to read the Day 1 PDF - The Hollywood Reporter

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to read the Day 1 PDF - The Hollywood Reporter

ThR.cOM/TORONTO

INDUSTRYWORKS

brings critical acclaim

to the controversial

AMERICAN MARY

TORONTO

DAILY

№1

S E P T E M B E R

7, 2 0 1 2

AMERICAN MARY

“American Mary is a film not to be missed! A true original modern horror.”

- EatSleepLiveFilm

Industry Works D1_090712.indd 1 9/6/12 2:41 PM


Premiere Entertainment D1_090712.indd 1 9/6/12 11:24 AM


S E P T E M B E R 7, 2 0 1 2

B R E A K I N G

N E W S

Metropolitan takes Land

of Hope for France

Zellweger

To Helm

First Film

By Tatiana Siegel

RENEE ZELLWEGER

is moving behind

the camera.

The actress will make her

directorial debut with the

comedy 4 1/2 Minutes. Zellweger

also will star

alongside Johnny

Knoxville in the

film that is set in

Zellweger New York’s standup

comedy world.

The film’s financing and

sales deal was finished Thursday

between K5 International

and Kevin Frakes’ PalmStar

Media Capital.

Knoxville will play Jimmy

Bennett, a commitmentphobic,

train-wreck comedian

whose life is falling apart when

he takes a job looking after the

genius son of single mom P.J.

Andersen (Zellweger).

Written by Anthony Tambakis

(Warrior) and based on the

comedy of real-life stand-up

Dov Davidoff. The film will be

produced by Frakes, Zellweger

and Tambakis through their

All Together Now banner.

Production will kick off in

February in New York.

K5 is presenting the

project to buyers at TIFF.

CAA is handling North

American rights.

The project marks the third

collaboration for Zellweger

and Tambakis, who recently

received a pilot order for their

original series Cinnamon Girl.

Zellweger also will star in the

upcoming Broadway adaptation

of The Hustler, written by

Tambakis and to be directed by

Gavin O’Connor. THR

Cohen Media snaps up U.S.

rights to thriller Capital

Exclusive Media Launches

U.S.Distribution Shingle

New outfit will be dubbed Exclusive Releasing By Scott Roxborough and Tatiana Siegel

THERE’S A NEW

player in the domestic

distribution and

acquisitions arena.

Exclusive Media is Brodlie

launching Exclusive

Releasing, a U.S. distribution

company to be headed

by veteran executives Scott

Pascucci and Matt Brodlie. Pascucci

Insiders say Exclusive Releasing

Joseph Gordon-Levitt

greets the fans before the

opening night screening of

Rian Johnson’s Looper at

the Toronto International

Film Festival.

Eli Roth to Produce Up-and-Coming

Horror Director Ti West’s Sacrament

By Scott Roxborough and Pamela McClintock

HORRORMEISTER ELI ROTH HAS SIGNED ON

to produce and present The Sacrament, a

horror thriller from director Ti West.

Worldview Entertainment, which is building

an impressive slate of projects, will finance and

produce the film, while IM Global will handle

international sales through its genre label Octane.

1

Penelope Wilton joins cast

of Amma Asante’s Belle

Films’ distribution division,

giving it instant

infrastructure.

Pascucci, who recently

joined Exclusive from

Grove Street Prods., will

serve as president and chief

operating officer. Brodlie

will head up acquisitions,

as he did for Paramount.

The move comes on the eve of

S E E T H R .COM/TO RONTO

FOR FULL STO R I E S

TORONTO

№1

Festival, where Exclusive Releasing

will be on the prowl for pickups

to feed its new release slate.

Parent company Exclusive

Media has three of its own films

in official selection in Toronto: the

crime drama End of Watch starring

Jake Gyllenhaal and Michael

Pena, which Open Road Films will

bow in the U.S.; Ramin Bahrani’s

At Any Price, featuring Dennis

likely will acquire Millennium the Toronto International Film

CONTINUED ON PAGE 6

ABOUT TOWN

buyers at the Toronto International

Film Festival. CAA is repping domestic

rights.

Roth didn’t give many details of the

Roth project except to say Sacrament would be

“Ti’s first mainstream movie, without sacrificing the

quality and unflinching horror of the subject matter.”

Added Worldview CEO Christopher Woodrow, “Ti

IM Global will introduce the film to foreign CONTINUED ON PAGE 6

day1_newsA.indd 1 9/6/12 9:03 PM

LOOPER: GEORGE PIMENTEL/CONTRIBUTOR


the REPORT

Sexy Girls 25 Years in the Making

Veteran screenwriter —

and Hollywood mom —

Naomi Foner makes

directing debut at 66

By Tatiana Siegel

ON ONE OF THE FINAL DAYS

of shooting Very Good

Girls, director Naomi

Foner bobbed ever so slightly on

a moving pier in New York’s Port

Authority Ferry Terminal — a

trippy effect that induced a wave

of vertigo in anyone watching.

Even the film’s star Dakota

Fanning admitted she felt the

rocking sensation hours after the

marathon shoot while lying in bed.

Despite the shaky terrain,

Foner remained surefooted, an apt

metaphor for a woman making her

feature directorial debut at the age

of 66. Entrusted with a $10 million

budget and a buzzy cast that also

includes indie “It” girl Elizabeth

Olsen, Ellen Barkin, Richard

Dreyfuss and Demi Moore,

Foner blocked out the chaos and

uncertainty and brought her longgestating

project to life.

“We have a joke in my family

that I’m probably the first

grandmother to direct her

Popular Children’s Book Tale Dark

& Grimm Headed to Big Screen

By Pamela McClintock

FILMNATION ENTERTAINMENT AND

Kamala Films are teaming to turn Adam

Gidwitz’s popular children’s book A Tale

Dark & Grimm into a live-action feature.

Jon Gunn (My Date With Drew) and

John W. Mann (Mercy Streets) will write the

adapted screenplay.

Gidwitz’s original frightening and witty

story — inspired by the Brothers Grimm —

follows the adventures of two unsuspecting

children who hold the key to breaking out of

the Dark Ages.

FilmNation has acquired film rights to the

book and will partner with Marissa McMahon

of Kamala Films in financing and producing

Dark & Grimm alongside FilmNation Entertainment’s

Aaron Ryder and Karen Lunder.

first feature,” Foner said during

shooting, referring to her

famous offspring, Jake and Maggie

Gyllenhaal, and son-in-law

Peter Sarsgaard.

K5 is screening footage of the

film to international buyers at

the Toronto Film Festival, where

it already is garnering heat. The

film inked a deal with SWEN

for Latin America and also has

sold in such territories as Russia,

the Czech Republic, Israel and

the Middle East, South Africa,

Greece, Portugal, Iceland, India,

Singapore and Indonesia.

Foner is no stranger to the

film business, boasting a long

2

and successful career as a

screenwriter with such credits

as Losing Isaiah and Bee Season

as well as an Oscar nomination

for Running on Empty. When

she wrote Very Good Girls nearly

three decades ago, she had no

idea that the coming-of-age

story would take such a labyrinthine

journey to fruition.

The extraordinary thing about

Naomi is she fought for 25 years

to make this movie,” explains the

film’s producer Michael London

(Sideways). “It’s a sexy movie

about girls on the cusp of adult

sexuality. I’m surprised it took as

long as it did. By my standards, it

“We have been searching for distinctive

source material for our first family

project. Said Ryder, “We found this in Gidwitz’s

witty manuscript and look forward to

nurturing the project with our partners at

Kamala Films.”

Added McMahon: “Gidwitz’s A Tale Dark

& Grimm is a smart, addictive and hilariously

gruesome narrative that turns familiar

fairy tales on their head, much to the delight

of both children and parents. I’m looking

forward to joining Mann, Gunn and the

FilmNation team to bring this fantastically

original story to the big screen.”

Mann and Gunn are working with

Universal on Chernin Entertainment’s The

Nutcracker as well as an original animated

CONTINUED ON PAGE6

Dakota Fanning and

Boyd Holbrook star in

the sexually charged

Very Good Girls.

felt commercial.”

After falling in love with

Foner’s script, London came

aboard the project a year ago,

helped untangle the rights from

its longtime home at Sony and

brought deep-pocketed financier

Norton Herrick into the mix.

The story revolves around two

high school seniors (Fanning

and Olsen) looking to lose their

virginity during the course of

the summer after graduation.

Although that setup has long

been a staple of male-driven teen

comedies, there has been scant

interest from studios to tackle the

female take on going all the way.

“How often have we seen

that flustered mother character

catching her son (masturbating)

and saying, ‘What am I going to

do with him?’” jokes Olsen of the

well-worn genre.

“What’s interesting is that

opportunities are opening up in

what I like to call the third act

of one’s life,” adds Foner. “We

are perfectly capable. We are

intelligent, and we have a lot of

experience and wisdom. I think

it’s a terrible shame not to make

use of that.” THR

Pike, Plummer

Join Hector

By Tatiana Siegel

ROSAMUND PIKE AND CHRISTOPHER

Plummer are becoming happy

campers.

The pair are joining the cast of Peter

Chelsom’s dramedy Hector and the Search

for Happiness.

Simon Pegg has already signed on to play

the lead in the film, which Solution Entertainment

Group is presenting to buyers at

the Toronto International Film Festival.

UTA is repping U.S. rights.

Pegg plays Hector, an eccentric yet irresistible

London psychiatrist in crisis.

