court, at the AGO<br />

CARMEN WALKER<br />

that will be celebrated in an<br />

upcoming concert by the<br />

Cardinal Consort of Viols,<br />

joined by countertenor Daniel<br />

Cabena. This year marks<br />

the 400th anniversary of a<br />

composer who is beloved by<br />

choristers and viol-players<br />

but deserves greater attention<br />

in general. The concert<br />

will feature works by William<br />

Byrd and, to place him in<br />

context, by his contemporaries<br />

as well.<br />

The Cardinal Consort of Viols<br />

Jun 17, 12:15: Church of the<br />

Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521 X223 or www.musicmondays.ca<br />

or musicmondayscs@gmail.com. PWYC ($10 suggested).<br />

Frey at Elora: I feel that no opportunity to hear Elinor Frey play<br />

should be missed. Her performances of 17th and 18th-century<br />

compositions delight whether she is interpreting classics or bringing<br />

lesser-known works to light, such as in her latest recording of music<br />

by Dell’abaco. Her performance at this year’s Elora Festival will<br />

return to more familiar works as she revisits Bach’s Cello Suites. She<br />

recently performed the entire set over two nights in Toronto, but<br />

presumably this concert will present a selection of suites.<br />

Jul 13, 4:00: Elora Festival. Elinor Frey Plays Bach. St. John’s Anglican<br />

Church (Elora), 36 Henderson St., Elora. www.ticketpeak.co. $50; $20(st).<br />

Elinor Frey playing Bach on a five-string Baroque cello<br />

– Church of St. Andrew & St. Paul in Montréal.<br />

Compiled by Stephanie Conn<br />

MOSTLY<br />

MADRIGALS<br />

Singout<br />

WED. JUNE 12, 1pm<br />

Woodbine Beach<br />

gazebo<br />

Singout<br />

FRI. JULY 12, 1pm<br />

Humber Bay West<br />

Park gazebo<br />

Singout<br />

MON. AUG 12, 1pm<br />

Pickering Esplanade<br />

Park gazebo<br />

These concerts are FREE. Please bring a lawn chair.<br />

For details see listing section.<br />

Painting by Catherine Anderson<br />

30 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


WORLD MUSIC ROUNDUP<br />

David Pecaut Square<br />

Luminato in the Square takes place <strong>June</strong> 7-16 in David Pecaut<br />

Square 215 King Street W, Toronto).<br />

This is the Luminato Festival’s lively central location for art, culture,<br />

and community, where a whole wide world of diverse concerts,<br />

performances, installations, interactive workshops, with each day’s<br />

music co-curated with another presenter or arts organization. Entry<br />

is free for all events.<br />

One such event is the Toronto Arts Council’s 50th Anniversary<br />

Celebration, on Thursday, <strong>June</strong> 13 from 6-9:30 pm, which promises<br />

to be a fun-filled, all-ages celebration of dance, music, visual/media<br />

art and community, representing just some of the dynamic work<br />

that Toronto Arts Council supports. Family-friendly interactive arts<br />

activities will give everyone the opportunity to create and innovate<br />

together as we celebrate how artists and arts organizations contrib-<br />

ute to our city. “Join us, and together, let’s keep believing in art.”<br />

Beyond David Pecault Square this summer, there’s much music<br />

from all the worlds of music and musics of the world that make their<br />

home here. Noted in brief below, by date, is just a taste of what we<br />

knew when we went to press, and could get into our daily listings.<br />

But as the summer continues, remember that The WholeNote’s<br />

online listings are updated weekly, and are searchable by “world” and<br />

other genres. Visit thewholenote.com/index.php/listings/just-ask<br />

Music in the Market – Andy Philips Plays Steel Drum Jun 5,<br />

2pm. Bloor/Borden Farmer’s Market.<br />

Solalie. Jun 8, 10am, 11am & 3pm. WeeFestival of Arts & Culture.<br />

A unique sound art installation and concert inspired by the natural<br />

world, for infants and toddlers 12 months and up. Also Jun 9, 11 am<br />

& 3pm).<br />

Earth Garden: Aki Gitigaan Jun 7, 6-11pm. Luminato in the<br />

Square. Elder Duke Redbird, dancer and Miigwech Collective member<br />

Cotee Harper, Jeremy Dutcher, and DJ Classic Roots. Hosted by<br />

Tamara Podemski. David Pecaut Square. Free<br />

border crossing odyssey Jun 15, 5pm. Jumblies Theatre. Selected<br />

works from Jumblies’ multi-year project blue skies, red earth & tall<br />

pines, including lines between things, a multimedia exhibition of<br />

comics, sculpture and audio art and songs from the edge, a suite of<br />

new music from Suba Sankaran plus other selected works. 132 Fort<br />

York Blvd.<br />

Summer Music in the Garden: IndigiDivas at Harbourfront<br />

Jun 21, 7pm. Harbourfront Centre. Classical and contemporary.<br />

Toronto Music Garden<br />

Possibilities Jun 21, 8pm. Nagata Shachu - 9 member taiko drumming<br />

ensemble. Harbourfront Centre - Fleck Dance Theatre. <br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> | 31


Opening Gala Concert: Autorickshaw & the PSQ Jun 22,<br />

7:30pm. Leith Summer Festival. Pop, western and Indian, funk<br />

and jazz. Autorickhaw – Suba Sankaran, voice; Ed Hanley, tabla;<br />

Dylan Bell, beatbox; Penderecki String Quartet. (Leith)<br />

“Walking Through The Fire”: Indigenous Collaborations With<br />

Sultans of String in Honour of National Indigenous History Month.<br />

Jun 22, 8pm Hugh’s Room Live. Alyssa Delbaere-Sawchuk; Dr.<br />

Duke Redbird; Marc Meriläinen; Shannon Thunderbird; The North<br />

Sound. Virtual guests include the Northern Cree Pow Wow Group,<br />

Inuit Throat Singers Kendra Tagoona & Tracy Sarazin, and others.<br />

Summer Music in the Garden: Crossroads Jul 11, 7pm Harbourfront<br />

Centre. Iranian classical. Tarolinbak Persian Trio.<br />

Toronto Music Garden.<br />

Natural Balance Jul 11, 7pm Westben. Music, art and storytelling<br />

with members of Alderville First Nation, Dave Mowat, Leanne<br />

Betasamosake Simpson, Cale Crowe, Jordan Mowat. The Barn<br />

(Campbellford)<br />

Welcome to Char Bagh Jun 14 6-11pm Luminato in the Square.<br />

Kathak dance performances, Hindustani ghazals, classical ragas,<br />

Bangladeshi pop. David Pecaut Square. Free.<br />

Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy: Kal Ho Na Ho Jul 20, 7pm. TO Live/<br />

Small World Music Series. Shankar Mahadevan, Ehsaan Noorani,<br />

and Loy Mendonsa. Meridian Hall<br />

Breathings Jul 22, 7:30pm. Toronto Summer Music. Breath at<br />

the centre of the musical act. Constantinople’s musicians and<br />

guests from indigenous communities are guided by the pulsing of<br />

a heartbeat and the human voice in all its forms. Edward Johnson<br />

Building - Walter Hall<br />

Schmaltz & Pepper Jul 23, 7:30pm: Toronto Summer Music.<br />

Yiddish music ensemble plays klezmer inspired by jazz, Roma,<br />

classical, and European folk music. Edward Johnson Building -<br />

Walter Hall.<br />

Summer Music in the Garden: Scenic Sojourn Jul 25, 7pm Harbourfront<br />

Centre. Traditional & contemporary Chinese music. Toronto<br />

Chinese Orchestra Chamber Players. Toronto Music Garden<br />

Summer Music in the Garden: From Tehran to Casablanca<br />

Aug 1 7pm. Harbourfront Centre. Middle Eastern, Balkan, and<br />

North African music. Toronto Music Garden,<br />

Colours of Carnival Aug 2, 7pm Brampton On Stage. Soca,<br />

dancehall, and calypso – a radiant mix of soulful perfection. The<br />

Rose Patio<br />

Summer Music in the Garden: From Baghdad to Toronto Aug<br />

8 7pm Harbourfront Centre.. Moneka Arabic Jazz. Toronto Music<br />

Garden.<br />

Summer Music in the Garden: The Art of Expression Aug 11,<br />

4pm Harbourfront Centre. Pan-African drumming and dancing.<br />

Ngoma Ensemble. Toronto Music Garden.<br />

Music Mondays Aug 12, 12:15pm. Syrian and Arabic traditional<br />

songs infused with Flamenco music. Church of the Holy Trinity.<br />

Summer Music in the Garden: The Family That Sings Together<br />

Aug 22 7:00: Harbourfront Centre.. Georgian polyphony. Ori<br />

Shalva. Toronto Music Garden<br />

Compiled by Wholenote staff<br />

Toronto Music Garden<br />

OPERA & CHORAL MUSIC ROUNDUP<br />

Tagged - you’re it!<br />

When we went to press with this edition we already had<br />

dozens of listings tagged as opera, and choral. “Tagged” in<br />

this case means that when someone searches our listings<br />

database using either of those terms, what they will get is all<br />

the detailed listings that are likely to be of interest.<br />

What struck us immediately was how literally all-overthe-Ontario-map<br />

the opportunities are this summer.<br />

Depending on where you live and work, and your summer<br />

plans, and where you’re planning to be, you can hear<br />

some magnificent singing – getting an opera or choral fix<br />

in all sorts of places, including many that are other than<br />

‘the usual.”<br />

Below, in brief below is just a taste of what we knew<br />

when we went to press, and could get into our daily listings,<br />

which is where you’ll find all of the details! But as the<br />

summer continues, remember that The WholeNote’s online<br />

listings are updated weekly, and are searchable by “opera,”<br />

“choral” and other genres.<br />

Visit thewholenote.com/index.php/listings/just-ask<br />

OPERA<br />

This year, Summer Opera Lyric Theatre will present their minifestival<br />

of three operas at The Alumnae Theatre. Originally<br />

Toronto’s Firehall No.4, and built in 1900, this handsome building<br />

– 70 Berkeley Street at Adelaide – was renovated and restored<br />

by the Alumnae Theatre Company in 1972. Puccini’s La Boheme,<br />

Mozart’s Idomeneo, and Handel’s Xerxes (<strong>July</strong> 26-<strong>August</strong> 4).<br />

The Turn of the Screw Jun12-15 Opera 5. Britten’s creepy<br />

psychological thriller with a signature Opera 5 twist – a fresh take<br />

on this spooky opera classic. (Theatre Passe Muraille, Toronto)<br />

A New Musical: The Selfish Giant’s Garden Jun 14-16;<br />

Jun 21-23 Westben. Can one child make a difference? This<br />

original, fully staged musical, based on a short story by Oscar<br />

Wilde, explores the precarious beauty and power of nature (<br />

Westben’s The Barn, in Campbellford).<br />

Shoestring Opera: The Magic Flute. Jul 06 Elora Festival.<br />

A fantastic way to introduce younger people to the magic of<br />

opera.In this whimsical adaptation, Allegra finds a golden flute<br />

32 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


on her way home from school. Blowing on it, her street turns into<br />

a dark forest. She blows again and out pops Papageno, a strange<br />

bird-catcher – with a padlock on his mouth! Can Allegra help her<br />

new friend and get home in time for her music lesson? (Melville<br />

United Church, Fergus)<br />

Il barbiere di Siviglia (The Barber of Seville) Jul 11 Brott Music<br />

Festival. Figaro’s madcap schemes and Rossini’s luscious melodies<br />

…how could anyone resist!? With the Brott Opera cast and the<br />

National Academy Orchestra (Theatre Aquarius, Hamilton).<br />

Opera Plus Jul 19 Festival of the Sound. An evening of opera<br />

and musical theatre from Puccini to Porter (Charles W. Stockey<br />

Centre, Parry Sound).<br />

Mishaabooz’s Realm Aug 15 & 17. Commissioned by Highlands<br />

Opera Studio (HOS) in 2017 and written in Haliburton County!<br />

Combining opera with First Nation singers and instrumentalists,<br />

created for HOS by Cree First Nation composer, Andrew Balfour<br />

(Northern Lights Performing Arts Pavilion,Haliburton).<br />

CHORAL<br />

Classically Composed! Jun 15 Brampton Festival Singers.<br />

Mozart: Requiem and other works. Brampton Festival Singers;<br />

Great Lakes Philharmonic; Robert Hennig and Anton Yeretsky,<br />

directors (North Bramalea United Church, Brampton).<br />

Opening Night Gala: The Creation Jul 05 Elora Festival. Haydn:<br />

The Creation. Elora Singers; Claire de Sévigné, soprano; Isaiah<br />

Bell, tenor; Tyler Duncan, baritone; Musicians of the Kitchener-<br />

Waterloo Symphony. (Gambrel Barn Elora).<br />

Britten: Canticles, Hymns & Folk Songs Jul 06 Elora Festival.<br />

Elora Singers, with Isaiah Bell, tenor; Erika Switzer, piano;<br />

Christopher Dawes, organ; Mark Vuorinen, conductor (St. John’s<br />

Anglican Church, Elora).<br />

Carmina Burana Jul 20, Elora Festival, and <strong>July</strong> 21 Festival of<br />

the Sound. For 45 years, the Elmer Iseler Singers, Elora Festival<br />

and Festival of the Sound have championed great music. This<br />

once-a-generation performance of Carl Orff’s iconic Carmina<br />

Burana is not to be missed. Also Brahms: Variations on a Theme<br />

by Haydn. Elmer Iseler Singers (Lydia Adams, conductor);<br />

Elora Singers (Mark Vuorinen, conductor); Anagnason and<br />

Kinton, piano duo; Beverly Johnston and the Festival Percussion<br />

Ensemble. (<strong>July</strong> 20, Gambrel Barn in Elora; <strong>July</strong> 21, Charles W.<br />

Stockey Centre in Parry Sound).<br />

Toronto Mass Choir Aug 1 Festival of the Sound. Sing, clap, and<br />

celebrate Emancipation Day as the sound of this Juno winning<br />

gospel choir resonates through the incredible acoustics of the<br />

Stockey Centre. (Charles W. Stockey Centre, Parry Sound)<br />

An Epic 80s Sing-Along! Aug 3 Choir! Choir! Choir! “Don’t<br />

stop believin’”, and prepare to sing your heart out! (Regent<br />

Theatre (Picton)<br />

Compiled by Wholenote staff<br />

Satisfied by Toronto Mass Choir, features Nicole Sinclair Anderson,<br />

from their recent Hymns Alive album.<br />

Missa Afro Brasiliera Jun 11 Luminato Festival. 25th<br />

Anniversary of Nathaniel Dett Chorale. Sid Robinovitch:<br />

Canciones por las Americas; Xavier Montsalvatge: Cinco<br />

Canciones Negras; Carlos Alberto Pinto Fonseca: Missa Afro<br />

Brasiliera. With Measha Bruggergosman-Lee, soprano; BaKari<br />

I. Lindsay, dancer & choreographer; Nathaniel Dett Chorale.<br />

(Koerner Hall, Toronto)<br />

The Schobertiade Jun 14 Apocryphonia. In collaboration with<br />

the Rezonance Baroque Ensemble. Johann Schobert: Sonatas<br />

for Keyboard & Strings; and works for strings and voice by<br />

Vaughan Williams, Giuseppe Agus, & Paul Constantinescu. Andrea<br />

Botticelli, fortepiano; Rezan Onen-Lapointe, violin; Laura Jones,<br />

cello; Michelle Odorico, violin; Alexander Cappellazzo, tenor.<br />

(Church of the Redeemer, Toronto)<br />

PRESENTS<br />

Levels the Play<br />

by Abby Grass and Clarence (CJ) Jura<br />

A developmental workshop reading,<br />

<strong>July</strong> 19, <strong>2024</strong><br />

The Magic Flute by W A Mozart<br />

and opera excerpts in collaboration with<br />

Opera by Request, <strong>August</strong> 8-18, <strong>2024</strong><br />

WWW.NOSTRINGSTHEATRE.COM<br />

Opera BrewHaHa<br />

Opera pub night at the Granite Brewery<br />

in collaboration with Opera by Request,<br />

<strong>August</strong> 13, <strong>2024</strong><br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> | 33


FROM UP HERE<br />

Hornepayne<br />

HELLO YOU!<br />

(YES, YOU)<br />

SOPHIA PERLMAN<br />

COURTESY PERLMAN FAMILY<br />

One of the things I will forever love about writing for<br />

print media in general is that I never know exactly<br />

who you are. So it feels a bit like throwing a message<br />

in a bottle. One of the things I will forever love about<br />

writing for this particular magazine though is that I have<br />

a better idea who you might be: You are a music maker,<br />

or you are a “music lover.” You are presenters, promoters,<br />

general managers and music directors. You are the parent<br />

reading this while you wait for your kid to get out of<br />

music lessons. You are a music student yourself. You are<br />

the person behind the counter at a business, or behind<br />

the desk at a library or community centre, or the front of<br />

house staff at a venue that serves as a distribution point<br />

for this free, physical magazine. Some of you have been<br />

reading this magazine for a long, long time.<br />

These various “yous” are woven into my childhood: eagle-eyed<br />

readers will have noticed the family name, and long time readers<br />

will have seen my name pop up in various capacities since early on<br />

in the magazine’s evolution. My father, and longest-suffering editor<br />

(from pre kindergarten) David Perlman has written from the publisher’s<br />

perch about the genesis of this magazine. Growing up alongside<br />

The WholeNote (and its older sibling the Kensington Market Drum)<br />

helped me understand that publishing a newspaper or magazine was<br />

like making music – everyone has a part to play.<br />

How The Children Saved the Carnival Kensington Summer Festival, 2000<br />

St. Catherines<br />

“FESTIVAL SEASON”<br />

The same can, without question, be<br />

said of any of the myriad of music and<br />

arts festivals in <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> and <strong>August</strong>.<br />

The same chunk of Kensington Market<br />

where I had my early lessons into the<br />

world of publishing was where I also had<br />

my first “behind the curtain” look at the<br />

sheer amount of planning, effort and<br />

teamwork it takes to produce a festival<br />

– thanks to the genius of the late Ida<br />

Carnevale and her committed belief that<br />

if there were going to be festivals, even Trying to see your own festival<br />

children were expected to help.<br />

can be a long work-day when<br />

Some of the “yous” that are reading you're in festival mode. Josh<br />

this, right now, are “up to your knees<br />

Grossman’s book from <strong>June</strong><br />

standing on your heads” as my father<br />

2022 said this: “Day 2 of Toronto<br />

Jazz Festival! If you need<br />

likes to say, in helping to produce a<br />

me, here’s where I’ll be…”<br />

festival this summer. So for all of you<br />

in that final crucial crunch-time of creating magic for others, a few<br />

sincere wishes for the season:<br />

– I sincerely hope that your <strong>2024</strong> festival planning didn’t start the<br />

morning after your 2023 wrap party, and that you’ve had at least<br />

one solid night’s sleep since then.<br />

– I hope that you have managed to ride this year out, and that you<br />

know that you aren’t alone.<br />

– I refuse to spend any more column inches talking about the scary<br />

post-covid state of arts and culture. I see all round me the brilliant,<br />

brave, creative solutions you are finding every day to make<br />

things work. I hope you find ways to celebrate these with each<br />

other and to find community in your shared resilience.<br />

– I hope you get a little bit of time this summer to actually see your<br />

festival through the eyes of someone who doesn’t know the nuts<br />

continues to page 79<br />

FACEBOOK<br />

34 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong>, <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


<strong>2024</strong><br />

GREEN PAGES<br />

20th Annual Summer Music Guide<br />

Welcome to The WholeNote’s 20th annual Green Pages guide to<br />

summer music! We’ve invited music festivals and series from across<br />

Ontario to let you know what they’re up to this summer, in their own<br />

words. There are festivals of all kinds and genres, from classical to<br />

jazz to opera and more! The 28 profiles below represent what we<br />

received as of our print deadline. Like the listings section that follows<br />

(pages 42-57) the most we can do in print is to provide a snapshot,<br />

frozen in time, of a dynamic and ever expanding summer music scene.<br />

While our next print edition – the first of our 30th Anniversary season<br />

– only comes out around Labour Day, we’ll continue to update these<br />

Green Pages, and our summer live music listings, regularly over the<br />

course of the summer, at thewholenote.com - see our Who’s Who tab,<br />

or our Listings tab, on the home page.<br />

Enjoy what’s here! We hope it whets your appetite.<br />

For information on how to join the Green Pages,<br />

contact Karen at karen@thewholenote.com<br />

<strong>2024</strong> GREEN PAGES TEAM<br />

PROJECT MANAGER: Karen Ages<br />

PROJECT EDITOR: Danial Jazaeri<br />

LAYOUT & DESIGN: Susan Sinclair<br />

WEBSITE: Kevin King<br />

ASHKENAZ FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>August</strong> 26 to September 2, <strong>2024</strong><br />

BROOKSIDE MUSIC ‘FESTIVAL OF<br />

THE BAY’<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 18 to <strong>August</strong> 2, <strong>2024</strong><br />

BROOKSIDE MUSIC - “ONE WORLD<br />

MUSIC FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>August</strong> 23 to 24, <strong>2024</strong><br />

BROTT MUS!IC FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 20 to <strong>August</strong> 15, <strong>2024</strong><br />

CCC TORONTO INTERNATIONAL<br />

MUSIC FESTIVAL<br />

➤ October 21 to November 4, <strong>2024</strong><br />

COLLINGWOOD MUSIC FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 5 to 12, <strong>2024</strong><br />

ELORA FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 5 to 20, <strong>2024</strong><br />

FESTIVAL OF THE SOUND<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 1, <strong>July</strong> 19 to <strong>August</strong> 3, <strong>2024</strong><br />

HABARI AFRICA FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>August</strong> 9 to 11, <strong>2024</strong><br />

HIGHLANDS OPERA STUDIO<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 25 to <strong>August</strong> 26, <strong>2024</strong><br />

JUMBLIES THEATRE:<br />

BORDER CROSSING ODYSSEY<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 12 to 27, <strong>2024</strong><br />

LEITH SUMMER FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 22 to <strong>August</strong> 24, <strong>2024</strong><br />

MARKHAM JAZZ FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>August</strong> 16 to 18, <strong>2024</strong><br />

MARKHAM VILLAGE MUSIC<br />

FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 14 to 15, <strong>2024</strong><br />

MUSIC AT PORT MILFORD<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 13 to <strong>August</strong> 3, <strong>2024</strong><br />

MUSIC MONDAYS<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 3 to September 2, <strong>2024</strong><br />

OPEN EARS FESTIVAL OF<br />

MUSIC & SOUND<br />

➤ May 30 to <strong>June</strong> 2, <strong>2024</strong><br />

PORT HOPE JAZZ<br />

➤ <strong>August</strong> 22 to 25, <strong>2024</strong><br />

RHYTHMS OF CANADA<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> <strong>29</strong> to <strong>July</strong> 1, <strong>2024</strong><br />

SOMETHING ELSE! FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 20 to <strong>June</strong> 23, <strong>2024</strong><br />

SOUTH COAST JAZZ FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>August</strong> 9 to 11, <strong>2024</strong><br />

STRATFORD SUMMER MUSIC<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 18 to <strong>August</strong> 11, <strong>2024</strong><br />

SUMMER OPERA LYRIC THEATRE<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 26 to <strong>August</strong> 4, <strong>2024</strong><br />

SUMMERSTAGE <strong>2024</strong><br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 18 to <strong>August</strong> 18, <strong>2024</strong><br />

SUN LIFE UPTOWN WATERLOO<br />

JAZZ FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 19 to 21, <strong>2024</strong><br />

TD TORONTO JAZZ FEST<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 21 to 30, <strong>2024</strong><br />

TORONTO SUMMER MUSIC<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 11 to <strong>August</strong> 3, <strong>2024</strong><br />

WESTBEN<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 14 to <strong>August</strong> 4, <strong>2024</strong><br />

thewholenote.com Summer <strong>2024</strong> | 35


GREEN PAGES<br />

BROOKSIDE MUSIC ‘ONE WORLD MUSIC FESTIVAL’<br />

➤ <strong>August</strong> 23 to 24, <strong>2024</strong><br />

606 Little Lake Park Rd., Midland, ON<br />

Join us at the Multicultural One World Music Festival – Local talent will start<br />

things off on Friday night at Little Lake Park in Midland followed by Saturday’s<br />

collection of musicians and musical styles from around the world including<br />

African, Steel Drums, Moroccan, French Canadian and more! Includes a beer<br />

garden and international food vendors and market!<br />

705-427-3<strong>29</strong>5<br />

www.brooksidemusic.com<br />

www.facebook.com/BrooksideMusicAssociation www.<br />

youtu.be/CBWIQhvtq_c?si=Bhov1urT1O1QRNGk<br />

Elora Festival Elora, ON<br />

ASHKENAZ FESTIVAL<br />

➤<strong>August</strong> 26 to September 2, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Toronto, ON<br />

Ashkenaz is one of the largest and most prestigious showcases of Jewish music<br />

and culture in the world. Originally founded as a showcase for Klezmer/Yiddish<br />

music and culture, the Festival has evolved over the years into an eclectic showcase<br />

of global Jewish culture, encompassing not merely the traditions of eastern<br />

Europe, but also Sephardic, Mizrachi and other underrepresented Jewish identities,<br />

and all manner of cross-cultural fusion. The Festival is offered 90% free to the<br />

public and attracts a multicultural audience of over 60,000 people. Nowhere else<br />

in the world does so large and diverse an audience come together to experience<br />

Jewish cultural arts. Ashkenaz usually features over 75 performances and 200+<br />

individual artists, hailing from across Canada and around the world.<br />

(416) 979-9955<br />

ashkenaz.ca<br />

https://www.facebook.com/AshkenazFestival<br />

https://www.youtube.com/@AshkenazFestival<br />

BROOKSIDE MUSIC ‘FESTIVAL OF THE BAY’<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 18 to <strong>August</strong> 2, <strong>2024</strong><br />

333 King St., Midland, ON<br />

Just an hour north of Toronto, Brookside Music’s <strong>2024</strong> ‘Festival of the<br />

Bay’ in Midland will keep the music in summer with these internationally<br />

acclaimed performances.<br />

Join us at the Midland Cultural Centre at 7pm for: (Thurs, <strong>July</strong> 18) - “Bach’s<br />

Long Walk in the Snow - Tom Allen”; (Wed, <strong>July</strong> 24) - “Fiesta - Music of Spain<br />

and South America”; (Sun, <strong>July</strong> 28) - New Zealand String Quartet with James<br />

Campbell; and (Fri, <strong>August</strong> 2) - The Swiss Trio.<br />

The concerts are offered for an unbelievable $35, or any 4 for $100 plus HST.<br />

Seniors, children and students may attend for free!<br />

Join us for the sweet sounds of summer!<br />

705-527-4420<br />

www.brooksidemusic.com<br />

www.facebook.com/BrooksideMusicAssociation<br />

BROTT MUS!IC FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 20 to <strong>August</strong> 15, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Hamilton; Burlington; Parry Sound, ON<br />

Brott Music Festival is Ontario’s only and Canada’s largest orchestral music<br />

festival. Founded by the late Boris Brott in 1988, it enters its 37th season under<br />

the baton of Tania Miller. “Unique in its sheer variety” is how BMF’s mix of classical,<br />

opera, rock, pop and Broadway has been described. <strong>2024</strong> highlights include<br />

a Beethoven Immersive, Rossini’s Barber of Seville, Ian Parker playing Rachmaninoff’s<br />

2nd Piano Concerto, Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite, Dvorak 8 and Mahler 5,<br />

dedicated to Brott’s memory. There are free concerts on Hamilton’s Waterfront,<br />

one night only staged performance of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Evita, film music<br />

of James Bond, and an East Coast Kitchen party with Celtic band. The BMF<br />

features the National Academy Orchestra of Canada and BrottOpera Emerging<br />

Artists. Both are nationally recognized training programs.<br />

905-525-7664<br />

www.brottmusic.com<br />

www.facebook.com/BrottMusicFestival<br />

www.twitter.com/brottmusicfesti<br />

www.youtube.com/@brottmusicfestival2247<br />

CCC TORONTO INTERNATIONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL<br />

➤ October 21 to November 4, <strong>2024</strong><br />

5183 Sheppard Ave. E, Toronto, ON<br />

Since 2010, the CCCTIMF has established a solid name as one of the most reputable<br />

and high-profile music festivals in Canada. The festival is held in recognition<br />

of the artistic achievements of young musicians, providing them with the<br />

opportunity to learn, grow, and showcase their potential in performance. It also<br />

provides performance opportunities for young musicians to help bring the scope<br />

of their talents to new heights. The annual festival is conducted at the 626-seat,<br />

state-of-the-art P.C. Ho concert hall in Toronto. Trophies, medals, and scholarships<br />

are awarded to the winners based on the class criteria. Selected winners<br />

will receive the opportunity to perform in the Gala Concert and the “Rising Star”<br />

concert series. For more information, please visit our website.<br />

416-<strong>29</strong>2-9<strong>29</strong>3, x2<strong>29</strong><br />

www.ccctimf.org<br />

www.facebook.com/people/<br />

CCC-Toronto-International-Music-Festival/100069307357306<br />

www.twitter.com/ccctimf<br />

36 | Summer <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


COLLINGWOOD MUSIC FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 5 to 12, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Collingwood, ON<br />

The Collingwood Music Festival is an annual, family-friendly music festival<br />

that brings high-calibre, live music performances to Collingwood, Ontario.<br />

Between <strong>July</strong> 5 to 12, over 100 performing artists across classical, world, jazz<br />

and Indigenous music genres will present intimate chamber music recitals to<br />

full orchestral concerts.<br />

Highlights of the <strong>2024</strong> Festival will be: Toronto Concert Orchestra, Toronto<br />

Welsh Male Voice Choir, the duo Stick&Bow; performances by Tomson Highway,<br />

Gino Quilico and Julie Nesrallah, Joe Sealy with Jackie Richardson, James Campbell<br />

and Daniel Vnukowski. There will also be opportunities for talented youth<br />

to shine. The Collingwood Music Festival’s initiatives continue to create a platform<br />

where diverse voices converge, promoting unity and cultural understanding.<br />

705-416-1317<br />

www.collingwoodfestival.com<br />

www.facebook.com/collingwoodfest<br />

www.twitter.com/collingwoodfest<br />

www.youtube.com/channel/UCaojBwNJYcbShzb4gE42orw<br />

ELORA FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 5 to 20, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Various locations, Elora, ON<br />

Now in its 45th season, the Elora Festival has established a reputation as Canada’s<br />

international choral festival, presenting world-class choirs and vocal ensembles<br />

over three weeks in <strong>July</strong> in the artists’ village of Elora, “Ontario’s most<br />

beautiful village”.<br />

The Festival’s ensemble-in-residence is The Elora Singers, one of Canada’s<br />

finest professional chamber choirs.<br />

This year’s festival features The King’s Singers, Laila Biali, the Gryphon Trio,<br />

Elmer Iseler Singers, Constantinople, our Barn Dance, family concerts, Bach<br />

Day at the Festival, and more!<br />

519-846-0331<br />

www.elorafestival.ca<br />

www.facebook.com/elorafestival<br />

www.youtube.com/channel/UCIqiT4wiOx6j0l7FJ4CI61A<br />

FESTIVAL OF THE SOUND<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 1, <strong>July</strong> 19 to <strong>August</strong> 3, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Parry Sound, ON<br />

The Festival of the Sound is celebrating big this summer with an incredible line-up<br />

of classical, jazz and choral music, and much more. This year is extra special with<br />

two important anniversaries - James Campbell’s 40th as artistic director and the<br />

Festival’s 45th in beautiful Parry Sound, Ontario, Canada.<br />

705-746-2410<br />

www.festivalofthesound.ca<br />

www.facebook.com/FestivaloftheSound<br />

www.twitter.com/FestoftheSound<br />

www.youtube.com/FestivaloftheSound1<br />

HABARI AFRICA FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>August</strong> 9 to 11, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Harbourfront Centre, Toronto, ON<br />

Batuki Music Society is proud to present the Habari Africa Festival at Harbourfront<br />

Highlands Opera Studio Haliburton, ON<br />

Centre from Friday, <strong>August</strong> 9 to Sunday, <strong>August</strong> 11, <strong>2024</strong>. Habari Africa is a multidisciplinary<br />

music and arts festival that displays the rich and diverse cultures of<br />

Africa. Join us for a weekend of exploration and engagement with the art, sounds<br />

and tastes of the continent. The festival will offer an authentic experience through<br />

presentations that celebrate the uniqueness, wealth and diversity of African music,<br />

dance, film and arts. The annual Habari Africa Festival is a focal point of Toronto’s<br />

cultural calendar, bringing together musicians and performing artists from<br />

all over the world. The festival is an all-ages family event presented free to the<br />

public. Batuki Music is a non-profit African arts organization based in Toronto.<br />

416-948-4132<br />

www.batukimusic.com<br />

www.facebook.com/BatukiMusic<br />

www.youtube.com/watch?v=xP2MNiQjNg0<br />

HIGHLANDS OPERA STUDIO<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 25 to <strong>August</strong> 26, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Haliburton, ON<br />

Hear the best emerging professional voices from Canada and beyond in the<br />

beauty of the Haliburton Highlands, only 2.5 hours northeast of Toronto. Established<br />

in Haliburton, ON, in 2007 by internationally-acclaimed Canadian tenor<br />

Richard Margison and Canadian stage director/violist, and former Metropolitan<br />

Opera stage director, Valerie Kuinka, Highlands Opera Studio is an advanced<br />

intensive professional training and networking program for emerging operatic<br />

professionals. Chosen from close to 100 applicants from across Canada and internationally,<br />

the 17 successful <strong>2024</strong> participants attend the 5-week program free of<br />

charge and can be heard in public masterclasses, multiple concerts, community<br />

events, and two fully-staged operas: Rossini’s Il Barbiere di Siviglia and Andrew<br />

Balfour’s Mishabooz’s Realm, commissioned in 2017.<br />

1-855-455-5533<br />

www.highlandsoperastudio.com/events<br />

www.facebook.com/highlandsoperastudio<br />

www.twitter.com/highlandsopera<br />

www.youtube.com/user/HighlandsOperaStudio<br />

thewholenote.com Summer 2020 | 37


GREEN PAGES<br />

Markham Village Music Festival Markham, ON<br />

JUMBLIES THEATRE: BORDER CROSSING ODYSSEY<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 12 to 27, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Jumblies Theatre, Toronto, ON<br />

Jumblies is a Toronto-based organization that engages in collaborations between<br />

professional artists and diverse people and places, mentoring and supporting<br />

others to do so as well. Jumblies expands where art happens, who gets to be part<br />

of it, what forms it takes and whose stories it tells. As a culmination of our multiyear<br />

project, we present: border crossing odyssey a series of performances and<br />

presentations of selected works from our multi-year project blue skies, red earth<br />

& tall pines -- including a suite of new music from Suba Sankaran plus other<br />

selected works performed by the Gather Round Singers and guests and a multimedia<br />

exhibition of comics, sculpture and audio art. Events will take place in<br />

Brampton, Toronto and Scarborough from <strong>June</strong> 12 to <strong>June</strong> 27. Contact us at<br />

info@jumbliestheatre.org !<br />

647-918-4824<br />

www.jumbliestheatre.org<br />

www.facebook.com/jumbliestheatre<br />

LEITH SUMMER FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 22 to <strong>August</strong> 24, <strong>2024</strong><br />

419134 Tom Thomson Lane, Leith, ON<br />

The Leith Summer Festival and Artistic Director Jeremy Bell present five concerts<br />

each summer in the Historic Leith Church, 12km from Owen Sound. The church is<br />

an intimate venue with excellent acoustics. The festival begins on Saturday, <strong>June</strong> 22<br />

with a mix of Indo jazz and Classical with Autorickshaw and the Penderecki<br />

String Quartet. On Sunday, <strong>July</strong> 7, the New Zealand String Quartet performs<br />

Shostakovich and Debussy. The Swiss Piano Trio presents Dvorak’s Dumsky on<br />

Saturday, <strong>July</strong> 27. Benedict Lauziere, violin and Angel Park, piano will play Saint-<br />

Saens and Chausson on Sunday, <strong>August</strong> 11. On Saturday, <strong>August</strong> 24, Stewart<br />

Goodyear concludes the festival with Beethoven and Gershwin.<br />

Sunday afternoon concerts start at 2:30pm, Saturday evening concerts are at<br />

7:30pm. Tickets are $45 at www.roxytheatre.ca. For details, call 519-371-2833.<br />

519-664-2092<br />

www.leithchurch.ca<br />

www.facebook.com/LeithSummerFestival<br />

MARKHAM JAZZ FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>August</strong> 16 to 18, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Main Street Unionville, Markham, ON<br />

The Markham Jazz Festival features more than 30 free jazz, blues, soul and related<br />

acts on three stages, as well as along Main St. and in area restaurants. The <strong>2024</strong><br />

festival takes place Friday to Sunday, <strong>August</strong> 16 to 18. Experience award-winning<br />

music (Grammy and Juno winners) in Unionville’s charming heritage village<br />

setting. Free continuous shuttle from Markham Pan Am Centre (15 Main St.<br />

Unionville, near Unionville GO). Free Parking. Accessible.<br />

This year’s headliners include New York-based Duchess, and Grammy winner<br />

Nicole Zuraitis (Best Jazz Vocal Album <strong>2024</strong>) on Friday evening. Saturday<br />

evening includes Jackie Richardson, Juno winner Dominique Fils-Aimé, plus<br />

the amazing U.N. Jefferson. On Sunday, Hilario Duran’s Big Band (<strong>2024</strong> Juno<br />

winner for Jazz Album of the year) closes off the show.<br />

Come and have a ball!<br />

647-983-7777<br />

markhamjazzfestival.com<br />

www.facebook.com/markhamjazzfestival<br />

www.twitter.com/markhamjazzfest<br />

www.youtube.com/@markhamjazzfestival2823<br />

MARKHAM VILLAGE MUSIC FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 14 to 15, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Main Street, Markham, ON<br />