Pike will portray his long-term girlfriend,

while Plummer, coming off his Oscar win

for Beginners, is taking on the role of Professor

Coreman, leading guru for Happiness

Studies at UCLA. THR

day1_newsA.indd 2 9/6/12 8:50 PM


The � rst English-language feature � lm from the director of TRICKS

DIRECTOR Andrzej Jakimowski

CAST Edward Hogg (ANONYMOUS)

Alexandra Maria Lara (CONTROL, DOWNFALL)

Melchior Derouet

SCREENINGS

TODAY I Sep 7th I 11:45 I Scotiabank 6 I PRESS & INDUSTRY

Monday I Sep 10th I 21:00 I Cineplex Odeon 3 I WORLD PREMIERE

Wednesday I Sep 12th I 18:00 I Cineplex Odeon 3 I PUBLIC

Thursday I Sep 13th I 14:15 I Scotiabank 6 I PRESS & INDUSTRY

Saturday I Sep 15th I 16:00 I Jackman Hall I PUBLIC

TIFF OFFICE I German Films c/o TIFF Industry Centre I Hyatt Regency Hotel I King Ballroom (Mezzanine Level) I 370 King St. West I Mobile +49 176 1031 26 46

HEAD OFFICE I Gruenwalder Weg 28d I D-82041 Oberhaching I Phone +49 89 673469 - 828 I beta@betacinema.com www.betacinema.com

Beta Cinema D1_090712.indd 1 9/4/12 1:16 PM


the REPORT

T H R A T T O R O N T O

NEWS

Kevin Cassidy

kevin.cassidy@thr.com • +1 323 525 2198

Gregg Kilday

gregg.kilday@thr.com • +1 310 528 3395

Scott Roxborough

scott.roxborough@thr.com • +49 173 260 3692

Etan Vlessing

etan.vlessing@thr.com • 416 588 8388

Pamela McClintock

pamela.mcclintock@thr.com • +1 323 627 0670

Tatiana Siegel

tatiana.siegel@thr.com • +1 310.998.7212

Matthew Belloni

matthew.belloni@thr.com •+1 323 627 0670

Scott Feinberg

Scottfeinberg@hotmail.com •+1 203-907-9036

Leslie Bruce

leslie.bruce@thr.com •+1 310 923 8161

Gary Baum

gary.baum@thr.com • +1 213 840 1661

Stacey Wilson

stacey.wilson@thr.com • 646-937-0450

Erik Pedersen

erik.pedersen@thr.com • +1 323 525 2247

REVIEWERS

Deborah Young

dyoung@mclink.it

David Rooney

drooney@nyc.rr.com

John DeFore

john@johndefore.com

Jordan Mintzer

jpmintzer@mac.com

ART

Emily Johnson

emily.johnson@thr.com • +1 323 525 2247

PHOTO + VIDEO

Jennifer Laski

jennifer.laski@thr.com • +1 917 664 1673

Carrie Smith

carrie.smith@thr.com • +1 917 570 0452

PRODUCTION

Maya Eslami

maya.eslami@thr.com • +1 323 525 2247

SALES

Alison Smith

alison.smith@thr.com • +44 7788 591 781

Victoria Gold

victoria.gold@thr.com • +1 310 746 8508

Jonathon Aubry

jonathon.aubry@thr.com • +1 323 397 3725

Matt Price

matt.price@thr.com • +1 310 428 8071

MARKETING

Kyle Konkoski

kyle.konkoski@thr.com • +1 518 339 5927

Alex More

alex.more@thr.com • +1 917 232 0914

Laura Lorenz

laura.lorenz@thr.com • +1 908 432 9821

THR .com

To download a PDF of the

The Hollywood Reporter’s

Toronto Film Festival,

go to:THR.com/Toronto.

Snoop has a spiritual

experience with local

vegetation in Reincarnated.

Snoop: What I Learned

About Making Movies

The hip-hop icon drops some wisdom after making

Rasta doc Reincarnated By Shirley Halperin

THE DOGGFATHER GOES TO

Jamaica, returns reborn as

Snoop Lion. The story may

sound like it warrants a cymbal

crash at the end, but Snoop

Dogg’s trip to the birthplace of

cultural icon Bob Marley was

anything but a joke.

The 40-year-old rapper, actor,

entrepreneur and, yes, smoker,

headed to the Caribbean island

to write and record music, but

he ended up with a documentary.

Reincarnated which debuts

today. Directed by Andy Capper

for VICE Films and produced by

VICE Media co-founder Suroosh

Alvi along with Snoop’s manager

Ted Chung, the film chronicles a

true rags-to-rap-to-riches story

of the hip hop star born Calvin

Broadus and his quest for selffulfillment

and a sense of place

in the world. Was he, like Marley,

sent to spread a gospel? Is there

deeper meaning to surviving his

gang-banging formative years,

when so many others didn’t? And

when you’ve already accomplished

so much, where do you go

next?As far as his doc is concerned:

Toronto — where Snoop

says he already feels like he won.

“For TIFF to even accept my

movie, that’s enough for me,” he

tells THR. “I never thought my

movie would make it into a festival

with such critically acclaimed

films. This ain’t my lane, but I

love every minute of it.”

4

No stranger to the movie

business having appeared in

such comedies as Soul Plane, Old

School, Starsky & Hutch and The

Wash, Snoop has learned much

about life in front of the camera,

behind the scenes and in the

seats. He lists a few of those

hard-earned lessons below:

ALWAYS BE ON

“Having cameras in your face all

the time is hard because sometimes,

you just want to be left

alone — but that’s why you always

have to be on. You never know

when you’re going to capture that

moment. Then, when you watch it

back at the end of the day and you

see that moment, you’re glad the

cameras were there.”

HIRE A LOCAL DRIVER

The roads in Jamaica — one

false move and you could fall

3,000 feet and no one would ever

find you. We had to have Evel

Knievel driving us because it was

some tricky moves. … I had my

camera guy to the side of me and

it was a great experience.”

STEER THE ROLE, DON’T LET IT

STEER YOU

“One of the hardest things I

learned was that it’s better to

control your own character than

be characterized. With the first

couple of movies I got, I didn’t

CONTINUED ON PAGE6

Demarest

Backs A

Wanted Man

By Pamela McClintock

NEW FINANCING AND

production venture

Demarest Films has

come aboard to co-finance

and co-produce Anton Corbijn’s

espionage saga A Most

Wanted Man, starring Philip

Seymour Hoffman, Rachel

McAdams, Willem Dafoe and

Robin Wright.

Demarest was launched

in April by Sam Englebardt,

Michael Lambert and William

D. Johnson. The company’s

slate also includes

Neil Jordan’s motherdaughter

vampire film Byzantium,

which is premiering

here at Toronto. Byzantium

stars Saoirse Ronan and

Gemma Arterton.

A Most Wanted Man is based

on John le Carre’s acclaimed

novel. Screenwriter Andrew

Bovell adapted it for the

big screen.

The spy thriller is set

in present-day Hamburg,

Germany, where a mysterious

half-Chechen, half-Russian

man, brutally scarred from

torture, surfaces in the city’s

Islamic community, on the

run and desperate for help.

He seeks to recover his late

Russian father’s fortune and

soon connects with a conflicted

British private banker

and a young female lawyer

fiercely determined to

protect the rights of persecuted

emigres.

“A Most Wanted Man is the

perfect addition to Demarest’s

slate of smart, commercially

viable projects,” said Englebardt.

“Andrew Bovell did a

magnificent job adapting one

of Le Carré’s most compelling

and relevant novels. Anton

Corbijn is at the top of his

game and the cast is stellar.”

FilmNation Entertainment

is handling domestic and

international sales. THR

day1_newsA.indd 3 9/6/12 8:50 PM


New Zealand Film Commission D1_090712.indd 1 9/6/12 10:32 AM


the REPORT

Exclusive

CONTINUED FROM 1

Quaid and Zac Efron, a Sony

Pictures Classics release; and

Disconnect, an ensemble drama

featuring Jason Bateman, Hope

Davis andFrank Grillo.

Exclusive Media co-chairmen

Nigel Sinclair and Guy East

said Exclusive Releasing plans

to distribute three or four wide

releases a year, both in-house

produced films as well as thirdparty

titles. Veteran marketer

Mike Vollman is consulting for

the new division.

Exclusive Media’s move into

the crowded domestic distribution

Snoop

CONTINUED FROM 4

add anything to the character,

but as I started doing more films

and making my own, I learned

how to add my thing and to give

the director and writer what

they had seen in me. I felt closer

to the characters that they tried

to create of me.”

DON’T ASK STONERS TO LEAVE

THE HOUSE

“With Mac and Devin Go to High

School, I thought it was a waste

of time to go theatrical with it.

That movie was to be enjoyed in

the convenience of your home

and your couch, hanging out

with your homies, chilling, eating

some snacks, able to turn it

up and rewind some parts — it’s

a stoner flick. To stand in line,

get popcorn and wait for all

those movie trailers… First of

all, we might get pulled over on

the way to the motherf—ing theater.

We could be dealing with a

trap or a road block or checkpoint,

it’s too much. It’s like, put

that shit in right now, smoke

something and enjoy it. That’s

why the DVD was created.”

HAVE A PROPER FEST PARTY

“I like to work, and I love to

have fun ... so expect superstars,

celebrities, red wine,

vegetables and vegetation at

Great Hall Friday night.”

THR

waters follows the box-office success

of The Woman in Black, which

CBS Films distributed in the U.S.

on behalf of Exclusive. The supernatural

horror title, starring Daniel

Radcliffe, was a surprise hit, earning

more than $54 million in the

U.S. and $128 million worldwide.

Having its own domestic

distribution operation gives

Exclusive Media more flexibility

— and control.

The launch of Exclusive

Releasing is the exciting and logical

next step for Exclusive Media

to be involved in all aspects of

the filmmaking and distribution

of our movies from development

through production and into

Roth

CONTINUED FROM 1

has become a force in the horror

genre, and we are confident that

he is going to deliver another

chilling, elevated film that audiences

will love.”

Roth and Woodrow will

produce with Worldview COO

Molly Conners alongside Jacob

Jaffke and Peter Phok. Executive

producers include West,

Eric Newman and Worldview

execs Maria Cestone, Sarah

Johnson Redlich and Hoyt

David Morgan.

Sacrament marks Worldview’s

second collaboration with Roth.

The company said in Cannes

that it will be backing The

Green Inferno, Roth’s return to

6

theaters,” East and Sinclair said in

a statement. “We are thrilled that

we have Scott and Matt joining us

to put this division together.”

Exclusive Releasing also will

acquire films for VOD and digital

platforms as well as develop and

buy alternative content, including

concert films and music

documentaries. Insiders say

Open Road might do some of the

booking for the new operation.

Upcoming films on Exclusive

Media’s slate include Can a

Song Save Your Life? with Keira

Knightley, and Rush, Ron Howard’s

Formula 1 film.

PAMELA MCCLINTOCK CONTRIBUTED

TO THIS REPORT.

FilmNation’s Dark & Grimm

CONTINUED FROM 2

feature for Skydance Productions. Previously, they penned the Seth

Rogen-voiced feature Boo U for DreamWorks Animation and the

Mattel toy-inspired feature Magic 8 Ball for Paramount. Mann and

Gunn are repped by WME and Mosaic.

Kamala is in development on the screen adaptations of Jeff

Guinn’s Go Down Together: The True, Untold Story of Bonnie and Clyde

and Nancy Goldstone’s The Maid and The Queen: The Secret History of

Joan of Arc with Furst Films.

FilmNation has a major presence at the Toronto International

Film Festival this year, handling international sales on Rian Johnson’s

Looper — which opens the festival Sept. 6 — as well as several

other titles, including Terrence Malick’s To The Wonder, starring

Ben Affleck, Olga Kurylenko, Rachel McAdams and Javier Bardem,

and Deepa Mehta’s Midnight’s Children. THR

directing, which is set to begin

shooting in the fall in Chile

and Peru.

Roth’s latest thriller, Aftershock,

premieres this week in

Toronto, bowing in the festival’s

Midnight Madness section.

Worldview quickly is becoming

one of the most buzzworthy

new finance/production outfits.

The group recently wrapped

production on Atom Egoyan’s

West Memphis Three biopic;

Devil’s Knot, starring Colin Firth

and Reese Witherspoon; and

Guillaume Canet’s crime thriller

Blood Ties, featuring Clive Owen

and Marion Cotillard.

Worldview is in postproduction

on James Gray’s untitled period

drama starring Cotillard, Joaquin

Phoenix and Jeremy Renner. THR

Out in the Dark

Glass Grabs

Out in

the Dark

By Scott Roxborough

OUT IN THE DARK, A GAY

love story set amid the

political turmoil of the

Israeli-Palestinian conflict,

will be coming to North

American screens courtesy of

Breaking Glass Pictures. The

company has picked up rights

to the feature from m-appeal

ahead of the Toronto International

Film Festival, where

Out in the Dark will have its

world premiere.

The drama, the directorial

debut of American-Israeli filmmaker

Michael Mayer, follows

an Israeli lawyer who falls in

love with a Palestinian student.

“This is a love story which

becomes complicated by

borders,” said Breaking Glass

CEO Richard Wolff. “The

adage ‘love knows no borders’

is unfortunately false in today’s

often intolerant society when

two countries are at odds.”

Breaking Glass plans to

bow Out in the Dark in North

America in August or September

2013. Wolff said he hopes

the film and its subject matter

will “raise awareness.”

M-appeal also has closed

deals for the film with Benelux

(ABC Distribution),

Germany (Pro-Fun Media)

and France (OutPlay). Out in

the Dark premieres Sept. 7 in

Toronto’s Discovery Section.

The German sales group

has two other TIFF titles on its

slate: the politically incorrect

Dutch comedy The Deflowering

of Eva van End and Julio Hernandez

Cordon’s drama Polvo,

both of which screen in the

World Cinema Section. THR

day1_newsA.indd 4 9/6/12 8:50 PM


Lotte Entertainment D1_090712.indd 1 9/4/12 2:06 PM


TORONTO 2012

TORONTO OFFICE:

Suite 1853, Hyatt Regency Hotel

Hotel Phone: (416) 343-1234

E-mail: market@fortissimo.nl

ATTENDING EXECUTIVES:

Michael J. Werner

Nicole Mackey

Winnie Lau

Courtney Noble

SHIP OF THESEUS

by ANAND GANDHI

India, 2012, 139’, Hindi, Drama

CITY TO CITY: Opening Film

Thu, Sep 6 9.30 pm TIFF Bell Lightbox 2 (World Premiere)

Fri, Sep 7 2.30 pm Cineplex Odeon Yonge & Dundas 7 (Public)

Sat, Sep 8 1.15 pm Scotiabank Theatre 10 (P&I)

Tue, Sep 11 9.15 pm TIFF Bell Lightbox 5 (P&I)

Sun, Sep 16 12.00 pm Scotiabank Theatre 4 (Public)

BEIJING FLICKERS

by ZHANG YUAN

China, 2012, 96’, Mandarin, Drama

VANGUARD

Sun, Sep 9 11.15 am Scotiabank Theatre 9 (P&I)

Mon, Sep 10 9.00 pm The Bloor Hot Docs Cinema (World Premiere)

Wed, Sep 12 9.30 am Scotiabank Theatre 9 (P&I)

Wed, Sep 12 2.45 pm Cineplex Odeon Yonge & Dundas7 (Public)

Sun, Sep 16 9.30 pm TIFF Bell Lightbox 4 (P & I)

WHAT MAISIE KNEW

by SCOTT MCGEHEE and DAVID SIEGEL

USA, 2012, 95’, English, Drama

Starring Julianne Moore, Alexander Skarsgård, Steve Coogan, Onata Aprile,

Joanna Vanderham

GALA

Fri, Sep 7 9:30pm Roy Thomson Hall (World Premiere)

Sat, Sep 8 8.45 am Scotiabank Theatre 1 (P & I)

Sat, Sep 8 12.45 pm TIFFBell Lightbox 1 (Public)

Tue, Sep 11 12.00 pm Scotiabank Theatre 1 (P & I)

Sun, Sep 16 3.30 pm TIFF Bell Lightbox 1(Public)

BWAKAW

by JUN ROBLES LANA

Philippines, 2012, 110’, Tagalog, Drama/Comedy

CONTEMPORARY WORLD CINEMA

Sun, Sep 9 9.00 pm TIFF Bell Lightbox 5 (P & I)

Mon, Sep 10 5.45 pm Cineplex Odeon Yonge & Dundas 5 (International Premiere)

Wed, Sep 12 2.30 pm Cineplex Odeon Yonge & Dundas 4 (Public)

Sat, Sep 15 6.00 pm Cineplex Odeon Yonge & Dundas 5 (Public)

MISS LOVELY (New International Version]

by ASHIM AHLUWALIA

India, 2012, Hindi, Drama

CITY TO CITY

Mon, Sep 10 12.00 pm Scotiabank Theatre 10 (P & I)

Tue, Sep 11 9.15 pm Scotiabank Theatre 3 (North American Premiere)

Thu, Sep 13 6.00 pm Cineplex Odeon Yonge & Dundas 6 (Public)

Sat, Sep 15 9.00 am TIFF Bell Lightbox 4 (Public)

Fortissimo Films D1_090712.indd 1 9/5/12 11:31 AM

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UPCOMING FILMS

TOUCH OF THE LIGHT

by CHANG Jung-Chi

Taiwan, 2012, Mandarin

Presented by: Wong Kar Wai

Status: Post Production

WHITE FROG

by QUENTIN LEE

USA, English, Coming of Age/Drama

Cast: Booboo Stewart, Joan Chen, BD Wong

Status: Completed

CAMERA

by JAMES LEONG

Singapore, Suspense/Thriller

Status: Post Production

CAMIEL BORGMAN

by ALEX VAN WARMERDAM

The Netherlands / Belgium / Denmark, Dutch,

Drama

Status: In Production

SIMON KILLER

by ANTONIO CAMPOS

USA, 2012, English, Psychological Drama

Cast: Brady Corbet, Mati Diop

Status: Completed

AN END TO KILLING

by WANG PING

China, 2012, Mandarin, Drama

Status: Completed

DJINN

by TOBE HOOPER

UAE, English/Arabic, Supernatural Horror Thriller

Status: Post Production

SUNSET SONG

by TERENCE DAVIES

UK, English

Cast: Peter Mullan (WAR HORSE), Agyness Deyn

Status: Pre-production

FULL CIRCLE

by ZHANG YANG

China, 2012, Mandarin, Comedy/Drama

Status: Completed

REDEMPTION STREET

by MIROSLAV TERZIĆ

Serbia, 2012, 97’, Serbian, Thriller

Status: Completed

MONSOON SHOOTOUT

by AMIT KUMAR

India, Hindi, Action/Thriller

Status: Post Production

Director: Terence Davies Director: John Cameron Mitchell

HOW TO TALK TO GIRLS AT PARTIES

by JOHN CAMERON MITCHELL

USA, English, Romance/Sci-Fi/Music

Status: In Development

Fortissimo Films D1_090712.indd 2 9/5/12 11:31 AM


ABOUT TOWN

RAMBLING REPORTER

BRADLEY COOPER: SCARFACE

The unofficial face of this year’s fest

is Bradley Cooper, with two of his

films — The Place Beyond the Pines

and Silver Linings Playbook — world

premiering back-to-back on Sept.

7 and 8. But those who’ve been up

close and personal with People’s

former Sexiest Man Alive, especially

prior to time spent in the makeup

chair, know that his face is not without

imperfection. There’s a reason

that David Lynch’s The Elephant Man

inspired him to get into acting in the

first place. (He also performed the

title role in a stage adaptation at the

Williamstown Festival in Massachusetts

this summer, and plans are in

the works for him to bring the play to

Broadway next fall for a limited run.)

Look closely, or even not so closely,

at the big-screen heartthrob and

Three Parties Not to Miss

TWC’S THE MASTER AFTERPARTY Friday, Sept. 7

No one knows how to throw a party quite like Harvey

Weinstein. And at this year’s fest, The Weinstein

Co. is touting its anticipated Paul Thomas Anderson

drama The Master, starring Philip Seymour Hoffman,

Amy Adams and Joaquin Phoenix. TWC will take

over Toronto’s members-only SoHo House pop-up

club 192 Adelaide Street West for the film’s obligatory

TIFF debut afterparty. The company regularly

rents out the club’s West Hollywood property for

both private Golden Globe and Oscar parties).

FLASH Monday, Sept. 10

For those veteran TIFF-goers in the know, the most

notorious party of the festival is Sunday’s Ladies

Night at Remingtons, a gay cabaret near Ryerson

University that maintains strict regulations

THR cover boy

Cooper has back-to-

back screenings in

Toronto this year.

you’ll see that Cooper’s countenance

is covered with his fair share of flaws.

“I have so many scars on my face,” he

tells THR (Cooper graces this week’s

THR cover for the Toronto Issue).

Some were accumulated accidentally

— and at least one on purpose.

“It’s huge,” he says of one

particular scar on his forehead.

“It goes all the way

to the back [of my scalp].

A huge glass lamp fell on

my face when I was 15. I

lived in an old barn, and

my parents bought this

glass lampshade —

like a lawyer’s lamp.

They hung it on the

wall. It was Super

Bowl Sunday, I

heard my grandparents

come in, and

I threw the covers

open. I watched

10

it fall. It crashed, and blood was

squirting out. I couldn’t move part of

my face for six months. It went right

to my skull.”

BOARDWALK EMPIRE’S

TORONTO VETERANS

At the third-season premiere of HBO’s

Boardwalk Empire in New York City,

stars reminisced about their time at

what many call the industry’s most

laid-back film festival. Series star

Gretchen Mol, who made her TIFF

debut to rave reviews in 2005’s The

Notorious Bettie Page, said her best

memory of the fest was the supportive

theatergoers. “I just loved

the Toronto audience,” she tells THR.

They were real movie lovers.” Shea

Whigham, who plays Boardwalk’s

resident corrupt cop, has become

a Toronto regular during the past

decade (“I love this festival,” he said)

and currently has a major feature in

contention, David O’Russell’s Silver

Linings Playbook (alongside

Cooper and Robert De Niro).

Kelly Macdonald made her

TIFF debut back in 1998 with

Shekhar Kapur’s Elizabeth. “I

was there with my good friend

Emily Mortimer,” Macdonald

says of her Elizabeth costar

and fellow HBO series

regular (Mortimer stars on

Aaron Sorkin’s The Newsroom).