York Region’s largest outdoor music festival with five stages of multicultural entertainment<br />

(music and dance). More than 100 Craft and Food vendors, Farmers’<br />

Market. Headliners include Tom Wilson, Zaki Ibrahim, Exodus: Bob Marley<br />

tribute with Lazo Finn, Georgia Harmer, Pony Girl, Rikashay, Samba Squad,<br />

Dan the Music Man, Los Moralitos, <strong>June</strong>stone, Blackboard Blues Band, and<br />

more. Back again - Barkham will be at the north end of the street for dogs and<br />

their pet parents with vendors, Luge course and contests. The Kidz Zone at the<br />

bottom of the street will have games, performances, crafts. This is a family event<br />

for all ages. Friday from 6pm to 11pm; Saturday from 11am to 10pm.<br />

647-983-9054<br />

www.markhamfestival.com<br />

https://www.facebook.com/MarkhamVillageMusicFestival<br />

https://twitter.com/mvmfestival<br />

https://www.youtube.com/markhamfestival<br />

MUSIC AT PORT MILFORD<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 13 to <strong>August</strong> 3, <strong>2024</strong><br />

St. Mary Magdalene Church, Prince Edward County, ON<br />

Music at Port Milford Artist Chamber Music Series was established in 1987<br />

and takes place on four consecutive Saturday evenings at St. Mary Magdalene<br />

Church, 335 Main St., Picton. Tickets: $50 (adult), $20 (youth 16 and under &<br />

students). Season Pass: $150 (adult), $60 youth & students).<br />

Saturday, <strong>July</strong> 13, 7:30pm: “Beginnings”<br />

George Enescu; Trevor Wilson; Beethoven; Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson;<br />

Kevin Lau; Joseph Suk<br />

Saturday, <strong>July</strong> 20, 7:30pm: “Tenacity & Wit”<br />

Haydn; Margaret Brouwer; Ann Southam; Brahms<br />

Saturday, <strong>July</strong> 27, 7:30pm: “In Wonder”<br />

Ravel; Ian Cusson; Schumann; Ellington; Schubert; Dvorak<br />

Saturday, <strong>August</strong> 3, 7:30pm: “Romanceros”:<br />

38 | Summer 2020 thewholenote.com


Schubert; Schumann; Gabriella Lena Frank; Borodin: String Quartet No. 2<br />

914-439-5039<br />

www.musicatportmilford.org<br />

MUSIC MONDAYS<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 3 to September 2, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Church of the Holy Trinity, Toronto, ON<br />

Music Mondays has served as a launching pad for emerging talent, and a celebration<br />

of established local talent since its inception in 1992. Our pay-what-youcan<br />

lunchtime concerts take place in the warm acoustics of Holy Trinity Church,<br />

just steps away from the Eaton Centre, in busy Downtown Toronto. Our goal is to<br />

provide the highest possible musical experience to a pay-what-you-can downtown<br />

Toronto audience. Our audience includes office workers, tourists, retired folks,<br />

young children, the homeless, students, and the musically curious. The acoustics<br />

of Holy Trinity are very special - warm and inviting. Please join us for this, our 33rd<br />

Season. Bring your lunch – and a friend – every Monday at 12:15pm from <strong>June</strong> 3<br />

to Labour Day, September 2. Admission: Pay-what-you-can, $10 to $20 suggested.<br />

416-598-4521, x223<br />

www.musicmondays.ca<br />

www.facebook.com/MusicMondaysToronto<br />

www.twitter.com/musicmondayscs<br />

www.youtube.com/user/MusicMondaysHT<br />

OPEN EARS FESTIVAL OF MUSIC & SOUND<br />

➤ May 30 to <strong>June</strong> 2, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Kitchener/Waterloo, ON<br />

Join us at the Open Ears Festival <strong>2024</strong> (#OE24). Once again, this year’s festival<br />

brings some of the world’s highest calibre musicians to our region, featuring local,<br />

national, and international award-winning soloists and ensembles.<br />

We will present numerous performances and workshops to appease your curiosity<br />

and highlight the many cultural activities in our area, including the Canadian<br />

premiere of SIERRA performed by the one and only Vicki Chow, and the iconic<br />

experimental DJ Hieroglyphic Being. We also have more premiere performances,<br />

including sound installations, multi-media, foley workshops and a drag show.<br />

We look forward to seeing you there!<br />

www.openears.ca<br />

www.facebook.com/openearsfest<br />

www.twitter.com/openearsfest<br />

PORT HOPE JAZZ<br />

➤ <strong>August</strong> 22 to 25, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Port Hope, ON<br />

Port Hope Jazz strives to be Canada’s premier national jazz festival for the celebration<br />

of the diversity of Canadian Jazz arts excellence and to promote youth<br />

program development within a vibrant musical, economic and cultural atmosphere.<br />

We have a spectacular festival planned for <strong>August</strong> 22 to 25, <strong>2024</strong>.<br />

This year’s event will feature performances by Allison Au, Mike Downes<br />

with Robi Botos and Ted Quinlan, Kellylee Evans, Ewen Farncombe and Alex<br />

Bird, Steve Holt with Kevin Turcotte, Kirk MacDonald, Duncan Hopkins and<br />

Terry Clark, Duncan Hopkins, George Koller, Joy Lapps-Lewis, Fern Lindzon,<br />

Charlotte McAfee-Brunner, Alex Pangman, Reg Schwager, Michael Shand and<br />

The Shuffle Demons.<br />

905-885-2737<br />

www.porthopejazz.com<br />

Music at Port Milford Prince Edward County, ON<br />

www.facebook.com/porthopejazz<br />

RHYTHMS OF CANADA<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> <strong>29</strong> to <strong>July</strong> 1, <strong>2024</strong><br />

The Aga Khan Museum, Toronto, ON<br />

The culmination of a month of diverse musical performance, the Aga Khan<br />

Museum’s Rhythms of Canada Festival is returning for another weekend filled<br />

with live music, art, and family activities. Join us this summer from <strong>June</strong> <strong>29</strong> to<br />

<strong>July</strong> 1 and enjoy entrancing musical performances by a diverse range of local<br />

artists, special programming for all ages, delicious food, and our world-class<br />

collection of art from across the Muslim world.<br />

416-646-4677<br />

www.agakhanmuseum.org/rhythmsofcanada<br />

https://www.facebook.com/agakhanmuseumtoronto/?ref=page_internal<br />

https://twitter.com/agakhanmuseum<br />

SOMETHING ELSE! FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 20 to 23, <strong>2024</strong><br />

St. Cuthbert’s (2 Bond. St. N., Westdale, Hamilton); HPL – Central<br />

Library (55 York Blvd., Hamilton); Open Streets – Bernie Morelli<br />

Hub – Jimmy Thompson Memorial Pool, Hamilton, ON<br />

Zula Music & Arts Collective Hamilton presents the annual Something Else!<br />

Festival along with a year-round music series mostly focusing on jazz, creative,<br />

free, improvised, experimental music and various folk traditions.<br />

Ticketed, multi-bill events at St. Cuthbert’s include:<br />

Thursday, <strong>June</strong> 20 at 7pm: Earth, Wind & Choir; Ugly Beauties; Gayle Young;<br />

Sofia Jernberg & Mats Gustafsson.<br />

Friday, <strong>June</strong> 21 at 8pm: Beingfive; Amrita; The End.<br />

Saturday, <strong>June</strong> 22 at 4pm: Tashi Dorji; Cluttertones; Emmeluth’s Amoeba;<br />

and at 8pm: Sakina Abdou; Doug Tielli’s Imaginary Brass; Dave Rempis &<br />

Tashi Dorji.<br />

Ticketed events are $25-$30 advance tickets; $30-$40 at the door; $85 pass.<br />

Free events include:<br />

Saturday, <strong>June</strong> 22 at 12pm (HPL): Sakina Abdou & Dave Rempis; Aline’s<br />

Étoile Magique; Caroline Davis & Wendy Eisenberg<br />

thewholenote.com Summer <strong>2024</strong> | 39


GREEN PAGES<br />

it hosts educational programs, fostering musical appreciation and talent growth.<br />

With venues spanning churches, theatres, and outdoor spaces, the festival promises<br />

unique and unforgettable experiences. Stratford Summer Music ensures a<br />

summer filled with enchanting melodies and cultural enrichment for all, making<br />

it a highlight of the Canadian cultural calendar.<br />

519-271-2101<br />

www.stratfordsummermusic.ca<br />

www.facebook.com/StratfordMusic<br />

www.twitter.com/StratfordMusic<br />

www.youtube.com/watch?v=3vCgAH0-5Qc&t=7s<br />

Stratford Summer Music Stratford, ON<br />

Sunday, <strong>June</strong> 23 at 12pm (Open Streets): Shuffle Demons<br />

289-993-1993<br />

www.somethingelsefestival.com<br />

www.facebook.com/ZulaPresents<br />

www.twitter.com/ZulaPresents<br />

www.youtube.com/c/ZulaPresentsSomethingElse<br />

SOUTH COAST JAZZ FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>August</strong> 9 to 11, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Lynnwood Arts Centre, Simcoe; Glenhyrst<br />

Gardens / Gallery, Brantford, ON<br />

Main Festival locations are Norfolk County and Brantford.<br />

Welcome to the 11th annual South Coast Jazz Festival in Norfolk County and<br />

Brantford, and worldwide online. For tickets, schedule and all information visit<br />

our website. Enjoy an accessible and wonderfully diverse selection of concerts<br />

at Lynnwood Arts Centre Simcoe and Glenhyrst Gardens Brantford. Take in the<br />

Gallery Exhibits too. Headliners include Johannes Linstead, Shannon Butcher<br />

and Michael Shand, Sammy Jackson, Avery Raquel, Branson Palanio Organ<br />

Trio and James Wilson. VIP guaranteed seat tickets are limited, download from<br />

the website now.<br />

519-774-2787<br />

www.southcoastjazz.com<br />

www.facebook.com/SouthCoastJazz1<br />

www.twitter.com/southcoastjazz1<br />

www.youtube.com/proartsca/videos<br />

STRATFORD SUMMER MUSIC<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 18 to <strong>August</strong> 11, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Stratford, ON<br />

A vibrant convergence of folk, jazz, classical and world music, Stratford Summer<br />

Music is a renowned Southwestern Ontario music festival held annually in<br />

<strong>July</strong> and <strong>August</strong> in Stratford, Ontario. The <strong>2024</strong> festival features acclaimed<br />

artists like Angela Hewitt, Allison Au, and Measha Brueggergosman-Lee. From<br />

symphony orchestras to jazz legends, the festival showcases diverse genres,<br />

offering both intimate recitals and grand productions. Alongside performances,<br />

SUMMER OPERA LYRIC THEATRE<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 26 to <strong>August</strong> 4, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Alumnae Theatre, Toronto, ON<br />

Celebrating four decades of opera presentations by Canada’s emerging artists,<br />

Summer Opera Lyric Theatre features Handel’s Xerxes, Mozart’s Idomeneo and<br />

Puccini’s La Boheme, under the leadership of experts in the field - Jo Greenaway,<br />

Suzy Smith and Helen Becqué in fully staged operas directed by Guillermo Silva-<br />

Marin. 33 vocalists from across Canada will thrill and entertain you with their<br />

fresh and insightful dramatic interpretations in the intimacy and acoustic excellence<br />

of the Alumnae Theatre in Toronto. 12 performances culminate eight weeks<br />

of intensive training in the performing arts, movement, deportment and acting<br />

technique. SOLT is generously supported by the Jackman Foundation and the<br />

Estate of Sandra Marlene Painter. For further information please visit our website.<br />

416-922-<strong>29</strong>12<br />

www.solt.ca<br />

www.facebook.com/summeroperalyrictheatre<br />

www.twitter.com/OperaSOLT<br />

SUMMERSTAGE <strong>2024</strong><br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 18 to <strong>August</strong> 18, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Toronto, ON (<strong>July</strong> 18 and 19); Loretto and Toronto, ON (<strong>August</strong> 9 to 18)<br />

No Strings Theatre presents its ‘SummerStage’ <strong>2024</strong>! NST will present in Toronto<br />

in <strong>July</strong>, a table read of Levels The Play, a new musical by Clarence (CJ) Jura and<br />

Abby Grass, and in <strong>August</strong>, Mozart’s The Magic Flute, in collaboration with<br />

Opera by Request at an outdoor farm near Orangeville. Levels The Play navigates<br />

relationships, familial pressures, intersectionality, and coming of age. The play,<br />

which was wonderfully acclaimed at the 2023 Fringe Festival, will be further<br />

developed by dramaturgs Mark Cassius (script) and Darryl Joseph Dennie<br />

(music). Director, Gregory Finney, brings The Magic Flute to a magic fantasy<br />

at the farm, along with other opera excerpts. Levels is suitable for 13+ and The<br />

Magic Flute is suitable for all ages. Also, check out our opera pub night at Toronto’s<br />

Granite Brewery on <strong>August</strong> 13!<br />

416-898-6538<br />

www.nostringstheatre.com<br />

www.facebook.com/nostringstheatretoronto<br />

www.twitter.com/nostringstheatr<br />

www.youtube.com/nostringstheatre<br />

SUN LIFE UPTOWN WATERLOO JAZZ FESTIVAL<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 19 to 21, <strong>2024</strong><br />

100 Regina St. S, Waterloo, ON<br />

The 31st Annual Music Festival headliners include JUNO Award winner Laila<br />

Biali (vocals/piano) on Friday night; JUNO winner and Grammy Nominee<br />

40 | Summer <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Hilario Duran (piano) and his 19-piece Latin Jazz Big Band on Saturday night;<br />

and a “hall of fame” lineup of musicians in the Canadian Jazz Collective on<br />

Sunday afternoon. We will also feature local artists Tim Louis (vocals/piano);<br />

the Natu Trio, Ralf Buschmeyer, Adam Bowman, Patti Payne, along with many<br />

others. There will be family activities on Saturday and Sunday afternoons, along<br />

with plenty of food vendors and your favourite beverages. Best of all, admission<br />

to the Festival is FREE! What could be better than a great summer weekend<br />

enjoying live music with family and friends? Everyone is welcome. We cannot<br />

wait to see you there!<br />

519-885-1921<br />

www.waterloojazzfest.com<br />

www.facebook.com/WaterlooJazz<br />

www.twitter.com/waterloojazz<br />

TD TORONTO JAZZ FEST<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 21 to 30, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Toronto, ON<br />

The TD Toronto Jazz Fest is an annual event produced by the Toronto Downtown<br />

Jazz Society. Celebrating its 37th edition in <strong>2024</strong>, the festival has grown<br />

from an eight-day showcase that began in 1987 to a major event attracting over<br />

500,000 patrons annually over ten days. The festival features a mix of free and<br />

ticketed performances across various venues in Toronto, including outdoor stages<br />

in the Bloor-Yorkville area and indoor concerts throughout the city. It showcases<br />

a diverse range of jazz music and artists, from legendary performers to emerging<br />

talent, and includes more than 100 performances.<br />

www.torontojazzfest.com<br />

TORONTO SUMMER MUSIC<br />

➤ <strong>July</strong> 11 to <strong>August</strong> 3, <strong>2024</strong><br />

University of Toronto’s Faculty of Music, Toronto, ON<br />

Toronto Summer Music’s <strong>2024</strong> Festival welcomes artists from around the world<br />

to share their artistry. From the strong voices of masters resonating with wisdom<br />

and experience to the bright voices of emerging artists ringing with hope and<br />

innovation, the multitude of voices within our community will be celebrated.<br />

Starring an exceptional array of musicians, including Orchestre des Arts Florissants,<br />

and laureates of Le Jardin des Voix, Les Arts Florissants’ academy for<br />

young singers, Canadian Brass, violin superstar Kerson Leong, Gold Medallist<br />

of the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition Vadym Kholodenko,<br />

Dame Sarah Connolly, among others. The Voices Within Festival runs from<br />

<strong>July</strong> 11 to <strong>August</strong> 3.<br />

647-430-5699<br />

https://torontosummermusic.com/events<br />

https://www.facebook.com/TorontoSummerMusic<br />

https://www.youtube.com/@TSMFestival<br />

WESTBEN<br />

➤ <strong>June</strong> 14 to <strong>August</strong> 4, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Campbellford, ON<br />

Westben is an immersive music in nature experience on a 50-acre farm, two<br />

hours east of Toronto. Westben’s 25th anniversary summer season features 32<br />

performances and experiences including concerts, nature walks, forest bathing,<br />

garden tours, a film night, comedy evening with outstanding performers in four<br />

outdoor venues.<br />

Angela Hewitt, Gerald Finley, Jeremy Dutcher, Holly Cole, New Zealand<br />

SummerStage <strong>2024</strong> Toronto, ON<br />

String Quartet, Colin Ainsworth, Steve Page, Sarah Slean, Colin Mochrie &<br />

Deb McGrath, Big Smoke Brass, Andy Forgie, Kevin Drew, Jackie Richardson<br />

and Joe Sealy, Dave Mowat, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson and participants<br />

from the Performer-Composer Residency.<br />

Tickets from Pay-What-You-Can to $110 + HST. $5 for anyone under 18;<br />

$30 for 19-30 years. Ask about the pre-concert chats, Dare to Pair culinary<br />

events, BBQs and Opera Tea Party.<br />

877-883-5777<br />

www.westben.ca<br />

www.facebook.com/westbenconcerts<br />

www.twitter.com/WestbenCentre<br />

www.youtube.com/channel/UChzKMXMS3r2ucfeySgI6BLQ<br />

THE WHOLENOTE “WHO’S WHO”<br />

WholeNote’s directories provide a wealth of<br />

information about our music community. They are<br />

refreshed regularly online at thewholenote.com.<br />

Hover over the Who’s Who tab to see the<br />

drop-down list for:<br />

Blue Pages presenter profiles<br />

Canary Pages choral directory<br />

Green Pages summer music festivals<br />

Summer Music Education<br />

For information on how to join any of our<br />

WholeNote Who’s Who online directories, contact<br />

Karen Ages at karen@thewholenote.com<br />

thewholenote.com Summer <strong>2024</strong> | 41


LIVE OR ONLINE | Jun 1 to Sep 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Saturday <strong>June</strong> 1<br />

● 10:00am: T.Y.T. Theatre. Thumbelina:<br />

A Little Musical. Wychwood Theatre,<br />

76 Wychwood Ave. admin@tyttheatre.com.<br />

$35.99; $34.99(under 12); $42.99(front row<br />

seating); $32.99(group of 4 or more). Also<br />

at 12:30pm.<br />

● 10:00am: WeeFestival of Arts & Culture.<br />

Walangaan. Tarragon Theatre - Extra Space,<br />

30 Bridgman Ave. weefestival.myshopify.<br />

com/products/walangaan. $17; $10 on weekdays.<br />

Also at 4pm.<br />

● 3:00: Canadian Children’s Opera Company.<br />

The Hobbit. Harbourfront Centre - Theatre,<br />

235 Queens Quay W. www.canadianchildrensopera.com/thehobbit.<br />

$40; $30(sr); $25(18<br />

years and younger/arts workers/school &<br />

community groups). Please contact CCOC for<br />

student group pricing. Also at 7:30pm.<br />

● 4:00: Music Toronto. Celebration of Small<br />

Ensembles. Thornton-Smith Building - Aperture<br />

Room, 340 Yonge St. www.musictoronto.<br />

com. $40(single); $20(st/arts).<br />

● 4:00: SING! The Toronto International<br />

Vocal Arts Festival. Great North Battle Beatboxers,<br />

Workshops, and Competition. El Mocambo,<br />

464 Spadina Ave. www.singtoronto.<br />

com or 416-524-8123. Ticket prices to be<br />

announced.<br />

● 4:00: SING! The Toronto International<br />

Vocal Arts Festival. SING! with Pride! Redwood<br />

Theatre, 1300 Gerrard Ave. E. www.<br />

singtoronto.com or 416-524-8123. $40.<br />

● 4:30: T.Y.T. Theatre. The Stinky Cheese<br />

Man. Wychwood Theatre, 76 Wychwood<br />

Ave. admin@tyttheatre.com. $30.99;<br />

$<strong>29</strong>.99(under 12); $34.99(front row);<br />

$<strong>29</strong>.99(group of 4 or more).<br />

● 7:30: Arcady. Bridging the Eras. Central<br />

Presbyterian Church, 97 Wellington<br />

St., Brantford. 519-428-3185 or visit www.<br />

arcady.ca. $35; $12(under 18).<br />

● 7:30: Etobicoke Centennial Choir.<br />

Musica del sur. Runnymede United Church,<br />

432 Runnymede Rd. 416-779-2258 or www.<br />

etobicokecentennialchoir.ca. $30.<br />

● 7:30: Hamilton Children’s Choir. Begin<br />

Again. Melrose United Church, 86 Homewood<br />

Ave., Hamilton. www.hamiltonchildrenschoir.<br />

com. $25(adult); $20(sr); $15(st/alumni/child<br />

over 12); Free(child under 12).<br />

● 7:30: Jubilate Singers. Requiems. Christ<br />

Church Deer Park, 1570 Yonge St. 416-485-<br />

1988 or www.jubilatesingers.ca. $35; $25(sr);<br />

$15(st/arts workers).<br />

● 7:30: Kitchener Waterloo Community<br />

Orchestra. K-W Community Orchestra in<br />

Partnership with K-W Kiwanis Music Festival.<br />

Knox Presbyterian Church, 50 Erb St. W.,<br />

Waterloo. 519-744-2666 or www.kwco.org or<br />

www.onstagedirect.com. $22; $18(college/<br />

univ st); Free(high school st and younger).<br />

● 7:30: Melos Choir & Period Instruments.<br />

Magnificats: 15th-18th centuries. St. George’s<br />

Cathedral, 270 King St. E., Kingston. www.<br />

melos-earlymusic.org or meloskingston@<br />

gmail.com or 613-767-7245. $25.<br />

● 7:30: Shoreline Chorus. All The World<br />

Sings. Georgian Shores United Church, 997<br />

4th Ave. E., Owen Sound. 519-599-2710. $25.<br />

● 7:30: The Annex Singers. Fascinating<br />

Rhythm. Grace Church on-the-Hill,<br />

300 Lonsdale Rd. www.annexsingers.com.<br />

From $15.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Gilbert & Sullivan Society.<br />

The Nostalgics. St. Andrew’s United<br />

Church (Bloor St., Toronto), 117 Bloor St E.<br />

Sheryl at 416-616-1462. Free(members);<br />

$5(non-members).<br />

● 8:00: Kir Stefan The Serb Choir. Love<br />

Divination. St. Paul’s Basilica, 83 Power St.<br />

Visit www.universe.com/host/events/kirstefan-the-serb-choir-love-divination-tickets-TFJ482/info/tickets.<br />

$45; $35(sr/st);<br />

$15(ages 5-12).<br />

● 8:00: SoundCrowd. Back to Broadway Live.<br />

Isabel Bader Theatre, 93 Charles St. W. 647-<br />

970-1397 www.soundcrowd.ca. $35. Tickets<br />

on sale Apr 1.<br />

● 8:00: Tafelmusik. A Handel Celebration.<br />

Royal Conservatory of Music - TELUS Centre<br />

- Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor St. W. www.tafelmusik.org/handel-celebration<br />

or 416-408-<br />

0208. $48.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

James Ehnes + An American in Paris. Roy<br />

Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375.<br />

From $35.<br />

● 8:00: Voices Chamber Choir. All-Night<br />

Vigil. St. Martin-in-the-Fields Anglican<br />

Church, 151 Glenlake Ave. 416-519-0528. $20;<br />

$15(sr/st). Cash only.<br />

● 9:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Sheena<br />

Easton. Avalon Theatre, 6380 Fallsview<br />

Blvd, Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$46.85-$76.85.<br />

Sunday <strong>June</strong> 2<br />

● 10:00am: T.Y.T. Theatre. Thumbelina:<br />

A Little Musical. Wychwood Theatre,<br />

76 Wychwood Ave. admin@tyttheatre.com.<br />

For prices see <strong>June</strong> 1. Also 12:30pm.<br />

● 11:00am: WeeFestival of Arts & Culture.<br />

Walangaan. Tarragon Theatre - Extra Space,<br />

30 Bridgman Ave. weefestival.myshopify.<br />

com/products/walangaan. $17; $10 on<br />

weekdays.<br />

● 1:00: New Horizons Band of Toronto. The<br />

Beat Goes On <strong>2024</strong>. Seicho-No-Ie Toronto,<br />

662 Victoria Park Ave. 647-217-9067. Free.<br />

● 3:00: Canadian Children’s Opera Company.<br />

The Hobbit. Harbourfront Centre - Theatre,<br />

235 Queens Quay W. www.canadianchildrensopera.com/thehobbit.<br />

$40; $30(sr); $25(18<br />

years and younger/arts workers/school &<br />

community groups). Please contact CCOC for<br />

student group pricing.<br />

● 3:00: North Toronto Community Band.<br />

25th Anniversary Concert and Celebration.<br />

Crescent School - Theatre, 2365 Bayview Ave.<br />

www.ntcband.ca. $25; Free(under 12).<br />

● 3:00: Tafelmusik. A Handel Celebration.<br />

Royal Conservatory of Music - TELUS Centre<br />

- Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor St. W. www.tafelmusik.org/handel-celebration<br />

or 416-408-<br />

0208. $48.<br />

● 3:30: T.Y.T. Theatre. The Stinky Cheese<br />

Man. Wychwood Theatre, 76 Wychwood Ave.<br />

admin@tyttheatre.com. For prices see <strong>June</strong> 1.<br />

● 4:00: Flute Street. Tenth Anniversary<br />

Season: Crossing the Bridge. Church of St.<br />

Peter and St. Simon-the-Apostle, 525 Bloor<br />

St. E. 416-462-9498 or www.flutestreet.<br />

ca. Pay what you can (cash only) - $20-$30<br />

suggested.<br />

● 4:00: Jubilate Singers. Requiems. St.<br />

Paul’s Anglican Church, 227 Church St.,<br />

Newmarket. 416-485-1988 or www.jubilatesingers.ca.<br />

$35; $25(sr); $15(st/arts<br />

workers).<br />

● 4:00: Univox Choir. The Beauty of a Summer<br />

Night. Humbercrest United Church,<br />

16 Baby Point Rd. www.universe.com/<br />

thebeautyofasummernight. PWYC - suggested<br />

$25; Free(ages 12 and under).<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber<br />

Music Society. Piano Recital. Keffer<br />

Memorial Chapel, Wilfrid Laurier University,<br />

75 University Ave. W., Waterloo. 519-569-<br />

1809 or www.ticketscene.ca/kwcms. $30;<br />

$10(st).<br />

● 8:00: TONE. S* Glass, Sailor Beware,<br />

Paul Dutton Fleshtone Aura. Tranzac Club,<br />

<strong>29</strong>2 Brunswick Ave. 416-923-8137. $15 at the<br />

door.<br />

Monday <strong>June</strong> 3<br />

● 12:00 noon: Roy Thomson Hall. The Nathaniel<br />

Dett Chorale: Shout for Joy. 60 Simcoe St.<br />

www.tickets.mhrth.com. Free.<br />

● 12:15: Music Mondays. Dark Tales. Church<br />

of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. 416-598-<br />

4521 X223 or www.musicmondays.ca or<br />

musicmondayscs@gmail.com. PWYC ($10<br />

suggested).<br />

● 7:30: Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra.<br />

The Joy of Beethoven. Royal Botanical Gardens,<br />

680 Plains Rd. W., Burlington. 905-526-<br />

7756 or boxoffice@hpo.org. $40.<br />

● 7:30: Opera Revue. Drag Me to the Opera:<br />

Opera Meets Drag. Drake Hotel, 1150 Queen<br />

St. W. 647-637-7491. $30.<br />

Tuesday <strong>June</strong> 4<br />

● 12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation.<br />

Lunchtime Chamber Music. Yorkminster Park<br />

Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167<br />

or www.yorkminsterpark.com. Free. Donations<br />

welcome.<br />

● 1:00: St. James Cathedral. Tuesday Organ<br />

Recital. Cathedral Church of St. James,<br />

106 King St. E. 416-364-7865 or www.<br />

stjamescathedral.ca/recitals. Free. Donations<br />

encouraged.<br />

● 6:00: Toronto Reference Library. Janet<br />

Whiteway. Toronto Public Library - Toronto<br />

Reference Library, Beeton Hall (1st Floor),<br />

WHOLENOTE Event Listings are free of charge<br />

and can be submitted by artists, venues or presenters at any time.<br />

WE INCLUDE<br />

Daily listings for date-specific events such as live and/or livestream<br />

performances, workshops, etc.<br />

A directory of alternative venues - mainly clubs mostly jazz.<br />

Listings for ongoing, on-demand and other music-related activities not<br />

tied to a specific date.<br />

HOW TO LIST<br />

Use the convenient online form at thewholenote.com/applylistings<br />

or email listings to listings@thewholenote.com.<br />

Changes to listings already submitted can usually be accommodated.<br />

Please note, we do not take listings over the phone.<br />

Inquiries about WholeNote listings should be addressed to<br />

John Sharpe, Listings Editor at listings@thewholenote.com<br />

DEADLINES<br />

Weekly Listings Update (our e-letter)<br />

& JUST ASK (our searchable online listings)<br />

Eligible listings received by 6pm Tuesday, each week, will be included<br />

in the following Sunday’s e-letter, and simultaneously posted to our<br />

searchable online listings database.<br />

Please note: the weekly listing e-letter typically looks one week ahead. The<br />

Just Ask database is searchable as far into the future as we have listings.<br />

The WholeNote, print magazine<br />

Our next print issue, <strong>Volume</strong> 30 no.1 covers September <strong>2024</strong>.<br />

The print listings submission deadline is Tuesday <strong>August</strong> 6.<br />

See page 8 for a list of publication dates.<br />

Advertising inquiries should be addressed to<br />

Karen Ages at advertising@thewholenote.com<br />

REGISTER TO RECEIVE THE WEEKLY LISTINGS UPDATE at thewholenote.com/newsletter<br />

42 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


789 Yonge St. For information, call the Arts<br />

Department at 416-393-7157. Free. No registration<br />

required.<br />

Wednesday <strong>June</strong> 5<br />

● 12:15: St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church.<br />

Noon Hour Series: Douglas Haas Legacy Concerts.<br />

54 Queen St. N., Kitchener. 519-578-<br />

4430 or www.standrewskw.com. Free.<br />

● 12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.<br />

Noonday Organ Recital. Yorkminster Park<br />

Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge St. www.yorkminsterpark.com.<br />

Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 2:00: Bloor/Borden Market. Music in the<br />

Market - Andy Philips Plays Steel Drum. 300<br />

Borden St. 613-475-4769. Free.<br />

Thursday <strong>June</strong> 6<br />

● 12:00 noon: Metropolitan United Church.<br />

Noon at Met: Carillon Recital. Metropolitan<br />

United Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331<br />

x226. Freewill donation. Also Organ Recital<br />

at 1pm.<br />

● 8:00: Royal Conservatory of Music. Chamber<br />

& String Concerts Series: Hilary Hahn<br />

with Andreas Haefliger. Royal Conservatory<br />

of Music - TELUS Centre - Koerner Hall,<br />

273 Bloor St. W. 416-408-0208; rcmusic.com/<br />

performance. From $70.<br />

● 8:00: TD Music Hall. Ekali and Flight School.<br />

178 Victoria St. www.tickets.mhrth.com. $20.<br />

● 8:30: Fallsview Casino Resort. Kool &<br />

The Gang. OLG Stage at Fallsview Casino,<br />

6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$71.20-$100.45.<br />

Friday <strong>June</strong> 7<br />

● 6:00: Luminato Festival. Earth Garden:<br />

Aki Gitigaan. David Pecaut Square, 55 John<br />

St. Free.<br />

● 7:00: Jazz at Durbar. Rebecca Enkin Trio.<br />

Durbar Indian Restaurant, 2469 Bloor St. W.<br />

416-762-4441. Free. Reservations strongly<br />

recommended.<br />

● 7:30: Guelph Musicfest <strong>2024</strong>. Stewart<br />

Goodyear, Piano. Guelph Youth Music Centre,<br />

75 Cardigan St., Guelph. Visit www.guelphmusicfest.ca/stewartgoodyear.html<br />

or 519-<br />

993-7591. $50; $45(sr)l $25(st); $20(12 and<br />

under).<br />

● 7:30: Opera by Request. The Seagull. College<br />

St. United Church, 452 College St. 416-<br />

455-2365. $20.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Mendelssohn’s Violin. Roy Thomson Hall,<br />

60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. From $35.<br />

● 8:00: Music Gallery. Vintage & Villains.<br />

Music Gallery at 918 Bathurst, 918 Bathurst<br />

St. 416-204-1080. Pay what you can afford:<br />

$25/$15/$10; $10(Music Gallery members).<br />

● 8:00: Old Mill Toronto. Alison Young. 21 Old<br />

Mill Rd. www.oldmilltoronto.com/event/alison-young.<br />

$20.<br />

● 8:00: TD Music Hall. Liza. 178 Victoria St.<br />

www.tickets.mhrth.com. $30.<br />

Saturday <strong>June</strong> 8<br />

● 10:00am: T.Y.T. Theatre. Thumbelina:<br />

A Little Musical. Wychwood Theatre,<br />

76 Wychwood Ave. admin@tyttheatre.com.<br />

For prices see <strong>June</strong> 1. Also at 12:30pm.<br />

● 10:00am: WeeFestival of Arts & Culture.<br />

Solalie. Tarragon Theatre - Near Studio,<br />

30 Bridgman Ave. boxoffice@weefestival.<br />

ca. $10.<br />

● 11:00am: Desifest. Desifest Presented by<br />

TD. Yonge-Dundas Square, 1 Dundas St. E.<br />

416-302-9321. Free.<br />

● 11:00am: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Relaxed Concert: Mendelssohn’s Violin. Roy<br />

Thomson Hall, 60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375.<br />

From $23.<br />

● 11:30am: WeeFestival of Arts & Culture.<br />

Solalie. Tarragon Theatre - Near Studio,<br />

30 Bridgman Ave. boxoffice@weefestival.<br />

ca. $10.<br />

● 12:00 noon: Winterfolk Music Festival.<br />

Spring Edition. Redwood Theatre, 1300 Gerrard<br />

Ave. E. www.winterfolk.com/wristbands. Preorder<br />

prices: $30 (May 1-31), $35 (Jun 1-7 if available),<br />

$40 (Jun 8 at door if available).<br />

● 1:00: Luminato Festival. Luminato in the<br />

Square: The Indie Scene. David Pecaut<br />

Square, 55 John St. Free.<br />

● 2:00: Drums N Flats. 8th Annual Rockin’<br />

For The Cure - Featuring Spoons. 60 Randall<br />

Dr., Ajax. $45.<br />

● 2:00: Festival Wind Orchestra. Till Victory<br />

Is Won: A Celebration of Black Heroes. Salvation<br />

Army Scarborough Citadel Community<br />

Church, 2021 Lawrence Ave. E., Scarborough.<br />

www.festivalwindorchestra.ca. $25.<br />

● 2:30: Royal Canadian College of Organists<br />

Kingston Centre. Organ Recital. Chalmers<br />

United Church, 212 Barrie St., Kingston. Visit<br />

www.rcco-kingston.ca. Free. Donations to<br />

RCCO organ scholarship gratefully accepted.<br />

● 2:30: T.Y.T. Theatre. The Stinky Cheese<br />

Man. Wychwood Theatre, 76 Wychwood Ave.<br />

admin@tyttheatre.com. For prices see <strong>June</strong><br />

1. Also 4:30pm.<br />

● 3:00: Les Voix du Coeur. 30 Ans de Bonheur<br />

- 30 Years of Happiness. St. Lawrence Centre<br />

for the Arts - Jane Mallett Theatre, 27 Front St.<br />

E. 416-366-1656 or www.ticketmaster.ca. $27;<br />

$22(Group); $18(Youth), $4(Child).<br />

● 3:00: WeeFestival of Arts & Culture.<br />

Solalie. Tarragon Theatre - Near Studio,<br />

30 Bridgman Ave. boxoffice@weefestival.<br />

ca. $10.<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. KWS Musicians Sextet & Octet. First<br />

United Church Waterloo, 16 William St. W.,<br />

Waterloo. Visit www.ticketscene.ca/kwcms.<br />

$40; $10(st).<br />

● 8:00: Les Voix du Coeur. 30 Ans de Bonheur<br />

- 30 Years of Happiness. St. Lawrence<br />

Centre for the Arts - Jane Mallett Theatre,<br />

27 Front St. E. 416-366-1656 or www.ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$27; $22(Group); $18(Youth),<br />

$4(Child).<br />

● 8:00: Massey Hall. An Evening With<br />

Hauser. 178 Victoria St. www.ticketmaster.<br />

ca. From $<strong>29</strong>7.<br />

● 8:00: Orchestra Toronto. Forces of Nature.<br />

Meridian Arts Centre - George Weston<br />

Recital Hall, 5040 Yonge St. 416-467-7142 or<br />

www.ticketmaster.ca. From $14.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Mendelssohn’s Violin. Roy Thomson Hall,<br />