“We had so much

fun hanging out, but I can

barely remember what

we did.” Perhaps too

Mol

much fun? THR

regarding female clubgoers. But this year THR

hears the festivities are moving to Mondays at

Flash on Church Street, another racy dive. After

a busy TIFF opening weekend, publicists, agents

and occasionally talent (Johnny Knoxville has been

known to attend) let their hair down in a decidedly

unglamourous setting. Remingtons, however,

is still rolling out the red carpet — the club is

generously offering a $5 cover-charge discount for

patrons sporting festival credentials.

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER’S TIFF BASH

5-8 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 9

THR news director Matthew Belloni and staff

are hosting an exclusive cocktail party at the

Thompson Hotel’s Rooftop Bar (complete with

music by Mick Boogie) and VIP guests including

Jake Gyllenhaal, Jason Reitman, Keira Knightley

and Emile Hirsch.

Moose Point Estate on Lake Muskoka

Toronto’s

Lakeside Getaways

By Bryan Dearsley

LOCATED 100 MILES NORTH OF

Toronto, Muskoka is a landscape

of pristine lakes, rugged

islands and prized fishing and

hunting that first enticed New YorK

and Pittsburgh’s wealthy in the late

1800s. These days, the region has

become a summer and even postfestival

draw for celebrities.

Summer saw Hugh Grant

golfing on Bigwin Island, a resort

famous for once having hosted

Clark Gable, Carole Lombard, Ernest

Hemingway and H.G. Wells.

Tom Hanks spent yet another

summer scooting around Lake

Muskoka by boat while renting a

cottage complex, where he reportedly

hosted Steven Spielberg.

Other names who own cottages

or have recently visited: Martin

Short, Goldie Hawn, Kurt Russell,

Kenny G, Cindy Crawford

and Bill Murray. And realtors are

abuzz about the prospect of Leonardo

DiCaprio and Tom Cruise

being in the market for cottages of

their own. Although “you can’t call

them cottages,” says Lionsgate

Entertainment co-chair Harald

Ludwig, “more like estates with

fabulous boat houses.”

And if the stars need privacy,

it can be obtained for upward of

$1 million by purchasing lushly

treed lots on Lake Muskoka’s

“Millionaire’s Row.” Or there’s Lake

of Bays, where one of the most

stunning properties is Moose Point

Estate (listed at $8.5 million with

Sotheby’s International), a customcarved

rustic 12,400-squarefoot

mansion with 600 feet of

shoreline, radiant heated floors, a

screening room with a fiber-optic

night-sky ceiling and triple-slip

boathouse and dock.

THR THR

day1_ramblingC.indd 1 9/6/12 5:46 PM

COOPER: MEL BARLOW


Wavelengths

THE FIFTH SEASON

by Peter Brosens and Jessica Woodworth

NL Co-prod: Molenwiek Film

Sales: Films Boutique

eye international

your Dutch film connection

• 09/07, 14:45, TIFF Bell Lightbox 5 (press & industry)

• 09/12, 19:15, TIFF Bell Lightbox 4

• 09/13, 14:00, Cineplex Odeon Yonge & Dundas 10

• 09/14, 09:45, TIFF Bell Lightbox 5 (press & industry)

• 09/16, 14:30, Cineplex Odeon Yonge & Dundas 10

Contemporary World Cinema

IN THE FOG

by Sergei Loznitsa

NL Co-prod: Lemming Film

Sales: The Match Factory

• 09/12, 21:30, Cineplex Odeon Yonge & Dundas 3

• 09/14, 09:15, Cinema 2

• 09/16, 21:30, Jackman Hall (AGO)

Wavelengths

POST TENEBRAS LUX

by Carlos Reygadas

NL Co-prod: Topkapi Films

Sales: NDM

• 09/07, 11:15, Scotiabank 8 (press & industry)

• 09/12, 21:45, TIFF Bell Lightbox 1

• 09/13, 13:15, TIFF Bell Lightbox 3

• 09/16, 18:00, Scotiabank 3

Future Projections

SPRINGTIME

by Jeroen Eisinga

Prod/sales: Jeroen Eisinga

• 08/24 – 09/16, MOCCA, 952 Queen Street West

Wavelengths

VIEW FROM THE ACROPOLIS

by Lonnie van Brummelen and Siebren de Haan

Prod: Van Brummelen en De Haan

Sales: Motive Gallery

• 09/10,19:00, Jackman Hall (AGO)

Eye Films Institute D1_090712 1.indd 1 9/6/12 10:35 AM


DIRECTOR Q&A

Rian Johnson

The man behind TIFF opener Looper talks about

breaking with tradition, the challenges of time travel

and the sad state of the blockbuster By Borys Kit

RIAN JOHNSON BURST ON

the movie scene with

2005’s Brick, a stylized

film noir set in high school that

starred a young Joseph Gordon-

Levitt, who was eager to break

out of his Third Rock From the

Sun shadow. USC grad Johnson,

38, made his first TIFF appearance

in 2008 with the quirky The

Brothers Bloom, and now its his

$30 million-budgeted Looper is

generating buzz with the festival

and geek crowds alike, ahead of

its Sept. 28 release by TriStar/

FilmDistrict. The first non-Canadian

narrative film to open TIFF,

Looper reteams the director with

Gordon-Levitt, who has since

become one of Hollywood’s most

promising actors.

It was a bit controversial for TIFF

to break with tradition and choose

your non-Canadian film to open

the festival. Were you aware of the

potential backlash?

No, I wasn’t really privy to all of

that. I caught up on the controversy

after the announcement

was made. I heard [TIFF artistic

director] Cameron Bailey speak

to it, and it sounds like they were

ready for the pushback, and they

had their reasons for it. It was the

sort of thing where when they

offered it to us, it was a bit of a

surprise but a really pleasant one.

How different was it for you

to tackle a time-travel sci-fi

action movie compared with your

previous films?

In some ways, I guess it doesn’t feel

too different for me because

I have a group of friends that I have

stayed consistent with, that I’ve

made all three movies with. And

although this was a bigger scale

then Brothers Bloom, it was kind of

made the same way with [Looper

production company] Endgame

Entertainment: I had my cinematographer,

who has been my

best friend since film school; my

cousin Nathan did the music for

it — we’ve been working together

since we were 10 years old — and

[Gordon-Levitt], of course, who

I’ve known since Brick. It’s been

like the family coming together to

make another movie. It didn’t feel

like a significantly different thing

in terms of the process of it. The

film itself, it’s definitely a different

genre then either Brick or Bloom,

but within that I think it’s trying

to do the same thing: to connect to

12

something that I care about.

What are some of the biggest challenges

of time-travel movies?

Figuring out how much to explain,

figuring how to keep it simple.

With this film especially, because

even though it’s a time-travel

movie, the pleasure of it doesn’t

come from the mass of time

travel. It’s not a film like Primer (a

2004 cult movie that deals in the

complexities of time travel), for

instance, where the big part of the

enjoyment is kind of working out

all the intricacies of it. For Looper I

very much wanted it to be a more

character-based movie that is more

about how these characters dealt

with the situation time travel has

brought about. So the biggest challenge

was figuring out how to not

spend the whole movie explaining

the rules and figure out how to

put it out there in a way that made

sense on some intuitive level for the

audience; then get past it and deal

with the real meat of the story.

Looper feels like it could have been

a summer blockbuster a decade

ago, but these days it’s independently

financed. I don’t know about

you, but I found this summer’s

movies kind of lackluster.

Well, there’s always enjoyable

stuff, and I don’t want to slag

off a big group of movies, but I

do feel like just in general, with

big films recently, it is increasingly

difficult to sit down in a

theater and be surprised. It feels

increasingly like movies are

being developed as properties —

the same way you would develop

a fast-food franchise. Those

movies can be made to be really

fun and really creative, but one

thing that I find myself seeking

out more and more is something

where I sit down and I’m not

sure what to expect. That’s what

Vital Stats

Nationality American

Born Dec. 17, 1973

Film in Toronto Looper

(Opening-night film)

Filmography

Brick (2005),

The Brothers Bloom (2008)

Notable Awards Sundance Special

Jury Prize (dramatic) for Brick

we were aspiring to with Looper,

mixing actual surprise with

some of the summer movie elements

of the action.

A few years ago when Inception

came out, everyone was saying,

“Wow, this is going to bring back

originality to Hollywood!” But it

hasn’t, has it?

It feels dramatic to frame it like

that. I think the truth is just that

good movies get made and a lot of

less interesting movies get made,

and that has always been happening.

The gap between them can be

long or it can be short, but I think

it matters that there are diamonds

in the rough. I’m a huge Inception

fan, but viewing it as a failed

movement would be the wrong

way of looking at it. For me, as a

moviegoer, as long as a movie like

that can bust through every now

and then, as long as every year we

get at least one of those — God, I’ll

even settle for every two years if we

get an Inception — I’m thrilled.

Have you ever been approached to

direct a big studio movie?

I’ve had conversations about it,

but they’ve never gotten very far,

and I don’t know how seriously

I’ve ever been in the running for

anything. On one level, it’s always

tempting, especially as a filmmaker

just starting out careerwise.

The notion of jumping on to

something big like that and having

those toys to play with and incredibly

talented people involved with

it and engaging a big audience —

it’s great. I think great movies can

be made in that mode. But for me

specifically, I have figured out that

at least for now, what really gets

me excited is creating something

from the ground up. It’s even less

about it being original per se, it’s

more about the fact that it’s mine.

It’s more about that fact that I

start with just a seed of an idea

and take it all the way through to

the end. I feel like I have this window

right now where my producer

Ram Bergman and I are actually

able to get our own scripts made.

However many of these we can get

through, I want to take advantage

of this window while it’s still here

and get my own stories told. THR

day1_qaB.indd 1 9/6/12 4:02 PM


Contemporary

World Cinema

JACKIE

eye international

your Dutch film connection

by Antoinette Beumer

Prod: Eyeworks Film & TV Drama

• Fri September 7, 10:00, Scotiabank 7 (press & industry)

• Sat September 8, 15:15, Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 7

• Mon September 10, 21:00, Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 2

• Sat September 15, 12:00, Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 7

Eye Films Institute D1_090712 2.indd 1 9/6/12 10:36 AM


EXECUTIVE SUITE

UTA’s dynamic duo discuss thriving in a man’s world, their TIFF strategy

and the secret behind their succesful collaboration By Tatiana Siegel

SPEND ENOUGH TIME ON THE FESTIVAL

circuit, and one can’t help but notice

something missing. No, it’s not the

absence of no-fee ATMs or even the lack of

decent takeout. What’s striking is the dearth

of female sales agents at the negotiating

table. Still, UTA’s independent film group

is bucking the trend in a big way. With its

dynamic female duo of Rena Ronson and

Bec Smith hammering out buzz-worthy deals

for such recent films as Salmon Fishing in the

Yemen, Our Idiot Brother and Margin Call, the

agency is dispelling the notion that the indie

sphere is a man’s world. In fact, UTA’s Rich

Klubeck and David Flynn now find themselves

in the minority within the agency’s

five-member independent film group thanks

to the promotion of Hailey Wierengo to

coordinator. Ronson and Smith spoke with

The Hollywood Reporter about navigating the

so-called gender divide and their expectations

heading into TIFF.