60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. From $35.<br />

Sunday <strong>June</strong> 9<br />

● 10:00am: T.Y.T. Theatre. Thumbelina:<br />

A Little Musical. Wychwood Theatre,<br />

76 Wychwood Ave. admin@tyttheatre.com.<br />

For prices see <strong>June</strong> 1. Also 12:30pm.<br />

● 10:00am: WeeFestival of Arts & Culture.<br />

Solalie. Tarragon Theatre - Near Studio,<br />

30 Bridgman Ave. boxoffice@weefestival.ca.<br />

$10. Also 11:30am.<br />

● 1:00: Luminato Festival. Luminato in the<br />

Square. David Pecaut Square, 55 John St.<br />

Free.<br />

● 2:00: Toronto City Opera/Opéra Queens.<br />

Proud Voices: A Pride Cabaret Celebration.<br />

Buddies in Bad Times Theatre, 12 Alexander<br />

St. www.torontocityopera.com. From $20.<br />

● 2:00: Toronto Early Music Players Organization<br />

(TEMPO). TEMPO Tea. Grace Church<br />

on-the-Hill, 300 Lonsdale Rd. www.tempotoronto.net<br />

or info@tempotoronto.net. Pay<br />

What You Can. Tax receipt for $20 donation.<br />

● 3:00: Off Centre Music Salon. The Secret<br />

Hero of the 19th Century. , . www.offcentremusic.com.<br />

● 3:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Mendelssohn’s Violin. Roy Thomson Hall,<br />

60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. From $35.<br />

● 3:00: WeeFestival of Arts & Culture.<br />

Solalie. Tarragon Theatre - Near Studio,<br />

30 Bridgman Ave. boxoffice@weefestival.<br />

ca. $10.<br />

● 3:30: T.Y.T. Theatre. The Stinky Cheese<br />

Man. Wychwood Theatre, 76 Wychwood Ave.<br />

admin@tyttheatre.com. For prices see <strong>June</strong> 1.<br />

SUNDAY 9 JUNE AT 4<br />

Choral Evensong<br />

for King Charles III<br />

plus at 5 p.m.<br />

OUR KING’S LIFE<br />

AND INTERESTS<br />

with historian Dr. Jim Leatch<br />

The Secret Hero of the 19 th Century<br />

<strong>June</strong> 9 th , <strong>2024</strong> at 3:00 p.m.<br />

FEATURING:<br />

Mezzo-soprano, Erica Iris Huang, Tenor, Ernesto Ramirez,<br />

Soprano, Ilana Zarankin, and Pianists, Elina Kelebeev,<br />

Inna Perkins, and Boris Zarankin. Plus, an on-stage<br />

interview with special guest, Dr. Julia Zarakin<br />

Artistic Directors: Boris Zarankin & Inna Perkis<br />

For more details and to purchase tickets<br />

www.offcentremusic.com<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 43


LIVE OR ONLINE | Jun 1 to Sep 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

● 4:00: St. Olave’s Anglican Church. Choral<br />

Evensong for King Charles III. St. Olave’s<br />

Anglican Church, 360 Windermere Ave.<br />

www.YouTube.com/StOlavesAnglicanChurch<br />

or 416-769-5686. Contributions appreciated.<br />

Followed by a talk on the life of King<br />

Charles III.<br />

● 5:00: Aga Khan Museum. Erkan Oğur<br />

and Ismail Hakki Demircioğlu: A Soul-Stirring<br />

Concert in Toronto. Aga Khan Museum<br />

- Auditorium, 77 Wynford Dr. www.ticketing.<br />

agakhanmuseum.org/single/SelectSeating.<br />

aspx?p=22448. Row A–C: $100(Regular)/$90<br />

(Friends)/$50(st). Row D+: $80(Regular)/$7<br />

2(Friends)/$40(st). Tickets include same-day<br />

Museum admission.<br />

● 5:00: Pax Christi Chorale/North York<br />

Concert Orchestra. Carmina Burana. Meridian<br />

Arts Centre - George Weston Recital Hall,<br />

5040 Yonge St. Visit www.paxchristichorale.<br />

org or 416-733-9388. Regular: From $35; Senior<br />

(60+): From $30; Under 30: $15.<br />

● 7:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Frankie<br />

Valli & The Four Seasons: The Last<br />

Encores. Fallsview Casino Resort - OLG Stage,<br />

6380 Fallsview Blvd., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$64.55-$87.15.<br />

● 7:00: Westdale Theatre. “Walking Through<br />

The Fire”: Indigenous Collaborations With<br />

Sultans of String. Westdale Theatre, The,<br />

1014 King St. W., Hamilton. Register at https://<br />

sultans-hamilton<strong>2024</strong>.eventbrite.ca. Free<br />

with registration.<br />

Monday <strong>June</strong> 10<br />

● 12:15: Music Mondays. Sweelinck’s Report<br />

Card. Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq.<br />

416-598-4521 X223 or www.musicmondays.<br />

ca or musicmondayscs@gmail.com. PWYC<br />

($10 suggested).<br />

● 7:00: Coro San Marco. Peace in the World<br />

/ Pace nel Mondo. Columbus Centre - Joseph<br />

D. Carrier Gallery, 901 Lawrence Ave. W.<br />

www.corosanmarco.com or 416-789-7011<br />

X248. $15.<br />

● 7:30: TD Music Hall. International Indigenous<br />

Music Summit <strong>2024</strong> Opening Gala.<br />

178 Victoria St. www.tickets.mhrth.com. $50.<br />

● 8:00: Tafelmusik. Tafelmusik Baroque Summer<br />

Festival: Opening Night. Trinity St. Paul’s<br />

United Church. Jeanne Lamon Hall, 427 Bloor<br />

St. W. www.tafelmusik.org. Free admission<br />

but a ticket is required.<br />

Tuesday <strong>June</strong> 11<br />

● 12:10: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation.<br />

Lunchtime Chamber Music. Yorkminster Park<br />

Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167<br />

or www.yorkminsterpark.com. Free. Donations<br />

welcome.<br />

_1920x1080<br />

Carmina<br />

Burana<br />

Fate, love, temptation, struggle,<br />

fulfillment. Timeless storytelling.<br />

Captivating music.<br />

Sunday, <strong>June</strong> 9, <strong>2024</strong> | 5:00 pm<br />

Tickets at www.paxchristichorale.org<br />

● 1:00: St. James Cathedral. Tuesday Organ<br />

Recital. Cathedral Church of St. James,<br />

106 King St. E. 416-364-7865 or www.<br />

stjamescathedral.ca/recitals. Free. Donations<br />

encouraged.<br />

● 8:00: Luminato Festival. Missa Afro Brasiliera.<br />

Royal Conservatory of Music - TELUS<br />

Centre - Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor St. W. 416-<br />

408-0208. From $30.<br />

Wednesday <strong>June</strong> 12<br />

● 12:15: St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church.<br />

Noon Hour Series: Douglas Haas Legacy Concerts.<br />

54 Queen St. N., Kitchener. 519-578-<br />

4430 or www.standrewskw.com. Free.<br />

● 12:30: Yorkminster Park Baptist Church.<br />

Noonday Organ Recital. Yorkminster Park<br />

Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge St. www.yorkminsterpark.com.<br />

Free. Donations welcome.<br />

● 1:00: Mostly Madrigals. Singout at Woodbine<br />

Beach. Woodbine Beach, 1675 Lake<br />

Shore Blvd. E. Free.<br />

● 2:00: Bloor/Borden Farmer’s Market.<br />

Music in the Market - Pete & Anna. 300 Borden<br />

St. 613-475-4769. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Opera 5. Turn of the Screw. Theatre<br />

Passe Muraille, 16 Ryerson Ave. www.<br />

ca.patronbase.com/_TheatrePasseMuraille/Productions/OP5/Performances.<br />

$60;<br />

$38(arts workers); $33(over 70/under 30).<br />

● 8:00: New Music Concerts. Ensemble<br />

Made in Canada: Mosaique and<br />

Beyond. Trinity St. Paul’s United Church.<br />

Jeanne Lamon Hall, 427 Bloor St. W. 416-<br />

961-9594 or visit www.eventbrite.com/e/<br />

Ensemble Made<br />

in Canada:<br />

Mosaïque and<br />

Beyond<br />

Jun. 12. 24<br />

7PM Doors and Pre-show<br />

8PM Concert<br />

newmusicconcerts.com<br />

ensemble-made-in-canada-mosaique-andbeyond-tickets.<br />

$30; $25(arts workers/sr);<br />

$15(st).<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Mahler Symphony No.3. Roy Thomson Hall,<br />

60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. From $35.<br />

Thursday <strong>June</strong> 13<br />

● 12:00 noon: Metropolitan United Church.<br />

Noon at Met: Carillon Recital. Metropolitan<br />

United Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331<br />

x226. Freewill donation. Also Organ Recital<br />

at 1pm<br />

● 2:00: Toronto Reference Library. Robert<br />

Ball. Toronto Public Library - Toronto<br />

Reference Library, Beeton Hall (1st Floor),<br />

789 Yonge St. For information, call the Arts<br />

Department at 416-393-7157. Free. No registration<br />

required.<br />

● 6:00: Luminato Festival. Luminato in the<br />

Square: Toronto Arts Council’s 50th Anniversary<br />

Celebration. David Pecaut Square,<br />

55 John St. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Opera 5. Turn of the Screw. Theatre<br />

Passe Muraille, 16 Ryerson Ave. www.<br />

ca.patronbase.com/_TheatrePasseMuraille/<br />

Productions/OP5/Performances. $33.<br />

● 8:00: TONE & Labyrinth. Fred Moten &<br />

Brandon Lopez + Lee & Gamble Unlimited<br />

+ Roa Lee. Music Gallery at 918 Bathurst,<br />

918 Bathurst St. 416-204-1080. $20(adv);<br />

$25(door).<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Mahler Symphony No.3. Roy Thomson Hall,<br />

60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. From $35.<br />

● 8:30: Fallsview Casino Resort. Bachman<br />

Turner Overdrive. Fallsview Casino Resort<br />

- OLG Stage, 6380 Fallsview Blvd., Niagara<br />

Falls. ticketmaster.ca. From $71.<br />

● 8:30: Native Earth Performing Arts/<br />

Buddies in Bad Times Theatre. Two-Spirit<br />

Cabaret, 8th Edition. Buddies in Bad Times<br />

Theatre, 12 Alexander St. www.tickets.buddiesinbadtimes.com/TheatreManager/1/<br />

online. $10-$70.<br />

Friday <strong>June</strong> 14<br />

Day 1 of Westben Festival in Campbellford<br />

running to Aug 14.<br />

Day 1 of Guelph Musicfest <strong>2024</strong> in Guelph<br />

running to <strong>June</strong> 21.<br />

● 6:00: Luminato Festival. Luminato in the<br />

Square: Welcome to Char Bagh. David Pecaut<br />

Square, 55 John St. Free.<br />

● 7:00: Apocryphonia. The Schobertiade.<br />

Church of the Redeemer, 162 Bloor St. W.<br />

514-378-2558. Pay What You Can: suggested<br />

$20 or $30.<br />

● 7:00: Brookside Music Association.<br />

Ensemble Vivant. Midland Cultural Centre,<br />

333 King St., Midland. www.brooksidemusic.<br />

com. $35; Free(child/st).<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. Didderich & Tahara. Venue TBA. Visit<br />

www.ticketscene.ca/kwcms. $30; $10(st).<br />

● 7:00: Westben. A New Musical: The Selfish<br />

Giant’s Garden. The Barn, 6698 County Road<br />

30, Campbellford. 1-877-883-5777 or www.<br />

westben.ca. $5-$45.<br />

● 7:30: Canadian Opera Company. Aportia<br />

Chryptych: A Black Opera for Portia White.<br />

Canadian Opera Company Theatre, 227 Front<br />

St. E. 416-363-8231 or www.coc.ca. $75.<br />

● 7:30: Guelph Musicfest <strong>2024</strong>. The Jerzy<br />

Kaplanek Jazz Quartet. Guelph Youth Music<br />

Centre, 75 Cardigan St., Guelph. Visit www.<br />

guelphmusicfest.ca/jerzykaplanekquartet.<br />

html or 519-993-7591. $50; $45(sr); $25(st);<br />

$20(12 and under).<br />

● 7:30: Opera 5. Turn of the Screw. Theatre<br />

Passe Muraille, 16 Ryerson Ave. www.<br />

ca.patronbase.com/_TheatrePasseMuraille/Productions/OP5/Performances.<br />

$60;<br />

$38(arts workers); $33(over 70/under 30).<br />

● 8:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. The Voice<br />

of the Who - Roger Daltrey with special guest<br />

Kt Tunstall. OLG Stage at Fallsview Casino,<br />

6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$76.85-$187.75.<br />

● 8:00: Hugh’s Room Live. Lester McLean’s<br />

One Hit Wonders. <strong>29</strong>6 Broadview Ave. www.<br />

showpass.com/lester-mcleans-one-hit-wonders/.<br />

$35.<br />

Saturday <strong>June</strong> 15<br />

● 10:00am: T.Y.T. Theatre. Thumbelina:<br />

A Little Musical. Wychwood Theatre,<br />

76 Wychwood Ave. admin@tyttheatre.com.<br />

For prices see <strong>June</strong> 1. Also 12:30pm.<br />

● 12:00 noon: T.Y.T. Theatre. Elephant & Piggie’s<br />

We Are In a Play! Randolph Theatre,<br />

736 Bathurst St. admin@tyttheatre.com.<br />

$<strong>29</strong>.99-$39.99.<br />

● 12:30: Tafelmusik. Tafelmusik Baroque<br />

Summer Festival: Baroque Portraits. University<br />

of Toronto - Edward Johnson Building<br />

- Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park. www.tafelmusik.org.<br />

Free admission on a first-come,<br />

first-served basis. No registration or tickets<br />

are required.<br />

● 1:00: Luminato Festival. Luminato in the<br />

Square: Lulaworld. David Pecaut Square,<br />

55 John St. Free.<br />

● 1:30: Brampton Festival Singers. Classically<br />

Composed! North Bramalea United<br />

Church, 363 Howden Blvd., Brampton. Visit<br />

www.bfschoir.org or www.eventbrite.ca or at<br />

the door. $30.<br />

● 2:00: Canadian Opera Company. Aportia<br />

Chryptych: A Black Opera for Portia White.<br />

Canadian Opera Company Theatre, 227 Front<br />

St. E. 416-363-8231 or www.coc.ca. $75.<br />

● 2:00: Symphonic Music Institute. Spring<br />

Concert. Unionville Presbyterian Church,<br />

600 Village Parkway, Unionville. 905-415-<br />

7772. $15.<br />

● 2:00: Westben. A New Musical: The Selfish<br />

Giant’s Garden. The Barn, 6698 County Road<br />

30, Campbellford. 1-877-883-5777 or www.<br />

westben.ca. $5-$45.<br />

● 2:30: T.Y.T. Theatre. The Stinky Cheese<br />

Man. Wychwood Theatre, 76 Wychwood Ave.<br />

admin@tyttheatre.com. For prices see <strong>June</strong> 1.<br />

Also at 4:30pm.<br />

● 3:00: Singing Out. True Colours: A Pride<br />

Concert. Glenn Gould Studio, 250 Front St. W.<br />

www.singingout.com/buy-tickets. $45(Singing<br />

Out Fan); $35(General admission); $25(sr/<br />

st/underemployed); Free(ages 3 and under).<br />

● 5:00: Jumblies Theatre. border crossing<br />

odyssey. 132 Fort York Blvd. info@jumbliestheatre.org.<br />

● 7:30: Opera 5. Turn of the Screw. Theatre<br />

Passe Muraille, 16 Ryerson Ave. www.<br />

ca.patronbase.com/_TheatrePasseMuraille/Productions/OP5/Performances.<br />

$60;<br />

$38(arts workers); $33(over 70/under 30).<br />

● 7:30: Singing Out. True Colours: A Pride<br />

Concert. Glenn Gould Studio, 250 Front St. W.<br />

www.singingout.com/buy-tickets. $45(Singing<br />

Out Fan); $35(General admission); $25(sr/<br />

st/underemployed); Free(ages 3 and under).<br />

● 8:00: Hugh’s Room Live. Gary LaRocca:<br />

44 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Reclamation - Album Release. <strong>29</strong>6 Broadview<br />

Ave. www.showpass.com.<br />

● 8:00: TD Music Hall. Kallitechnis.<br />

178 Victoria St. www.tickets.mhrth.com. $23.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Mahler Symphony No.3. Roy Thomson Hall,<br />

60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. From $35.<br />

Sunday <strong>June</strong> 16<br />

● 10:00am: T.Y.T. Theatre. Thumbelina:<br />

A Little Musical. Wychwood Theatre,<br />

76 Wychwood Ave. admin@tyttheatre.com.<br />

For prices see <strong>June</strong> 1. Also 12:30pm.<br />

● 1:00: Luminato Festival. Luminato in the<br />

Square: The Finale. David Pecaut Square,<br />

55 John St. Free.<br />

● 2:00: Canadian Opera Company. Aportia<br />

Chryptych: A Black Opera for Portia White.<br />

Canadian Opera Company Theatre, 227 Front<br />

St. E. 416-363-8231 or www.coc.ca. $75.<br />

● 2:00: Westben. A New Musical: The Selfish<br />

Giant’s Garden. The Barn, 6698 County Road<br />

30, Campbellford. 1-877-883-5777 or www.<br />

westben.ca. $5-$45.<br />

● 3:30: T.Y.T. Theatre. The Stinky Cheese<br />

Man. Wychwood Theatre, 76 Wychwood Ave.<br />

admin@tyttheatre.com. For prices see <strong>June</strong> 1.<br />

● 4:00: Aga Khan Museum/Small World<br />

Music. Maegandang. Aga Khan Museum -<br />

Auditorium, 77 Wynford Dr. www.ticketing.<br />

agakhanmuseum.org/single/SelectSeating.<br />

aspx?p=22448. $40(Regular); $36(Friends);<br />

$30(sr/st). Tickets include same-day Museum<br />

admission.<br />

● 8:00: TONE. Mas Aya “Coming And Going”<br />

+ Colin Fisher “Suns of the Heart” Double<br />

Release Show with Xicada. Tranzac Club,<br />

<strong>29</strong>2 Brunswick Ave. 416-923-8137. $20(adv);<br />

$25(door).<br />

Monday <strong>June</strong> 17<br />

● 12:15: Music Mondays. A Nest of Byrds.<br />

Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. 416-<br />

598-4521 X223 or www.musicmondays.ca<br />

or musicmondayscs@gmail.com. PWYC ($10<br />

suggested).<br />

Tuesday <strong>June</strong> 18<br />

● 12:00 noon: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation.<br />

Lunchtime Chamber Music: Jialiang Zhu<br />

& Friends, Piano & Violin. Yorkminster Park<br />

Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge St. 416-922-1167<br />

or www.yorkminsterpark.com. Free. Donations<br />

welcome.<br />

● 1:00: St. James Cathedral. Tuesday Organ<br />

Recital. Cathedral Church of St. James,<br />

106 King St. E. 416-364-7865 or www.<br />

stjamescathedral.ca/recitals. Free. Donations<br />

encouraged.<br />

Wednesday <strong>June</strong> 19<br />

● 12:00 noon: Tafelmusik. Tafelmusik Baroque<br />

Summer Festival: TBSI Orchestras and<br />

Choirs. University of Toronto - Edward Johnson<br />

Building - Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park.<br />

www.tafelmusik.org. Free admission on a<br />

first-come, first-served basis. No registration<br />

or tickets are required.<br />

● 12:15: St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church.<br />

Noon Hour Series: Douglas Haas Legacy Concerts.<br />

54 Queen St. N., Kitchener. 519-578-<br />

4430 or www.standrewskw.com. Free.<br />

● 2:00: Bloor/Borden Farmer’s Market.<br />

Music in the Market - Andrea Kuzmich. 300<br />

Borden St. 613-475-4769. Free.<br />

● 7:00: Toronto City Opera. Carmen. Miles<br />

Nadal JCC - Al Green Theatre, 750 Spadina<br />

Ave. www.torontocityopera.com/tickets.<br />

From $35.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Shape Note Singers. Sacred<br />

Harp Singing. Friends House, 60 Lowther<br />

Ave. 647-838-8764. Pay what you can.<br />

Thursday <strong>June</strong> 20<br />

Day 1 of Brott Music Festival in Hamilton,<br />

Burlington, and Parry Sound running Jun 20<br />

to Aug 15.<br />

● 12:00 noon: Metropolitan United Church.<br />

Noon at Met: Carillon Recital. Metropolitan<br />

United Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331<br />

x226. Freewill donation. Also Choral Recital<br />

at 1pm.<br />

● 7:30: Brott Music Festival. Beethoven No.3:<br />

Immersive Performance and After Party.<br />

Church of the Ascension, 64 Forest Ave.,<br />

Hamilton. 905-525-7664 or www.brottmusic.<br />

com. From $20.<br />

● 8:00: Freesound. Freesounds Presents:<br />

Vortex Temporum. Array Space, 155 Walnut<br />

Ave. 647-354-4244 or www.freesoundmusic.<br />

ca or freesoundseries@gmail.com. Pay What<br />

You Can.<br />

● 8:00: Hugh’s Room Live. Arkora: Styx and<br />

Stones. <strong>29</strong>6 Broadview Ave. www.arkorastyx-and-stones-tix.eventbrite.ca.<br />

$30;<br />

$20(sr/st/arts worker).<br />

● 8:00: Massey Hall. Classic Albums Live:<br />

Meat Loaf - Bat Out of Hell. 178 Victoria St.<br />

www.tickets.mhrth.com. From $45.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Hisaishi Conducts Hisaishi. Roy Thomson Hall,<br />

60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. From $105.<br />

Friday <strong>June</strong> 21<br />

● 2:00: Toronto Reference Library. Ori<br />

Dagan. Toronto Public Library - Toronto<br />

Reference Library, Beeton Hall (1st Floor),<br />

789 Yonge St. For information, call the Arts<br />

Department at 416-393-7157. Free. No registration<br />

required.<br />

● 7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: IndigiDivas at Harbourfront.<br />

Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens<br />

Quay W. www.harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

● 7:00: Niagara Parks Commission/Niagara<br />

Jazz Festival. The Power of Music. Oakes<br />

Garden Theatre, 5825 River Rd., Niagara<br />

Falls. Visit www.niagaraparks.com/jazz. $40;<br />

$20(musicians/arts workers/st).<br />

● 7:00: Westben. A New Musical: The Selfish<br />

Giant’s Garden. The Barn, 6698 County Road<br />

30, Campbellford. 1-877-883-5777 or www.<br />

westben.ca. $5-$45.<br />

● 7:30: Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre.<br />

Epic Eagles - The Definitive Eagles Tribute.<br />

357 Wilson St. E., Ancaster. 905-304-3232 or<br />

boxoffice@memorialarts.ca. From $55.<br />

● 7:30: Guelph Musicfest <strong>2024</strong>. Quartetto<br />

Gelato. Guelph Youth Music Centre,<br />

75 Cardigan St., Guelph. Visit www.guelphmusicfest.ca/quartettogelato.html<br />

or 519-<br />

993-7591. $50; $45(sr); $25(st); $20(12 and<br />

under).<br />

● 8:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Michael<br />

Bublé. Fallsview Casino Resort - OLG Stage,<br />

6380 Fallsview Blvd., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

From $386.<br />

● 8:00: Freesound. Freesounds Presents:<br />

Vortex Temporum. Array Space, 155 Walnut<br />

Ave. 647-354-4244 or www.freesoundmusic.<br />

ca or freesoundseries@gmail.com. Pay What<br />

You Can.<br />

● 8:00: Nagata Shachu. Possibilites.<br />

Kindred Spirits Orchestra<br />

Krissan Alexander | Music Director<br />

A ROMANTIC EVENING<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 45


LIVE OR ONLINE | Jun 1 to Sep 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Harbourfront Centre - Fleck Dance Theatre,<br />

235 Queens Quay W. nagatashachu.com. $35-<br />

$45; $25-$35(st/sr).<br />

● 8:00: TD Music Hall. Yonge St. Renaissance.<br />

178 Victoria St. www.tickets.mhrth.<br />

com. $31.50.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Hisaishi Conducts Hisaishi. Roy Thomson Hall,<br />

60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. From $105.<br />

Saturday <strong>June</strong> 22<br />

Day 1 of Leith Music Festival running from<br />

Jun 22 to Aug 24.<br />

● 10:00am: T.Y.T. Theatre. Thumbelina:<br />

A Little Musical. Wychwood Theatre,<br />

76 Wychwood Ave. admin@tyttheatre.com.<br />

For prices see <strong>June</strong> 1. Also 12:30pm.<br />

● 2:00: Toronto City Opera. Carmen. Miles<br />

Nadal JCC - Al Green Theatre, 750 Spadina<br />

Ave. www.torontocityopera.com/tickets.<br />

From $35.<br />

● 2:00: Westben. A New Musical: The Selfish<br />

Giant’s Garden. The Barn, 6698 County Road<br />

30, Campbellford. 1-877-883-5777 or www.<br />

westben.ca. $5-$45.<br />

● 2:30: T.Y.T. Theatre. The Stinky Cheese<br />

Man. Wychwood Theatre, 76 Wychwood Ave.<br />

admin@tyttheatre.com. For prices see <strong>June</strong><br />

1. Also 4:30pm<br />

● 3:00: Massey Hall. The Teskey Brothers.<br />

178 Victoria St. www.ticketmaster.ca.<br />

From $55.<br />

● 7:30: Brott Music Festival. Four Seasons:<br />

Recomposed Candlelight. Church of the<br />

Ascension, 64 Forest Ave., Hamilton. 905-<br />

525-7664 or www.brottmusic.com. From $20.<br />

● 7:30: FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre.<br />

Kimiko’s Pearl (World Première). FirstOntario<br />

Performing Arts Centre - Partridge Hall,<br />

250 St. Paul St., St. Catharines. 905-688-<br />

0722 or 1-855-515-0722 boxoffice@firstontariopac.ca.<br />

$65; $55(members); $25(under<br />

30).<br />

● 7:30: Leith Summer Festival. Opening<br />

Gala Concert: Autorickshaw & the PSQ. Historic<br />

Leith Church, 419498 Tom Thomson Ln.,<br />

Leith. 519-371-2833 or visit www.leithchurch.<br />

ca. $45.<br />

● 7:30: Opera by Request. Adriana<br />

Lecouvreur. College St. United Church,<br />

452 College St. 416-455-2365. $20.<br />

● 7:30: Tafelmusik. Tafelmusik Baroque Summer<br />

Festival: The Grand Finale. Grace Church<br />

on-the-Hill, 300 Lonsdale Rd. www.tafelmusik.org.<br />

Free admission but tickets are<br />

required. General admission.<br />

● 8:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Keith<br />

Urban. Fallsview Casino Resort - OLG Stage,<br />

6380 Fallsview Blvd., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$368.90-$946.05.<br />

● 8:00: Kindred Spirits Orchestra. Piano<br />

Concerto Series: A Romantic Evening. Meridian<br />

Arts Centre - George Weston Recital Hall,<br />

5040 Yonge St. 905-604-8339; KSOrchestra.<br />

ca. From $19.<br />

● 8:00: North York Concert Orchestra. The<br />

Elixir of Love. East End/Eastminster United<br />

Church, 310 Danforth Ave. www.nyco.ca. $40;<br />

$35(sr); $20(under 30).<br />

● 8:00: TD Music Hall. Amanda Keeles.<br />

178 Victoria St. www.tickets.mhrth.com. $25.<br />

● 8:00: Hugh’s Room Live. “Walking Through<br />

The Fire”: Indigenous Collaborations With<br />

Kindred Spirits Orchestra<br />

Krissan Alexander | Music Director<br />

BEGINNINGS AND ENDINGS<br />

Sultans of String in Honour of National<br />

Indigenous History Month. <strong>29</strong>6 Broadview<br />

Ave. 647-347-4769 or www.showpass.com/<br />

sultans-of-string-walking-through-the-fire.<br />

$50/$45(adv).<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Hisaishi Conducts Hisaishi. Roy Thomson Hall,<br />

60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. From $105.<br />

Sunday <strong>June</strong> 23<br />

● 10:00am: T.Y.T. Theatre. Thumbelina:<br />

A Little Musical. Wychwood Theatre,<br />

76 Wychwood Ave. admin@tyttheatre.com.<br />

For prices see <strong>June</strong> 1. Also 12:30pm.<br />

● 1:30: Stratford Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Cows and Classics in the Garden.<br />

Murray Family Farm, 3844 Road 155, Mitchell.<br />

519-271-0990 or www.stratfordsymphony.ca/<strong>2024</strong>_Cows_and_Classics/.<br />

$40;<br />

Free(under 12).<br />

● 2:00: Peterborough Concert Band. St.<br />

John’s Anglican Church Strawberry Social.<br />

St. John’s Anglican Church (Peterborough),<br />

99 Brock St., Peterborough. 705-745-7624<br />

or www.peterboroughconcertband.ca or<br />

stjohnsptbo@gmail.com or contact Elaine<br />

Orgill at elaineorgill6@gmail.com 705-748-<br />

0187. $10(adv). Available on Jun 2. $12(at<br />

door). Free(ages 5 and under).<br />

● 2:00: Tafelmusik. Tafelmusik Baroque<br />

Summer Festival: Midsummer Follies<br />

at The McMichael Canadian Art Collection.<br />

McMichael Canadian Art Collection,<br />

10365 Islington Ave, Kleinburg. www.mcmichael.com/event/tafelmusik-chamber-seriesmidsummer-follies.<br />

● 2:00: Toronto City Opera. Carmen. Miles<br />

Nadal JCC - Al Green Theatre, 750 Spadina<br />

Ave. www.torontocityopera.com/tickets.<br />

From $35.<br />

● 2:00: Westben. A New Musical: The Selfish<br />

Giant’s Garden. The Barn, 6698 County Road<br />

30, Campbellford. 1-877-883-5777 or www.<br />

westben.ca. $5-$45.<br />

● 2:30: FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre.<br />

Kimiko’s Pearl (World Première). FirstOntario<br />

Performing Arts Centre - Partridge Hall,<br />

250 St. Paul St., St. Catharines. 905-688-<br />

0722 or 1-855-515-0722 or boxoffice@firstontariopac.ca.<br />

$65; $55(members); $25(under<br />

30).<br />

● 3:00: North York Concert Orchestra. The<br />

Elixir of Love. East End/Eastminster United<br />

Church, 310 Danforth Ave. www.nyco.ca. $40;<br />

$35(sr); $20(under 30).<br />

● 3:30: T.Y.T. Theatre. The Stinky Cheese<br />

Man. Wychwood Theatre, 76 Wychwood Ave.<br />

admin@tyttheatre.com. For prices see <strong>June</strong> 1.<br />

● 4:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: Cello Revel. Toronto<br />

Music Garden, 479 Queens Quay W. www.<br />

harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

● 8:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Jason Isbell<br />

& The 400 Unit with special guest Courtney<br />

Marie Andrews. OLG Stage at Fallsview<br />

Casino, 6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara Falls.<br />

ticketmaster.ca. $76.85-$123.85.<br />

Monday <strong>June</strong> 24<br />

● 10:30am: Avenue Road Music & Performance<br />

Academy. Interwoven Harmonies<br />

and Romantic Echoes: The Influence of Personal<br />

Bonds in the Piano Works of Brahms<br />

and the Schumanns. Avenue Road Music and<br />

Performance Academy - Gordon Lightfoot<br />

Concert Hall, 460 Avenue Rd. www.avenueroadmusic.com<br />

or info@avenueroadmusic.<br />

com or 416-922-0855. $30.<br />

● 12:15: Music Mondays. Harmonies Revived:<br />

Team Japan! Plays Classical Gems. Church<br />

of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. 416-598-<br />

4521 X223 or www.musicmondays.ca or<br />

musicmondayscs@gmail.com. PWYC ($10<br />

suggested).<br />

● 7:00: Array/ECCG Gamelan. Evergreen<br />

Club Contemporary Gamelan Monthly<br />

Meetup. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-<br />

532-3019. Free.<br />

● 8:00: Kindred Spirits Orchestra. A<br />

Romantic Evening in France. Meridian Arts<br />

Centre, 5040 Yonge St., North York. 905-787-<br />

8811. $30-$40; $22.50-$30(sr); $15-$20(full<br />

time student or 18 and under).<br />

Tuesday <strong>June</strong> 25<br />

● 12:00 noon: Nine Sparrows Arts Foundation.<br />

Lunchtime Chamber Music. Yorkminster<br />

Park Baptist Church, 1585 Yonge St. 416-922-<br />

1167 or www.yorkminsterpark.com. Free.<br />

Donations welcome.<br />

● 1:00: St. James Cathedral. Tuesday Organ<br />

Recital. Cathedral Church of St. James,<br />

106 King St. E. 416-364-7865 or www.<br />

stjamescathedral.ca/recitals. Free. Donations<br />

encouraged.<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. Quartetfest #1: Skyros Quartet. Wilfrid<br />

Laurier University - Maureen Forrester<br />

Recital Hall, 75 University Ave., Waterloo.<br />

Visit www.ticketscene.ca/kwcms. $90(Quartetfest<br />

6-concert pass); $35; $10(st).<br />

● 8:00: Massey Hall. Ben Platt. 178 Victoria<br />

St. www.tickets.mhrth.com. From $65.<br />

● 8:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Pops:<br />

Broadway Blockbusters with Ramin Karimloo<br />

& Mikaela Bennett. Roy Thomson Hall,<br />

60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. From $62.<br />

Wednesday <strong>June</strong> 26<br />

● 2:00: Bloor/Borden Farmer’s Market.<br />

Music in the Market - Days of Grace: Robert<br />

Steiner & Christine Mourre. 300 Borden St.<br />

613-475-4769. Free.<br />

● 2:00: Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Pops:<br />

Broadway Blockbusters with Ramin Karimloo<br />

& Mikaela Bennett. Roy Thomson Hall,<br />

60 Simcoe St. 416-598-3375. From $47.<br />

● 7:30: Brott Music Festival. Balfour, Rachmaninoff<br />

Piano Concerto 2 , Brahms 4.<br />

McMaster University - L.R. Wilson Concert<br />

Hall, 1280 Main St. W. , Hamilton.<br />

46 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


905-525-7664 or www.brottmusic.com.<br />

From $25.<br />

● 8:00: Massey Hall. Ben Platt. 178 Victoria<br />

St. www.tickets.mhrth.com. From $65.<br />

Thursday <strong>June</strong> 27<br />

● 12:00 noon: Metropolitan United Church.<br />

Noon at Met: Carillon Recital. Metropolitan<br />

United Church, 56 Queen St. E. 416-363-0331<br />

x226. Freewill donation. Also Choral Recital<br />

at 1pm.<br />

● 7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: It’s Pronounced<br />

“George”. Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens<br />

Quay W. www.harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. Quartetfest #2: Penderecki String<br />

Quartet + Anya Alexeyev, Piano. Wilfrid Laurier<br />

University - Maureen Forrester Recital<br />

Hall, 75 University Ave., Waterloo. Visit www.<br />

ticketscene.ca/kwcms. $90(Quartetfest<br />

6-concert pass); $40; $10(st).<br />

● 7:30: Brott Music Festival. Balfour, Rachmaninoff<br />

Piano Concerto 2 , Brahms 4. Burlington<br />

Performing Arts Centre - Main<br />

Theatre, 440 Locust St., Burlington. 905-525-<br />

7664 or www.brottmusic.com. From $25.<br />

Friday <strong>June</strong> 28<br />

● 7:00: Art Gallery of Ontario. Tafelmusik:<br />

Making Herself Heard. Art Gallery of Ontario<br />

- Walker Court, 317 Dundas St. W. www.ago.<br />

ca/events/tafelmusik-making-herself-heard<br />

or 416-979-6648. A seated performance free<br />

with general admission.<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. Quartetfest #3: Students of Quartetfest.<br />

Wilfrid Laurier University - Maureen<br />

Forrester Recital Hall, 75 University<br />

Ave., Waterloo. Visit www.ticketscene.ca/<br />

kwcms. $90(Quartetfest 6-concert pass);<br />

$15; Free(st).<br />

● 7:30: Heliconian Hall. Rosas y Espinas<br />

(Roses and Thorns). 35 Hazelton Ave. marianadelarosamezzo@gmail.com<br />

or www.<br />

marianadelarosamezzo.com or www.lepointdevente.com/tickets/rosasyespinastoronto.<br />

$25(early pre-sale); $27.50(late pre-sale);<br />

$<strong>29</strong>(at the door); $19(12 and under).<br />

● 8:00: Massey Hall. André 3000.<br />

178 Victoria St. www.tickets.mhrth.com.<br />

From $78.<br />

● 9:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Steve Miller<br />

Band. OLG Stage at Fallsview Casino,<br />

6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$88.15-$187.75.<br />

Saturday <strong>June</strong> <strong>29</strong><br />

● 7:30: Ontario Cross-Cultural Music Society.<br />

East Meets West - Joy of Music for a<br />

Blessed Summer Night. Salvation Army Yorkminster<br />

Citadel, 1 Lord Seaton Rd., Toronto<br />

- North York. www.ocms-ca.com or www.<br />

ocms<strong>2024</strong>summer.eventbrite.ca. $30;<br />

$20(sr/st).<br />

● 8:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Nickelback<br />

with special guest Owen Riegling. OLG Stage<br />

at Fallsview Casino, 6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara<br />