Why does the film packaging and finance business

continue to be so male dominated?

RR We actually don’t see it that way. There

are definitely more men in the independent

business, but we don’t consider it male dominated.

It’s not about them dominating. It’s

just more volume.

So it’s a quality not quantity kind of thing?

RR (Laughs) I can’t say that. I just don’t see

things as male-female. I was raised in a family

with a brother, and we were always equal. Bec

and I do are jobs really well. There’s just more

men in this space than there are women.

So why do men seem to be more attracted to

this arena?

RR I think it’s changing. I think it’s about

opportunity. But there’s always that question

why. Why do we gravitate toward what we do?

BS I don’t think there are less women in

this space than any other space in the film

business. It’s good that there are women who

have been ensconced in positions of power

across the film industry, including in this

part of the business. I would say generationally,

some time ago, it was harder for women

to imagine themselves working in film. Now

those barriers have come down, and there are

women doing it everywhere.

How would you describe the dynamic between

the two of you?

RR Very collaborative. What’s great about

our division is we all bring specific expertise

to the division. Whether it’s my experience

in the foreign sales world or Bec’s in the film

and producing world or Rich’s in legal, we all

bring something from the outside world. For

Bec and I, we’re constantly back and forth

with each other in one of our offices.

BS I definitely look to Rena for her experience

and skill set. And she looks to me for

certain things that I have a background

in. And we also go to other members of the

group for their expertise. Rich used to run

companies and is a producer. Flynn has a

management background and specializes

in representing directors as well. But Rena

is definitely a mentor to me. It’s fun having

someone so close to hand there that you can

go to and ask questions of and who will take

14

Ronson, left, and

Smith photographed

in Ronson’s office at

UTA in Beverly Hills.

CO-HEAD, AGENT, UTA INDEPENDENT FILM GROUP

Rena Ronson and Bec Smith

the time to make sure those questions are

being answered.

Going into Toronto, what are your expectations?

RR To sell all of our movies. 100% sell-through.

We have a track record, and we haven’t broken

it. We don’t expect to break it this time. We

have an incredible lineup.

BS We have everything this year, from films

that started in the agency as a great script

from a younger writer that we were able

to attach a big star to like Kristen Wiig —

which turned into Imogene — to finished

films that came to us via relationships. The

two types of films also nicely reflect the taste

of the group.

With a film like the upcoming Arthur Newman,

with Colin Firth and Emily Blunt, you are

co-repping with CAA. In this cutthroat agency

world, how does that work?

RR More now than ever before, when you

have a greenlighting element at an agency,

whether it’s the writer or director or a big

actor, it lends itself to a co-repping situation.

In this case, we put the financing together. It

was our writer, Becky Johnston. We put one

of our directors on it, Dante Ariola, for his

first feature film. He’s been looking for years

for something to do. They went to (Blunt

and Firth) at CAA, but we’re the point

agency. What we’ve learned over the years

about co-representation is there are ways to

do it effectively.

BS If you’re putting a movie together and

representing a director, you’re going to be

involved. If you’re bringing a green light

element to the cast, you’ll likely be involved.

We try to be partnership-minded with the

other agency.

Your job requires you to be on the road at

festivals for so much of the year. How does that

affect your personal lives?

RR My daughter is now 13 and has grown up

with this business. This is what she knows.

She had to write an essay for school about

her role model, and she wrote about me. She

wrote about how much she respects how passionate

I am about what I do. She sometimes

asks, ‘Why do you have to go away so much?’

And I say, ‘I love what I do.’

BS As an Australian, travelling the world is

in my DNA. The minute I joined the film

industry, the international film festival circuit

became part of my routine. That circuit is

kind of its own beautiful family. You reconnect

with these people multiple times a

year. In terms of my personal life back here,

anybody who is going to want to be a friend of

mine has to understand that travelling is part

of my job and part of who I am. THR

day1_execsuiteB.indd 1 9/6/12 3:53 PM

PHOTOGRAPHED BY DANIEL HENNESSY HAIR AND MAKEUP BY ERIKA PARSONS FOR CHANEL AT CELESTINE AGENCY


toronto FILM FEStIVAL 2012

CANADA.

A WORLD OF TALENT.

GET UP CLOSE WITH CANADIAN TALENT AT THE 2012 TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

PICTURE DAY

KATE MELVILLE

Discovery

LE MAGASIN DES SUICIDES

(THE SUICIDE SHOP)

PATRICE LECONTE

Special Presentations

INCH’ ALLAH

ANAÏS BARBEAU-LAVALETTE

Special Presentations

THE LESSER BLESSED

ANITA DORON

Contemporary World Cinema

HOME AGAIN

SUDZ SUTHERLAND

Contemporary World Cinema

TOWER

KAZIK RADWANSKI

Discovery

LUNARCY!

SIMON ENNIS

TIFF Docs

CRIMES OF MIKE RECKET

BRUCE SWEENEY

Contemporary World Cinema

DON’T MISS THE 44 SHORT FILMS IN SHORT CUTS CANADA.

SHOW STOPPER:

THE THEATRICAL

LIFE OF GARTH

DRABINSKY

BARRY AVRICH

TIFF Docs

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THE SECRET DISCO REVOLUTION

JAMIE KASTNER

TIFF Docs

BLACKBIRD

JASON BUXTON

Discovery

FOXFIRE

LAURENT CANTET

Special Presentations

REBELLE (WAR WITCH)

KIM NGUYEN

Special Presentations

INESCAPABLE

RUBA NADDA

Gala

STORIES THAT BRING US TOGETHER

DES HISTOIRES QUI NOUS RASSEMBLENT

T E L E F I L M . C A

Telefilms_INTERNAL_HC_Day1_2012.indd 1 9/4/12 6:04 PM


TALENT

TO

WATCH

TALENT

TO

WATCH

TALENT

TO

WATCH

TALENT

TO

WATCH

SEPTEMBER

7

12 PM

@ THE

FILMMAKERS’

LOUNGE

SEPTEMBER

10

12 PM

@ THE

FILMMAKERS’

LOUNGE

SEPTEMBER

12

12 PM

@ THE

FILMMAKERS’

LOUNGE

SEPTEMBER

13

2 PM

@ THE

FILMMAKERS’

LOUNGE

CLASS OF 2012

CANADIAN DIRECTORS

TO WATCH

– BRANDON CRONENBERG (ANTIVIRAL)

– JASON BUXTON (BLACKBIRD)

– KATE MELVILLE (PICTURE DAY)

– KAZIK RADWANSKI (TOWER)

FIRST WE TAKE

MANHATTAN

CANADIAN FILMS

IN THE U.S.

– GEOFFREY GILMORE, TRIBECA ENTERPRISES

– JOHN SLOSS, CINETIC MEDIA

– RYAN WERNER, IFC FILMS

– DANIEL IRON, FOUNDRY FILMS

LOOKING AT

THE WORLD

CANADIAN CINEMA

BEYOND ITS BORDERS

INTRO: THE HONOURABLE LIEUTENANT-GENERAL

ROMÉO A. DALLAIRE

– ANAÏS BARBEAU-LAVALETTE (INCH’ALLAH)

– SUDZ SUTHERLAND (HOME AGAIN)

– KIM NGUYEN (REBELLE)

– RUBA NADDA (INESCAPABLE)

NOT SHORT

ON TALENT

CANADA’S FUNNIER

THAN EVER

INTRO: ACTOR AND DIRECTOR PAUL GROSS

– EVAN MORGAN (A PRETTY FUNNY STORY)

– NIK SEXTON (HOW TO BE DEADLY)

– JONATHAN WILLIAMS (CANOEJACKED)

– GRAYDON SHEPPARD AND KYLE HUMPHREY (SHIT GIRLS SAY)

– SOPHIE JARVIS (WORST DAY EVER)

STORIES THAT BRING US TOGETHER

DES HISTOIRES QUI NOUS RASSEMBLENT

T E L E F I L M . C A

Telefilms Full Page D1_090712.indd 1 9/4/12 1:28 PM


CANADIAN FILM HAS ENTERED A NEW ERA.

Carolle Brabant, executive director of Telefilm Canada,

is Canada’s premier film financier, backing such titles

as Deepa Mehta’s Midnight’s Children and Ruba Nadda’s

Inescapable that will receive world bows at the Toronto

International Film Festival.

But there were raised eyebrows a year ago when Brabant a

introduced a “success index” for Telefilm Canada to measure how

Canadian titles fared at home and overseas, in theaters and beyond.

A year later, the decision to tally film festival trophies and

international sales to measure how homegrown movies perform has

transformed how Canadians see their own cinema.

In a bold move, Telefilm Canada helped Canadian films to break

out at major international film festivals, including Cannes,

Venice and Locarno.

The result helped build audience anticipation ahead of foreignlanguage

Oscar contenders such as Denis Villeneuve’s Incendies and

Philippe Falardeau’s Monsieur Lazhar arriving in domestic theaters.

Take Incendies, which bowed in Venice and Toronto with critical

buzz and acclaim. “That, combined with the promotion that

[Telefilm] at the time did certainly helped the career of the film,”

Brabant recalls.

Likewise, Falardeau’s Monsieur Lazhar grabbed two prizes at

Locarno en route to its Oscar nomination and promotional push by

Telefilm Canada. “It’s not a secret. It’s how the Americans have built

buzz around their films,” Brabant argues.

But not in Canada, until Telefilm Canada began supporting

game-changing films that hit with audiences at home and abroad.

T-1

Canadian Passport

Canadian filmmaker Deepa

Mehta’s adaptation of Salman

Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children will

have its world premiere at TIFF.

THE GREAT

NORTHERN EXPANSION

Telefilm Canada’s comprehensive strategy for promoting local cinema — including

a ‘success index’ — is quietly transforming the Canuck film sector By Etan Vlessing

That quest for box office goes beyond promotional backing from

Telefilm Canada at TIFF.

The Canadian film industry has seen many of its biggest boxoffice

triumphs come from international co-productions.

So Telefilm Canada is looking to Toronto and Cannes, where it

held a Canadian talent tribute in May, and elsewhere overseas to

mine the international terrain for additional foreign co-production

coin and partners.

“All countries are struggling with their financial situation,” Brabant

says, “and Canada is doing a little bit better than other countries.

So American and other foreign film producers are looking to

partner with Canadians, not least to take advantage of domestic tax

credits and international co-production treaties.