Falls. ticketmaster.ca. $415.75(standing).<br />

● 8:00: Kindred Spirits Orchestra. Beginnings<br />

and Endings. Glenn Gould Studio,<br />

250 Front St. W. 905-604-8339. $30-$40;<br />

$22.50-$30(sr); $15-$20(full time student or<br />

18 and under).<br />

● 8:00: Roy Thomson Hall. Salim Sulaiman<br />

Live. 60 Simcoe St. www.tickets.mhrth.com.<br />

From $189.<br />

Sunday <strong>June</strong> 30<br />

● 2:00: Tafelmusik. Tafelmusik Baroque Summer<br />

Festival: Midsummer Follies at Toronto<br />

Botanical Garden (TBG). Toronto Botanical<br />

Garden, 777 Lawrence Ave. E. www.torontobotanicalgarden.ca.<br />

● 2:00: Westben. 25th Anniversary Concert.<br />

The Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.<br />

1-877-883-5777 or www.westben.<br />

ca. $5-$25.<br />

Monday <strong>July</strong> 1<br />

Day 1 of Festival of the Sound in Parry Sound<br />

running on Jul 1 and Jul 19 to Aug 3.<br />

● 12:15: Music Mondays. Pomegranate Seeds.<br />

Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. 416-<br />

598-4521 X223 or www.musicmondays.ca<br />

or musicmondayscs@gmail.com. PWYC ($10<br />

suggested).<br />

● 7:00: Festival of the Sound. Canada Day<br />

Cruise: The Empty Glasses. Island Queen<br />

Cruise Ship, 9 Bay St., Parry Sound. 1-866-<br />

364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $45, $85, $200.<br />

● 8:00: Kindred Spirits Orchestra. Unionville<br />

Canada Day Celebration. Unionville Millennium<br />

Theatre, 150 Main St., Unionville.<br />

905-787-8811. Free.<br />

Tuesday <strong>July</strong> 2<br />

● 7:30: Massey Hall. Wilco. 178 Victoria St.<br />

www.ticketmaster.ca. From $52.<br />

Wednesday <strong>July</strong> 3<br />

● 2:00: Bloor/Borden Farmer’s Market.<br />

Music in the Market - Hobo Soles: Rachel &<br />

Connie. 300 Borden St. 613-475-4769. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Massey Hall. Wilco. 178 Victoria St.<br />

www.ticketmaster.ca. From $52.<br />

Thursday <strong>July</strong> 4<br />

● 7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: Secret Heart. Toronto<br />

Music Garden, 479 Queens Quay W. www.<br />

harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. Quartetfest #4: Students of Quartetfest.<br />

Wilfrid Laurier University - Maureen<br />

Forrester Recital Hall, 75 University<br />

Ave., Waterloo. Visit www.ticketscene.ca/<br />

kwcms. $90(Quartetfest 6-concert pass);<br />

$15; Free(st).<br />

● 7:00: Magisterra Soloists. Magisterra at<br />

the Museum: Global Connections. Museum<br />

London, 421 Ridout St. N., London. www.<br />

magisterra.com. $35; $30(sr); $15(st);<br />

$10(under 10).<br />

● 7:30: Brott Music Festival. Bel Canto. Theatre<br />

Aquarius, 190 King William St., Hamilton.<br />

905-525-7664 or www.brottmusic.com.<br />

From $25.<br />

● 8:00: Massey Hall. Future Islands.<br />

178 Victoria St. www.tickets.mhrth.com.<br />

From $78.<br />

Friday <strong>July</strong> 5<br />

Day 1 of the Elora Festival in various locations<br />

in Elora running from Jul 5 to 20.<br />

● 7:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Mike Birbiglia<br />

- Please Stop the Ride. Fallsview<br />

Casino Resort - OLG Stage, 6380 Fallsview<br />

Blvd., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$87.15-$122.85.<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. Quartetfest #5: The New Zealand<br />

PART OF THE TORONTO SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL<br />

JUL 11 - AUG 3<br />

Trio Zimbalist<br />

<strong>July</strong> 17<br />

Elisabeth<br />

St-Gelais<br />

<strong>July</strong> 30<br />

Jonathan Crow, Artistic Director<br />

Connolly &<br />

Middleton<br />

<strong>July</strong> 16<br />

Voices Within<br />

<strong>July</strong> 26<br />

Chauson’s<br />

Concert<br />

<strong>August</strong> 2<br />

Buy tickets now!<br />

For Full Festival line up visit<br />

TOSUMMERMUSIC.COM<br />

416.408.0208<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 47


LIVE OR ONLINE | Jun 1 to Sep 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

String Quartet. Wilfrid Laurier University -<br />

Maureen Forrester Recital Hall, 75 University<br />

Ave., Waterloo. Visit www.ticketscene.ca/<br />

kwcms. $90(Quartetfest 6-concert pass);<br />

$40; $10(st).<br />

● 7:30: Elora Festival. Opening Night Gala:<br />

The Creation. Gambrel Barn Elora, Corner<br />

of County Rd. 7 and 21, Elora. Visit www.<br />

ticketpeak.co or call 519-846-0331. $20-$75;<br />

$20(st).<br />

● 8:00: Massey Hall. Get the Led Out.<br />

178 Victoria St. www.tickets.mhrth.com.<br />

From $51.<br />

Saturday <strong>July</strong> 6<br />

● 1:00: Elora Festival. Shoestring Opera: The<br />

Magic Flute. Melville United Church (Fergus),<br />

300 St. Andrew St. W., Fergus. Visit www.<br />

ticketpeak.co or call 519-846-0331. $20;<br />

$10(child).<br />

● 3:00: Roy Thomson Hall. XVI Latvian Festival<br />

of Song and Dance in Canada. 60 Simcoe<br />

St. www.tickets.mhrth.com. From $25.<br />

● 3:30: Elora Festival. Britten: Canticles,<br />

Hymns & Folk Songs. St. John’s Anglican<br />

Church, 36 Henderson St., Elora. Visit www.<br />

ticketpeak.co or call 519-846-0331. $50;<br />

$20(st).<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. Quartetfest #6: Finale. Wilfrid Laurier<br />

University - Maureen Forrester Recital<br />

Hall, 75 University Ave., Waterloo. Visit www.<br />

ticketscene.ca/kwcms. $90(Quartetfest<br />

6-concert pass); $25; $10(st).<br />

● 7:00: Westben. Jeremy Dutcher and Forest<br />

Bathing. The Barn, 6698 County Road 30,<br />

Campbellford. 1-877-883-5777 or www.westben.ca.<br />

$5-$68.<br />

● 7:30: Elora Festival. Laila Biali in Concert.<br />

Gambrel Barn Elora, Corner of County Rd. 7<br />

and 21, Elora. Visit www.ticketpeak.co or call<br />

519-846-0331. $20-$65; $20(st).<br />

● 7:30: Guild Festival Theatre. Spin.<br />

Guild Park and Gardens - Greek Theatre,<br />

201 Guildwood Pky, Scarborough. 647-576-<br />

7822 or visit www.guildfestivaltheatre.ca.<br />

$30.<br />

● 7:30: Port Hope Jazz. Hilario Durán and<br />

His Latin Jazz Big Band. Victoria Hall, Concert<br />

Hall, 55 King St. W., Cobourg. 855-372-<br />

2210. $44.<br />

● 8:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Dirty<br />

Heads. Fallsview Casino Resort - OLG Stage,<br />

6380 Fallsview Blvd., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$75.85-$122.85.<br />

● 8:00: Massey Hall. The Liverpool 4.<br />

178 Victoria St. www.tickets.mhrth.com.<br />

From $58.<br />

Sunday <strong>July</strong> 7<br />

● 2:30: Leith Summer Festival. New Zealand<br />

String Quartet. Historic Leith Church,<br />

419498 Tom Thomson Ln., Leith. 519-371-2833<br />

or visit www.leithchurch.ca. $45.<br />

● 3:00: Elora Festival. Tyler Duncan & Erika<br />

Switzer in Recital. St. John’s Anglican Church,<br />

36 Henderson St., Elora. Visit www.ticketpeak.co<br />

or call 519-846-0331. $50; $20(st).<br />

● 4:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: Up and Coming. Toronto<br />

Music Garden, 479 Queens Quay W. www.<br />

harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Elora Festival. King’s Singers. Gambrel<br />

Barn Elora, Corner of County Rd. 7 and<br />

21, Elora. Visit www.ticketpeak.co or call 519-<br />

846-0331. $20-$75; $20(st).<br />

● 7:30: Leith Summer Festival. Swiss Piano<br />

Trio. Historic Leith Church, 419498 Tom<br />

Thomson Ln., Leith. 519-371-2833 or visit<br />

www.leithchurch.ca. $45.<br />

Monday <strong>July</strong> 8<br />

● 12:15: Music Mondays. Modern Music for<br />

Guitar. Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity<br />

Sq. 416-598-4521 X223 or www.musicmondays.ca<br />

or musicmondayscs@gmail.com.<br />

PWYC ($10 suggested).<br />

Wednesday <strong>July</strong> 10<br />

● 2:00: Bloor/Borden Farmer’s Market.<br />

Music in the Market - J. Patrick O’Neal. 300<br />

Borden St. 613-475-4769. Free.<br />

● 8:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. The Offspring.<br />

OLG Stage at Fallsview Casino,<br />

6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$76.85-$187.75.<br />

Thursday <strong>July</strong> 11<br />

Day 1 of Toronto Summer Music running<br />

from Jul 11 to Aug 3.<br />

● 8:00am: Elora Festival. Music in the<br />

Woods. Grand River Community Church,<br />

7438 Wellington Rd 18, Elora. www.ticketpeak.co<br />

or call 519-846-0331. $20.<br />

● 7:00: Elora Festival. Fauré: Piano Trio<br />

& Quartet. St. John’s Anglican Church,<br />

36 Henderson St., Elora. www.ticketpeak.co<br />

or call 519-846-0331. $50; $20(st).<br />

● 7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: Crossroads. Toronto<br />

Music Garden, 479 Queens Quay W. www.<br />

harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

● 7:00: Westben. Natural Balance. The Barn,<br />

6698 County Road 30, Campbellford. 1-877-<br />

883-5777 or www.westben.ca. $5-$45.<br />

● 7:30: Brott Music Festival. Il barbiere<br />

di Siviglia (The Barber of Seville). Theatre<br />

Aquarius, 190 King William St., Hamilton.<br />

905-525-7664 or www.brottmusic.com.<br />

From $25.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Opening<br />

Night: The Fairy Queen. Royal Conservatory<br />

of Music - TELUS Centre - Koerner Hall,<br />

273 Bloor St. W. Tickets at 416-408-0208 /<br />

647-430-5699 / www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $26. Discounts are available for those<br />

OPENING<br />

NIGHT!<br />

Purcell:<br />

The Fairy Queen<br />

<strong>July</strong> 11<br />

tosummermusic.com<br />

over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 8:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. UB40 -<br />

Red Wine Tour with Maxi Priest. Fallsview<br />

Casino Resort - OLG Stage, 6380 Fallsview<br />

Blvd., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$70.20-$99.45.<br />

● 9:00: Elora Festival. Elora Singers<br />

at Twilight. St. John’s Anglican Church,<br />

36 Henderson St., Elora. www.ticketpeak.co<br />

or call 519-846-0331. $50; $20(st).<br />

Friday <strong>July</strong> 12<br />

● 1:00: Mostly Madrigals. Singout at Humber<br />

Bay West. Gazebo at Humber Bay, 50 Humber<br />

Bay Park Rd. W., Etobicoke. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Elora Festival. Unplugged. Gambrel<br />

Barn Elora, Corner of County Rd. 7 and 21,<br />

Elora. www.ticketpeak.co or call 519-846-<br />

0331. $20-$75; $20(st).<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Transfigured<br />

Night. University of Toronto - Edward Johnson<br />

Building - Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park.<br />

Tickets at 647-430-5699 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $25. Discounts are available<br />

for those over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 8:00: Brampton On Stage. The Rosebowl.<br />

The Rose Studio, 1 Theatre Ln., Brampton.<br />

905-874-2800. $10.<br />

Saturday <strong>July</strong> 13<br />

Day 1 of Music at Port Milford in Prince<br />

Edward County running from Jul 13 to<br />

Aug 3.<br />

● 10:30am: Elora Festival. Free Community<br />

Event: Elora Sings Bach. St. John’s Anglican<br />

Church, 36 Henderson St., Elora. www.ticketpeak.co<br />

or call 519-846-0331. Free.<br />

● 12:00 noon: Brott Music Festival. Brott on<br />

the Waterfront. Theatre Aquarius, 190 King<br />

William St., Hamilton. 905-525-7664 or www.<br />

brottmusic.com. Free.<br />

● 1:00: Toronto Summer Music. ReGeneration<br />

Concert: Art Song & Chamber Music.<br />

University of Toronto - Edward Johnson Building<br />

- Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park. Tickets at<br />

416-408-0208 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $20. Discounts are available for those<br />

over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 1:30: Elora Festival. J.S. Bach’s Long Walk<br />

in the Snow. St. John’s Anglican Church,<br />

36 Henderson St., Elora. www.ticketpeak.co<br />

or call 519-846-0331. $50; $20(st).<br />

● 4:00: Elora Festival. Elinor Frey Plays Bach.<br />

St. John’s Anglican Church, 36 Henderson St.,<br />

Elora. www.ticketpeak.co or call 519-846-<br />

0331. $50; $20(st).<br />

● 4:00: Toronto Summer Music. ReGeneration<br />

Concert: Art Song & Chamber Music.<br />

University of Toronto - Edward Johnson Building<br />

- Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park. Tickets at<br />

416-408-0208 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $20. Discounts are available for those<br />

over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. The Coriolis Trio. First United Church<br />

Waterloo, 16 William St. W., Waterloo. Visit<br />

www.ticketscene.ca/kwcms. $35; $10(st).<br />

● 7:30: Elora Festival. Immortal Bach. St.<br />

John’s Anglican Church, 36 Henderson St.,<br />

Elora. www.ticketpeak.co or call 519-846-<br />

0331. $50; $20(st).<br />

● 7:30: Fallsview Casino Resort. Jason<br />

Mraz & The Superband: The Mystical<br />

Magical Rhythmical Radical Ride. Fallsview<br />

Casino Resort - OLG Stage, 6380 Fallsview<br />

Blvd., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$75.85-$483.88.<br />

● 7:30: Music at Port Milford. Beginnings. St.<br />

Mary Magdalene Anglican Church, 335 Main<br />

St., Picton. 914-439-5039. $50; $20(ages 16<br />

& under).<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. ReGeneration<br />

Concert: Art Song & Chamber Music.<br />

University of Toronto - Edward Johnson Building<br />

- Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park. Tickets at<br />

416-408-0208 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $20. Discounts are available for those<br />

over 65 and under 35.<br />

Sunday <strong>July</strong> 14<br />

● 2:00: Westben. Performer-Composer Residency<br />

Concert - Music of Many Gardens.<br />

The Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.<br />

1-877-883-5777 or www.westben.ca.<br />

Pay-What-You-Can.<br />

● 3:00: Elora Festival. Messiaen: Quartet for<br />

the End of Time. St. John’s Anglican Church,<br />

36 Henderson St., Elora. www.ticketpeak.co<br />

or call 519-846-0331. $50; $20(st).<br />

● 4:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: The Nine Maidens.<br />

Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens Quay W.<br />

www.harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

Monday <strong>July</strong> 15<br />

● 12:15: Music Mondays. Tales and Dedications.<br />

Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq.<br />

416-598-4521 X223 or www.musicmondays.<br />

ca or musicmondayscs@gmail.com. PWYC<br />

($10 suggested).<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Death and<br />

the Maiden. University of Toronto - Edward<br />

Johnson Building - Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s<br />

Park. Tickets at 647-430-5699 or www.<br />

tosummermusic.com. From $25. Discounts<br />

are available for those over 65 and<br />

under 35.<br />

Tuesday <strong>July</strong> 16<br />

● 5:00: Toronto Summer Music. Shuffle<br />

Hour. Heliconian Hall, 35 Hazelton Ave. Tickets<br />

at 416-408-0208 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

Free.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Connolly &<br />

Middleton. University of Toronto - Edward<br />

Johnson Building - Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s<br />

Park. Tickets at 647-430-5699 or www.<br />

tosummermusic.com. From $25. Discounts<br />

are available for those over 65 and under 35.<br />

48 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


CONNOLLY &<br />

MIDDLETON<br />

<strong>July</strong> 16<br />

tosummermusic.com<br />

Wednesday <strong>July</strong> 17<br />

● 11:00am: Toronto Summer Music. TSM<br />

Kids Concert. University of Toronto - Edward<br />

Johnson Building - Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s<br />

Park. Tickets at 416-408-0208 or www.<br />

tosummermusic.com. Free.<br />

● 12:00 noon: Toronto Summer Music.<br />

Academy Noon Concerts. Heliconian Hall,<br />

35 Hazelton Ave. Tickets at 416-408-0208 or<br />

www.tosummermusic.com. Free.<br />

● 2:00: Bloor/Borden Farmer’s Market.<br />

Music in the Market - Tak Bui & Guests. 300<br />

Borden St. 613-475-4769. Free.<br />

● 5:00: Toronto Summer Music. Shuffle<br />

Hour. Heliconian Hall, 35 Hazelton Ave. Tickets<br />

at 416-408-0208 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

Free.<br />

● 6:30: Elora Festival. Festival Barn Dance.<br />

Gambrel Barn Elora, Corner of County Rd. 7<br />

and 21, Elora. www.ticketpeak.co or call 519-<br />

846-0331. $20.<br />

● 7:00: Westben. Film Night - XL Outer<br />

Worlds. The Barn, 6698 County Road 30,<br />

Campbellford. 1-877-883-5777 or www.westben.ca.<br />

$5-$25.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Shape Note Singers. Sacred<br />

Harp Singing. Friends House, 60 Lowther<br />

Ave. 647-838-8764. Pay what you can.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Trio Zimbalist.<br />

University of Toronto - Edward Johnson<br />

TRIO ZIMBALIST<br />

<strong>July</strong> 17<br />

tosummermusic.com<br />

Building - Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park. Tickets<br />

at 647-430-5699 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $25. Discounts are available<br />

for those over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 8:00: Payadora Tango Ensemble. A Night of<br />

Tango with Payadora. Jazz Bistro, 251 Victoria<br />

St. 416-363-5<strong>29</strong>9. $25.<br />

Thursday <strong>July</strong> 18<br />

Day 1 of Brookside Music “Festival of the<br />

Bay” in Midland running from Jul 18 to<br />

Aug 2.<br />

Day 1 of Stratford Summer Music running<br />

from Jul 18 to Aug 11.<br />

● 12:00 noon: Toronto Summer Music.<br />

Academy Noon Concerts. Heliconian Hall,<br />

35 Hazelton Ave. Tickets at 416-408-0208 or<br />

www.tosummermusic.com. Free.<br />

● 2:00: Westben. Angela Hewitt, Piano. The<br />

Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.<br />

1-877-883-5777 or www.westben.ca. $5-$110.<br />

● 5:00: Toronto Summer Music. Shuffle<br />

Hour. Heliconian Hall, 35 Hazelton Ave. Tickets<br />

at 416-408-0208 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

Free.<br />

● 7:00: Brookside Music Association. Festival<br />

of the Bay: Bach’s Long Walk in the<br />

Snow. Midland Cultural Centre, 333 King St.,<br />

Midland. www.brooksidemusic.com. $35;<br />

Free(child/st).<br />

● 7:30: Brott Music Festival. Four Seasons:<br />

Recomposed Candlelight. Church of the<br />

Ascension, 64 Forest Ave., Hamilton. 905-<br />

525-7664 or www.brottmusic.com. From $20.<br />

● 7:30: Stratford Summer Music. Opening<br />

Night Gala - Bring the Light. Avondale Church,<br />

194 Avondale Ave., Stratford. 519-271-2101<br />

or visit www.stratfordsummermusic.ca.<br />

$15-$135.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Vadym<br />

Kholodenko. Royal Conservatory of Music -<br />

TELUS Centre - Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor St. W.<br />

Tickets at 647-430-5699 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $26. Discounts are available<br />

for those over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 8:00: Elora Festival. Talbot: Path of Miracles.<br />

Gambrel Barn Elora, Corner of County<br />

Rd. 7 and 21, Elora. www.ticketpeak.co or call<br />

519-846-0331. $55; $20(st).<br />

● 8:00: Massey Hall. Classic Albums Live:<br />

The Rolling Stones - Exile on Main Street.<br />

178 Victoria St. www.tickets.mhrth.com.<br />

From $52.<br />

Friday <strong>July</strong> 19<br />

● 12:00 noon: Toronto Summer Music.<br />

Academy Noon Concerts. Heliconian Hall,<br />

35 Hazelton Ave. Tickets at 416-408-0208 or<br />

www.tosummermusic.com. Free.<br />

● 2:00: Westben. New Zealand String Quartet.<br />

The Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.<br />

1-877-883-5777 or www.westben.<br />

ca. $5-$55.<br />

● 7:00: Brampton On Stage. East Coast<br />

Kitchen Party. Rose Theatre, The (Brampton),<br />

1 Theatre Ln., Brampton. 905-874-2800. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Brott Music Festival. The Music of<br />

James Bond. Liuna Station, 360 James St. N.,<br />

Hamilton. 905-525-7664 or www.brottmusic.<br />

com. From $25.<br />

● 7:30: Elora Festival. Constantinople: A<br />

Fileta. Gambrel Barn Elora, Corner of County<br />

Rd. 7 and 21, Elora. www.ticketpeak.co or call<br />

519-846-0331. $20-$55; $20(st).<br />

● 7:30: Festival of the Sound. Opera Plus.<br />

Charles W. Stockey Centre for the Performing<br />

Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061<br />

or 705-746-2410. $80.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Schubert’s<br />

Piano. University of Toronto - Edward Johnson<br />

Building - Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park.<br />

Tickets at 647-430-5699 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $25. Discounts are available<br />

for those over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 9:00: Stratford Summer Music. Friday<br />

Night Live at Revival House - Aline Homzy<br />

& Friends. Revival House, 70 Brunswick St.,<br />

Stratford. 519-271-2101 or visit www.stratfordsummermusic.ca.<br />

$70.<br />

Saturday <strong>July</strong> 20<br />

● 11:00am: Festival of the Sound. Strings<br />

Across the Sky. Charles W. Stockey Centre<br />

for the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry<br />

Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. By<br />

donation.<br />

● 11:00am: Toronto Summer Music. Xenia @<br />

TSM. Venue TBA. Tickets at 416-408-0208 or<br />

www.tosummermusic.com. Free.<br />

● 1:00: Toronto Summer Music. ReGeneration<br />

Concert: Art Song & Chamber Music.<br />

University of Toronto - Edward Johnson Building<br />

- Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park. Tickets at<br />

416-408-0208 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $20. Discounts are available for those<br />

over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 2:00: Westben. Colin Ainsworth and the<br />

New Zealand String Quartet. The Barn,<br />

6698 County Road 30, Campbellford. 1-877-<br />

883-5777 or www.westben.ca. $5-$55.<br />

● 4:00: Toronto Summer Music. ReGeneration<br />

Concert: Art Song & Chamber Music.<br />

University of Toronto - Edward Johnson Building<br />

- Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park. Tickets at<br />

416-408-0208 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $20. Discounts are available for those<br />

over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 6:00: Westben. Strings Around the Campfire<br />

and Dare to Pair Culinary Experience. The<br />

Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.<br />

1-877-883-5777 or www.westben.ca. Dare to<br />

Pair Reservations are required 48 hours in<br />

advance. $110.<br />

● 7:00: Festival of the Sound. National Youth<br />

Orchestra of Canada. Charles W. Stockey<br />

Centre for the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St.,<br />

Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-<br />

2410. $60-$70.<br />

● 7:00: TD Music Hall. Cyberlandfest.<br />

178 Victoria St. www.tickets.mhrth.com. $35.<br />

● 7:00: TO Live/Small World Music Series.<br />

Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy: Kal Ho Na Ho. Meridian<br />

Hall, 1 Front St. E. Visit www.tolive.com or<br />

www.ticketmaster.ca. From $50.<br />

● 7:30: Brockville Arts Centre. The Duncan<br />

Hopkins Quartet. 235 King St. W., Brockville.<br />

www.bactickets.ca/TheatreManager/1/<br />

tmEvent/tmEvent1766.html. $50.<br />

● 7:30: Elora Festival. Closing Gala: Carmina<br />

Burana. Gambrel Barn Elora, Corner of<br />

County Rd. 7 and 21, Elora. www.ticketpeak.<br />

co or call 519-846-0331. $20-$75; $20(st).<br />

● 7:30: Music at Port Milford. Tenacity &<br />

Wit. St. Mary Magdalene Anglican Church,<br />

335 Main St., Picton. 914-439-5039. $50;<br />

$20(ages 16 & under).<br />

● 7:30: Stratford Summer Music. La Voce<br />

di Napoli. Stratford-Perth Museum Stage,<br />

4725 Huron St., Stratford. 519-271-2101<br />

or visit www.stratfordsummermusic.ca.<br />

$15-$50.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. ReGeneration<br />

Concert: Art Song & Chamber Music.<br />

University of Toronto - Edward Johnson Building<br />

- Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park. Tickets at<br />

416-408-0208 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $20. Discounts are available for those<br />

over 65 and under 35.<br />

Sunday <strong>July</strong> 21<br />

● 4:00: Stratford Summer Music. Angela<br />

Hewitt. Avondale Church, 194 Avondale Ave.,<br />

Stratford. 519-271-2101 or visit www.stratfordsummermusic.ca.<br />

$15-$80.<br />

● 7:00: Festival of the Sound. Carmina<br />

Burana. Charles W. Stockey Centre for the<br />

Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound.<br />

1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $75-$85.<br />

Monday <strong>July</strong> 22<br />

● 12:15: Music Mondays. Aire. Church of the<br />

Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. 416-598-4521 X223<br />

or www.musicmondays.ca or musicmondayscs@gmail.com.<br />

PWYC ($10 suggested).<br />

● 6:00: Festival of the Sound. Blues Cruise:<br />

Carlos del Junco Trio. Island Queen Cruise<br />

Ship, 9 Bay St., Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061<br />

or 705-746-2410. $40, $70, $160.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Breathings.<br />

University of Toronto - Edward Johnson Building<br />

- Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park. Tickets at<br />

647-430-5699 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $25. Discounts are available for those<br />

over 65 and under 35.<br />

Tuesday <strong>July</strong> 23<br />

● 9:30am: Festival of the Sound. Yoga &<br />

Classics. Charles W. Stockey Centre for<br />

the Performing Arts, Deck, 9 Bay St., Parry<br />

Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. By<br />

donation.<br />

● 11:00am: Festival of the Sound. Xenia Concert.<br />

Sound Community Hub, 86 Gibson St.,<br />

Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-<br />

2410. By donation.<br />

● 1:00: Festival of the Sound. ChamberKids.<br />

Parry Sound Public Library, <strong>29</strong> Mary St.,<br />

Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-<br />

2410. By donation.<br />

● 2:00: Westben. Best of Barnful of Broadway.<br />

The Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.<br />

1-877-883-5777 or www.westben.<br />

ca. $5-$58.<br />

● 2:30: Festival of the Sound. Welcome to<br />

the Circle. St. James United Church (Parry<br />

Sound), 24 Mary St., Parry Sound. 1-866-364-<br />

0061 or 705-746-2410. By donation.<br />

SCHMALTZ &<br />

PEPPER<br />

<strong>July</strong> 23<br />

tosummermusic.com<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 49


LIVE OR ONLINE | Jun 1 to Sep 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

● 5:00: Toronto Summer Music. Shuffle<br />

Hour. Heliconian Hall, 35 Hazelton Ave. Tickets<br />

at 416-408-0208 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

Free.<br />

● 7:00: Festival of the Sound. Bands on the<br />

Bay: Chameleon. Charles W. Stockey Centre<br />

for the Performing Arts, Deck, 9 Bay St.,<br />

Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-<br />

2410. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Schmaltz &<br />

Pepper. University of Toronto - Edward Johnson<br />

Building - Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park.<br />

Tickets at 647-430-5699or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $25. Discounts are available<br />

for those over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 8:15: Festival of the Sound. Für Elise by<br />

Candlelight. Charles W. Stockey Centre<br />

for the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry<br />

Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. By<br />

donation.<br />

Wednesday <strong>July</strong> 24<br />

● 11:00am: Toronto Summer Music. TSM<br />

Kids Concert. University of Toronto - Edward<br />

Johnson Building - Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s<br />

Park. Tickets at 416-408-0208 or www.<br />

tosummermusic.com. Free.<br />

● 1:30: Festival of the Sound. Postcards.<br />

Charles W. Stockey Centre for the Performing<br />

Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061<br />

or 705-746-2410. $40 & $45.<br />

● 2:00: Bloor/Borden Farmer’s Market.<br />

Music in the Market - Joseph Landau. 300<br />

Borden St. 613-475-4769. Free.<br />

● 2:00: Westben. Best of Barnful of Broadway.<br />

The Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.<br />

1-877-883-5777 or www.westben.<br />

ca. $5-$58.<br />

● 3:30: Festival of the Sound. Quartet for the<br />

End of Time. Charles W. Stockey Centre for<br />

the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound.<br />

1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $45 & $55.<br />

● 5:00: Toronto Summer Music. Shuffle<br />

Hour. Heliconian Hall, 35 Hazelton Ave. Tickets<br />

at 416-408-0208 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

Free.<br />

● 7:00: Brookside Music Association. Festival<br />

of the Bay: Fiesta - Music of Spain and<br />

South America. Midland Cultural Centre,<br />

333 King St., Midland. www.brooksidemusic.<br />

com. $35; Free(child/st).<br />

● 7:30: Festival of the Sound. Brahms, Ravel<br />

& Harold Lloyd. Charles W. Stockey Centre for<br />

the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound.<br />

1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $60 & $75.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Bach & Vivaldi.<br />

Church of the Redeemer, 162 Bloor St. W.<br />

Tickets at 416-408-0208 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $20. Discounts are available<br />

for those over 65 and under 35.<br />

Thursday <strong>July</strong> 25<br />

Day 1 of Highlands Opera Studio in Haliburton<br />

running from Jul 25 to Aug 26.<br />

● 1:30: Festival of the Sound. Bach to<br />

Beethoven. Charles W. Stockey Centre for<br />

the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound.<br />

1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $55 & $65.<br />

● 2:00: Westben. Best of Barnful of Broadway.<br />

The Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.<br />

1-877-883-5777 or www.westben.<br />

ca. $5-$58.<br />

● 3:30: Festival of the Sound. The Gryphon<br />

Trio Play Beethoven’s Archduke Trio. Charles<br />

W. Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts,<br />

2 Bay St., Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or<br />

705-746-2410. $55 & $65.<br />

● 5:00: Toronto Summer Music. Shuffle<br />

Hour. Heliconian Hall, 35 Hazelton Ave. Tickets<br />

at 416-408-0208 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

Free.<br />

● 7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: Scenic Sojourn. Toronto<br />

Music Garden, 479 Queens Quay W. www.<br />

harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. Chamber Music Concert. Venue<br />

TBA. Visit www.ticketscene.ca/kwcms. $30;<br />

$10(st).<br />

● 7:30: Brott Music Festival. Dvořák 8. Theatre<br />

Aquarius, 190 King William St., Hamilton.<br />

905-525-7664 or www.brottmusic.com.<br />

From $25.<br />

● 7:30: Festival of the Sound. Two Grand Serenades.<br />

Charles W. Stockey Centre for the<br />

Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound.<br />

1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $60 & $70.<br />

● 7:30: Highlands Opera Studio. Richard<br />

Margison Masterclass No.1. St. George’s<br />

Anglican Church, 617 Mountain St., Haliburton.<br />

www.brownpapertickets.com/<br />

event/6183428 or 1-855-455-5533. $10.<br />

CANADIAN<br />

BRASS<br />

<strong>July</strong> 25<br />

tosummermusic.com<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Canadian<br />

Brass. Royal Conservatory of Music - TELUS<br />

Centre - Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor St. W. Tickets<br />

at 647-430-5699 or www.tosummermusic.<br />

com. From $26. Discounts are available for<br />

those over 65 and under 35.<br />

Friday <strong>July</strong> 26<br />

Day 1 of Summer Opera Lyric Theatre in<br />

Toronto running from Jul 26 to Aug 4.<br />

● 11:00am: Festival of the Sound. Cameron<br />

Crozman. Festival Station Office, 1 Avenue Rd.,<br />

Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-<br />

2410. By donation.<br />

● 1:30: Festival of the Sound. The Heart of<br />

the Drum. Charles W. Stockey Centre for the<br />

Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound.<br />

1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $45 & $55.<br />

● 2:00: Westben. Best of Barnful of Broadway.<br />

The Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.<br />

1-877-883-5777 or www.westben.<br />

ca. $5-$58.<br />

● 7:30: Festival of the Sound. Mozart and<br />

Ziigwan. Charles W. Stockey Centre for the<br />

Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound.<br />

1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $60 & $70.<br />

● 7:30: Highlands Opera Studio. Richard<br />

Margison Masterclass No.2. St. George’s<br />

Anglican Church (Haliburton), 617 Mountain<br />

St., Haliburton. www.brownpapertickets.<br />

com/event/6183428 or 1-855-455-5533. $10.<br />

VOICES WITHIN<br />

<strong>July</strong> 26<br />

tosummermusic.com<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Voices<br />

Within. University of Toronto - Edward Johnson<br />

Building - Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park.<br />

Tickets at 647-430-5699 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $25. Discounts are available<br />

for those over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 8:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Babyface in<br />

Concert. Fallsview Casino Resort - OLG Stage,<br />

6380 Fallsview Blvd., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$87.15-$122.85.<br />

● 8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. La<br />

Boheme. Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St.<br />

www.solt.ca/performances or 416-366-7723.<br />

$28; $22(sr/st).<br />

Saturday <strong>July</strong> 27<br />

● 2:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Idomeneo.<br />

Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St. www.<br />

solt.ca/performances or 416-366-7723. $28;<br />

$22(sr/st).<br />

● 2:00: Westben. Best of Barnful of Broadway.<br />

The Barn (Campbellford), 6698 County<br />

Road 30, Campbellford. 1-877-883-5777 or<br />

www.westben.ca. $5-$58.<br />

● 4:00: Toronto Summer Music. ReGeneration<br />

Concert: Chamber Music. University<br />

of Toronto - Edward Johnson Building - Walter<br />

Hall, 80 Queen’s Park. Tickets at 416-408-<br />

0208 or www.tosummermusic.com. From<br />

$20. Discounts are available for those over 65<br />

and under 35.<br />

● 7:00: Festival of the Sound. Gala Dinner:<br />

Broadway Through the Years. Charles W.<br />

Stockey Centre for the Performing Arts, 2 Bay<br />

St., Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or 705-<br />

746-2410. $200.<br />

● 7:30: Highlands Opera Studio. Richard<br />

Margison Masterclass No.3. St. George’s<br />

Anglican Church (Haliburton), 617 Mountain<br />

St., Haliburton. www.brownpapertickets.<br />

com/event/6183428 or 1-855-455-5533. $10.<br />

● 7:30: Music at Port Milford. In Wonder. St.<br />

Mary Magdalene Anglican Church, 335 Main<br />

St., Picton. 914-439-5039. $50; $20(ages 16<br />

& under).<br />

● 7:30: Stratford Summer Music. FreePlay<br />

Duo. Factory163, 163 King St., Stratford. 519-<br />

271-2101 or visit www.stratfordsummermusic.ca.<br />

$15-$45.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. ReGeneration<br />

Concert: Chamber Music. University<br />

of Toronto - Edward Johnson Building - Walter<br />

Hall, 80 Queen’s Park. Tickets at 416-408-<br />

0208 or www.tosummermusic.com. From<br />

$20. Discounts are available for those over 65<br />

and under 35.<br />

● 8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre.<br />

Xerxes. Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St.<br />

www.solt.ca/performances or 416-366-7723.<br />

$28; $22(sr/st).<br />

Sunday <strong>July</strong> 28<br />

● 2:00: Festival of the Sound. Jazz Canada.<br />

Charles W. Stockey Centre for the Performing<br />

Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061<br />

or 705-746-2410. $50 & $60.<br />

● 2:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Idomeneo.<br />

Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St. www.<br />

solt.ca/performances or 416-366-7723. $28;<br />

$22(sr/st).<br />

● 2:00: Westben. Best of Barnful of Broadway.<br />

The Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.<br />

1-877-883-5777 or www.westben.<br />

ca. $5-$58.<br />

● 4:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: From Canada to Cuphead.<br />

Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens<br />

Quay W. www.harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

● 4:00: Stratford Summer Music. Ofra Harnoy<br />

with Mike Herriott. Avondale Church,<br />

194 Avondale Ave., Stratford. 519-271-2101<br />

or visit www.stratfordsummermusic.ca.<br />

$15-$80.<br />

● 7:00: Brookside Music Association. Festival<br />

of the Bay: New Zealand String Quartet<br />

With James Campbell. Midland Cultural Centre,<br />

333 King St., Midland. www.brooksidemusic.com.<br />

$35; Free(child/st).<br />

● 7:30: Festival of the Sound. Toronto All-<br />

Star Big Band. Charles W. Stockey Centre for<br />

the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound.<br />

1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $60 & $70.<br />

Monday <strong>July</strong> <strong>29</strong><br />

● 12:15: Music Mondays. A Romance on Three<br />

Legs. Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq.<br />

416-598-4521 X223 or www.musicmondays.<br />

ca or musicmondayscs@gmail.com. PWYC<br />

($10 suggested).<br />

● 1:00: Festival of the Sound. Office Hour:<br />

Swiss Piano Trio. Festival Station Office,<br />

1 Avenue Rd., Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061<br />

or 705-746-2410. By donation.<br />

● 6:00: Festival of the Sound. Jazz Cruise:<br />

The Shuffle Demons. Island Queen Cruise<br />

Ship, 9 Bay St., Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061<br />

or 705-746-2410. $40, $70, $160.<br />

● 7:00: Array/ECCG Gamelan. Evergreen<br />

Club Contemporary Gamelan Monthly<br />

Meetup. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-<br />

532-3019. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Highlands Opera Studio. Why Choose<br />

Opera? Abbey Gardens, 1012 Garden Gate<br />

Dr., Haliburton. www.brownpapertickets.<br />

com/event/6183459 or 1-855-455-5533. Pay<br />

what you can.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Dreams<br />

and Shadows. University of Toronto - Edward<br />

Johnson Building - Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s<br />

Park. Tickets at 647-430-5699 or www.<br />

50 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


tosummermusic.com. From $25. Discounts<br />

are available for those over 65 and under 35.<br />

Tuesday <strong>July</strong> 30<br />

● 9:30am: Festival of the Sound. Yoga &<br />

Classics. Charles W. Stockey Centre for<br />

the Performing Arts, Deck, 9 Bay St., Parry<br />

Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. By<br />

donation.<br />

● 1:00: Festival of the Sound. ChamberKids.<br />

Parry Sound Public Library, <strong>29</strong> Mary St.,<br />

Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-<br />

2410. By donation.<br />

● 2:30: Festival of the Sound. Greetings<br />

From Abroad. Charles W. Stockey Centre for<br />

the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound.<br />

1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $45 & $50.<br />

● 7:00: Festival of the Sound. Bands on the<br />

Bay: The Georgian Winds. Charles W. Stockey<br />

Centre for the Performing Arts, Deck, 9 Bay<br />

St., Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or 705-<br />

746-2410. Free.<br />

ELISABETH<br />

ST-GELAIS<br />

<strong>July</strong> 30<br />

tosummermusic.com<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Elisabeth St-<br />

Gelais. University of Toronto - Edward Johnson<br />

Building - Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park.<br />

Tickets at 647-430-5699 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $25. Discounts are available<br />

for those over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 8:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Alice<br />

Cooper. OLG Stage at Fallsview Casino,<br />

6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara Falls. www.ticketmaster.ca.<br />

From $52.<br />

● 8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre.<br />

Xerxes. Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St.<br />

www.solt.ca/performances or 416-366-7723.<br />

$28; $22(sr/st).<br />

● 8:15: Festival of the Sound. Pachelbel<br />

by Candlelight. Charles W. Stockey Centre<br />

for the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry<br />

Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. By<br />

donation.<br />

Wednesday <strong>July</strong> 31<br />

● 12:00 noon: Toronto Summer Music.<br />

Academy Noon Concerts. Heliconian Hall,<br />

35 Hazelton Ave. Tickets at 416-408-0208 or<br />

www.tosummermusic.com. Free.<br />

● 1:30: Festival of the Sound. Carol’s Choice.<br />

Charles W. Stockey Centre for the Performing<br />

Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061<br />

or 705-746-2410. $45 & $50.<br />

● 2:00: Bloor/Borden Farmer’s Market.<br />

Music in the Market - Wayne & Brian. 300<br />

Borden St. 613-475-4769. Free.<br />

● 2:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. La<br />

Boheme. Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St.<br />

www.solt.ca/performances or 416-366-7723.<br />

$28; $22(sr/st).<br />

● 2:00: Westben. Gerald Finley and Brian Finley.<br />

The Barn, 6698 County Road 30, Campbellford.<br />

1-877-883-5777 or www.westben.<br />

ca. Reservations are required 48 hours in<br />

advance. $5-$110.<br />

● 3:30: Festival of the Sound. Mozart Clarinet<br />

Concerto. Charles W. Stockey Centre for<br />

the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound.<br />

1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $45 & $50.<br />

● 4:30: Festival of the Sound. A Conversation<br />

with Keith. Charles W. Stockey Centre<br />

for the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry<br />

Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. By<br />

donation.<br />

● 7:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. 311: Unity<br />

Tour with special guests AWOLNATION &<br />

Neon Tress. OLG Stage at Fallsview Casino,<br />

6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$76.85-135.15.<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. Chamber Music Concert. Keffer<br />

Memorial Chapel, Wilfrid Laurier University,<br />

75 University Ave. W., Waterloo. Visit www.<br />

ticketscene.ca/kwcms. $20; $10(st).<br />

● 7:30: Festival of the Sound. Come to the<br />

Party! Charles W. Stockey Centre for the Performing<br />

Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound. 1-866-<br />

364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $75 & $85.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Pacifica<br />

Quartet. University of Toronto - Edward Johnson<br />

Building - Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park.<br />

Tickets at 647-430-5699 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $25. Discounts are available<br />

for those over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Idomeneo.<br />

Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St. www.<br />

solt.ca/performances or 416-366-7723. $28;<br />

$22(sr/st).<br />

Thursday <strong>August</strong> 1<br />

● 12:00 noon: Toronto Summer Music.<br />

Academy Noon Concerts. Heliconian Hall,<br />

35 Hazelton Ave. Tickets at 416-408-0208 or<br />

www.tosummermusic.com. Free.<br />

● 1:30: Festival of the Sound. Silvie’s Choice.<br />

Charles W. Stockey Centre for the Performing<br />

Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound. 1-866-364-0061<br />

or 705-746-2410. $45 & $55.<br />

● 3:30: Festival of the Sound. Cameron’s<br />

Choice. Charles W. Stockey Centre for the<br />

Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound.<br />

1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $45 & $55.<br />

● 7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: From Tehran to Casablanca.<br />

Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens<br />

Quay W. www.harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Brott Music Festival. Stravinsky -<br />

Firebird. Mohawk College - McIntyre Performing<br />

Arts Centre, 135 Fennell Ave. W.,<br />

Hamilton. 905-525-7664 or www.brottmusic.<br />

com. From $25.<br />

● 7:30: Festival of the Sound. Toronto Mass<br />

Choir. Charles W. Stockey Centre for the Performing<br />

Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound. 1-866-<br />

364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $55 & $65.<br />

● 7:30: Highlands Opera Studio. From Opera<br />

to Broadway. St. George’s Anglican Church<br />

(Haliburton), 617 Mountain St., Haliburton.<br />

www.brownpapertickets.com/event/6183437<br />

or 1-855-455-5533. $25.<br />

● 7:30: Stratford Summer Music. Viva<br />

Mexico Mariachi. Factory163, 163 King St.,<br />

Stratford. 519-271-2101 or visit www.stratfordsummermusic.ca.<br />

$15-$45.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Beethoven<br />

Unleashed. Royal Conservatory of Music -<br />

TELUS Centre - Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor St. W.<br />

Tickets at 647-430-5699 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $26. Discounts are available<br />

for those over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. La<br />

Boheme. Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St.<br />

www.solt.ca/performances or 416-366-7723.<br />

$28; $22(sr/st).<br />

Friday <strong>August</strong> 2<br />

● 12:00 noon: Toronto Summer Music.<br />

Academy Noon Concerts. Heliconian Hall,<br />

35 Hazelton Ave. Tickets at 416-408-0208 or<br />

www.tosummermusic.com. Free.<br />

● 1:30: Festival of the Sound. Dvořák &<br />

Danny Boy. Charles W. Stockey Centre for<br />

the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound.<br />

1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $45 & $55.<br />

● 7:00: Brampton On Stage. Colours of Carnival.<br />

The Rose Patio, 1 Theatre Lane, Brampton.<br />

905-874-2800. Free.<br />

● 7:00: Brookside Music Association. Festival<br />

of the Bay: The Swiss Trio. Midland Cultural<br />

Centre, 333 King St., Midland. www.<br />

brooksidemusic.com. $35; Free(child/st).<br />

● 7:00: Festival of the Sound. Elmer Iseler<br />

Singers at 45. Charles W. Stockey Centre for<br />

the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry Sound.<br />

1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410. $60 & $70.<br />

● 7:00: Westben. Big Smoke Brass. The Barn,<br />

6698 County Road 30, Campbellford. 1-877-<br />

883-5777 or www.westben.ca. $5-$48.<br />

CHAUSSON’S<br />

CONCERT<br />

<strong>August</strong> 2<br />

tosummermusic.com<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. Chausson’s<br />

Concert. University of Toronto - Edward<br />

Johnson Building - Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s<br />

Park. Tickets at 647-430-5699 or www.<br />

tosummermusic.com. From $25. Discounts<br />

are available for those over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 8:00: Massey Hall. Stephen Sanchez.<br />

178 Victoria St. www.tickets.mhrth.com.<br />

Ticket pricing to be announced.<br />

● 8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. Idomeneo.<br />

Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St. www.<br />

solt.ca/performances or 416-366-7723. $28;<br />

$22(sr/st).<br />

● 9:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Flo<br />

Rida. Fallsview Casino Resort - OLG Stage,<br />

6380 Fallsview Blvd., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

From $76.<br />

● 9:00: Stratford Summer Music. Friday<br />

Night Live at Revival House - SSM Jazz<br />

All-Stars. Revival House, 70 Brunswick St.,<br />

Stratford. 519-271-2101 or visit www.stratfordsummermusic.ca.<br />

$70.<br />

Saturday <strong>August</strong> 3<br />

● 2:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre.<br />

Xerxes. Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St.<br />

www.solt.ca/performances or 416-366-7723.<br />

$28; $22(sr/st).<br />

● 2:00: Westben. Holly Cole with Dare to Pair<br />

Culinary Experience. The Barn, 6698 County<br />

Road 30, Campbellford. 1-877-883-5777<br />

or www.westben.ca. Dare to Pair must be<br />

reserved 48 hours. $5-$72.<br />

● 7:00: Festival of the Sound. National Academy<br />

Orchestra. Charles W. Stockey Centre<br />

for the Performing Arts, 2 Bay St., Parry<br />

Sound. 1-866-364-0061 or 705-746-2410.<br />

$70 & $80.<br />

● 7:30: Music at Port Milford. Romanceros.<br />

St. Mary Magdalene Anglican Church,<br />

335 Main St., Picton. 914-439-5039. $50;<br />

$20(ages 16 & under).<br />

● 7:30: Stratford Summer Music. Lessons in<br />

Failure. Factory163, 163 King St., Stratford.<br />

519-271-2101 or visit www.stratfordsummermusic.ca.<br />

$15-$45.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Summer Music. TSM Finale.<br />

University of Toronto - Edward Johnson Building<br />

- Walter Hall, 80 Queen’s Park. Tickets at<br />

647-430-5699 or www.tosummermusic.com.<br />

From $25. Discounts are available for those<br />

over 65 and under 35.<br />

● 8:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre. La<br />

Boheme. Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St.<br />

www.solt.ca/performances or 416-366-7723.<br />

$28; $22(sr/st).<br />

● 8:00: Westben. Seyblu. The Barn,<br />

6698 County Road 30, Campbellford. 1-877-<br />

883-5777 or www.westben.ca. $5-$35.<br />

● 8:30: Regent Theatre. Choir! Choir!<br />

Choir!: Epic 80s Sing-Along! Regent Theatre,<br />

224 Main St., Picton. Visit www.theregenttheatre.org/buy-tickets.<br />

$41.<br />

Sunday <strong>August</strong> 4<br />

● 2:00: Summer Opera Lyric Theatre.<br />

Xerxes. Alumnae Theatre, 70 Berkeley St.<br />

www.solt.ca/performances or 416-366-7723.<br />

$28; $22(sr/st).<br />

● 2:00: Westben. Jackie Richardson & Joe<br />

Sealy Present Africville Stories. The Barn,<br />

6698 County Road 30, Campbellford. 1-877-<br />

883-5777 or www.westben.ca. $5-$65.<br />

● 4:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: Tango and Diaspora.<br />

Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens Quay W.<br />

www.harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Fallsview Casino Resort. Greta Van<br />

Fleet Starcatcher World Tour with special<br />

guest Crown Lands. OLG Stage at Fallsview<br />

Casino, 6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara Falls.<br />

ticketmaster.ca. $355.67-$548.73.<br />

Monday <strong>August</strong> 5<br />

● 12:15: Music Mondays. Dialogues: Rachmaninoff<br />

& Britten Sonatas for Cello and<br />

Piano. Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq.<br />

416-598-4521 X223 or www.musicmondays.<br />

ca or musicmondayscs@gmail.com. PWYC<br />

($10 suggested).<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 51


LIVE OR ONLINE | Jun 1 to Sep 7, <strong>2024</strong><br />

Wednesday <strong>August</strong> 7<br />

● 2:00: Bloor/Borden Farmer’s Market.<br />

Music in the Market - Hobo Soles. 300 Borden<br />

St. 613-475-4769. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Highlands Opera Studio. Pop Goes<br />

the Opera! Abbey Gardens, 1012 Garden Gate<br />

Dr., Haliburton. www.brownpapertickets.<br />

com/event/6183456 or 1-855-455-5533. $25.<br />

Thursday <strong>August</strong> 8<br />

● 7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: From Baghdad to<br />

Toronto. Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens<br />

Quay W. www.harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Brott Music Festival. Evita. FirstOntario<br />

Centre, 101 York Blvd., Hamilton. 905-<br />

525-7664 or www.brottmusic.com. From $25.<br />

● 7:30: Stratford Summer Music. Echo<br />

Chamber - A World Transformed. Avondale<br />

Church, 194 Avondale Ave., Stratford. 519-<br />

271-2101 or visit www.stratfordsummermusic.ca.<br />

$15-$80.<br />

Friday <strong>August</strong> 9<br />

● 7:30: Brott Music Festival. Liuna Station.<br />

FirstOntario Concert Hall, 1 Summers Ln.,<br />

Hamilton. 905-525-7664 or www.brottmusic.<br />

com. From $25.<br />

● 8:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Black<br />

Eyed Peas. OLG Stage at Fallsview Casino,<br />

6366 Stanley Ave., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

$88.15-$187.75.<br />

● 8:00: TD Music Hall. Taytay Dance.<br />

178 Victoria St. www.tickets.mhrth.com.<br />

Ticket prices to be announced.<br />

● 9:00: Stratford Summer Music. Friday<br />

Night Live at Revival House - Allison Au<br />

Quartet. Revival House, 70 Brunswick St.,<br />

Stratford. 519-271-2101 or visit www.stratfordsummermusic.ca.<br />

$70.<br />

Saturday <strong>August</strong> 10<br />

● 6:00: Highlands Opera Studio. Music on<br />

the Water. Mountain Lake Fairfield Bay, ,<br />

Minden Hills. www.brownpapertickets.com/<br />

event/6183453 or 1-855-455-5533. Pay what<br />

you can.<br />

● 7:30: Stratford Summer Music. Quattro<br />

Mani. Avondale Church, 194 Avondale Ave.,<br />

Stratford. 519-271-2101 or visit www.stratfordsummermusic.ca.<br />

$15-$80.<br />

Sunday <strong>August</strong> 11<br />

● 2:30: Leith Summer Festival. Bénédicte<br />

Lauzière and Angela Park. Historic Leith<br />

Church, 419498 Tom Thomson Ln., Leith. 519-<br />

371-2833 or visit www.leithchurch.ca. $45.<br />

● 4:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: The Art of Expression.<br />

Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens Quay W.<br />

www.harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

● 4:00: Stratford Summer Music. The Big<br />

Finale: Zombie Blizzard. Avondale Church,<br />

194 Avondale Ave., Stratford. 519-271-2101 or<br />

www.stratfordsummermusic.ca. $15-$80.<br />

Monday <strong>August</strong> 12<br />

● 12:15: Music Mondays. راَیْد - Diar. Church<br />

of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. 416-598-<br />

4521 X223 or www.musicmondays.ca or<br />

musicmondayscs@gmail.com. PWYC ($10<br />

suggested).<br />

● 1:00: Mostly Madrigals. Singout at Pickering<br />

Esplanade Park. Esplanade Park (Pickering),<br />

1 The Esplanade, Pickering. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Highlands Opera Studio. Casual Song<br />

Soirée. St. George’s Anglican Church (Haliburton),<br />

617 Mountain St., Haliburton. www.<br />

brownpapertickets.com/event/6183440 or<br />

1-855-455-5533. $25.<br />

Tuesday <strong>August</strong> 13<br />

● 8:00: Massey Hall. Idina Menzel.<br />

178 Victoria St. www.tickets.mhrth.com.<br />

From $63.<br />

Wednesday <strong>August</strong> 14<br />

● 2:00: Bloor/Borden Farmer’s Market.<br />

Music in the Market - Pete & Anna. 300 Borden<br />

St. 613-475-4769. Free.<br />

Thursday <strong>August</strong> 15<br />

● 7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: Nichol Robertson’s<br />

Country All-Stars. Toronto Music Garden,<br />

479 Queens Quay W. www.harbourfrontcentre.com.<br />

Free.<br />

● 7:30: Brott Music Festival. Mahler 5.<br />

FirstOntario Concert Hall - Boris Brott Great<br />

Hall, 1 Summers Ln., Hamilton. 905-525-7664<br />

or www.brottmusic.com. From $10.<br />

● 7:30: Highlands Opera Studio. Mishaabooz’s<br />

Realm. Northern Lights Performing<br />

Arts Pavilion, 5358 County Rd. 21, Haliburton.<br />

1-855-455-5533. $30.<br />

Friday <strong>August</strong> 16<br />

Day 1 of Markham Jazz Festival running<br />

from Aug 16 to 18.<br />

● 7:00: Brampton On Stage. Stomp N’ Stampede.<br />

Garden Square, 12 Main St. N., Brampton.<br />

905-874-2800. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Highlands Opera Studio. Celebrations!<br />

Northern Lights Performing Arts Pavilion,<br />

5358 County Rd. 21, Haliburton. Visit<br />

www.brownpapertickets.com/event/6183183<br />

for further information. Pay what you can.<br />

Call 1-855-455-5533.<br />

● 7:30: Markham Jazz Festival. Duchess<br />

Trio. Mainstage, Main St., Unionville. 647-983-<br />

7777. Free.<br />

● 8:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Sam<br />

Hunt. Fallsview Casino Resort - OLG Stage,<br />

6380 Fallsview Blvd., Niagara Falls. ticketmaster.ca.<br />

From $122.<br />

● 9:15: Markham Jazz Festival. Nicole<br />

Zuraitis. Mainstage, Main St., Unionville. 647-<br />

983-7777. Free.<br />

Saturday <strong>August</strong> 17<br />

● 12:00 noon: Markham Jazz Festival. Joel<br />

Haynes Quartet. Varley Stage, Main St.,<br />

Unionville. 647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 12:30: Markham Jazz Festival. Los Variants.<br />

Mainstage, Main St., Unionville. 647-<br />

983-7777. Free.<br />

● 1:00: Markham Jazz Festival. Dhaivat Jani<br />

Plus. Mainstage, Main St., Unionville. 647-<br />

983-7777. Free.<br />

● 1:30: Markham Jazz Festival. Nicky<br />

Schrire. Varley Stage, Main St., Unionville.<br />

647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 2:00: Markham Jazz Festival. Natasia Y.<br />

McKay Stage, Main St., Unionville. 647-983-<br />

7777. Free.<br />

● 2:30: Markham Jazz Festival. Junior Santos<br />

“Con Pambiche”. Mainstage, Main St.,<br />

Unionville. 647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 3:00: Markham Jazz Festival. Robert Lee<br />

Group. Varley Stage, Main St., Unionville.<br />

647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 3:30: Markham Jazz Festival. Elizabeth<br />

Shepherd. McKay Stage, Main St., Unionville.<br />

647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 4:00: Markham Jazz Festival. Eisenman/<br />

Murley Quartet. Mainstage, Main St., Unionville.<br />

647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 4:30: Markham Jazz Festival. Peripheral<br />

Vision. Varley Stage, Main St., Unionville. 647-<br />

983-7777. Free.<br />

● 5:00: Markham Jazz Festival. Marie Goudy<br />

& Paloma Sky. McKay Stage, Main St., Unionville.<br />

647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 5:30: Markham Jazz Festival. Dominique<br />

Fils-Aime. Mainstage, Main St., Unionville.<br />

647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 6:00: Markham Jazz Festival. Queen Kong.<br />

Varley Stage, Main St., Unionville. 647-983-<br />

7777. Free.<br />

● 6:30: Markham Jazz Festival. Suzie Vinnick.<br />

McKay Stage, Main St., Unionville. 647-<br />

983-7777. Free.<br />

● 7:00: Markham Jazz Festival. Jackie Richardson<br />

with TABB. Mainstage, Main St.,<br />

Unionville. 647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Highlands Opera Studio. Mishaabooz’s<br />

Realm. Northern Lights Performing<br />

Arts Pavilion, 5358 County Rd. 21, Haliburton.<br />

1-855-455-5533. $30.<br />

● 8:45: Markham Jazz Festival. U.N. Jefferson.<br />

Mainstage, Main St., Unionville. 647-983-<br />

7777. Free.<br />

● 9:00: Fallsview Casino Resort. Larry Fleet.<br />

Avalon Theatre, 6380 Fallsview Blvd, Niagara<br />

Falls. www.ticketmaster.ca. From $59.<br />

Sunday <strong>August</strong> 18<br />

● 12:00 noon: Markham Jazz Festival. Bob<br />

Brough Quartet. Varley Stage, Main St.,<br />

Unionville. 647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 12:30: Markham Jazz Festival. Ale Nunez<br />

Quartet. McKay Stage, Main St., Unionville.<br />

647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 1:00: Markham Jazz Festival. Moneka<br />

Arabic Jazz. Mainstage, Main St., Unionville.<br />

647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 1:30: Markham Jazz Festival. Ona Ensemble.<br />

Varley Stage, Main St., Unionville. 647-<br />

983-7777. Free.<br />

● 2:00: Markham Jazz Festival. Alex Pangman<br />

& Her Alleycats. McKay Stage, Main St.,<br />

Unionville. 647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 2:30: Markham Jazz Festival. Sarah<br />

Jerrom’s Magpie. Mainstage, Main St., Unionville.<br />

647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 3:00: Markham Jazz Festival. Mark Kelso’s<br />

Mystic Isle. Varley Stage, Main St., Unionville.<br />

647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 3:30: Markham Jazz Festival. Kari van der<br />

Kloot. McKay Stage, Main St., Unionville. 647-<br />

983-7777. Free.<br />

● 4:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: Songs of Faith, Hope,<br />

and Love. Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens<br />

Quay W. www.harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

● 4:00: Markham Jazz Festival. Disaster<br />

Pony. Mainstage, Main St., Unionville. 647-<br />

983-7777. Free.<br />

● 4:30: Markham Jazz Festival. Mira Choquette.<br />

Varley Stage, Main St., Unionville. 647-<br />

983-7777. Free.<br />

● 5:00: Markham Jazz Festival. Jake<br />

Chisholm. McKay Stage, Main St., Unionville.<br />

647-983-7777. Free.<br />

● 5:30: Markham Jazz Festival. Hilario<br />

Duran Big Band. Mainstage, Main St., Unionville.<br />

647-983-7777. Free.<br />

Monday <strong>August</strong> 19<br />

● 12:15: Music Mondays. Between Worlds.<br />

Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq. 416-<br />

598-4521 X223 or www.musicmondays.ca<br />

or musicmondayscs@gmail.com. PWYC ($10<br />

suggested).<br />

● 4:00: Arcady. Emerging Artist Showcase.<br />

Whistling Gardens, 698 Concession 3, Wilsonville.<br />

www.arcady.ca/performances/<br />

upcoming/emerging-artist-showcase or<br />

arcadyensemble@gmail.com Call: (519)-428-<br />

3185. $37(adult/sr); $15(under 18).<br />

● 7:30: Highlands Opera Studio. Homecoming:<br />

HOS Alumni in Concert. St. George’s<br />

Anglican Church (Haliburton), 617 Mountain<br />

St., Haliburton. 1-855-455-5533. $25.<br />

Wednesday <strong>August</strong> 21<br />

● 2:00: Bloor/Borden Farmer’s Market.<br />

Music in the Market - Andy Phillips. 300 Borden<br />

St. 613-475-4769. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Toronto Shape Note Singers. Sacred<br />

Harp Singing. Friends House, 60 Lowther<br />

Ave. 647-838-8764. Pay what you can.<br />

Thursday <strong>August</strong> 22<br />

● 7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: The Family That Sings<br />

Together. Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens<br />

Quay W. www.harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Highlands Opera Studio. Il barbiere<br />

di Siviglia (The Barber of Seville). Northern<br />

Lights Performing Arts Pavilion, 5358 County<br />

Rd. 21, Haliburton. 1-855-455-5533.<br />

● 8:00: Massey Hall. Passenger. 178 Victoria<br />

St. www.ticketmaster.ca. From $60.<br />

Friday <strong>August</strong> 23<br />

Day 1 of Brookside Music Association’s One<br />

World Music Festival in Midland running<br />

Aug 23 & 24.<br />

● 6:00: Brookside Music Association. One<br />

World Music Festival. Little Lake Park - Rotary<br />

Stage, 549 Little Lake Park Rd., Midland.<br />

www.brooksidemusic.com. Free.<br />

● 8:00: Massey Hall. Bronco. 178 Victoria St.<br />

www.tickets.mhrth.com. From $79.<br />

Saturday <strong>August</strong> 24<br />

● 12:30: Brookside Music Association. One<br />

World Music Festival. Little Lake Park - Rotary<br />

Stage, 549 Little Lake Park Rd., Midland.<br />

www.brooksidemusic.com. $10/$8(adv).<br />

● 7:30: Highlands Opera Studio. Il barbiere<br />

di Siviglia (The Barber of Seville). Northern<br />

Lights Performing Arts Pavilion, 5358 County<br />

Rd. 21, Haliburton. 1-855-455-5533.<br />

● 7:30: Leith Summer Festival. Stewart<br />

Goodyear. Historic Leith Church, 419498 Tom<br />

Thomson Ln., Leith. 519-371-2833 or visit<br />

www.leithchurch.ca. $45.<br />

Sunday <strong>August</strong> 25<br />

● 2:30: Highlands Opera Studio. Il barbiere<br />

di Siviglia (The Barber of Seville). Northern<br />

Lights Performing Arts Pavilion, 5358 County<br />

Rd. 21, Haliburton. 1-855-455-5533.<br />

● 4:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: From Toronto to Kyoto.<br />

Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens Quay W.<br />

www.harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

Monday <strong>August</strong> 26<br />

● 12:15: Music Mondays. The Bohemian Violin.<br />

Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq.<br />

52 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


416-598-4521 X223 or www.musicmondays.<br />

ca or musicmondayscs@gmail.com. PWYC<br />

($10 suggested).<br />

● 7:00: Array/ECCG Gamelan. Evergreen<br />

Club Contemporary Gamelan Monthly<br />

Meetup. Array Space, 155 Walnut Ave. 416-<br />

532-3019. Free.<br />

● 7:30: Highlands Opera Studio. Il barbiere<br />

di Siviglia (The Barber of Seville). Northern<br />

Lights Performing Arts Pavilion, 5358 County<br />

Rd. 21, Haliburton. 1-855-455-5533.<br />

Wednesday <strong>August</strong> 28<br />

● 2:00: Bloor/Borden Farmer’s Market.<br />

Music in the Market - Andrea Kuzmich. 300<br />

Borden St. 613-475-4769. Free.<br />

Thursday <strong>August</strong> <strong>29</strong><br />

● 7:00: Harbourfront Centre. Summer<br />

Music in the Garden: The Joining of Light.<br />

Toronto Music Garden, 479 Queens Quay W.<br />

www.harbourfrontcentre.com. Free.<br />

Friday <strong>August</strong> 30<br />

● 7:00: Brampton On Stage. The Poets: A<br />

Tragically Hip Tribute presented in partnership<br />

with The Gord Downie & Chanie Wenjack<br />

Fund. Garden Square, 12 Main St. N.,<br />

Brampton. 905-874-2800. Free.<br />

Saturday <strong>August</strong> 31<br />

● 7:00: Brampton On Stage. Classic Rock<br />

Royalty. Garden Square, 12 Main St. N.,<br />

Brampton. 905-874-2800. Free.<br />

Monday September 2<br />

● 12:15: Music Mondays. Of Premier Importance.<br />

Church of the Holy Trinity, 19 Trinity Sq.<br />

416-598-4521 X223 or www.musicmondays.<br />

ca or musicmondayscs@gmail.com. PWYC<br />

($10 suggested).<br />

Wednesday September 4<br />

● 2:00: Bloor/Borden Farmer’s Market.<br />

Music in the Market - Hobo Soles. 300 Borden<br />

St. 613-475-4769. Free.<br />

Saturday September 7<br />

● 7:00: Kitchener-Waterloo Chamber Music<br />

Society. Chamber Music Concert. Venue<br />

TBA. Visit www.ticketscene.ca/kwcms. $30;<br />

$10(st).<br />

MAINLY CLUBS<br />

The front of Kensington Market's Cafe Pamenar offers no clue to the<br />

riches hidden behind: a beautifully lit, intimate backyard performance<br />

space with fruit trees and vines, that hosts an ongoing roster of<br />

fine music, 307 <strong>August</strong>a Avenue, south of College Street.<br />

Bebop Joe’s Coffee House<br />

960 Queen St W. 416-534-5<strong>29</strong>8<br />

A cozy spot with great vibes, Bebop Joe’s Coffee<br />

House is the place for Armenian coffee,<br />

collectible vinyl, and live jazz on Queen Street.<br />

BSMT 254<br />

254 Lansdowne Ave. 416-801-6325<br />

bsmt254.com<br />

A cozy music venue with an underground<br />

vibe, BSMT 254 has a wide variety of shows,<br />

from jazz to hip-hop to DJ nights.<br />

Burdock<br />

1184 Bloor St. W. 416-546-4033<br />

burdockto.com<br />

A sleek music hall with exceptional sound<br />

and ambience, featuring a draft list of housemade<br />

brews.<br />

Cameron House<br />

408 Queen St. W. 416-703-0811<br />

thecameron.com<br />

An intimate, bohemian bar with ceiling<br />

murals & nightly performances from local<br />

roots acts on 2 stages.<br />

Capone’s Cocktail Lounge<br />

1573 Bloor St. W. 416-534-7911<br />

caponestoronto.com<br />

A self-described perfect marriage of an<br />

intimate cocktail den and comfortable neighbourhood<br />

bar, with live music Wednesday<br />

through Sunday.<br />

Castro’s Lounge<br />

2116 Queen St. E. 416-699-8272<br />

castroslounge.com<br />

Featuring an ever-changing selection of specialty<br />

beers, Castro’s hosts a variety of local<br />

live music acts, including bluegrass, jazz,<br />

rockabilly, and alt-country.<br />

C’est What<br />

67 Front St. E. 416-867-9499<br />

cestwhat.com<br />

A haven for those who appreciate real cask<br />

ale, draught beer from local Ontario breweries,<br />

and live music.<br />

Drom Taberna<br />

458 Queen St. W. 647-748-2099<br />

dromtaberna.com<br />

A heartfelt homage to the lands that stretch<br />

from the Baltic to the Balkans to the Black<br />

Sea, with a wide variety of music.<br />

Emmet Ray, The<br />

924 College St. 416-792-4497<br />

theemmetray.com<br />

A whisky bar with a great food menu, an everchanging<br />

draft list, and live jazz, funk, folk and<br />

more in the back room.<br />

Golden Pigeon Beer Hall, The<br />

424 Parliament St. 416-392-1039<br />

goldenpigeonbar.com<br />

A classic beer hall with sophisticated food offerings,<br />

Golden Pigeon features a weekly Tuesday<br />

jazz night, as well as other special events.<br />

Grossman’s Tavern<br />

379 Spadina Ave. 416-977-7000<br />

grossmanstavern.com<br />

One of the city’s longest-running live music<br />

venues, and Toronto’s self-described “Home<br />

of the Blues.”<br />

Hirut Cafe and Restaurant<br />

2050 Danforth Ave. 416-551-7560<br />

hirut.ca<br />

A major destination for delicious and nutritious<br />

Ethiopian cuisine, with monthly jazz<br />

residencies and jam sessions.<br />

Hugh’s Room<br />

<strong>29</strong>6 Broadview Ave. 647-960-2593<br />

hughsroom.com<br />

A dedicated listening room with an intimate<br />

performing space, great acoustics, and<br />

an attentive audience, Hugh’s Room recently<br />

made the move to their new permanent home<br />

on Broadview Avenue.<br />

Jazz Bistro, The<br />

251 Victoria St. 416-363-5<strong>29</strong>9<br />

jazzbistro.ca<br />

In an historic location, Jazz Bistro features<br />

great food, a stellar wine list, and world-class<br />

jazz musicians in airy club environs.<br />

Jazz Lounge – See Old Mill, The<br />

Jazz Room, The<br />

Located in the Huether Hotel, 59 King St. N.,<br />

Waterloo. 226-476-1565<br />

kwjazzroom.com<br />

A welcoming music venue dedicated to the<br />

best in jazz music presentations, and home to<br />

the Grand River Jazz Society, which presents<br />

regular series throughout the year.<br />

Lula Lounge<br />

1585 Dundas St. W. 416-588-0307<br />

lula.ca<br />

Toronto’s mecca for salsa, jazz, afro-Cuban,<br />

and world music, with Latin dance classes<br />

and excellent food and drinks.<br />

Manhattans Pizza Bistro & Music Club<br />

951 Gordon St., Guelph 519-767-2440<br />

manhattans.ca<br />

An independently owned neighbourhood restaurant<br />

boasting a unique dining experience<br />

that features live music almost every night<br />

of the week.<br />

Mekan Toronto<br />

817 Queen St. W. 647-901-6280<br />

mekantoronto.com<br />

A new Queen St. spot with an emphasis on lively<br />

music, good times, and Turkish culture, Mekan<br />

features world music, jazz, swing, and more.<br />

Mezzetta Restaurant<br />

681 St. Clair Ave. W. 416-658-5687<br />

mezzettarestaurant.com<br />

With a cozy atmosphere and a menu of Middle-Eastern<br />

cuisine, Mezzetta hosts music on<br />

Wednesday evenings.<br />

Monarch Tavern<br />

12 Clinton St. 416-531-5833<br />

themonarchtavern.com<br />

With a café/cocktail bar on the main floor and<br />

a pub with microbrews upstairs, Monarch<br />

Tavern regularly hosts indie, rock, and other<br />

musical genres on its stage.<br />

Nice Bistro, The<br />

117 Brock St. N., Whitby. 905-668-8839<br />

nicebistro.com<br />

A French restaurant with Mediterranean flair,<br />

Nice Bistro hosts ticketed live music events<br />

once every month or so.<br />

Old Mill, The<br />

21 Old Mill Rd. 416-236-2641<br />

oldmilltoronto.com<br />

Jazz Lounge:<br />

An updated space in the Old Mill’s main dining<br />

room, the Jazz Lounge features an updated<br />

sound system, a new shareable menu, and listenable<br />

straightahead jazz.<br />

Oud and the Fuzz, The<br />

21 Kensington Ave. 647-283-9136<br />

With a focus on Armenian-inspired food and<br />

cocktails, The Oud and the Fuzz regularly presents<br />

a wide variety of musical genres, as<br />

well as poetry nights, themed Arabic events,<br />

and more.<br />

Pamenar<br />

307 <strong>August</strong>a Ave.<br />

cafepamenar.com<br />

One of the city’s best third-wave coffee shops<br />

by day and bar by night, Pamenar hosts live<br />

music, DJs, comedy, and more.<br />

Pilot Tavern, The<br />

22 Cumberland Ave. 416-923-5716<br />

thepilot.ca<br />

With over 75 years around Yonge and Bloor,<br />

the Pilot is a multi-level bar that hosts live jazz<br />

on Saturday afternoons.<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 53


Poetry Jazz Café<br />

1078 Queen St W. 416-599-5<strong>29</strong>9<br />

poetryjazzcafe.com<br />

A sexy, clubby space, Poetry hosts live jazz,<br />

hip-hop, and DJs nightly on Queen St. West.<br />

Reposado Bar & Lounge<br />

136 Ossington Ave. 416-532-6474<br />

reposadobar.com<br />

A chic, low-light bar with top-shelf tequila,<br />

Mexican tapas, and live music.<br />

Reservoir Lounge, The<br />

52 Wellington St. E. 416-955-0887<br />

reservoirlounge.com<br />

Toronto’s self-professed original swingjazz<br />

bar and restaurant, located in a historic<br />

speakeasy near St. Lawrence Market, with<br />

MAINLY CLUBS<br />

live music four nights a week.<br />

Rev, La<br />

2848 Dundas St. W. 416-766-0746<br />

larev.ca<br />

La Rev offers their guests and authentic taste<br />

of comida casera (Mexican homestyle cooking),<br />

and a welcoming performance space<br />

featuring some of Toronto’s most talented<br />

musicians.<br />

Rex Hotel Jazz & Blues Bar, The<br />

194 Queen St. W. 416-598-2475<br />

therex.ca<br />

With over 60 shows per month of Canadian<br />

and international groups, The Rex is Toronto’s<br />

longest-running jazz club, with full bar and<br />

kitchen menu.<br />

Sauce on Danforth<br />

1376 Danforth Ave. 647-748-1376<br />

sauceondanforth.com<br />

With Victorian lighting, cocktails, and an<br />

extensive tap and bottle list, Sauce on Danforth<br />

has live music Tuesday through Saturday<br />

(and sometimes Sunday).<br />

The Senator Winebar<br />

249 Victoria St 416 364-7517<br />

thesenator.com<br />

An intimate, upscale French-inspired bistro<br />

with live music serving hearty, delicious comfort<br />

food alongside a curated selection of<br />

wine and cocktails.<br />

Smokeshow BBQ and Brew<br />

744 Mt. Pleasant Rd 416-901-7469<br />

Smokeshowbbqandbrew.com<br />

A laid-back venue with an emphasis on barbecue<br />

and beer, Smokeshow hosts cover artists<br />

and original music Thursday through Sunday,<br />

with Bachata lessons on Tuesdays and Karaoke<br />

on Wednesdays.<br />

Tapestry<br />

224 <strong>August</strong>a Ave.<br />

In the space formerly occupied by Poetry,<br />

Tapestry features jazz, electronic music, soul,<br />

and more.<br />

Tranzac<br />

<strong>29</strong>2 Brunswick Ave. 416-923-8137<br />

tranzac.org<br />

A community arts venue dedicated to supporting,<br />

presenting, and promoting creative<br />

and cultural activity in Toronto, with<br />

live shows in multiple rooms every day of<br />

the week.<br />

UNDATED EVENTS & ETCETERAS<br />

FALL FESTIVALS<br />

● Chinese Canadian Cultural Centre.<br />

Toronto International Music Festival. Registration<br />

open now until Sep 20, <strong>2024</strong>. Festival<br />

runs Oct 20-Nov 4. Gala and Concert Awards<br />

Ceremony Dec 8, <strong>2024</strong>. Visit www.cccctimf.<br />

org for details.<br />

LIVE REHEARSAL & PERFORMANCE<br />

OPPORTUNITIES<br />

● A New Quartet is an emerging Toronto<br />

area ensemble that rehearses traditional<br />

repertoire and writes new music. The quartet<br />

is currently seeking saxophone players<br />

and composers. For details please visit www.<br />

anewquartet.net.<br />

● The Choralairs is a non-audition, adult<br />

choir that welcomes new members in September<br />

and January. Rehearsals are on Tuesday<br />

6:45-8-45pm at Edithvale C.C. 131 Finch<br />

Ave. W, Toronto. Please contact Elaine at<br />

choralairs.delighted.720@silomails.com to<br />

RSVP. Check out our new website at www.<br />

Choralairs.com.<br />

A vacation<br />

for your dog!<br />

Barker Avenue Boarding<br />

in East York<br />

call or text 416-574-5250<br />

● Etobicoke Community Concert Band. Full<br />

rehearsals every Wednesday night at 7:30pm.<br />

309 Horner Ave. Open to all who are looking<br />

for a great band to join. Text Rob Hunter at<br />

416-878-1730.<br />

● Harmony Singers of Etobicoke. The<br />

women of The Harmony Singers survived<br />

COVID and are regrouping for <strong>2024</strong>! If you’d<br />

like to sing an exciting repertoire of pop, jazz,<br />

folk and light classics, the group will give you<br />

a warm welcome! Rehearsals start in January<br />

on Wednesday nights from 7:15 to 9:30<br />

p.m. at Richview United Church in Etobicoke.<br />

Contact Conductor Harvey Patterson<br />

at: theharmonysingers@ca.com or call<br />

416-239-5821.<br />

● New Horizons Band of Toronto. All levels<br />

from beginners to advanced for brass, woodwind,<br />

and percussion instruments. Weekly<br />

classes led by professional music teachers.<br />

Loaner instrument provided to each new<br />

registrant in the beginners’ program. Visit<br />

www.newhorizonsbandtoronto.ca.<br />

BUSINESS<br />

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● North Toronto Community Band. Openings<br />