The federal government’s film financier is even selecting local

movie scripts for Chinese producers to possibly make as official

Canada-China co-productions.

“It’s well known that we have talented people, even though we're

a small market,” Brabant insists. Telefilm Canada also has set about

attracting more private coin for Canadian films to leverage dwindling

government subsidies.

The stepped-up promotional push for Canadian film will culminate

this week at TIFF with initiatives including the Talent to Watch

series, the Talent Lab professional development workshop and

the Filmmaker Boot Camp, a training event for local filmmakers

descending on Toronto.

“This year is a good year for Canadian films at TIFF. We have a good

selection that shows what Canada is all about, about diversity and a good

balance between woman and men filmmakers,” Brabant says. THR

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Canadian Passport

CANADIAN TITLES

SCREENING AT TIFF

A complete rundown of locally produced movies playing throughout the fest

CAMION

Rafal Ouellet

The Montreal filmmaker returns

to TIFF with his fourth feature, a

drama about a working-class family

that reconnects in the wake of a fatal

road accident. The French-language

pic, starring Julien Poulin, Patrice

Dubois and Stephane Breton,

earned the best director award and

the Ecumenical prize at the Karlovy

Vary International Film Festival.

North American Premiere

Contemporary World Cinema

Press & Industry Sept. 6 2:15 p.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Press & Industry Sept.

13 12:45 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 5;

Public Sept. 12 9:30 p.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 3; Public Sept. 14 6 p.m. Cineplex

Yonge & Dundas 10; Public Sept. 15 1:15

p.m. Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 10

THE CRIMES OF MIKE RECKET

Bruce Sweeney

The neo-noir police procedural

portrays a failed real estate agent,

played by Nicolas Lea, who seduces

and defrauds a writer to turn things

around, only to end up the subject of

a criminal investigation. Also stars

Gabrielle Rose and Agam Darshi.

World Premiere

Contemporary World Cinema

Press & Industry Sept. 7 2 p.m. Scotiabank

9; Press & Industry Sept. 12

2:45 p.m. Scotiabank 9; Public Sept. 11

9:45 p.m. Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 7;

Public Sept. 13 9 p.m. Cineplex Yonge

& Dundas 10

HOME AGAIN

Sudz Sutherland

The Tatiana Ali-starring drama

follows three adults raised as

foreigners in the U.S., Canada

and Britain from childhood and

deported to Jamaica, the country

of their birth, on a journey of

survival and discovery.

World Premiere

Contemporary World Cinema

Press & Industry Sept. 7 2:30 p.m.

Scotiabank 11; Public Sept. 12 5:30 p.m.

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 7; Public Sept.

14 5 p.m. Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 7

MY AWKWARD SEXUAL

ADVENTURE

Sean Garrity

Starring Emily Hampshire and

Jonas Chernik, the drama sees a

conservative accountant looking

to win back his ex-girlfriend who

hires an exotic dancer to guide him

on a journey of sexual discovery in

the world of strip clubs, massage

parlors and cross-dressing.

World Premiere

Contemporary World Cinema

Press & Industry Sept. 8 9 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Press & Industry

Sept. 12 9:30 a.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema

3; Public Sept. 11 7 p.m. Scotiabank

4; Public Sept. 13 8:30 p.m. Cineplex

Yonge & Dundas 9 ; Public Sept. 15 9:45

a.m. Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 9

THE LESSER BLESSED

Anita Doron

Twilight actor Kiowa Gordon and

Benjamin Bratt topline a comingof-age

tale about a First Nations

teenager struggling to cope with

a painful past and trying to find

his place in the modern world.

Newcomer Joel Evans, a 16-year-old

native Canadian from Fort Smith in

the Northwest Territories, also stars

in the drama, shot in Canada’s north.

World Premiere

Press & Industry Sept. 10 9:45 a.m.

Scotiabank 10; Public Sept. 9 4 p.m.

Isabel Bader Theater; Public Sept. 11

T-2

6:15 p.m. Scotiabank 2

BLACKBIRD

Jason Buxton

The timely first feature, starring

Connor Jessup and Alexia Fast,

portrays a troubled teen who is

falsely accused of planning a

Columbine-type shooting scenario

online. Jailed in a youth detention

facility, the 16-year-old struggles

to defend his innocence and fend

off a public crucifixion in a smartly

produced cyber-bullying drama.

World Premiere

Discovery

Press & Industry Sept. 7 4:15 p.m. Scotiabank

9; Press & Industry Sept. 13 4:15

p.m. Scotiabank 9; Public Sept. 9 9:45

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 3; Public

Sept. 10 1 p.m. Jackman Hall (AGO)

KRIVINA

Igor Drljaca

Miro, an immigrant from the

former Yugoslavia, lives in Toronto.

When he finds out that his prewar

friend Dado, who has been missing

for almost two decades, is now

wanted for war-era crimes, his

life starts to unravel. The Serbo-

Croatian- and Bosnian-language

pic stars Goran Slavkovic, Jasmin

Geljo and Edis Livnjak.

World Premiere

Discovery

Press & Industry Sept. 10 9:30 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 5

Press & Industry Sept. 13 6:45 p.m.

Scotiabank 9; Public Sept. 9 9:15 p.m.

Jackman Hall (AGO) ; Public Sept. 11 3

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

PICTURE DAY

Kate Melville

A floundering high school senior,

played by Tatiana Maslany, is

forced to repeat her last year of

classes. Caught between adolescence

and adulthood, she falls

in love with an aging rock star,

while making friends with a nerdy

freshman. The indie pic marks

Nadda

Mehta

Melville

WOMEN HELMERS

MAKE THEIR MARK

A number of high-profile titles from female filmmakers

adds diversity to the TIFF lineup By Etan Vlessing

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screenwriter Melville’s directorial

debut and also stars Spencer Van

Wyck and Steven McCarthy.

World Premiere

Discovery

Press & Industry Sept. 7 2:15 p.m.

Scotiabank 6; Press & Industry Sept. 13

8:30 a.m. Scotiabank 3; Public Sept. 7

9:45 p.m. Isabel Bader Theater; Public

Sept. 8 3:30 p.m. Cineplex Yonge &

Dundas 6; Public Sept. 16 6:45 p.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

TOWER

Kazik Radwanski

The Toronto filmmaker, known for

Home Again director

Sudz Sutherland’s

previous film Love, Sex

and Eating the Bones

won best first feature

at TIFF in 2003.

his signature short films, makes

his feature debut with a character

study about Derek, a thirty-something

loner without a career who

finds romance with Nicole while

on a quest to find the raccoon who

has been tearing up his family’s

garbage. Tower, which stars Derek

Bogart and Nicole Fairbairn,

debuted at Locarno.

North American Premiere

Discovery

Press & Industry Sept. 9 2 p.m. Scotiabank

7; Public Sept. 11 10 p.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 3; Public

Sept. 12 6:15 p.m. Cineplex Yonge &

Dundas 9

CANADIAN FEMALE FILM DIRECTORS HAVE CRACKED THE

old boys club. In addition to the high-heeled and designergowned

festival starlets strutting the red carpet at the Toronto

International Film Festival will be seven Canadian women screening

their latest movies.

“For me, this is a beautiful conversation to have. It puts out in the

open the elephant in the room,” says Ruba Nadda, who is receiving a

world premiere at Roy Thomson Hall for her Marisa Tomei-starring

Syrian drama Inescapable.

“I have other issues,” she adds. “I’m an Arab. I have everything

thrown at me, being an Arab, Syrian and a woman filmmaker.”

Toronto also will play host to Sarah Polley’s Stories We Tell, where

the Oscar-nominated filmmaker peels away the layers from a family

of storytellers; Anais Barbeau-Lavalette’s Inch Allah, which is set in

the West Bank; and Anita Doron’s The Lesser Blessed, a coming-ofage

story starring Benjamin Bratt.

Also getting gala treatment at Roy Thomson Hall is Deepa

Mehta’s Midnight’s Children, her long-awaited collaboration with

British novelist Salman Rushdie.

“I’m not surprised that TIFF is showcasing a strong female

T-3

LUNARCY!

Simon Ennis

The debut feature documentary

follows a group of dreamers who

have devoted their lives to the

moon. Ennis follows eccentric subjects

across North America as they

pursue lunar goals — from moon

rituals in Brooklyn to lunar laser

shows in San Antonio, from the

world’s largest science fiction convention

to a dusty space port in the

Mojave Desert. Ennis’ first feature,

You Might as Well Live, was a 2009

Slamdance award winner.

World Premiere

Real to Reel

Press & Industry Sept. 7 9:30 a.m. Scotiabank

9; Public Sept. 8 6:30 p.m. Cineplex

Yonge & Dundas 10; Public Sept. 13 5 p.m.

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 2

REVOLUTION

Rob Stewart

The follow-up to the box-office hit

Sharkwater, Stewart takes his audience

an impassioned and at times

angry quest to stop the destruction

of Earth’s precious marine life.

The doc starts with the release of

Sharkwater in China and the filmmaker

recognizing that sharks still

face a bleak future.

World Premiere

Real to Reel

Press & Industry Sept. 10 2:30 p.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 5; Public Sept.

12 8:45 p.m. Cineplex Yonge & Dundas

6; Public Sept. 14 2:30 p.m. Cineplex

Yonge & Dundas 2

SHOW STOPPER:

THE THEATRICAL LIFE

OF GARTH DRABINSKY

Barry Avrich

Avrich, who has done documentaries

on such power players as Lew

Wasserman, Harvey Weinstein

and Dominick Dunne, has turned

his camera on Garth Drabinsky.

The Canadian former Broadway

impresario is in jail for his role in the

downfall of live stage producer Live

Entertainment, which most recently

was owned by Michael Ovitz. Interviewees

include Diahann Carroll,

Chita Rivera and Elaine Stritch.

World Premiere

Real to Reel

Press & Industry Sept. 9 2:15 p.m.

Scotiabank 9; Public Sept. 11 6:45 p.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 1; Public Sept. 13

2 p.m. Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 7

THE SECRET

DISCO REVOLUTION

Jamie Kastner

You might think you know disco.

The Toronto filmmaker’s cheeky

documentary spotlights the muchmaligned

world of disco, arguing

the musical genre represented a

moment of mass liberation for

women, African-Americans and

contingency as [the fest] always has been ahead of the game in

terms of featuring a true and diverse cross section of storytellers in

our country, many of which happen to be women,” Mehta says.

Toronto also booked world premieres for Manon Briand’s

Liverpool, a feature drama about a coat check attendant in a

bar who returns an unclaimed coat to its owner, only to land in

the middle of criminal intrigue, and Kate Melville’s directorial

debut with Picture Day, coming-of-age story starring Tatiana

Maslany.