for drums, clarinets, trumpets, trombones,<br />

French horns. Rehearsals held at Willowdale<br />

Presbyterian Church 38 Ellerslie Ave. (just north<br />

of Mel Lastman Square). Monday evenings 7:30-<br />

9:30 pm. Contact ntcband@gmail.com.<br />

● String Orchestra TO is a new string<br />

orchestra in Toronto for amateur intermediate<br />

and advanced string players. No auditions.<br />

Our season runs from Sep 11, <strong>2024</strong> to<br />

May 28, 2025. Wed rehearsals: 7:15-9:15 pm at<br />

St. Barnabas Church, 361 Danforth Ave.. Visit<br />

www.sites.google.com/view/stringorchestrato/home<br />

or email us at StringOrchestraTO@gmail.com.<br />

● Strings Attached Orchestra, North York.<br />

All string players (especially viola, cello,<br />

bass) are welcome. Mondays 7 to 9 p.m.<br />

from Sep to Jun. Email us first at info.stringsattached@gmail.com<br />

to receive music and<br />

other details or visit our website at www.<br />

Jubilate<br />

singers<br />

isabel Bernaus<br />

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stringsattachedorchestra.com for more<br />

information.<br />

● Toronto Shape Note Singers. Sacred<br />

Harp Singing. Shape note selections from<br />

the Sacred Harp tunebook.Singing is participatory,<br />

not a performance. No experience<br />

necessary. All are welcome and there are<br />

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54 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


ooks to borrow. Monthly on the third Wednesday<br />

from Feb 21 to Dec 8, <strong>2024</strong>. Friends<br />

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ONGOING EVENTS<br />

● Trinity College, University of Toronto.<br />

Evensong. Traditional Anglican choral music.<br />

Trinity College Chapel Choir; Thomas Bell, director<br />

of music; Peter Bayer, organ scholar.<br />

Trinity College Chapel, University of Toronto,<br />

6 Hoskin Ave. 416-978-2522 or Trinity College.<br />

Free. Evensong is sung every Wednesday at<br />

5:15pm in the beautiful Trinity College chapel<br />

during term time.<br />

● Encore Symphonic Concert Band. Monthly<br />

Concert Band Concert. The first Thursday of<br />

every month at 11am. 35-piece concert band<br />

performing band concert music, pop tunes,<br />

jazz standards (2 singers) and the occasional<br />

march. Trinity Presbyterian Church<br />

York Mills, 2737 Bayview Ave. www.encoreband.ca.<br />

$10.<br />

ONLINE EVENTS<br />

● Arts@Home. A vibrant hub connecting<br />

Torontonians to arts and culture. Designed to<br />

strengthen personal and societal resilience<br />

through the arts. www.artsathome.ca.<br />

● North Toronto Community Band. Openings<br />

for clarinet, trumpet, trombone, tuba and<br />

auxiliary percussion. Rehearsals held at Willowdale<br />

Presbyterian Church 38 Ellerslie Ave.<br />

(just north of Mel Lastman Square). Monday<br />

evenings 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Contact ntcband@<br />

gmail.com.<br />

● Recollectiv. For anyone living with cognitive<br />

challenges from Alzheimer’s, dementia, traumatic<br />

brain injury, stroke or PTSD. The group<br />

meets weekly to rediscover the joy of making<br />

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thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 55


DISCOVERIES | RECORDINGS REVIEWED<br />

DAVID OLDS<br />

Correction: In a review in our previous issue (<strong>Volume</strong> <strong>29</strong> No 5) the<br />

bass player on John Herberman’s album Spring Comes Early was<br />

incorrectly identified as Jim Vivian. In actuality the “sinuous, emotive<br />

bass” playing referred to was that of Paul Novotny. The WholeNote<br />

apologizes for the error. Lesley Mitchell-Clarke’s review of Novotny’s<br />

own latest album Summertime in Leith, which features duets with<br />

Robi Botos, leads off the Jazz and Improvised review section further<br />

on in these pages.<br />

I enjoy connections, and excuses to revisit my vinyl collection, and in<br />

this issue I found several. While editing Yoshi Maclear Wall’s review of<br />

Disaster Pony in the Jazz and Improvised Section below, I was struck<br />

by his comments about the interplay between cello and saxophone. It<br />

put me in mind of the first time I encountered saxophone in a classical<br />

context in a 1965 recording of Kabalevsky’s Cello Concerto No.2<br />

featuring its dedicatee Daniil Shafran with the Leningrad<br />

Philharmonic. About halfway through the work there is a cello<br />

cadenza followed by a phrenetic orchestral tutti in which a saxophone<br />

takes up the cello’s theme. On first listening, it took several seconds to<br />

assimilate what I was hearing. When the cello takes back the theme a<br />

minute later, I was amazed to realize just how alike the two seemingly<br />

disparate instruments could sound. It was a revelation. So, Yoshi’s<br />

review sent me rooting around my vinyl collection to come up with<br />

the old Melodyia/Angel LP. What a joy to revisit that seminal<br />

recording.<br />

The next excuse for a deep dive came as a<br />

result of a CD which I didn’t at first think<br />

I would be reviewing, Sinta Quartet Plays<br />

Beethoven (Bright Shiny Things BSTC-0196<br />

brightshiny.ninja). Now Sinta is a saxophone<br />

quartet, and I must say my initial skepticism<br />

was not allayed by the opening movement of<br />

Beethoven’s “Serioso” String Quartet No.11<br />

in F Minor, Op.95. It was as if I was hearing<br />

the soundtrack of a Roadrunner cartoon, or maybe the Keystone<br />

Kops. I decided to withhold judgement, however, and skipped ahead<br />

to the centrepiece of the disc, the prayer-like third movement of String<br />

Quartet No.15 in A Minor, Op.132. From there I was drawn into the<br />

fugal opening of String Quartet No.14 in C-Sharp Minor, Op.131 and<br />

sat transfixed throughout its seven movements. I was immediately<br />

taken by the effectiveness of Dan Graser’s transcriptions, although I<br />

found the upper range of the soprano saxophone at times a bit shrill.<br />

To contrast that, the rich fullness of the baritone sax, far exceeding<br />

the depths of a cello, was captivating. I was surprised to find myself<br />

spending more time with this disc than any other in recent memory.<br />

Over the period of a month, I pulled out half a dozen versions of the<br />

string quartets, from my first vinyl recordings with the Yale String<br />

Quartet on the Vanguard Cardinal label and the Guarneri on RCA,<br />

through Orford and Italiano quartet LPs, to CDs featuring the Alban<br />

Berg, Tokyo (with Peter Oundjian) and Alcan quartets, all juxtaposed<br />

with repeated listenings to the saxophone versions. I’m not suggesting<br />

that saxophone arrangements will replace the originals in my heart,<br />

and pride of place for Op.132 still goes to the Orford Quartet’s digital<br />

recording on a Delos CD, but I’m pleased have this alternate take in<br />

my collection, much in the way that I appreciate Marion Verbruggen’s<br />

performance of Bach Cello Suites on the recorder – an interesting and<br />

enchanting new perspective.<br />

I had no qualms whatsoever about Kinds of<br />

~Nois, a recording of original works for<br />

saxophone quartet written by the members<br />

of the composers collective Kinds of Kings<br />

for the Chicago-based quartet ~Nois (Bright<br />

Shiny Things BSTC-0197 brightshiny.ninja).<br />

Presented in reverse chronology, the disc is<br />

bookended by two works by Gemma<br />

Peacocke, the recent Hazel, inspired by a<br />

poem by Pablo Neruda, and Dwalm, which represents the first collaboration<br />

between the two groups back in 2018. Shelley Washington’s<br />

Eternal Present is in two movements: I. Now and II. Always. The first<br />

features gently moving cloud-like clusters; the second is more playful<br />

and percussive, with echoes and games of tag. Maria Kaoutzani’s<br />

Count Me In is an “exploration of rhythm and drive inspired by Afro-<br />

Cuban bata traditions, made up of interlocking rhythmic patterns”<br />

which at times give way to drone-like stasis. Washington returns to<br />

narrate her poem BIG TALK and then to perform one of the two baritone<br />

sax parts in the duet of the same name, “an outcry against rape<br />

culture designed to be an endurance piece for the performers in solidarity<br />

with women forced to endure a daily barrage of physical<br />

abuse.” An “intentionally confrontational” work, BIG TALK exploits<br />

fully the range and power of the baritone instrument in a wild and<br />

varied ride lasting 11 minutes, with driving minimalist low ostinati<br />

and occasional hints of Harlem Nocturne on speed. Kaoutzani’s Shore<br />

to Shore provides respite with its quiet tribute to the sea, “with echoes<br />

of a Cypriot lullaby the composer’s grandmother used to sing to her.”<br />

Dwalm is an old Scottish word meaning both stupor or daydream and<br />

to faint or fall ill. “The composer pursues that idea by contrasting<br />

lullabies with cries of sorrow […] in the context of the same underlying<br />

darkness of oblivion,” although the density of layers and accelerated<br />

tempi keep despair at bay.<br />

Leah Plave is a cellist currently based in The<br />

Netherlands who holds degrees from universities<br />

in Cincinnati, Montreal, Budapest and<br />

Den Haag. While studying at McGill she<br />

served as artistic director and cellist for the<br />

Montreal Music Collective. Tong Wang is a<br />

Canadian pianist and collaborative artist<br />

active in performance, research and<br />

community engagement. The Canada<br />

Council-funded Black Sea, Orange Tree (Leaf Music leahplave.com)<br />

features the two in works for cello and piano by Turkish composer<br />

Fazil Say and Canadian Alice Ping Yee Ho. Each four-movement work<br />

depicts specific places in colourful aural portraits of the Republic of<br />

Türkiye and the People’s Republic of China respectively, and in each,<br />

the cello is called upon to replicate sounds of traditional instruments.<br />

Say’s Dört Şehir (Four Cities) is a journey through culturally diverse<br />

regions of Anatolia (Asia Minor) with stops at Sivas (a conservative city<br />

in Eastern Anatolia), Hopa (represented by a traditional wedding<br />

dance), Ankara (the capital city of Turkey under Atatürk in 1923), and<br />

finally Bodrum (known as the “St. Tropez of Turkey”). This last is a<br />

boisterous, jazz-inspired romp with “an abrupt and absurd conclusion<br />

in its depiction of a pub brawl as frequently experienced in this city.”<br />

Ho’s Four Impressions of China portray Hunan, Tibet, Heilongjiang<br />

and her birthplace, Hong Kong. The composer tells us that the music<br />

of Hunan takes a Chinese folk song as its point of departure. Tibet is<br />

56 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


an “imaginary train ride through the Himalayas to the city of Lhasa.”<br />

The Black Dragon River, one of China’s four great rivers, is the inspiration<br />

for Heilongjiang as the composer imagines a dance of the Black<br />

Dragon to symbolize the province’s fierce winters and dormant volcanoes.<br />

Hong Kong captures night scenes where locals “...gather at the<br />

harbour and lively night markets. Music unfolds the magical view of<br />

the Victoria Harbor glittering with city lights; there are the sounds of<br />

street performers singing and playing traditional instruments.” In<br />

these diverse portraits both performers have shown consummate<br />

command of their western instruments while adapting them admirably<br />

to create convincing Asian soundscapes.<br />

David Crowell is a New York-based<br />

composer and instrumentalist who is active<br />

in the fields of contemporary classical<br />

composition, improvisation, jazz and experimental<br />

rock and pop. His latest release Point<br />

/ Cloud (Better Company Records davidcrowellmusic.com/music)<br />

features four<br />

compositions performed by Sandbox<br />

Percussion, guitarists Dan Lippel and Mak<br />

Grgić, and the duo eco|tonal. The percussion work Verses for a<br />

Liminal Space is a gentle piece full of bell sounds, vibraphone and<br />

marimba ostinati underscored by subtle drum kit beats. The title work<br />

is a response to Steve Reich’s Electric Counterpoint from 1987. Like<br />

that iconic work, Point / Cloud is in three movements in which the<br />

solo guitarist plays against tracks they have previously recorded.<br />

Lippel, who consulted with Reich for his own recording of Electric<br />

Counterpoint, is the guitarist here and gives a nuanced and wellbalanced<br />

performance of this effective tribute, which, while acknowledging<br />

its forebear, avoids being derivative. For Pacific Coast<br />

Highway Lippel is joined by Grgić in a classical guitar duet version of<br />

a work Crowell originally composed for electric guitar and electric<br />

bass. It’s a wild ride “via dancelike passages that bend and wind after<br />

their namesake.” The most intriguing work is the final one, 2 Hours in<br />

Zadar featuring the meditative duo eco|tonal consisting of Crowell and<br />

cellist/singer/improviser Iva Casián-Lakoš. The text is drawn from a<br />

poem by Casián-Lakoš’ mother Nela Lakoš. “Subtle utterances of<br />

Casián-Lakoš speaking Croatian are blended with organ-like electronics,<br />

which are derived from manipulations of [her] voice. […]<br />

Eventually, samples of a sound unique to the city of Zadar makes its<br />

presence known: The Sea Organ. A symbiosis of human architecture<br />

and the unpredictability of nature, this ‘organ’ is a marble stair in the<br />

Croatian coastal city that contains an assortment of pipes in its steps,<br />

which are ‘played’ by the ebb and flow of waves.” The sounds are<br />

haunting and captivating, as is the entire disc.<br />

Founded in 2011 by clarinetist Pascal Archer,<br />

Exponential Ensemble is a mixed chamber<br />

music collective (flute, clarinet, oboe,<br />

bassoon, violin, viola, cello and piano,<br />

supplemented with horn, trumpet and an<br />

additional violin here), whose unusual<br />

mission includes commissioning and<br />

premiering works that are inspired by math,<br />

science and literacy. Matters of Time<br />

(American Modern Recordings AMR1055 americanmodernrecordings.com)<br />

features four quite different works that approach this<br />

mandate in varying ways. Amy Brandon says “Crown of the Sun is a<br />

reflection on the physical nature of the sun’s corona contrasted with<br />

the deep emptiness of space. NASA recently sonified the radiation<br />

patterns that the sun emits, and I found a particular connection<br />

between this sound and the complex and beautiful sound of oboe<br />

multiphonics, which is why they are referenced throughout this piece,<br />

to essentially sonify the varying states of the sun’s corona in sound.” A<br />

Dark Matter by Gilead Cohen “explores the notion that our mind also<br />

sometimes circles around an […] indefinable worry, regret, or fear<br />

[that] can occupy us for a long time and color everything else in dark<br />

shades. At the core of this piece is such musical ‘dark matter.’” The<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 57


Bright Exuberant Silence by Jared Miller gives us a curiously positive<br />

glimpse at the lockdowns of 2020, inspired by that “fleeting and eerie<br />

moment in modern history when the world was put on pause due to<br />

COVID-19 [and] nature began to heal. Pollution started to clear in the<br />

air as fewer people drove cars to work every day. Birdsong was audible<br />

in silent metropolises [and] you could even see the stars in the sky in<br />

the middle of Manhattan on some nights. Nature began to overtake<br />

cities quietly and holistically – and for a moment, urban dwellers<br />

learned what it was like to peacefully coexist with the natural world.”<br />

Both Miller’s and Brandon’s work were commissioned with the<br />

support of the Canada Council. The disc is completed by a surprisingly<br />

lyrical, playful and somewhat anachronistic work, to my ear reminiscent<br />

of the music of Francis Poulenc, by Robert Paterson. Relative<br />

Theory is in four movements that reference physicists and mathematicians<br />

Blaise Pascal, Emmy Noether, Albert Einstein and Pythagoras.<br />

Paterson says he was inspired by how much the Exponential Ensemble<br />

enjoy performing programs for children that relate math to music. “In<br />

a fun, yet hopefully meaningful way, the movements of my piece are<br />

designed to draw parallels between these two distinct, but interrelated<br />

worlds.” It certainly is fun, especially Einstein’s Daydream with its<br />

quotations from Bach, Beethoven and Mozart, and the rollicking finale<br />

The Hammers of Pythagoras.<br />

I began this column writing about string<br />

quartet transcriptions for saxophones,<br />

and this latest arrival seems, in a way, to<br />

bring me full circle. Russell Truesdell<br />

Presents SYNTHESIS – The String Quartet<br />

Sessions (SynthesisSQS.com) is a mammoth<br />

project for which Truesdell invited 15 large<br />

ensemble jazz composers to write for the<br />

iconic classical string formation. Truesdell<br />

says the project grew out of the isolation<br />

of the pandemic. “I wanted to find a way to inspire and challenge<br />

large ensemble composers – myself included – at a time when<br />

we were feeling hopeless for the future of our artform [...] The idea<br />

for SYNTHESIS came from the knowledge that many jazz composers<br />

derive inspiration from the string quartet writing of composers like<br />

Bartok, Brahms, and Ravel, and the necessity of finding a realistic,<br />

yet inspiring way to create music together, safely, in person. [...] I<br />

wanted to hear my peers, whom I respect and whose music I love so<br />

much, create something new in this idiom.” The 3CD set has kept me<br />

enthralled throughout my first listening – it arrived as I was putting<br />

the finishing touches on this column, so I haven’t had time to properly<br />

immerse myself in it yet – and although there is simply too much<br />

material to deal with in detail, I wanted to share my enthusiasm with<br />

you. Truesdell gave the composers very few parameters in terms of<br />

length or style to guide them, and I was particularly taken with the<br />

range of approaches taken. While most of the works were composed<br />

specifically for this project, also included are a previously unrecorded<br />

work for string trio from 1990 by Bob Brookmeyer and a reworking of<br />

John Hollenbeck’s Grey Cottage, originally for solo violin, for quartet<br />

with the composer adding drums, marimba and piano. Most of the<br />

composers have chosen to stick within the traditional quartet formation<br />

of two violins, viola and cello, but several feature soloists within<br />

this context, including Christine Jensen whose lovely Tilting World<br />

features violin soloist Sara Caswell. Truesdell, who himself contributed<br />

three titles, adds Israeli-born clarinetist Anat Cohen for Suite for<br />

Clarinet and String Quartet and bassist Jay Anderson to the quartet in<br />

Heart of Gold (for Jody) which is a showcase for cellist Jody Redhage<br />

Ferber. To quote the press release: “SYNTHESIS challenges old perceptions<br />

of the traditional string quartet [...] exploring a new genre of<br />

music cultivated at the intersection of jazz, classical, world, and<br />

contemporary music.” It does so admirably.<br />

We invite submissions. CDs, DVDs and comments should<br />

be sent to: DISCoveries, The WholeNote c/o Music Alive,<br />

The Centre for Social Innovation, 720 Bathurst St. Toronto<br />

ON M5S 2R4 or to discoveries@thewholenote.com.<br />

STRINGS<br />

ATTACHED<br />

TERRY ROBBINS<br />

There’s an outstanding new recording of<br />

the quite remarkable Mystery Sonatas, or<br />

Rosary Sonatas of Heinrich Ignaz Franz von<br />

Biber, violinist Alan Choo the exceptional<br />

soloist with Apollo’s Fire, under the direction<br />

of Jeanette Sorrell at the harpsichord<br />

(Avie AV2656 avie-records.com).<br />

Believed to have been written in the 1670s<br />

and never published – the sole source is<br />

the manuscript dating from around 1676 –<br />

the 15 sonatas follow events in the lives of Jesus and the Virgin Mary,<br />

known in Catholic tradition as the Mysteries of the Rosary. A monumental<br />

solo, Passacaglia in G Minor, completes the set.<br />

What makes the work so remarkable is the unprecedented and<br />

unsurpassed use of scordatura – the re-tuning of the violin strings –<br />

with all 15 sonatas requiring different tunings and the resulting use of<br />

multiple violins, Choo using six here.<br />

The manuscript gives no indication regarding accompaniment, with<br />

Sorrell choosing to use various combinations of continuo instruments<br />

to add colour and variety to the individual sonatas.<br />

Excellent booklet notes, with full tuning details and reproductions<br />

of the copper engravings Biber placed at the start of each sonata in the<br />

manuscript, add to a superb release.<br />

The Armenian violinist Sergey Khachatryan<br />

is simply superb on Ysaÿe VI Sonatas, the<br />

set of 6 Sonatas for solo violin Op.27 by<br />

the Belgian violinist and composer Eugene<br />

Ysaÿe (naïve V 5451 arkivmusic.com/<br />

products/ysaye-sergey-khachatryan).<br />

After hearing Joseph Szigeti play Bach’s<br />

Sonata No.1 in G Minor in early 1923, Ysaÿe<br />

decided to compose his own tribute to<br />

Bach, reflecting current musical language and violin technique while<br />

also incorporating elements of Szigeti’s style. By <strong>July</strong> he had written<br />

a further five, each dedicated to and depicting a different violinist:<br />

Jacques Thibaud; Georges Enescu; Fritz Kreisler; Mathieu Crickboom;<br />

and Manuel Quiroga.<br />

What makes this release extra special, though, is the fact that it<br />

marks the first recording of the sonatas on Ysaÿe’s 1740 Guarneri del<br />

Gesù violin, on loan from the Nippon Music Foundation; its sumptuous<br />

tone in such supremely talented hands fully exploits the instrument’s<br />

wide range of tonal colour.<br />

Canadian violinist Karl Stobbe presents<br />

works for solo violin by Ysaÿe, J.S. Bach<br />

& Paganini in a digital release that is part<br />

of a six-album series based on the Bach<br />

Sonatas & Partitas (Leaf Music LM<strong>29</strong>4 leafmusic.ca).<br />

The Bach work here is the Partita No.1<br />

in B Minor, BWV1002, with Ysaÿe’s Sonata<br />

in E Minor, Op.27 No.4 (dedicated to Fritz<br />

Kreisler) opening the recital and three of<br />

58 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Paganini’s 24 Caprices Op.1 – No.9 in E Major, No.17 in E-flat Major<br />

and No.24 in A Minor – closing it. There is a hidden connection here:<br />

Kreisler apparently had a special affinity for this particular Bach<br />

Partita, and also arranged the Paganini Caprices for violin and piano.<br />

Technical difficulties don’t seem to present any challenge for<br />

Stobbe, who handles everything with ease with his 1806 Nicolas Lupot<br />

violin and 1790 François Xavier Tourte bow.<br />

Ukrainian-American violinist Solomiya<br />

Ivakhiv continues her mission to share<br />

the music of her home country with<br />

Ukrainian Masters, a new CD featuring<br />

20th-century sonatas by three major figures<br />

in Ukrainian classical music. Steven Beck<br />

is the pianist (Naxos 8.579146 naxos.com/<br />

CatalogueDetail/?id=8.579146).<br />

The world-premiere recording of the1927<br />

Violin Sonata in A Minor, Op.18 by Viktor<br />

Kosenko (1896-1938) is quite lovely, a lush, immediately accessible<br />

work beautifully played. The 1991 Violin Sonata No.2 by Myroslav<br />

Skoryk (1938-2020) with its “pointed allusions to Beethoven,<br />

Prokofiev and Gershwin” is another winner, with more fine playing.<br />

Ivakhiv only recently discovered the music of Sergei Bortkiewicz<br />

(1877-1952), which was banned in the Soviet Union after he fled<br />

Ukraine in 1919. His Violin Sonata in G Minor, Op.26 was written in<br />

1922 in Germany, and finds his mature musical language “at its most<br />

vivid and directly communicative.”<br />

On The Night Shall Break violinist Hanna<br />

Hurwitz, joined by cellist Colin Stokes<br />

and pianist Daniel Pesca goes back 100<br />

years to find neglected gems and present<br />

them alongside established works (Neuma<br />

Records 198 neumarecords.org).<br />

Florence Price’s attractive Fantasie No.1<br />

for Violin and Piano from 1933 and Rebecca<br />

Clarke’s 1921 Piano Trio both produce toplevel<br />

playing, and the standard never drops through the very brief<br />

(four movements, each less than two minutes) 1924 Sonatina for<br />

Violin and Piano by Carlos Chávez and particularly through the established<br />

works: Messiaen’s Thème et Variations pour Violon et Piano<br />

from 1932 and the terrific Duo No.1 for Violin and Cello by<br />

Bohuslav Martinů.<br />

Violist Molly Gebrian discovered the works<br />

she plays on Trailblazers several years ago<br />

when listening to music online, YouTube’s<br />

auto-play feature kicked in to play cello<br />

sonatas by Dora Pejačević (1885-1923),<br />

Henriëtte Bosmans (1895-1952) and Ethyl<br />

Smyth (1858-1944). Gebrian knew immediately<br />

that these were sonatas she wanted<br />

to play, and her effective transcriptions for<br />

viola and piano are presented here. Danny<br />

Holt is the pianist (Acis APL54162 acisproductions.com).<br />

All three composers broke new ground by defying social expectations<br />

of their times. The Dutch Bosmans was a concert pianist as<br />

well as a composer; her Sonata in A Minor is from 1919. Dame Ethyl<br />

Smyth’s essentially Romantic Sonata in A Minor, Op.5 is from 1887,<br />

and the Croatian Pejačević’s Sonata in E Minor, Op.35 from 1913.<br />

Gebrian is a superb player, strong and full-toned. Ably supported by<br />

Holt, she gets to the heart of these exceptional works in stellar<br />

performances.<br />

Cellist Alexander Baillie and pianist Nigel<br />

Yandell are in fine form on the new CD<br />

Fauré, Crosse and Ravel – Works for Cello<br />

& Piano (First Hand Records FHR152 firsthandrecords.com).<br />

The disc opens with a lovely performance<br />

of Fauré’s Cello Sonata No.1 in D Minor,<br />

Op.109 from 1917 and ends with an effective transcription of Ravel’s<br />

early Violin Sonata No.1 in A Minor, Op.posth. M.12 from 1897. The<br />

heart of the CD, both physically and musically is the 1983 Wavesongs<br />

by the English composer Gordon Crosse, who died in 2021. Written<br />

for Baillie, it’s described as a 22-minute tone poem, a single-movement<br />

work with numerous sub-sections with titles like Sea Shanty,<br />

Troubled Waves, Storm, Cruel Sea, Tempest and Lost at Sea. This<br />

recording uses a newly revised performing edition resulting from<br />

Yandell’s partnership with Baillie and is dedicated to Crosse’s memory.<br />

It’s a striking work and a notable addition to the contemporary cello<br />

repertoire, more than justifying the description as “a modern masterpiece”<br />

in the press release.<br />

There are another two contemporary<br />

cello works on CanCan Macabre, with<br />

the American cellist Sophie Shao playing<br />

music by Couperin, Debussy, Herschel<br />

Garfein, Thomas Adès and Chopin.<br />

Adrienne Kim is the pianist in all but the<br />

Couperin and Chopin, where the pianist<br />

is Ieva Jokubaviciute (Centaur CRC4052<br />

centaurrecords.com).<br />

Couperin’s five Pièces en concert in the<br />

1924 arrangement by Paul Bazelaire and Debussy’s 1915 Cello Sonata<br />

in D Minor open the disc, with the Largo from Chopin’s Cello Sonata<br />

in G Minor, Op.65 closing it. In between are the two contemporary<br />

works. Garfein’s The Layers, commissioned by and written for Shao,<br />

was inspired by the poem by former U.S. poet laureate Stanley Kunitz,<br />

its three sections reflecting central images in the poem.<br />

Adès’ Lieux retrouvés was written in 2009 for Steven Isserlis, its<br />

final movement, La ville – cancan macabre providing the title for a<br />

high-quality CD.<br />

Hidden Flame, the new CD from cellist Yoshika Masuda and pianist<br />

HyeJin Kim features compositions by women presented simply as<br />

EXPLORE THE MUSIC OF<br />

JAN JÄRVLEPP<br />

SONIX<br />

AND OTHER TONIX<br />

TRIO CASALS \ BENDA QUARTET<br />

NISHIKAWA ENSEMBLE<br />

CHELSEA MEYNIG FLUTE ANTONELLO DIMATTEO CLARINET LUMÍR KAVÍK DOUBLE BASS<br />

Drawing from a vast array of artistic and extra-musical<br />

influences, JAN JÄRVLEPP’s oeuvre is indicative of his<br />

innate curiosity, fluid mastery of compositional techniques,<br />

and unwavering drive to expand the boundaries of classical.<br />

Järvlepp’s latest Navona Records release, SONIX AND<br />

OTHER TONIX, exemplifies this same iconoclastic creativity<br />

for which he is celebrated. Learn more at:<br />

navonarecords.com/catalog/nv6603/<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 59


“masterpieces by truly great composers”<br />

(Avie AV2653 avie-records.com).<br />

Amy Beach’s Romance Op.23 and<br />

Clara Schumann’s 3 Romanzen Op.22,<br />

both originally for violin and piano,<br />

provide a gorgeous opening with a full,<br />

rich cello sound across the entire range.<br />

The major work here is the lengthy<br />

(almost 40 minutes) 1892 Great Dramatic<br />

Sonata “Titus et Bérénice” by the French<br />

composer Rita Strohl (1865-1941), a little-known work that will repay<br />

repeated hearings.<br />

Rena Ismail’s one word makes a world is a world-premiere<br />

recording; based on the third movement cello solo from her 2013<br />

String Quartet, it was written for Masuda. Nadia Boulanger’s 3 Pieces<br />

for Cello and Piano are delightful, but the final track – the Sicilienne<br />

attributed to Maria Theresia Paradis – hardly qualifies as a masterpiece<br />

by a great composer; indeed, current research suggests that the<br />

composer was probably the violinist Samuel Dushkin.<br />

No matter, for it closes a fine CD full of excellent playing.<br />

If you want to hear some superb string<br />

ensemble playing then look no further than<br />

Tchaikovsky & Korngold: String Sextets,<br />

the new release from the Nash Ensemble<br />

(Hyperion CDA68406 hyperion-records.<br />

co.uk/dc.asp?dc=D_CDA68406).<br />

Although only written some 25 years<br />

apart, the two works are from opposite ends<br />

of their composers’ lives: Tchaikovsky’s<br />

Sextet in D Minor “Souvenir de Florence”<br />

Op.70 from 1890, when he feared his creative powers were waning,<br />

and Korngold’s astonishingly mature, rich and Romantic Sextet in D<br />

Major Op.10 from 1914-16, started when he was only 17 years old.<br />

“The Nash Ensemble brings passion and conviction to both,” says<br />

the promotional release, and indeed they do in simply outstanding<br />

performances.<br />

Isabella d’Éloize Perron is the violinist<br />

on the 2CD set Vivaldi & Piazzolla<br />

The Four Seasons, with the Orchestre<br />

Filmharmonique under Francis Choinière<br />

(GFN Classics gfnproductions.ca).<br />

There’s a real freshness to the Vivaldi,<br />

with a resonant recording enhancing a<br />

spirited, animated and really effective<br />

performance. The same approach works<br />

wonderfully well in Piazzolla’s Las cuatro<br />

estaciones porteñas - The Four Seasons of Buenos Aires, four individual<br />

pieces written for his bandoneón quintet and not originally<br />

intended as a suite; they are heard here in the terrific 1990s adaptation<br />

by Leonid Desyatnikov for violin and string orchestra that incorporates<br />

direct quotes from the Vivaldi Seasons.<br />

Perron draws a magnificent sound from her 1768 Guadagnini violin<br />

in riveting performances, with Choinière and the orchestra adding<br />

significantly to a superb release.<br />

Violinist Francesca Dego admits that the<br />

Brahms & Busoni Violin Concertos make<br />

an unusual pairing but says that “one of the<br />

reasons I fell in love with Busoni’s concerto<br />

is that it is permeated with the spirit of the<br />

Brahms.” Dalia Stasevska conducts the BBC<br />

Symphony Orchestra (Chandos CHSA 5333<br />

chandos.net/products/catalogue/CHAN%20<br />

5333).<br />

Brahms and Busoni had a somewhat<br />

uneven relationship, but Busoni certainly respected the older<br />

composer’s music. His Violin Concerto in D Major, Op.35a K243 was<br />

premiered a few months after Brahms’ death in 1897, and although<br />

initially favoured by players like Kreisler and Szigeti its popularity<br />

gradually faded. It’s certainly very “Brahms” in nature, with influences<br />

of Liszt in its structure, and clearly will repay repeated listening.<br />

There’s a direct Busoni link to the Brahms Violin Concerto in D<br />

Major, Op.77, with Dego using Busoni’s cadenza (with timpani<br />

accompaniment) in the first movement of a thoughtful performance<br />

that perfectly displays Dego’s luminous, crystal-clear tone.<br />

Violinist Leonidas Kavakos stopped playing<br />

Bach in public for quite some time so that<br />

he could examine his relationship with<br />

the music and recalibrate his baroque<br />

technique. His 2022 CD of the Sonatas &<br />

Partitas was his first Bach recording, and<br />

he has followed it with his new release<br />

Bach Violin Concertos with the ApollΩn<br />

Ensemble (Sony Classical 19658868932<br />

sonyclassical.com/releases/releases-details/<br />

bach-violin-concertos).<br />

The four concertos are all for solo violin – no Double Concerto<br />

here – and include two transcribed from harpsichord concertos –<br />

the Concerto in D Minor BWV1052R and the Concerto in G Minor<br />

BWV1056R – in addition to the Concerto No.1 in A Minor BWV1041<br />

and the Concerto in E Major BWV1042.<br />

Kavakos decided to go with the smallest possible ensemble of five<br />

string players (one per part) and harpsichord, with the result being a<br />

light, intimate and well-balanced sound in which the soloist is never<br />

placed too far forward but always seems to be an integral part of the<br />

ensemble.<br />

Cellist Trey Lee describes Seasons<br />

Interrupted as “a musical narrative that<br />

confronts our climate crisis, which every<br />

year is distorting the behavior of nature’s<br />

four seasons beyond recognition.” Georgy<br />

Tchaidze is the pianist, and Emilia Hoving<br />

conducts the English Chamber Orchestra<br />

(Sigma Classics SIGCD791 signumrecords.<br />

com/?s=seasons+interrupted).<br />

Lee’s arrangements of 4 Schubert Lieder<br />

– Im Frühling (Spring); Die Sommernacht (Summer Night); Herbst<br />

(Autumn); and Gefrorne Tränen (Frozen Tears, from Die Winterreise)<br />

– represent the untainted Past.<br />

A terrific performance of Lee’s highly effective arrangement of<br />

Piazzolla’s Las Cuatro Estaciones Porteñas for cello and string<br />

orchestra embodies the Present and the rise of 20th-century industry,<br />

while the Future is represented by the striking Cello Concerto by<br />

Finnish composer Kirmo Lintinern (b.1967), an imaginary journey<br />

through a possible climate-changed future with no recognizable<br />

seasons.<br />

With 16 Histoires de guitares III the<br />

Canadian guitarist David Jacques returns<br />

with yet another fascinating selection of<br />

guitars from his astonishing private collection<br />

(ATMA Classique ACD2 2868 atmaclassique.com/en).<br />

Ten of the instruments on this disc were<br />

built by the best 19th-century luthiers; there<br />

are also three from the late 1700s and three<br />

more recent guitars from 1940, 1993 and 2017. Each instrument is<br />

illustrated in full colour, along with its history and with information<br />

on the composers of the selected works, all chosen to best illustrate<br />

the individual qualities of the instruments and which produce a wide<br />

range of tonal colours.<br />

Those composers include Coste, Aguardo, Carulli, Giuliani and a<br />

host of lesser-known names, all wonderfully presented with faultless<br />

technique and admirable sensitivity.<br />

In Time, the new CD from the Aros Guitar Duo of Simon Wildau and<br />

Mikkel Egelund is a tribute to the city of Aarhus (Aros being the old<br />

60 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Norse name) where the duo started (OUR<br />

Recordings 8.226919 ourrecordings.com).<br />

The clock in the city hall bell tower plays In<br />

vernalis temporis, a Danish melody from<br />

around 1500. When the duo premiered<br />

Asger Buur’s I fordret (In the spring) in<br />

2018 they asked that he use the tune in the<br />

work, and the idea for a complete concert<br />

programme was born, with five newly<br />

commissioned works added in the next three years.<br />

All six works here incorporate the theme in some fashion. Buur’s<br />

original piece is joined by Martin Lohse’s Ver, Peter Bruun’s Dark is<br />

November, Rasmus Zwicki’s In Time, John Frandsen’s Rollercoaster<br />

and Wayne Siegel’s bluegrass-inspired Vernalis Breakdown. All<br />

are finely crafted and impressive works, given equally impressive<br />

performances by the duo.<br />

Guitarist Aaron Larget-Caplan is back<br />

with his 11th solo album, and second celebrating<br />

Spanish musical heritage with<br />

Spanish Gems, a collection of works from<br />

the classical and flamenco repertoire (Tiger<br />

Turn 888-11 ALCguitar.com).<br />

Included are Tárrega’s Capricho Arabe<br />

and Adelita, Esteban de Sanlúcar’s<br />

Panaderos, Albeniz’ Asturias, Gaspar<br />

Sanz’ Canarios from Suite Española, Emilio Pujol’s El Abejorro and –<br />

perhaps somewhat surprisingly – the ubiquitous Spanish Romance,<br />

hardly worthy of inclusion in “a collection of masterpieces.”<br />

Torroba’s three-movement Sonatina closes a thoroughly enjoyable –<br />

albeit brief at 35 minutes – CD full of Larget-Caplan’s customary clean<br />

and sensitive playing.<br />

VOCAL<br />

Bach – Mass in B Minor<br />

Cantata Collective; Nicholas McGegan<br />

Avie Records AV2668<br />

(cantatacollective.org)<br />

! Some people<br />

submit finelycrafted<br />

resumes,<br />

perfectly-worded<br />

cover letters and<br />

superfluously<br />

supportive references<br />

as part of a<br />

job application.<br />

Johann Sebastian Bach sent (an early version<br />

of) the Mass in B Minor. Submitted (along<br />

with a letter of appeal) to Elector Frederick<br />

<strong>August</strong>us II of Saxony in <strong>July</strong> 1733, Bach<br />

was seeking a position outside of Leipzig,<br />

where his work at the Thomaskirche was<br />

full of conflict, insufficient resources and,<br />

according to Bach, blatant disrespect. Despite<br />

this impressive application, there is no<br />

evidence that the work was ever performed in<br />

Dresden and Bach did not receive the title of<br />

Hofcompositeur, or Court Composer, from the<br />

Elector until late in 1736.<br />

Now recognized as one of the greatest<br />

choral masterworks in music history, the B<br />

Minor Mass was not composed all at once, nor<br />

was it entirely spontaneous; it was, however,<br />

meticulously crafted. Cobbled together over<br />

a significant portion of Bach’s career from<br />

music that he composed previously and<br />

revised as needed, this work is considered his<br />

last major composition.<br />

The San Francisco-based Cantata Collective,<br />

led by early music specialist Nicholas<br />

McGegan, tackles the B Minor Mass head-on<br />

in this live recording from March 2023.<br />

Measured and well-paced, this performance<br />

prioritizes contrapuntal clarity over<br />

velocity, giving fleeting movements such as<br />

the Et Resurrexit a sense of depth, and slower<br />

sections, such as the opening Kyrie, much<br />

weight and gravity.<br />

While not as superficially thrilling as more<br />

“fast and furious” interpretations of this work,<br />

it is a challenging task to find a single note<br />

that is out of place or tune; it is, in fact, difficult<br />

to determine that this is indeed a live<br />

recording. The choir and orchestra are in fine<br />

form here, and this recording is an excellent<br />

listening opportunity both for those who are<br />

intimately familiar with this masterwork and<br />

those who are discovering it for the first time.<br />

Matthew Whitfield<br />

Christopher Tyler Nickel – Requiem<br />

Catherine Redding; Northwest Sinfonia and<br />

Choir; Clyde Mitchell<br />

Avie Records AV2659 (avie-records.com)<br />

! Vancouverite<br />

Christopher<br />

Tyler Nickel has<br />

composed over 100<br />

scores for theatre,<br />

film and TV, as well<br />

as symphonies,<br />

concertos, chamber<br />

works and a sevenhour-long<br />

(!) oratorio, a complete setting of<br />

The Gospel According to Mark. His Requiem<br />

(2019), lasting “only” 70 minutes, here<br />

receives an emotionally stirring performance<br />

from Canadian soprano Catherine Redding<br />

and the Northwest Sinfonia and Choir<br />

conducted by Claude Mitchell.<br />

It’s scored for a dark-sounding chamber<br />

orchestra of oboe, English horn, two<br />

French horns and strings; “I wanted to<br />

keep a solemnity to the Requiem,” writes<br />

Nickel. The choral writing largely avoids<br />

The WholeNote Listening Room<br />

Hear tracks from any of<br />

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Watch Videos<br />

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thewholenote.com/listening<br />

Zombie Blizzard<br />

Measha Brueggergosman-Lee<br />

Zombie Blizzard is a unique<br />

blending of classical arias and<br />

jazz art songs, in which composer<br />

Aaron Davis sets Margaret<br />

Atwood's visceral poetry to music.<br />

Matters of Time<br />

Exponential Ensemble<br />

Debut album featuring four<br />

brand-new contemporary<br />

classical chamber works inspired<br />

by science, the cosmos, and the<br />

passage of time.<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 61


hythmic counterpoint, embracing instead<br />

“homorhythm” – all voices in rhythmic<br />

unison, creating a sense of granite-like<br />

solidity. The music varies in character, each<br />

of the 19 sections, says Nickel, having its own<br />

“overarching emotion.” He’s drawn from stylistic<br />

sources ranging from the austerity of<br />

Gregorian chant, in the opening Introitus<br />

and Kyrie, to the urgent expressivity of<br />

late-Romanticism.<br />

The gently supplicating lyricism of Gabriel<br />

Fauré’s Requiem predominates in nine of<br />

the sections, while the syncopated, motoric<br />

dynamism of Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana<br />

energizes the Dies Irae, Confutatis and<br />

Responsorium. Brucknerian grandeur magnifies<br />

the Tuba Mirum; the Offertorium sounds<br />

like a sentimental folk-ballad.<br />

Nevertheless, there’s an overall unity to<br />

this beauty-filled music, thanks to Nickel’s<br />

distinctive melodic gift. As a chorister, I’ve<br />

sung in Requiems by Mozart, Cherubini,<br />

Brahms, Fauré and Duruflé; I’d love to be able<br />

to add Nickel’s to this list.<br />

Michael Schulman<br />

Breathe<br />

Hera Hyesang Park; Orchestra del Teatro<br />

Carlo Felice; Jochen Rieder<br />

Deutsche Grammophon 486 4627<br />

(deutschegrammophon.com/en/artists/<br />

hera-hyesang-park)<br />

! Can profound<br />

fear be experienced<br />

– and expressed<br />

– with quintessence<br />

of beauty?<br />

In theory, probably<br />

not. Yet every<br />

aspect of this disc<br />

does exactly this.<br />

The prescient repertoire on Breathe paves the<br />

way. The real reason, of course, is an inspired<br />

performance by rising-star lyric soprano Hera<br />

Hyesang Park. The utter luminosity of her<br />

voice, and deep digging into songs, brings<br />

special grace to words, and extraordinary lyricism<br />

to vocalise and rhapsodising about the<br />

exposition of both the literal and metaphorical<br />

beauty of fearfulness.<br />

The act of making breath not simply a<br />

gesture of release, but an artistic device is<br />

what we – in turn – experience throughout<br />

this extraordinary disc. Park delves into the<br />

work of a group of composers from the 19th<br />

and 20th centuries, exploring their work as<br />

part of a bleak, Impressionistic backdrop for<br />

the horrors of the global pandemic and the<br />

isolation that it inflicted on humanity. In<br />

doing so she imbues songs, and their significance,<br />

with near-spiritual fervour in the<br />

context of the pandemic.<br />

Should familiarity of repertoire be an indicator,<br />

then the Lento e Largo movements of<br />

Górecki’s Symphony of Sorrowful Songs is<br />

the apogee of this recording. But the Evening<br />

Prayer from Humperdinck’s Hänsel and<br />

Gretel and the Flower Duet from Delibes’<br />

Lakmé are also sensational.<br />

So deeply does Park embody this material<br />

that she lives the songs rather than projecting<br />

them as outside entities of breathing.<br />

Everything about this disc declares: A<br />

minor miracle.<br />

Raul da Gama<br />

David Bontemps – La Flambeau<br />

Suzanne Tafflot; Catherine Daniel; Paul<br />

Williamson; Brandon Coleman; Orchestre<br />

Classique de Montréal; Alain Trudel<br />

ATMA ACD2 2880 (atmaclassique.com/en)<br />

! La Flambeau is<br />

a chamber opera by<br />

David Bontemps.<br />

Premiered in 2023<br />

with the Montreal<br />

Classical Orchestra<br />

and conducted by<br />

Alain Trudel, La<br />

Flambeau features<br />

Canadian mezzo-soprano Catherine Daniel,<br />

American bass-baritone Brandon Coleman,<br />

Cameroonian-born soprano Suzanne<br />

Taffot and Jamaican-Canadian tenor Paul<br />

Williamson.<br />

Based on the play of the same name by<br />

Haitian poet and playwright Faubert Bolivar<br />

(b.1979), the opera is sung in French with<br />

short passages in Haitian Creole. The opera<br />

begins with an overture and evolves into<br />

seven scenes scored for string orchestra and<br />

maracas. Set in Haiti, La Flambeau’s characters<br />

have no names: Monsieur who has political<br />

ambitions and is preparing a speech;<br />

Madame, his wife who speaks to deceased<br />

family members; Mademoiselle, their<br />

working-class maid abused by Monsieur; and<br />

l’Homme, a sort of judge who condemns and<br />

ultimately sentences Monsieur, turning him<br />

into a zombie in the service of his community.<br />

While on the surface drawing on Yoruba<br />

mythology and Haitian Vodou traditions,<br />

the composer also embeds commentary<br />

on women’s rights, deceit, prejudice and<br />

corruption. Bontemps writes unornamented<br />

melodies with Afro-Haitian elements and in<br />

the style and rhythm of spoken word.<br />

The recording of La Flambeau is an opportunity<br />

to hear a cast of prominent Black<br />

singers in a medium where they are historically<br />

underrepresented. The singers’ musicality<br />

and commitment to the text invites listeners<br />

on a journey inside of our humanity to show<br />

that individual struggles are of a universal<br />

nature, regardless of gender, colour or caste.<br />

Sophie Bisson<br />

Paul Moravec – The Shining<br />

Lyric Opera of Kansas City; Gerard<br />

Schwarz<br />

Pentatone PTC5187036<br />

(operatheshining.com)<br />

! In an isolated mountain hotel with<br />

a blood-soaked past, ghostly voices and<br />

visions propel a troubled man’s descent<br />

into murderous<br />

madness. “Opera’s<br />

power as an artform,”<br />

writes<br />

Buffalo-born,<br />

Pulitzer Prizewinner<br />

Paul<br />

Moravec, “springs<br />

from its essentially<br />

primordial, irrational nature. It’s ideally<br />

suited to the adaptation of Mr. King’s irresistibly<br />

compelling story.” Opera goers agree;<br />

since its 2016 Minnesota Opera premiere, The<br />

Shining has been enthusiastically received in<br />

San Francisco, Atlanta and Kansas City, where<br />

this two-CD set was recorded in 2023.<br />

Mark Campbell says his libretto (included<br />

in the booklet) hews closer to Stephen King’s<br />

novel than to Stanley Kubrick’s film (not<br />

having read the book nor seen the movie,<br />

I’ll take his word for it). Moravec’s score,<br />

however, is thoroughly “cinematic” – in the<br />

best sense – effectively creating an agitated,<br />

discordant atmosphere of irrationality and<br />

impending violence.<br />

Heading the cast of 17 soloists is baritone<br />

Edward Parks, vocally powerful and dramatically<br />

convincing as the tormented Jack<br />

Torrance. Soprano Kelly Kaduce is sympathetic<br />

as his loving but fearful wife Wendy.<br />

The hotel’s cook, Dick Hallorann (baritone<br />

Aubrey Allicock) recognizes the psychic abilities<br />

– “the shining” – of the Torrances’ son<br />

Danny (treble Tristan Hallett), becoming his<br />

supportive friend.<br />

Enhancing the opera’s theatrical impact,<br />

Torrance’s hallucinations were seen and<br />

heard by the audience; hopefully, they were<br />

immune to the phantasms’ murder-inducing<br />

influence. Immune, thankfully, the Lyric<br />

Opera of Kansas City Chorus, Kansas City<br />

Symphony and conductor Gerard Schwarz<br />

contributed greatly to this performance’s<br />

unrelenting intensity.<br />

Michael Schulman<br />

Michael Hersch – Poppaea<br />

Ah Young Hong; Steve Davislim; Silke Gang;<br />

Ensemble Phoenix Basel; Jerg<br />

Henneberger<br />

New Focus Recordings FCR390<br />

(newfocusrecordings.com)<br />

! Even if you<br />

were not aware of<br />

the details of the<br />

violence of Roman<br />

rule during the<br />

early Anno Domini<br />

era you will feel its<br />

effects in the pit of<br />

your stomach as you<br />

listen to the operatic recreation of the story of<br />

the Empress Poppaea.<br />

On one level, Michael Hersch’s recreation<br />

of Poppaea Sabina (30AD-65AD), the<br />

second wife of the legendary imperial despot<br />

Nero, may be a simple tale of palace intrigue.<br />

However, there seems to be a much deeper<br />

62 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


motive in this shrill, masterful retelling of the<br />

tragedy. And it is this: The conniving woman<br />

who won the heart and hand of the emperor<br />

and bore him a child, appears to have created<br />

a powerful, matriarchal rule in the imperial<br />

household.<br />

Brilliantly detailed booklet notes by<br />

Dr. Lauren Donovan-Ginsberg, Associate<br />

Professor of Classical Studies at Duke<br />

University and a specialist in Neronian<br />

culture and history, make for riveting reading.<br />

Stephanie Fleischmann’s prescient libretto<br />

recreates the bloody and devious plot.<br />

Poppaea – played with shrill and terrifying<br />

ingenuity by the soprano Ah Young<br />

Hong – tears Nero (an appropriately despotic<br />

tenor Steve Davislim) away from his first<br />

wife Octavia, superbly sung by the dark and<br />

smoky-voiced mezzo Silke Gäng.<br />

You will also find yourself harbouring high<br />

praise for the superb casting and performances,<br />

and especially for the sensitive and<br />

vigorous direction of Jürg Henneberger who<br />

brings this Neronian tragedy of Poppaea to<br />

vivid life once again.<br />

Raul da Gama<br />

CLASSICAL AND BEYOND<br />

East is East<br />

Infusion Baroque<br />

Leaf Music LM276 (leaf-music.ca)<br />

! To 19th century<br />

literary aficionados<br />

– and many<br />

who came thereafter<br />

– Rudyard<br />

Kipling’s poem The<br />

Ballad of East and<br />

West must have<br />

sounded prescient.<br />

Indeed, many with self-serving nationalist<br />

tendencies, ever mindful of irrational<br />

social turmoil the world over might, with<br />

the wag of a rigid digit even go further and<br />

say, “Told you so.” However, the cultural<br />

topography of civilisations have been<br />

enriched immeasurably from such collisions<br />

since time immemorial. Canadian culture<br />

is an outstanding example of such amazing<br />

cultural collisions.<br />

Although we do not need proof that<br />

humanity is brought so many degrees closer<br />

together by art – especially music and dance<br />

– the repertoire on East is East is a beautiful<br />

example of how much better we can begin to<br />

appreciate and live alongside the “otherness”<br />

of cultures. In fact, such “otherness” may<br />

often seem apocryphal. Listen with wideeyed<br />

wonder to Infusion Baroque’s eloquent<br />

undulant variations (of) La Bergamasca.<br />

In an act of true inspiration, the ensemble<br />

has fused variations by Uccellini and Vitali,<br />

Corelli, Vivaldi and Marais into an inspired<br />

reinvention in the Phrygian mode.<br />

Refusing to let this inspirational music fade<br />

away thereafter, the performers soar loftily<br />

with music that interprets Indian ragas such as<br />

Sandhya Raga and Gurjari Todi, in performances<br />

led by the luminous-voiced soprano<br />

Vidita Kanniks. Santoor master, Amir Amiri also<br />

contributed several celestial compositions: Saghi<br />

Nameh, Cortege, Raghse Choobi and Aghrab are<br />

truly outstanding. Infusion Baroque anchored<br />

by Alexa Raine-Wright, Sallynee Amawat and<br />

Andrea Stewart and guests – Thibault Bertin-<br />

Maghit, Hamin Honari, Hank Knox and Shawn<br />

Mativetsky – are masterful throughout.<br />

Raul da Gama<br />

Mozart – Piano Concertos K238 | K242 |<br />

K246<br />

Robert Levin; Ya-Fei Chuang; Academy of<br />

Ancient Music<br />

AAM AAM044 (aam.co.uk)<br />

! Few period<br />

music ensembles<br />

have had as<br />

long and illustrious<br />

a history as the<br />

Academy of Ancient<br />

Music. Founded<br />

by Christopher<br />

Hogwood in 1973, it took its name from an<br />

earlier ensemble that existed between 1725<br />

and 1806. Since then, the orchestra has maintained<br />

a reputation for its excellence in the<br />

performance of baroque and classical period<br />

music on period instruments.<br />

This newest recording on the AAM Classics<br />

label is the 12th and penultimate disc in a<br />

Mozart piano concerto cycle, presenting<br />

concertos numbers six, seven and eight – all<br />

from 1776 – with soloists Robert Levin and<br />

Ya-Fe Chuang under the direction of Laurence<br />

Cummings and Bojan Čičić.<br />

This disc is a delight! Opening with the<br />

Concerto No.6, Levin delivers a fresh and<br />

robust performance on a tangent piano (a<br />

cross between a harpsichord and pianoforte)<br />

particularly suiting this youthful music.<br />

His phrasing is carefully conceived and the<br />

cadenzas, tasteful and creative.<br />

Levin is joined by Chuang on a fortepiano<br />

and Cummings (who also directs) on a harpsichord<br />

in the Concerto for Three Pianos<br />

K242, music written for the wealthy Lodron<br />

family of Salzburg with each of the solo parts<br />

composed to meet the ability of the original<br />

soloists. Here, the march-like opening movement,<br />

the lyrical adagio and sprightly Rondo<br />

finale are all adroitly handled by the three<br />

soloists who achieve a wonderful sense of<br />

balance while the AAM proves a sturdy and<br />

sympathetic partner.<br />

Rounding out the recording is the Concerto<br />

K246, the “Lutzow” performed by Levin and<br />

directed by Čičić. Levin’ s approach is fluid<br />

and stylish, particularly in the courtly finale<br />

which brings the disc to a most satisfying<br />

conclusion.<br />

Attractive packaging and detailed notes<br />

further add to an already exemplary<br />

recording. We can look forward to the final<br />

release in the series.<br />

Richard Haskell<br />

What we're listening to this month:<br />

thewholenote.com/listening<br />

SYNTHESIS:<br />

The String Quartet Sessions<br />

Ryan Truesdell<br />

Epic new project from Grammywinning<br />

producer. 15 Large<br />

Ensemble Jazz Composers. 17<br />

Newly Commissioned works for<br />

String Quartet.<br />

Limited Edition 3 CD Album<br />

Ysaÿe: Six Sonatas for Solo Violin<br />

Sergey Khachatryan<br />

The Armenian violinist presents<br />

the first recording of Ysaÿe’s<br />

sonatas to be performed on the<br />

composer’s own 1740 Guarneri del<br />

Gesù.<br />

Ysaÿe, J. S. Bach & Paganini:<br />

Works for Solo Violin<br />

Karl Stobbe<br />

Celebrate the violin's 500th<br />

birthday by exploring the evolution<br />

of violin music through his second<br />

of six albums featuring J.S. Bach's<br />

solo violin works.<br />

TRAILBLAZERS<br />

Molly Gebrian, viola;<br />

Danny Holt, piano<br />

Under-appreciated composers who<br />

defied social expectations of their<br />

time: Bosmans was openly queer,<br />

Smyth was a suffragette leader, and<br />

Pejačević rejected her nobility.<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 63


Heritage – Bohme; Ewald; Jergensen<br />

Buzz Brass<br />

ATMA ACD2 2897 (atmaclassique.com/en)<br />

! Buzz Brass<br />

(Buzz Cuivres),<br />

a Canadian but<br />

globally recognized<br />

brass quintet,<br />

has been dependably<br />

putting out<br />

strong recordings<br />

and concertizing<br />

around the world<br />

for over two decades. For an ensemble such as<br />

this – two trumpets, horn, trombone and bass<br />

trombone – the challenge, it seems, is what to<br />

play. First, the aggregation itself is relatively<br />

young in comparison to other classical music<br />

forms, dating back to 1833 with the Distin<br />

family. Secondly, although such well-known<br />

composers as Joseph Haydn were indeed<br />

known for fine chamber music contributions,<br />

the canonical repertoire for this unique<br />

instrumental setting belongs primarily to<br />

a handful of such wonderful composers<br />

as Victor Ewald, Axel Jørgensen and Oskar<br />

Böhme, who were all new to me and who<br />

Buzz Brass does a marvellous job at broadcasting<br />

more widely.<br />

With such titles as Brass Quintet No.1 in<br />

B-flat Minor and Brass Quintet in A-flat<br />

Major, we are clearly in the territory of<br />

so-called “absolute music,” where the music<br />

itself, fine playing and cohesive blend of<br />

beautiful brass instruments is the point,<br />

rather than some extra-musical theme or<br />

programme intended to give the pieces<br />

further meaning. And with Héritage, the<br />

group’s first recording for ATMA Classique<br />

(following two on the Analekta label),<br />

nothing additional is needed. Like slipping<br />

into a warm bath of wonderfully resonant<br />

and round brass timbres, this <strong>2024</strong> recording<br />

is immersive and enveloping, capable of<br />

washing over the attuned listener with<br />

beauty, lyricism and expressiveness.<br />

Andrew Scott<br />

Ravel – Complete Works for Solo Piano Vol.1<br />

Vincent Larderet<br />

Avie Records AV2623 (avie-records.com)<br />

! On the last page<br />

of the booklet there<br />

is a beautifully<br />

captured sketch of<br />

Ravel by none other<br />

than our pianist at<br />

age 12! So we have a<br />

talented visual artist<br />

as well as a pianist<br />

and that’s just what we need for the world of<br />

Ravel. “Steinway Artist” Vincent Larderet’s<br />

playing, apart from superb technique, is<br />

beautifully lyrical and deeply inspired with<br />

“a rare melding of the intellectual and the<br />

visceral” (International Piano, UK).<br />

Ravel has an amazing quantity of piano<br />

works and Larderet embarks here on a project<br />

to record them all in four volumes. This first<br />

contains Miroirs, Jeux d’eau, Valses nobles<br />

et sentimentales, Sonatine and Pavane pour<br />

une princesse défunte.<br />

One salient feature of French<br />

Impressionism is getting inspiration from<br />

the external world, in the case of Ravel from<br />

Nature, e.g. water in its many representations.<br />

This is the case for Jeu d’eau, which<br />

was also inspired by Liszt, his Fountains of<br />

the Villa d’Este. The multifaceted genius Ravel<br />

was also quite entranced with the dance form<br />

the Waltz, and here we are treated to a set of<br />

eight delightful Valses that are indeed Noble<br />

and Sentimental. One can sense here some<br />

elements germinating towards Ravel’s major<br />

orchestral composition La Valse.<br />

The final work is one of Ravel’s finest,<br />

Pavane pour une princesse défunte, a hauntingly<br />

beautiful melody that was also orchestrated<br />

by the composer. This fine collection<br />

bodes well for the future and we look<br />

forward to further volumes from this exceptional<br />

pianist.<br />

Janos Gardonyi<br />

Mahler – Symphony No.6<br />

Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen<br />

Rundfunks; Sir Simon Rattle<br />

BR Klassik BRK900217 (brso.de/en/<br />

media-center/cds-and-dvds)<br />

! Throughout<br />

his life, the music<br />

of Gustav Mahler<br />

has been a guiding<br />

star in Simon<br />

Rattle’s career.<br />

While a percussion<br />

student at the Royal<br />

Academy of Music<br />

he single-handedly organized and conducted<br />

a performance of Mahler’s Second Symphony<br />

by his fellow pupils. His love of Mahler<br />

continued throughout his years directing the<br />

City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra<br />

(1980 to 1998); their well-received recordings<br />

of contemporary and late romantic works<br />

included several Mahler symphonies. Rattle<br />

made his conducting debut with the Berlin<br />

Philharmonic in 1987 in a performance of<br />

Mahler’s Sixth Symphony; he was their chief<br />

conductor from 1999 to 2018 and chose the<br />

very same symphony for the final concert of<br />

his tenure. His subsequent leadership of the<br />

London Symphony Orchestra (2017 to 2023)<br />

also drew to a close with a Mahler symphony,<br />

the Ninth.<br />

Alban Berg once proclaimed, “There<br />

is only one Sixth, notwithstanding the<br />

Pastoral.” Rattle once again has chosen this<br />

tragic masterpiece that encapsulates, in<br />

his words, “the whole package of a colossal<br />

life – and that includes love and optimism”<br />

for his inaugural season with the Bavarian<br />

Radio Symphony Orchestra. The orchestra<br />

responds magnificently to Rattle’s direction<br />

with a sensitivity that surpasses the<br />

sometimes indifferent results he encountered<br />

in Berlin. I’d go as far as to say that Sir Simon<br />

may be the finest Mahler interpreter since<br />

the late Claudio Abbado, his predecessor in<br />

Berlin. Rattle has remarked in the past that a<br />

conductor doesn’t become really good until<br />

he hits his sixties. Give this compelling disc a<br />

listen and I’m sure you’ll find that truer words<br />

were never spoken.<br />

Daniel Foley<br />

Sibelius 2 & 5<br />

Orchestre Metropolitain de Montréal;<br />

Yannick Nézet-Séguin<br />

ATMA ACD2 2453 (atmaclassique.com/en)<br />

! In the right<br />

hands Sibelius’<br />

symphonic work<br />

can be extremely<br />

exciting. Yannick<br />

Nézet-Séguin<br />

can lay claim to<br />

being one of the<br />

most penetrating<br />

Sibelians in modern<br />

times. He may be less Romantic than some –<br />

Osmo Vänskä, for instance – but his understanding<br />

of the composer goes way beyond<br />

abstraction. His 2019 Symphony No.1 was<br />

amongst the most stirring ever recorded,<br />

while on this recording of Nos. 2 & 5 he brings<br />

the kind of visceral engagement that forces<br />

you to listen afresh.<br />

Symphony No.2 (1901), one of the most<br />

popular in the cycle, marks the transition<br />

between the youthful and the more mature<br />

Sibelius. The Russian influence is replaced by<br />

something more southern in feeling: themes<br />

and textures are more open, and the general<br />

atmosphere is one of warmth. But a mood of<br />

foreboding soon emerges at the start of the<br />

second movement, with a theme inspired<br />

by Don Juan being confronted by the figure<br />

of Death.<br />

Symphony No.5, experienced here,<br />

certainly lives up to its reputation as one of<br />

Sibelius’ most original reworkings of the<br />

symphonic form. During its dramatic (1919)<br />

revision he merged the first and second<br />

movements with a transitional passage that<br />

miraculously glides from one into the other.<br />

So heroic is the grand finale that it is aptly<br />

described as the swinging of Thor’s hammer.<br />

Nézet-Séguin and Orchestre Métropolitan<br />

de Montréal traverse both symphonies with<br />

exhilarating power and energy.<br />

Raul da Gama<br />

Editor’s Note: One of the most lauded<br />

conductors of his generation, Canadian<br />

Yannick Nézet-Séguin received the highest<br />

designation conferred by Toronto’s Royal<br />

Conservatory of Music on April 17 when he<br />

was inducted as an Honorary Fellow (FRCMT)<br />

of the organization.<br />

64 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Richard Strauss – Ein Heldenleben; Mahler<br />

– Rückert Lieder<br />

Sonya Yoncheva; Orchestre symphonique<br />

de Montréal; Rafael Payare<br />

Pentatone PTC 5187201 (pentatonemusic.<br />

com/product/30306)<br />

! Rafael Payare’s<br />

latest release with<br />

the OSM follows<br />

up on their highly<br />

effective Mahler<br />

Fifth Symphony<br />

recording with a<br />

disc devoted to<br />

Richard Strauss’<br />

monumental tone poem depicting the heroic<br />

life of none other than his very self. In the<br />

course of this lengthy work Strauss mocks his<br />

critics, worships his wife, goes to war with<br />

his perceived enemies and celebrates his own<br />

weighty accomplishments. The scenario is<br />

ridiculous on the surface, but the execution is<br />

undeniably brilliant, in no small part due to<br />

Payare’s keen affinity for the genre. He’s well<br />

aware that there’s more to this sporadically<br />

bombastic music than the notes and brings<br />

to the score an idiomatic and affectionate<br />

reading; the orchestra is with him all the way,<br />

expertly negotiating the sharp curves on the<br />

Strauss autobahn. Concertmaster Andrew<br />

Wan contributes an exceptionally multidimensional<br />

interpretation of the extended<br />

solo violin part at the centre of the work, a<br />

musical portrait of Strauss’ wife and muse<br />

Pauline, whose notorious mood swings and<br />

oft-times hectoring tone confirm his perception<br />

that “every minute is different from what<br />

she was a minute before.”<br />

The inclusion of Mahler’s Rückert-<br />

Lieder as filler material is puzzling. Why<br />

not more Strauss instead? There are more<br />

than 40 orchestral songs to choose from.<br />

The Bulgarian diva-du-jour Sonya Yoncheva<br />

has made quite a name for herself recently<br />

in the operatic world, but her tentative take<br />

on Mahler’s introspective and decidedly<br />

non-operatic music left me quite unmoved.<br />

Payare and the reduced forces of the OSM<br />

do their best to not get in the way, but it’s<br />

a hopeless cause. Turn instead to the great<br />

Mahler singers of the past such as Baker,<br />

Ludwig, Ferrier or Fischer-Dieskau if you<br />

truly want to savour these songs.<br />

Daniel Foley<br />

Moments Musicaux<br />

Petrit Çeku<br />

Eudora Records EUD-SACD-2401<br />

(eudorarecords.com)<br />

! Guitarist Petrit<br />

Çeku was born<br />

in Prizen, Kosovo<br />

and began his<br />

musical studies at<br />

the Lorenc Antoni<br />

music school before<br />

attending the<br />

Zagreb Academy<br />

and completing his studies with Manuel<br />

Barrueco at the Peabody Conservatory in<br />

Baltimore. Since then, he has performed<br />

recitals throughout Europe and continues to<br />

perform regularly with the Zagreb Soloists.<br />

This Eudora label recording titled Moments<br />

Musicaux is his third and affords the listener<br />

a glimpse into the world of Franz Schubert<br />

either through transcriptions or compositions<br />

with a Schubertian connection.<br />

Joseph Mertz’s transcriptions of six lieder<br />

– four from Schwanengesang, one from<br />

Winterreise and a standalone, Lob der Tränen<br />

– are all skillfully constructed miniatures, as<br />

compelling for the guitar as they are for voice.<br />

Çeku’s warmly resonant tone helps to evoke a<br />

true sense of intimacy – from the anguished<br />

tone of Aufenthalt to the familiar Ständchen<br />

The Variations on a Waltz of Schubert<br />

Op.4 by Croatian composer Ivan Padovec is a<br />

charming set based on the Waltz Op.9 No.2.<br />

Beginning with the simple waltz melody,<br />

the seven variations require considerable<br />

dexterity, but Çeku easily meets the<br />

challenges with a supple technique.<br />

Manuel Ponce was one of the first Mexican<br />

composers to be widely recognized outside<br />

his native country and during his career<br />

he had close ties to the renowned guitarist<br />

Andrés Segovia. His four-movement Sonate<br />

Romantique “Hommage à Schubert” is<br />

written in a lyrical style of which Schubert<br />

surely would have approved. In the words of<br />

Segovia, the piece “honours the instrument<br />

“ – and so does Çeku throughout this fine<br />

recording.<br />

Richard Haskell<br />

…of dreams unveiled<br />

Clare Longendyke<br />

Independent (clarelongendyke.com)<br />

! The discography<br />

of Debussy’s<br />

Préludes is already<br />

distinguished but<br />

here is a remarkable<br />

addition to<br />

it. What makes<br />

this so in the first<br />

instance is that the<br />

performer, pianist Clare Longendyke, abjures<br />

dancing her way dreamily through Debussy’s<br />

deux livres des Préludes. The very inclusion<br />

of the Préludes came about after Longendyke<br />

planned a programme around a commissioned<br />

set of Piano Portraits by her composer<br />

friend Amy Williams. Also included in this<br />

musical palimpsest are works by a fellow<br />

composer and Impressionist Anthony<br />

R. Green.<br />

The result is a work of remarkable pianistic<br />

invention. For one thing few other piano<br />

recordings contain so many unique features of<br />

Impressionism – and particularly Debussy’s<br />

genius. For instance, few pianists in recent<br />

memory play Debussy – and consequently<br />

the music of Williams and Green – with such<br />

wondrous ease in conveying both profundity<br />

and levity. Moreover, with her sheer mastery<br />

of the dynamics of the keyboard, combined<br />

What we're listening to this month:<br />

thewholenote.com/listening<br />

Vivaldi & Piazzolla:<br />

The Four Seasons<br />

Isabella d’Éloize Perron &<br />

FILMharmonic Orchestra<br />

Violinist Isabella d’Éloize Perron and<br />

conductor Francis Choiniere, two<br />

generational prodigies, join forces<br />

with the FILMharmonique Orchestra<br />

to breathe new life to timeless works.<br />

Spanish Gems<br />

Aaron Larget-Caplan<br />

Guitarist-Composer returns to<br />

Spain for a classical and flamenco<br />

re-imagining. "Aaron is the ideal<br />

21st century artist."<br />

– Network for New Music<br />

Poppaea<br />

Michael Hersch<br />

Poppaea begins and ends with<br />

a shocking act of violence. It is a<br />

tale of transgression perpetrated<br />

against women in a depraved,<br />

misogynistic world.<br />

East is East<br />

Infusion Baroque<br />

This album offers a fresh<br />

approach to music on historical<br />

and traditional instruments in<br />

a transcultural collaboration<br />

drawing from East and West.<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 65