“Technology is changing, the means of production is ending up

in the hands of the filmmakers and we get to hear more voices,”

Melville says of more Canadian women directing — and often writing

— TIFF titles.

Toronto fest director Piers Handling applauds the slew of Canadian

female directors breaking new ground at TIFF.

Says Handling: “What’s different this year is we have seven

[Canadian] women filmmakers — and that’s wonderful because,

certainly as a festival programmer and director, we’re looking for

representation for women. And that’s probably the most exciting

thing in the program for me.” THR

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Canadian Passport

gay men. The untold story of the

disco revolution features Village

People, Gloria Gaynor and Kool

and the Gang.

World Premiere

Real to Reel

Press & Industry Sept. 9 4:30 p.m.

Scotiabank 3; Public Sept. 8 9:45 p.m.

Scotiabank 3; Public Sept. 13 3 p.m.

Bloor Hot Docs Cinema

INESCAPABLE

Ruba Nadda

Alexander Siddig, Joshua Jackson

and Marisa Tomei star in a timely

thriller about a man whose

daughter disappears in Damascus,

forcing him to return to the country

he left behind more than three

decades ago. The Canada-South

Africa co-production enjoying

gala treatment in Toronto follows

Nadda’s earlier theatrical drama

Cairo Time, which snagged the

best Canadian feature prize at the

2009 Toronto International

Film Festival.

World Premiere

Gala

Press & Industry Sept. 8 10:45 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 3; Press &

Industry Sept. 10 2:15 p.m. Scotiabank

2; Public Sept. 11 6:30 p.m. Roy

Thomson Hall; Public Sept. 13 5 p.m.

Scotiabank 1

MIDNIGHT’S CHILDREN

Deepa Mehta

The Canadian-Indian filmmaker’s

long-awaited adaptation of

Salman Rushdie’s Booker Prizewinning

1981 novel spans generations

as the allegorical fantasy

captures India’s transition from

British colonialism to independence

and partition through

the eyes of two children. The

epic drama stars Shabana Azmi,

Seema Biswas, Rahul Bose and

Charles Dance.

World Premiere

Gala

Press & Industry Sept. 7 9:30 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 1; Public

Sept. 9 6:30 p.m. Roy Thomson Hall;

Public Sept. 10 9 a.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 2

ALL THAT YOU POSSESS

Bernard Emond

The Quebec filmmaker has created

a drama about a disgruntled

scholar trying to withdraw from

the world but finds personal ties

drawing him back into the family

he had left behind. The Frenchlanguage

pic, from the director of

La donation and La neuvaine, stars

Patrick Drolet, Isabelle Vincent,

Gilles Renaud and Sara Simard.

World Premiere

Masters

Public Sept. 10 7:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 3; Public Sept. 12 2:15 p.m..

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 6

THE END OF TIME

Peter Mettler

Having bowed in Locarno,

Mettler’s film traverses the globe

to explore, and explode, our

conceptions of time by combining

documentary, nature-heavy montages

and philosophical speculation.

The Switzerland-Canada film

is the latest from the Canadian

experimental filmmaker, visual

artist and cinematographer after

Picture of Light, Gambling and

Gods and LSD.

International Premiere

Masters

Press & Industry Sept. 7 12:30 p.m.

Scotiabank 7; Public Sept. 6 9:15 p.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 1; Public Sept. 8

12:15 p.m. Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 2

100 MUSICIANS

Charles Officer

Politics enters the bedroom as

the veteran Canadian television

director delivers an eight-minute

short about a couple in the

afterglow of making love who

then quarrel over what they

believe they hear on the radio.

Rainbow Sun Francks and Abena

Malika star.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 10 11:45 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

10 6:45 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4;

Public Sept. 11 12:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 4

T-4

A PRETTY FUNNY STORY

Evan Morgan

Rick, a bored family man, witnesses

a neighbor’s embarrassing act and is

eager to report the story back to his

co-workers to become an office hit.

The neighbor, shamed and maniacal,

has other designs and takes

action against his bully by targeting

Rick’s son. Justin Conley and Erin

Hicock topline the 19-minute short.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Public Sept. 7 7:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 3; Public Sept. 8 1:15 p.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4

AMERICAN SISYPHUS

Frieda Luk

A dysfunctional family meets over

Sunday brunch, leaving a young

daughter caught between the

insipid chatter of her family and

her father’s refusal to leave a buffet

table. The commentary on an overindulgent

society stars Rob Roig,

Jody Flynn and Sophia Nisivoccia.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 12 9:15 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

13 6:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 2;

Public Sept. 14 9:30 a.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 3

ASIAN GANGS

Lewis Bennett and Calum MacLeod

Bennett, as a documentary filmmaker,

revisits his past, which

includes an elementary schoolyard

fight that led his school principal to

warn “Change your ways, or you’ll

end up in an Asian gang.” Now

Bennett must find out whether, as a

Caucasian, he became a member of

an Asian gang.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 8 11:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 8 6:15

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

9 9 am. Bell Lightbox Cinema 3

BARDO LIGHT

Connor Gaston

A young man accused of killing

his father proclaims his innocence

and tells the police that the TV

set is the real offender. Inspired

by The Tibetan Book of the Dead,

Gaston’s 11-minute film stars Chris

Mackie, Donna Barnfield and

Shaan Rahman.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 7 9:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 7 7:15

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 3; Public

Sept. 8 1:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

BAREFOOT

Danis Goulet

Goulet’s coming-of-age tale follows

16-year-old Alyssa in a tightknit

Cree community in northern Saskatchewan

planning to become a

mother and challenged by reality.

The Emily Roberts and Cole Ballantyne

starrer spotlights the pressures

young people face in isolated

Canadian communities as they try

to take control of their lives.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 11 9:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 12 6 p.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 2; Public Sept. 13 2

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

BROKEN HEART SYNDROME

Dusty Mancinelli

After being dumped by his

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Three men from very different

backgrounds end up in the same

boat — literally — in Jonathan

Williams’ short Canoejacked.

girlfriend while making love, Russ

is diagnosed with a rare disease

known as BHS (broken heart

syndrome). His romance mocked

by a world that never comes to the

rescue, Russ needs to find a cure.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 10 11:45 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

10 6:45 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4;

Public Sept. 11 12:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 4

BYDLO

Patrick Bouchard

Inspired by Russian composer

Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an

Exhibition, Bydlo uses a wooden

Polish ox cart picture to portray

an allegory of man and beast as

mankind heads toward disaster.

The clay-sculpture animated short

was produced by the National Film

Board of Canada.

Canadian Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 7 9:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 7 7:15

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 3; Public

Sept. 8 1:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

CANOEJACKED

Jonathan Williams

Two fugitives, Vinny and Cisco,

elude the police while being chased

through the woods when they find

a canoe left by its owner, a nudist,

who wants it back. As bullets fly in

their direction, all three men jump

in the canoe. Al Sapienza, Mpho

Koaho and Pat Thornton star.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 12 9:15 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

13 6:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 2;

Public Sept. 14 9:30 a.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 3

CRACKIN’ DOWN HARD

Mike Clattenburg

A young man travels to the desert

for some meditation and solitary

TELEFILM CANADA

INVADES BIG APPLE

Manhattan-based Eye on TIFF yields fruit

for emerging Canuck filmmakers By Etan Vlessing

START SPREADING THE NEWS: THE CANADIANS HAVE TAKEN

Manhattan. Even before the Toronto International Film Festival

got underway, Telefilm Canada got Canadian talent in front

of the biggest U.S. film buyers as part of the second annual Eye on

TIFF in New York showcase.

The idea is to put the spotlight on those films, so when buyers

attend the festival, they already know what to look for,” said Carolle

Brabant, executive director of Telefilm Canada, which funds

Canadian film on behalf of the federal government.

On Aug. 22 at the Crosby Street Hotel Cinema in Manhattan

emerging Canadian filmmakers got the full attention of New York

T-5

hiking, only to see serenity ruined

by a strange man appearing out of

nowhere. Clattenburg’s ludicrously

funny tale stars Nicolas Wright,

Yoursie Thomas and Caitlin Howden.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 10 11:45 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

10 6:45 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4;

Public Sept. 11 12:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 4

DEAR SCAVENGERS

Aaron Phelan

A used-appliance shop owner in

Toronto who only has patience

for real customers has to serve

groups of tween girls in his store

on summer camp scavenger hunts.

Hrant Alianak plays the role of

the anti-social store owner, with

Helen Colliander and Erin Pitt

also starring.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 12 9:15 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

13 6:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 2;

Public Sept. 14 9:30 a.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 3

FROST

Jeremy Ball

The epic sci-fi thriller follows Nava,

a young Arctic hunter determined

to prove her skills on a dangerous

search for scarce food. At the edge

of the known territory, she makes

a discovery that will call for her to

win the battle in a new world. Frost

is the first Canadian Film Centre

short to shoot in an HD format.

World Premiere

Press & Industry Sept. 10 1:45 p.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

11 6:30 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4;

Public Sept. 12 4:45 p.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 4

HERD LEADER

Chloe Robichaud

Clara leads a solitary life, to the frustration

of her meddling family, until

her spinster aunt’s death has Clara

inherit a disobedient pug. Living

with man’s best friend teaches her a

few new tricks. The Eve Duranceaustarring

short bowed at Cannes.

Canadian Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 12 9:15 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

13 6:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 2;

Public Sept. 14 9:30 a.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 3

H’MONG SISTERS

Jeff Wong

Teenage sisters living in mountainous

Vietnam take an American

backpacker on a trek and

find everything changes as they

guide the Western man through

acquisitions, festival programming and exhibitors.

And the New York community received a sneak peak at Canadian

films at TIFF, thanks to a show reel of about 10 titles.

Canadian filmmakers at the North American

industry mixer included Anita Doron, director of The

Lesser Blessed; Sean Garrity, director of My Awkward

Sexual Adventure; Picture Day director Kate Melville;

Brabant and Kazik Radwanski, director of Tower.

The Manhattan showcase comes as American stars are

increasingly more open to working with Canadian directors on

indie projects.

And TIFF wouldn’t be TIFF without a parade of Hollywood stars

seizing the spotlight.

So Telefilm Canada is looking to the Big Apple as a place where

Canadians get onto the radar of U.S. film buyers before the circus

comes to Toronto.

“It brings the spotlight so the [Canadian] films don’t get lost in

the vast amount of films that get presented at TIFF,” Brabant says

of the Eye on TIFF gathering in New York City. THR

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Canadian Passport

a traditional way of life that has

been threatened and transformed

by economic and colonial forces.

Phung Hoa Hoai Linh, Thuy Anh

and Scott Dean star.