with the nuances of)pedalling, Longendyke<br />

brings to the fore the most important aspect<br />

of this repertoire: its intimacy.<br />

Williams’ music is written in the form of<br />

portraits. Each is so vivid that the characters<br />

shimmer through the speakers like holographic<br />

images, dancing (as holograms do) as<br />

they are conjured by Longendyke’s pianism.<br />

They are interspersed – as are Green’s – in<br />

sets of Debussy’s Préludes. The most eloquent<br />

moments come during the set that begins<br />

with the Prélude Voiles, through Williams’<br />

Yvar to Les sons et les parfums tournenet<br />

dans l’air du soir.<br />

Raul da Gama<br />

Voyages (Debussy; Alice Ping Yee Ho)<br />

Philip Chiu<br />

ATMA ACD2 2844 (atmaclassique.com/en)<br />

! In 2023, Philip<br />

Chiu, pianist,<br />

Montreal resident<br />

and inaugural<br />

recipient of<br />

the generous Prix<br />

Goyer, was once<br />

again fêted,<br />

this time with<br />

a JUNO award<br />

for Fables (ATMA Classique). Boldy jumping<br />

generations, continents and styles in<br />

both showcasing and finding the synergies<br />

between the work of Maurice Ravel<br />

and the Anishinaabekwe composer Barbara<br />

Assiginaak in a single recorded artefact,<br />

Fables proved a musically satisfying<br />

enough formula that Chiu has revisited this<br />

interdisciplinary idea with <strong>2024</strong>’s equally<br />

excellent Voyages. Here, handling the music<br />

of Claude Debussy and Alice Ping Yee Ho<br />

with equal aplomb, Chiu puts forth a “deeply<br />

personal album” that explores in sound the<br />

notion of belonging.<br />

As a Chinese native, transplanted<br />

Torontonian and a long-time Quebecer, the<br />

reflective idea of nostalgia – perhaps for a<br />

place, time or community that may be here<br />

or may not yet have materialized – is woven<br />

throughout the recording. Take, for example,<br />

Ho’s three-part suite Hong Kong Nostalgia<br />

that through tempo, key and changing<br />

compositional forms affords Chiu opportunity<br />

to, as he states in the liner notes, “attempt to<br />

capture something elusive to me: a sense of<br />

belonging.” Just as there is a kind of searching<br />

aesthetic present compositionally in this<br />

suite – from the Connaught Centre to The Ten<br />

Thousand Buddhas Monastery to that city’s<br />

Night Markets – there is an introspective and<br />

wanderlust quality to Chiu’s playing as he<br />

plumbs the compositional depths through<br />

an exploration of “reflections and musings.”<br />

What is beautifully captured, however, is<br />

Chiu’s distinct touch, playful mastery of the<br />

instrument and ongoing creativity.<br />

Andrew Scott<br />

MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY<br />

Known and Unknown – solo piano works by<br />

Rodney Sharman<br />

Rachel Kiyo Iwaasa<br />

Redshift Records TK539<br />

(rodneysharman.com)<br />

Patrick Giguere – Intimes Exubérances<br />

Cheryl Duvall<br />

Redshift Records TK545<br />

(patrickgiguere.ca)<br />

Nova Pon – Symphonies of Mother and<br />

Child<br />

Turning Point Ensemble; Owen Underhill<br />

Redshift Records TK564 (novapon.com)<br />

! Rounding up<br />

some of Redshift’s<br />

recent releases<br />

we see that this<br />

West Coast label<br />

continues to<br />

bring significant<br />

Canadian compositions<br />

to light with<br />

impressive frequency.<br />

To enjoy the whimsical ingenuity of Rodney<br />

Sharman’s work on Known and Unknown,<br />

even before you listen to a single note or<br />

phrase played by pianist Rachel Kiyo Iwaasa<br />

who interprets his whimsy, you may be well<br />

advised to consider everything that is part<br />

of the known world to be unknown. Such is<br />

the bewilderment and wonder of his music<br />

that the very air around you may be filled<br />

with green people, with crimson eyes and<br />

glittering silver and golden hair – a kind of<br />

ecstasy experienced should you dare let a<br />

proverbial genie out of a prismatic bottle.<br />

For instance, in the first three parts of the<br />

recording fabled – and real – operatic characters<br />

from Monteverdi, Puccini, and Wagner<br />

– yes, even Wagner, whose dogma was cast<br />

in bronze – are turned inside out. Genders<br />

are not merely reversed but inverted so that<br />

characters are imbued with wholly new<br />

personalities.<br />

Now imagine what this might do with<br />

your senses, set free of convention. Suddenly<br />

– even if you are stuck in conventions that<br />

are long dead – you can revel in beauty of<br />

an unexpected kind, be awestruck by love of<br />

a different sort, experiencing music played<br />

– no! sung – by a pianist who uses a tangy<br />

inimitable harmonic language to drive you to<br />

the delightful madness of a new, full-blooded<br />

romanticism, like a spell cast by Sharman’s<br />

bewitching compositions.<br />

On Intimes Exubérances Cheryl Duvall’s<br />

highly inflected interpretations of Patrick<br />

Giguère’s laudable compositions are of a<br />

different kind than the pianistic expressions<br />

of the music reviewed above. The<br />

repertoire is, of course, equally impressive<br />

but as befits the tenor and meaning of the<br />

work, what is impressive here is not just the<br />

magnificent and<br />

reactive pianism<br />

on show, but also<br />

Duvall’s maturity.<br />

Her performances<br />

of the four sections<br />

of this work<br />

possess a stunning<br />

èlan: magnificently<br />

ethereal in Partie I – à la frontière d<br />

l’intangible, by turns, tenderly delicate and<br />

rhythmically rippling in the Partie II – tisser<br />

le présent and with a biting drive in Partie<br />

III – corps, hors de temps. Finally, Partie IV –<br />

lueurs en voix is brilliantly virtuosic, with an<br />

understanding of the striking light and shade<br />

of this movement.<br />

All told, the excellent sound and annotations<br />

tilt the balance dramatically in favour of<br />

Duvall’s serious and enlivening artistry.<br />

Composers who<br />

venture into the<br />

realm of chamber<br />

work do so at their<br />

own peril, especially<br />

when they de<br />

rigueur must live up<br />

to the brilliant standards<br />

set by older<br />

contemporaries and<br />

look over their shoulders at past masters such<br />

as Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and Bartók. But<br />

Nova Pon, for one, has gone past intimidation<br />

to produce a long piece World Within, and<br />

the significant five-movement Symphonies of<br />

Mother and Child.<br />

It is clear from the first strains of World<br />

Within that the composer knows the importance<br />

of embracing the past while going her<br />

own way. The swirling gestures at the outset<br />

are like jolts of Bartók that quickly give way<br />

to Pon’s forceful and expressive sound world.<br />

Likewise, the organically arranged five movements<br />

of Symphonies of Mother and Child<br />

give the correct impression of being an<br />

intensely felt work from solemn to invigorating<br />

ideas, with ample contrapuntal interplay<br />

to keep the narratives rich and layered.<br />

The performers of the Turning Point<br />

Ensemble show how masterfully attuned to<br />

the vision and artistry of Nova Pon and how<br />

deeply they have interiorised this music in<br />

their idiomatically turned-out recital.<br />

Raul da Gama<br />

Brent Lee – Homstal<br />

Brent Lee; Various Artists<br />

Centrediscs CMCCD32223 (cmccanada.<br />

org/shop/homstal)<br />

! Windsor<br />

Ontario composer<br />

and media artist<br />

Brent Lee’s work<br />

explores relationships<br />

among music,<br />

image and technology,<br />

especially<br />

through multimedia<br />

66 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


performance. A professor of Integrated<br />

Media in the School of Creative Arts at the<br />

University of Windsor, he’s composed music<br />

for orchestra, interactive media and film<br />

soundtracks.<br />

Lee’s recent work integrates electroacoustic<br />

composition, improvisation, saxophone<br />

performance, videography, Max<br />

computer programming and field recording.<br />

His Homstal project reflects those interests.<br />

Homstal, the Old English word meaning<br />

“home” or “homestead,” reflects that much<br />

of the work on this project was accomplished<br />

at his studio in rural Ontario. While the six<br />

Homstal album tracks are studio productions,<br />

each can be presented as an audiovisual<br />

environment allowing for improvisation and<br />

site-specific variation.<br />

In his liner notes Lee acknowledges that<br />

Homstal “grew directly out of my work with<br />

my friends in the Noiseborder Ensemble and I<br />

am grateful for their generous collaboration. …<br />

Martin Schiller plays electric bass on Overtro<br />

and Aaron Eichler plays the long snare drum<br />

sample used in DOT 1000.”<br />

A quiet, chill, non-metric chamber jazz<br />

vibe presides over the album articulated by<br />

Lee’s eloquent sax playing and his chosen<br />

harmonic textures. The opening track for<br />

instance begins with soft spacialised sax key<br />

clack sounds, joined by a wandering cantabile<br />

soprano sax melody featuring sustained notes<br />

delicately ornamented with alternate fingerings.<br />

A seemingly un-metred treble melody<br />

on upright piano is then added; in turn the<br />

whole is deftly contextualised by several<br />

layers of electronic sounds.<br />

A dreamy Southwestern Ontario mist<br />

seems to have settled on Lee’s Homstal music.<br />

Andrew Timar<br />

Anthony Rozankovic – Origami<br />

Louise Bessette<br />

ATMA ACD2 2895 (atmaclassique.com/en)<br />

! Friends in<br />

Montreal have<br />

spoken for years<br />

about composer<br />

Anthony<br />

Rozankovich so it’s<br />

a delight to finally<br />

have a collection of<br />

his music to display<br />

some of this talent. Origami is an album of<br />

his music for solo piano performed with<br />

enormous dedication, virtuosity and sensitivity<br />

by Louise Bessette.<br />

Some of these works began life as film<br />

scores and others were composed as concert<br />

pieces; most are between three and four<br />

minutes long but a few are longer. Accessible<br />

but sophisticated, Rozankovich’s music<br />

displays his deep understanding of the<br />

building blocks of music: this is tonal, lyrical<br />

music but not at all facile or predictable.<br />

The listener is rewarded over and over again<br />

with gorgeous moments of introspection and<br />

nostalgia, complex counterpoint, some grit<br />

and even some humour. The composer has a<br />

fondness for waltz-like episodes but always he<br />

shows us his delicious mastery of harmony,<br />

taking us in unexpected directions and into<br />

curious sidebars.<br />

As a favourite, I might choose the<br />

thoughtful nostalgia of Avenue Zéro or<br />

Errance but I also love the fusion-inspired<br />

Andalouse Running Shoes and the quirky and<br />

rhapsodic Pigeon Biset (Rock Dove) which<br />

is available online but not on the disc itself.<br />

If there’s a shortcoming to this collection, it<br />

might be that the music is too interesting to<br />

use as background music and requires time to<br />

enjoy. It’s time well spent.<br />

Fraser Jackson<br />

What Brings You In<br />

Leslie Ting; Various Artists<br />

People Places Records PPR | 045<br />

(peopleplacesrecords.bandcamp.com)<br />

! Toronto-based<br />

violinist and interdisciplinary<br />

artist<br />

Leslie Ting’s creative<br />

output has incorporated<br />

elements<br />

of installation and<br />

theatre as much<br />

as pure musical<br />

expression. Her unusual career trajectory<br />

is also of note. After working as a licensed<br />

optometrist, from 2013-2017 she served as<br />

Associate Principal Second violinist in the<br />

Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony Orchestra.<br />

Ting’s theatre work Speculation layered<br />

the music of John Cage and Beethoven with<br />

a monologue and projections to tell the story<br />

of her mother “slowly losing her vision, while<br />

[Leslie] makes a career change to pursue her<br />

dream of becoming a professional musician.”<br />

An unconventional, ambitious debut album<br />

What Brings You In is much more than a<br />

violin recital of contemporary repertoire.<br />

Calling it, “A violinist confronts the noise<br />

of her psyche in an electroacoustic soundscape,”<br />

Ting operates both as a director and<br />

performer in the project, employing talk<br />

therapy, hypnotherapy, dreamwork, sandplay,<br />

somatics and reiki in her creative process<br />

with her co-musicians.<br />

Having been produced as a live theatrical<br />

event and a web-based installation,<br />

for this five-track audio recording of What<br />

Brings You In Ting has collaborated with<br />

several Canadian musicians: Germaine Liu on<br />

percussion and amplified sandbox, while Matt<br />

Smith, Rose Bolton and Julia Mermelstein<br />

provided electronic sounds, the latter two also<br />

contributing compositions.<br />

The album also features Ting as eloquent<br />

solo violinist, beginning with Linda Catlin<br />

Smith’s delicately austere violin and percussion<br />

composition Dirt Road. Bolton’s<br />

What we're listening to this month:<br />

thewholenote.com/listening<br />

Sibelius 2 & 5<br />

Yannick Nézet-Seguin, Orchestre<br />

Métropolitain<br />

A striking fusion of national<br />

romanticism, patriotic wind and<br />

artistic maturity in these iconic<br />

symphonies, with concentration<br />

and austerity.<br />

...of dreams unveiled<br />

Clare Longendyke<br />

Debussy's Piano Préludes curated<br />

alongside music of Amy Williams<br />

and Anthony R. Green for a debut<br />

"rich in nuance, texture, and shape"<br />

(Textura).<br />

Voyages<br />

Philip Chiu<br />

Explore intimate and universal<br />

territories through the<br />

spellbinding notes of this album,<br />

woven from memories, family<br />

stories and musical reveries.<br />

Nova Pon:<br />

Symphonies of Mother and Child<br />

Turning Point Ensemble<br />

From classical roots, the composer's<br />

contemporary, personal voice<br />

blossoms in beautifully rich, acutely<br />

sensitive, deftly organized music<br />

-- powerful emotional journeys for<br />

soloistic chamber orchestra.<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 67


Beholding for solo violin and electronics<br />

follows the composer’s sometimes turbulent<br />

internal therapeutic transformation.<br />

Mermelstein’s Folds in Crossings couches<br />

Ting’s violin performance in orchestral<br />

sounding electronic textures, culminating in<br />

a final peaceful violin sigh.<br />

Andrew Timar<br />

MC Maguire – Dystophilia<br />

MC Maguire Orchestra/CPU<br />

Neuma 190 (neumarecords.org)<br />

! The other day<br />

when I heard<br />

my neighbour’s<br />

pounding bass<br />

(something pop,<br />

disco or otherwise<br />

annoying)<br />

I responded<br />

by turning<br />

Dystophilia, M.C. Maguire’s new release, up<br />

to 11; the battle ended soon after. He offers<br />

sound-pressure supremacy that out-cools<br />

whatever tired torch song or clichéd show<br />

tune my neighbour enjoys. As a pacifist I<br />

don’t relish these battles, and only engage<br />

when the next-door volume is too high for<br />

my peaceful soul, but Maguire’s Yummy<br />

World (track one, followed by Another Lucid<br />

Dream) provides sonic delight as well as firepower.<br />

That said, I caution against the all-out<br />

assault: this is rich and textured music, so<br />

while high-volume might be your thing,<br />

you’ll possibly miss some of the depths if you<br />

indulge in your kink too much. You do you,<br />

though, no judgement.<br />

Gone are the days, I think, when record<br />

executives would target sound thieves in their<br />

war on audio crime (aka creativity). There’s<br />

just way too much borrowing or sampling<br />

today. They all make a mint on streaming<br />

platforms, anyway, enjoying profits from the<br />

Justin Biebers of the industry. How can they<br />

prevent Robin Hoodlums like Maguire from<br />

using a tune like Yummy to generate the<br />

mind-blowing soundscape presented here?<br />

Do I hear the Beebs? Arguable. What I definitely<br />

hear is pop-mageddon, a kind of hyperlayered<br />

riff on every aspect of the aesthetic.<br />

One reviewer references (or steals, I think)<br />

John Oswald’s term “plunderphonics;”<br />

Oswald got in trouble with another Michael,<br />

the late King of pop. I’d be disappointed<br />

to learn either that Maguire had received<br />

warning shots across his bow, or worse,<br />

had bowed to the power of Big Music’s<br />

money managers and received permission<br />

to extrapolate the stuff he uses/sends up/<br />

improves. Anyway, the result is exciting, even<br />

if not used in battle.<br />

Max Christie<br />

Jan Järvlepp – Sonix and Other Tonix<br />

Various Artists<br />

Navona Records nv6603 (navonarecords.<br />

com)<br />

! Ottawa-based<br />

Jan Järvlepp is<br />

an experienced<br />

composer, freelance<br />

and orchestral<br />

cellist, teacher<br />

and recording<br />

technician. After<br />

completing a<br />

doctorate in<br />

composition and 20th century avant-garde<br />

music, he began composing in the neotonal<br />

style instead, incorporating accessible<br />

classical, contemporary, world, folk,<br />

jazz, pop and rock music styles for various<br />

instrumentations.<br />

Sonix, composed for the Mexican Ónix<br />

ensemble, combines elements from two of<br />

his earlier works. Performed here by Trio<br />

Casals with guests Chelsey Menig flute and<br />

Antonello DiMatteo clarinet, there’s exciting<br />

listening throughout with opening fast<br />

tonal minimalistic lines, a middle section<br />

with supportive piano background below<br />

calming lyrical flute, and repeated accented<br />

descending short lines to closing loud<br />

rock chord. Trio Casals perform Trio No. 3,<br />

Järvlepp’s three movement musical protest<br />

against the rise of surveillance. The first<br />

movement Surveillance Cameras Everywhere<br />

features repeated piano rhythms with<br />

accented instrument shots imitating surveillance<br />

cameras snapping pictures.<br />

Nishikawa Ensemble performs Shinkansen,<br />

a two-movement ride on a Japanese bullet<br />

train musically driven here by short percussive<br />

hits. Members of the Benda Quartet<br />

perform Trio No.5, for violin, viola and cello,<br />

Järvlepp’s protest over the COVID shutdown<br />

rules. Strength in the Face of Adversity has<br />

a classically-influenced violin melody, and<br />

the constant rhythmic backdrop keeps the<br />

tense music and listener moving during the<br />

shutdown.<br />

The solo piano Insect Drive was composed<br />

at home during lockdown with Järvlepp’s<br />

self-described “treble sounds and bouncy<br />

rhythms.” It is performed here by Anna<br />

Kislitsyna. Trio Casals returns for In<br />

Memoriam, a respectful, caring, sad lyrical<br />

compositional tribute for his late brother.<br />

Tiina Kiik<br />

Realm<br />

Allison Burik<br />

Independent (allisonburik.bandcamp.com)<br />

! As a genderfixed<br />

male, I bear<br />

some shadowy<br />

traits that may<br />

include misogyny,<br />

and certainly some<br />

measure of toxicity;<br />

these are my boulder on the slope, if you’ll<br />

allow it. And how might this disclosure<br />

bear on this review? I can’t deny that I was<br />

reluctant or even unwilling to engage with<br />

Realm, featuring the music and performance<br />

of Allison Burik. Such subtext as one can<br />

read in the liner notes and source materials<br />

of the disc’s inspirations would indicate a<br />

staunch, maybe even aggressive, feminism in<br />

the author, with a certain degree of warning<br />

of the potential cost of being a disrespectful<br />

male. Track 6, Heiemo og Nykken, references<br />

a folk tale wherein an attempted seduction<br />

of N by H (the dark spirit of the deeps) ends<br />

badly for H(im).<br />

But, you see, it’s all deeply beautiful, if<br />

mostly sombre. The multi-abled Burik plays<br />

and sings overlays of bass clarinet, alto sax<br />

and flute, as well as guitar. Their voice is true,<br />

although there is a risky low low alto vocal<br />

that pairs in fantastic fragmenting unison<br />

pitch with the bass clarinet. Beware such<br />

witchery! It’s potent.<br />

I am enamored of the kind of instrumentalism<br />

where beauty of tone results from<br />

musicianship, and only in its service. Such<br />

is the approach I hear here; I believe we are<br />

all in some ways vain, but mostly it’s just<br />

better to be good. Burik makes the instruments<br />

work, with surprising and fascinating<br />

techniques.<br />

I could go on, but you won’t benefit from<br />

reading more description, and there are<br />

confines I would exceed. Better you should<br />

grab the disc, the beauty outbids the fearsomeness.<br />

The final track is built around a<br />

poem by Sappho, and it’s stunning.<br />

Max Christie<br />

Three Cellos<br />

Kenneth Kirschner<br />

Greyfade (greyfade.com)<br />

! Recentlyfounded<br />

creative<br />

record label<br />

Greyfade has taken<br />

contemporary<br />

music production<br />

and financial<br />

compensation<br />

ethics to a new<br />

level; they are<br />

refusing to stream.<br />

Not on any platform<br />

will you find their presentations; they offer<br />

downloads only. As described by Greyfade’s<br />

founder Joseph Branciforte when explaining<br />

some of the reasoning behind the download-only<br />

access, he refers to the resurgence<br />

of vinyl being the most intimate, commercial-free<br />

listening experience: “…in the digital<br />

realm, we believe that the direct download<br />

model most closely mirrors this private interaction<br />

and should be the preferred mode of<br />

exchange.” By avoiding the financial dissuasions<br />

of streaming, the label is committed to<br />

an artist-led production that hopes to fairly<br />

compensate creators for their work.<br />

68 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


Although the hard copy of the accompanying<br />

linen-bound book was not available<br />

for this review, the PDF featured 87 pages<br />

of casually written blog-like descriptions of<br />

the process, beginning with the uncertainty<br />

of converting Kirschner’s digital composition<br />

Three Cellos to Branciforte’s painstakingly<br />

detailed transcriptions, to then being<br />

precisely interpreted by cellist Christopher<br />

Gross. The book may not be a gripping read<br />

for the average listener, but it does shed some<br />

interesting light on the process, the details<br />

and the complexities of composing and then<br />

notating from various MIDI sources. In the<br />

composer’s own words: “The primary challenge<br />

with transcribing my work is, of course,<br />

the total lack of metric structure… It’s not that<br />

the meters are strange or difficult – it’s that<br />

they’re just not there at all.”<br />

This album will take some gentle peeling<br />

back to reveal the qualities it hopes to share,<br />

namely the dedication and craftsmanship<br />

that was poured into this translation from<br />

digital composition to acoustic interpretation.<br />

I might have enjoyed having access to<br />

the original MIDI compositions in order to<br />

fully appreciate the transformation. The nine<br />

tracks bear similarities but repeated deep<br />

listening slowly unfolds the nuances and<br />

range of energy played with supreme skill,<br />

precision and sensitivity by cellist Gross. A<br />

standout track is Part 3, the most dynamic<br />

and accessible in form.<br />

Cheryl Ockrant<br />

Melia Watras – Play/Write<br />

Melia Watras; Various Artists<br />

Planet M Records PMR-005<br />

(meliawatras.com/playwrite-album)<br />

! In the midst of<br />

contemporary classical<br />

music releases<br />

that tend to bank on<br />

a cerebral approach<br />

to music, here is an<br />

album that requires<br />

listening with one’s<br />

heart. Exploring the relationship between<br />

words and music, and close collaborations<br />

with composers, performers, writers and<br />

poets, Play / Write unfolds an exquisite world<br />

in which beauty and dreams flirt with sorrow.<br />

Compositions by Melia Watras (also a superb<br />

violist), Frances White and Leilehua Lanzilotti<br />

focus on strings and involve texts by Herbert<br />

Woodward Martin, James Pritchett, Luce<br />

Irigaray and Michael Jinsoo Lim (who also<br />

plays violin) forming a close bond between<br />

what is felt and what is just implied.<br />

The album opens with Watras’ 5 Poems<br />

of Herbert Woodward Martin (for narrator,<br />

violin and viola). Watras has a particular<br />

knack for string writing, expertly using<br />

colours and timbres to create melodic and<br />

textural vignettes that underline the flow of<br />

Martin’s wonderful poetry, spoken theatrically<br />

and amusingly by Carrie Henneman<br />

Shaw. Performances by Watras and Lim<br />

are sensuous and beautiful, particularly in<br />

Frances White’s As night falls for violin, viola,<br />

narrator and electronic sounds. This poignant<br />

piece follows the memories of the female<br />

narrator (Sheila Daniels) as she lays on her<br />

deathbed. The boundaries between a dream<br />

world and reality are dissolved with a juxtaposition<br />

of the background and foreground<br />

sounds, that is so brilliant we feel intimately<br />

involved in its setting. The music adds a<br />

visceral dimension to the beautifully simple<br />

text by James Pritchett, with string segments<br />

going in and out, conversing or lamenting,<br />

and never letting go of the intensity of the<br />

experience. Lanzelotti’s to be two for violin<br />

and viola ends the album’s sonic journey in<br />

serene surrender.<br />

Ivana Popovic<br />

Project Earth: The Blue Chapter<br />

Iris Trio<br />

Centrediscs CMCCD 33924 (cmccanada.<br />

org/shop/cmccd-33924)<br />

! Newfoundland<br />

is poetry and birds<br />

and surf, rocks and<br />

accents and music.<br />

This disc, from the<br />

Iris Trio, performing<br />

the music of jazz<br />

pianist Florian<br />

Hoefner, and<br />

including the poems of Don McKay, provides<br />

a window opening into the experience of<br />

being there, reminding the listener to seek<br />

what is wild or untainted, if anything of that<br />

nature remains to be found.<br />

Artistic activity that attempts what Blue<br />

Chapter does, whether effectual or not,<br />

always makes me sad. Fortunately in this<br />

instance, it doesn’t also provoke grumbles;<br />

rather, I can just listen and forget that the<br />

world these artists want to help us appreciate<br />

may already be gone. Consider the lament<br />

McKay has written for the now extinct Great<br />

Auk, whose calls were described in words by<br />

naturalists; they died out before the advent of<br />

sound recording. Spoken word followed by a<br />

musical soundscape, both words and musical<br />

cries make us lament what we missed. The<br />

sadness isn’t that we don’t know what the<br />

cry was like, but that we never will. In Song<br />

for the Song of the Great Auk the pathos<br />

is undeniable. Kudos to all three players<br />

(Christine Carter on clarinet, violist Zoë<br />

Martin-Doike and pianist Anna Petrova) for<br />

their confident and calm expression.<br />

In his note in the liner material, McKay<br />

ruefully comments on his approximate<br />

success in staying “on cue” (“with the beat”<br />

for the musicians among us). It’s fun to<br />

imagine him struggling on the learning curve<br />

with the band, and managing at a far better<br />

rate than his self-assigned 70%.<br />

And there are fun tracks too, there are<br />

joyful expressions, there’s a Newfie kitchen<br />

What we're listening to this month:<br />

thewholenote.com/listening<br />

Sonix and Other Tonix<br />

Jan Järvlepp<br />

Approachable and intriguing<br />

contemporary chamber music<br />

in exciting performances by US,<br />

Czech, Japanese and Canadian<br />

players - a true international fusion<br />

of styles and influences.<br />

Ebony Chants<br />

Paolo Marchettini<br />

Rome born, New York based<br />

composer and clarinetist turns his<br />

attention to his own instrument<br />

and works, highlighting his lyricism<br />

and deft integration of different<br />

aesthetic approaches.<br />

Crescent<br />

Kamala Sankaram<br />

Summoning a wide array of<br />

timbres, styles, composed and<br />

improvised performances, the<br />

album traces the impact of human<br />

technologies on the natural world.<br />

Takács Assad Labro<br />

Takács String Quartet; Clarice<br />

Assad; Julien Labro<br />

What happens when a great string<br />

quartet, an exciting composer/<br />

performer and one of the world's<br />

premiere bandeonists get<br />

together? MAGIC!<br />

thewholenote.com <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> | 69


party among the nesting birds on the islands.<br />

Forgive me for feeling Blue, but that is the<br />

colour of this chapter, the first, says the publicity<br />

material, of three. We look forward to<br />

the next two.<br />

Max Christie<br />

Walter Kaufmann – Piano Concerto No.3;<br />

Symphony No.3<br />

Elisaveta Blumina; Rundfunk-<br />

Sinfonieorchester Berlin; David Robert<br />

Coleman<br />

CPO 555 631-2 (cpo.de)<br />

! After fleeing<br />

Nazism in 1934,<br />

Czech-Jewish<br />

Walter Kaufmann<br />

(1907-1984)<br />

composed and<br />

conducted for radio<br />

in Bombay and<br />

films in London,<br />

then became the Winnipeg Symphony<br />

Orchestra’s first music director (1948-<br />

1957) before teaching ethnomusicology at<br />

Indiana University. When I reviewed the<br />

first-ever CD of his music (The WholeNote,<br />

September 2020), performed by Toronto’s<br />

ARC Ensemble, I wrote, “(I) hope that this<br />

superb CD will inspire more recordings of<br />

Kaufmann’s music.”<br />

That’s exactly what happened! That CD so<br />

“fascinated” Berlin-based conductor David<br />

Robert Coleman that he decided to record<br />

four works selected from Kaufmann’s manuscripts<br />

in Indiana University’s library. Three<br />

of these works reflect Kaufmann’s studies<br />

of Indian ragas, melodies and rhythms,<br />

admiringly incorporated into his essentially<br />

European, late-Romantic compositions, just<br />

like the pieces recorded by the ARC Ensemble.<br />

Symphony No.3 (1936) and An Indian<br />

Symphony (1943) date from Kaufmann’s<br />

years in India. Soulful woodwind solos,<br />

pulsating strings and dramatic brass and<br />

percussion recall the music of solemn Hindu<br />

rituals and jubilant dances that I heard during<br />

three trips to India. Six Indian Miniatures<br />

(1965), dominated by long-lined, wistful<br />

woodwind melodies over slowly throbbing<br />

strings and percussion, ending in boisterous<br />

revelry, testify to Kaufmann’s enduring love of<br />

India’s music.<br />

There’s nothing “Indian” about Kaufmann’s<br />

colourfully exuberant, Ravel-like Piano<br />

Concerto No.3 (1950), two extroverted,<br />

percussive movements framing a contemplative<br />

Andante, brilliantly performed by<br />

Elisaveta Blumina. Conductor Coleman,<br />

echoing my 2020 review, hopes this CD will<br />

help Kaufmann’s music “find the recognition<br />

it deserves.” So do I.<br />

Michael Schulman<br />

Ebony Chants<br />

Paolo Marchettini<br />

New Focus Recordings FCR402<br />

(newfocusrecordings.com)<br />

! Ebony Chants,<br />

featuring the music<br />

of clarinetist Paolo<br />

Marchettini, is a<br />

day in the life of the<br />

second-most listenable<br />

woodwind<br />

(after bassoon).<br />

It opens with the<br />

first of Due Canti:<br />

Il canto del giorno, and closes, after much<br />

business and play, with the suitably named<br />

counterpart, Il canto della notte.<br />

For several works Marchettini is joined by<br />

Meng Zhang and Ka Hei Chan on clarinet and<br />

Tommy Shermulis on bass clarinet. The parts<br />

are rotated democratically (if the listing order<br />

on the jacket indicates what it seems to). They<br />

are all excellent, and the material is mostly<br />

in brief segments lasting in the range of one<br />

to three minutes. Most delightful are his<br />

Cinque Fanfare Napoletane, which reference<br />

popular traditional melodies with affection<br />

and humour. Nothing is ever trite, although<br />

on the overly-serious side I am less of a fan<br />

of Nec Clari, a somewhat foggy multi-track<br />

overdubbing of the composer’s own playing.<br />

At over six minutes I lose attention (a product<br />

of my times, I admit), and I find his tone<br />

on bass clarinet to be less than compelling.<br />

Shermulis, by contrast, sounds terrific both<br />

as ensemble member and soloist for Entrée,<br />

a tough-sounding solo work. I’d love to hear<br />

him take a swing at Soft, Franco Donatoni’s<br />

work for the same instrument.<br />

Sad to say, the online jacket material<br />

includes only Marchettini’s bio details, not<br />

those of his collaborators, a detail I mentally<br />

file alongside other examples of sub-optimal<br />

digital publishing.<br />

Max Christie<br />

Kamala Sankaram – Crescent<br />

Kamala Sankaram; Andie Tanning;<br />

Ludovica Burtone; Joanna Mattrey; Mariel<br />

Roberts<br />

Neuma 187 (neumarecords.org)<br />

! Listening to<br />

Crescent by Kamala<br />

Sankaram it is<br />

important not to<br />

be blinded by her<br />

use of post-production<br />

techniques and<br />

devices. Focus your<br />

attention instead<br />

on the theme of the programme: the all-tooprescient<br />

demise of humanity by its own<br />

hand raised as if in a defiant gesture aimed at<br />

mastering the fate of spaceship earth.<br />

The programme is divided into two works<br />

– Crescent, a hypnotic and lyrical chronology<br />

of the destruction of the beautiful ecology<br />

of the planet that has forgotten its celestial<br />

creation, terrestrial beauty and artful history.<br />

Cue the poetry of W.B. Yeats here. This is en<br />

route to destruction by manufactured scientific<br />

pseudo-progress. This demise is tracked<br />

by Sankaram’s mesmerising narration of her<br />

Heat Map series, to show how over the past<br />

hundred years or so the planet is hurtling<br />

towards destruction by global warming. This<br />

part of Sankaram’s programme ends with<br />

the clairvoyant, vocal-and-percussion driven<br />

song Crescent delivered in a sotto voce wail.<br />

The second part of the programme features<br />

Sankaram’s voice emerging through a<br />

tremendous arco introduction by a string<br />

quartet. This work is entitled 5 Rasas (rasa<br />

means essence or taste). The pregnant<br />

vibrancy of the bowed introduction redolent<br />

of bells, electronica and field recordings of<br />

the twittering songs of birds, has a mystical<br />

pastoral quality. Sankaram’s vocals emerge<br />

from this prerecorded passage like an electrifying<br />

polytonal scherzo, performed with an<br />

almost mesmeric processional rhythm.<br />

Raul da Gama<br />

Takács Assad Labro<br />

Takács Quartet; Julien Labro; Clarice<br />

Assad<br />

Yarlung Records YAR59691<br />

(yarlungrecords.com)<br />

! The Takács<br />

Quartet was formed<br />

almost 50 years ago<br />

in 1975 in Hungary.<br />

Now based in the<br />

United States,<br />

original member<br />

András Fejér (cello)<br />

is joined by Edward<br />

Dusinberre and<br />

Harumi Rhodes (violins) and Richard O’Neill<br />

(viola). World-renowned for their performances<br />

of traditional mainstream string<br />

quartet repertoire and some contemporary<br />

works, here they expand outside the classical<br />

realm with guests Julien Labro (bandoneon/composition)<br />

and Clarice Assad (piano/<br />

vocals/composition).<br />

The seven compositions jump around stylistically<br />

yet still connect. Circles by Bryce<br />

Dessner begins with Labro’s calming bandoneon<br />

changing to fast florid virtuosic lines<br />

supported by contrasting strings with<br />

detached ascending/descending lines and<br />

rhythmic shots. Labro composed Meditation<br />

No.1 during the pandemic. The lyrical bandoneon<br />

plays held notes above string lines, tight<br />

conversations with strings, bellows shakes<br />

and tango stylings referencing Labro’s respect<br />

for Piazzolla and Saluzzi.<br />

Multi-talented Clarice Assad is represented<br />

by three works here. She composed<br />

and performs Luminous from Pendulum<br />

Suite for solo piano where the fast percussive<br />

piano start leads to modulating lines drawn<br />

from Brazilian jazz supporting her rhythmic<br />

scat-like vocalizations. Constellation is a<br />

70 | <strong>June</strong>, <strong>July</strong> & <strong>August</strong> <strong>2024</strong> thewholenote.com


three-movement work for piano and violin to<br />

be played in any order. The final track, Assad’s<br />

Clash, is inspired by society’s stressful social<br />

tensions. Intriguing strings at times sound<br />

like solos yet all fit together. A great mix of<br />

snippets of styles and tempi, I like the accents<br />

and string plucks making a “clash” effect, and<br />

the closing dark, grim cello and bandoneon<br />

interchanges. Intriguing works by Milton<br />

Nascimento and Kaija Saariaho are also<br />

included, making for a brilliant, wide-ranging<br />

and colourful disc.<br />

Tiina Kiik<br />

JAZZ AND IMPROVISED<br />

Summertime in Leith – In Concert at the<br />

Historic Leith Church<br />

Paul Novotny; Robi Botos<br />

Triplet Records TR10026-ATMOS<br />

(tripletrecords.com)<br />

! When two of<br />

Canada’s finest,<br />

most skilled and<br />

internationally<br />

acclaimed<br />

jazz musicians<br />

come together in<br />

a performance<br />

of phenomenal<br />

symbiosis, it is an<br />

occasion worthy of celebration. As the title<br />

of this fine recording would suggest, bassist/<br />

producer Paul Novotny and pianist (and<br />

Oscar Peterson protégé) Robi Botos graced the<br />

stage of the Historic Leith Church in Annan,<br />

Ontario on Georgian Bay and performed<br />

much loved compositions for an enraptured<br />

audience. With exquisite production, all of<br />

the electricity and spontaneity of the live<br />

event has been captured here.<br />

Six dynamic tracks are included in<br />

the recording – each one a rare jewel.<br />

Appropriately Gershwin’s Summertime opens<br />

the programme. The arrangement begins<br />

with a deep, languid bass pizzicato, which<br />

intertwines with diaphanous upper register<br />

piano keys as the tune morphs into a sensual,<br />

timeless journey. Novotny’s solo is lyrical,<br />

facile and loaded with emotional colours, and<br />

Botos answers with deeply rhythmic ideas,<br />

never overplaying.<br />

A stand-out is the duo’s take on Wheatland<br />

from Peterson’s Canadiana Suite. Novotny<br />

and Botos capture the majesty of central<br />

Canada, grooving à la the iconic Peterson<br />

and yet putting their own, contemporary and<br />

harmonically complex stamp on it. Novotny<br />

uses the full scope of his bass to create fluid,<br />

gravitas-laden tones that are imbued with a<br />

profound sense of rhythm and joy, and Botos<br />

is just simply breathtaking.<br />

Another highlight is The Flick which<br />

comes from Earl VanDyke (Motown’s “Soul<br />

Brothers”). This track is pure adrenaline,<br />

excitement and elation, with Novotny relentlessly<br />

laying it down while Botos fearlessly<br />

dives deep into blues and American soul. On<br />

this brilliant and well-produced project, the<br />

pair have created not only an auditory delight,<br />

but healing music for our very souls. Bravo!<br />

Lesley Mitchell-Clarke<br />

Oh Mo