World Premiere

Press & Industry Sept. 8 11:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 8 6:15

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

9 9 am. Bell Lightbox Cinema 3

HORRIBLE THINGS

Vincent Biron

Biron, who won the best Canadian

short film prize at the 2010 Toronto

International Film Festival for

Les Fleurs de l’age, returns with a thematically

linked short about Dede,

Carole and Steve and their attempts

to make amends and assuage their

guilt with gift-giving that falls comically

short. Marc-Antoine Beaudette

and Sebastien David star.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 12 9:15 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

13 6:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 2;

Public Sept. 14 9:30 a.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 3

HOW TO BE DEADLY

Nik Sexton

Donnie Dumphy is vulgar, harmless,

a hoser, an underdog and a

loyal friend — but he’s also brokenhearted.

On the eve of St. John’s

biggest dirt bike competition of the

year, he will live a thousand lives.

North American Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 12 9:15 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

13 6:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 2;

Public Sept. 14 9:30 a.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 3

I’M BEGINNING TO MISS YOU

Sakay Ottawa

Directed by and starring Ottawa,

the short probes the disappearance

of young man from Manawan,

Quebec, without anyone seeing him

leave. Amid stark images of a Canadian

winter, a brother struggles to

maintain hope, looking for clues on

his search for the lost young man.

Toronto Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 11 9:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 12 6 p.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 2; Public Sept. 13 2

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

APART

Theodore Ushev

Montreal animator Ushev’s latest

short film calls for the liberation

of imprisoned Iranian filmmakers

as it focuses on the plight of Jafar

Panahi. Using densely layered

rotoscoped images embedded with

Farsi text, Apart is produced by

Marcel Jean and Galile Marion-

Gauvin at L’Unite Centrale as part

of the Jafar Panahi project 2012.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 7 9:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 7 7:15

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 3; Public

Sept. 8 1:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

KEEP A MODEST HEAD

Deco Dawson

Jean Benoit, a member of the

French surrealist movement, is

the subject of a biography that

is part narrative, documentary

and animation. Mixing interviews

recorded in Benoit’s Parisian

studio with surrealist-inspired

re-enactments, the Microclimat

Films production deconstructs

documentary conventions to eulogize

a formidable artist.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 7 9:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 7 7:15

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 3; Public

Sept. 8 1:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

THE NEAR FUTURE

Sophie Goyette

Robin, a French pilot now living

in Quebec, receives a phone call at

work that turns his world upside

down. Unseen by others, turmoil

fills his mind. He will have to

let the pain in but not yet. The

French-language Near Future,

T-6

Goyette’s sixth short film, stars

Patrice Berthomier.

Canadian Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 10 11:45 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 10 6:45

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

11 12:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

LET THE DAYLIGHT INTO

THE SWAMP

Jeffrey St. Jules

With a mix of animation, reenactments

and archival evidence,

the National Film Board of Canada

short assembles a three-part 3D

documentary collage that explores

the consequences of parents who

make the difficult decision to give

up their children.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 11 9:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 12 6

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 2; Public

Sept. 13 2 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

LIFE DOESN’T FRIGHTEN ME

Stephen Dunn

Celebrating her 13th birthday,

Esther Weary comes to terms with

becoming a woman with the help

of a well-intentioned grandfather

and a nose that leaves her insecure.

There’s sharp writing and

standout performances by Jade

Aspros and Gordon Pinsent in an

exploration of ugliness and beauty.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 8 11:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 8 6:15

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

9 9 am. Bell Lightbox Cinema 3

LINGO

Bahar Noorizadeh

A boy mistakenly starts a fire

in a residential neighborhood,

leaving his mother — an Afghan

immigrant to Canada — a suspect,

according to the police. Protective

of her son and hindered by a

language barrier, the mother has

trouble explaining with certainty

what happened. Shaima Eshan and

Farhad Sarwari star.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 7 9:15 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 7

7:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 3;

Public Sept. 8 1:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 4

LOST IN MOTION

Ben Shirinian

Choreographed and performed by

Guillaume Cote, principal dancer

with the National Ballet of Canada,

Shirinian’s short portrays a dancer

freed from costumes and sets and

taking flight in a solo performance.

The bravoFact short features a

composition by James LaValle.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 10 11:45 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 10 6:45

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

11 12:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

MALODY

Philip Barker

As a young and sick woman sits in a

roadside diner, her world is literally

turned upside down. The ensuing

chaos triggers a fateful chain of

events, including seeing her reflection

in the mirror as a little girl. The

short debuted at the Oberhausen

EDITED toronto_canadianpassportB.indd 6 9/5/12 6:02 PM


A vacationing Canadian

is challenged to a unique

test of wills in Patrick

Sisam’s The Pool Date.

International Short Film Festival.

Alex Paxton-Beasley, Ashleigh Warren

and Thomas Huff star.

North American Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 7 9:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 7 7:15

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 3; Public

Sept. 8 1:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

MODEL

Dylan Reibling

The second installment of the interactive

artist’s Dead Media trilogy, the

short features an architectural model

builder creating ornate buildings out

of cardboard, paper and glue — until

a new technology threatens to render

his talents obsolete. Peter Pasyk and

Michael Thomas star.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 10 11:45 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 10 6:45

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema; Public Sept.

11 12:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

NOSTRADAMOS

Maxence Bradley, Elisabeth Olga

Tremblay, Alexandre Lampron

Veering between documentary

and fiction, Nostradamos follows

citizens preparing for the end

of the world in the city of Amos,

Quebec, apparently the safest

place to survive. Made in 72 hours,

Nostradamos portrays varied

human reactions to potential

environmental catastrophe. Ulrick

Cherubin and Veronique Pepin

feature in the cast.

Canadian Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 8 11:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 8 6:15

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

9 9 am. Bell Lightbox Cinema 3

OLD GROWTH

Tess Girard

In the frigid isolation of winter, an

elderly man cuts down and assembles

a cord of wood with nothing

but an ax and a wheelbarrow. What

first appears as a study in landscape

becomes an elegy for nature’s sacrifice

to fuel man’s existence.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 11 9:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 12 6 p.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 2; Public Sept. 13 2

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

THE POOL DATE

Patrick Sisam

A pasty-skinned Canadian, played

by Mike Beaver, vacationing in

South America and hanging by a

pool surrounded by good-looking

young people faces a sudden test of

wills with Rio after a local stranger

takes his chair and possibly his cocktail.

The short, also starring Adamo

Ruggiero, deals with questions of

sexual desire and invitation.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 12 9:15 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

13 6:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 2;

Public Sept. 14 9:30 a.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 3

REFLEXIONS

Martin Thibaudeau

The dark truth reveals itself at a

graveside funeral service as looking

beyond the surface reveals the

deceased’s former life. Tony Robinow,

Nathalie Breuer, Marianne

T-7

Fortier and Rosalie Fortier topline

the English-language short.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 10 11:45 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 10 6:45

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

11 12:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

SAFE ROOM

Elizabeth Lazebnik

A semi-autobiographical film

about a young Canadian woman

recalling her experience sitting in

a safe room as a child with her family

in Israel during the Gulf War.

Julia Mazour, Valentyn Ovsyuk

and Nataly Model star.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 10 1:45 p.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 11

6:30 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4;

Public Sept. 12 4:45 p.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 4

SHIT GIRLS SAY

Graydon Sheppard

A super-cut of the web series Shit

Girls Say by Graydon Sheppard

and Kyle Humphrey that features

catchphrases women say as spoken

by a man in drag. Juliette Lewis

made a cameo appearance, and the

YouTube phenomenon spawned a

slew of copycat videos.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 12 9:15 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

13 6:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 2;

Public Sept. 14 9:30 a.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 3

PRODUCERS LAB

COOKS UP RESULTS

Emerging filmmakers get the chance to produce

projects from Cronenberg, Reitman By Etan Vlessing

ASHLEY MCKENZIE HAS A HOT TICKET FOR THE TORONTO

International Film Festival. Away from the red carpets

and A-list stars, the Nova Scotia filmmaker with Grassfire

Films won’t be debuting a film in this year’s TIFF lineup.

But she has an invite to the festival’s ninth annual Talent Lab,

an exclusive workshop during the Toronto festival organized by

Telefilm Canada to produce the next David Cronenberg or Jason

Reitman.

McKenzie was chosen from among 500 applicants for the

gathering to sharpen the skills of the country’s emerging filmmakers

by learning from top industry players.

“I’m mostly there to soak up knowledge from

the world’s best filmmakers. So I’m there to be

inspired,” McKenzie says ahead of the four-day

McKenzie event that draws on Telefilm’s track record in talent

development and promotion.

Talent Lab participants will hear guest speakers and take part

in group discussions on their filmmaking craft, while boosting

their skills and confidence to forge sustainable careers.

“I’ll be there to meet new people, to meet new friends,” says

Canadian producer Heather Dahlstrom, another Talent Lab

attendee. “Anytime I’ve been to a festival before, I’ve ended up

working with them in some capacity.

“I’m going to be busy, but it will be fun,” she adds.

This year’s Talent Lab includes such industry mentors as British

producer Stephen Woolley, Canadian doc maker Jennifer Baichwal

and Scott McGehee and David Siegel, the directors of What Maisie

Knew, a Sony Pictures Classics title screening at TIFF. THR

EDITED toronto_canadianpassportB.indd 7 9/5/12 6:02 PM


Canadian Passport

STRUGGLE

Sophie Dupuis

As Ariane prepares to leave

Val-d’Or — and everything else

— behind for the big city, her

attempts to say goodbye to her

brother are complicated by persistent

sexual tension between them.

The portrait of young lust stars

Noemi Lira, Antoine Paquin and

Sonia Vigneault.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 8 11:15 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 8

6:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4;

Public Sept. 9 9 am. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 3

SULLIVAN’S APPLICANT

Jeanne Leblanc

Stuck in a traffic jam on her way

to a job interview in downtown

Montreal, a harried Lucy, played

by Judith Baribeau (Mauvaise

Karma, Trauma), looks beyond

the oppressive traffic and pushy

city pulse to make a connection

with a perfect stranger. Graham

Cuthbertson co-stars.

North American Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 10 1:45 p.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 11

6:30 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4;

Public Sept. 12 4:45 p.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 4

THE TAPE

Matt Austin Sadowski

Julian Richings plays a Toronto

man frantically digging through

his attic for a VHS cassette,

and then facing a 21st century

problem: How does he play it?

As the audience wonders what is

on the tape, Austin Sadowski plays

with our fears that obsolete technology

might erase our collective

memory.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 11 9:15 a.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 12

6 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 2;

Public Sept. 13 2 p.m. Bell Lightbox

Cinema 4

THEIR FEAST

Reem Morsi

Following the Egyptian revolution

of 2011, a mother and her children

prepare a celebratory meal to

mark the return of the eldest son

from a prison stay. The timely

short stars Hanan Youseff.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 10 1:45 p.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 11 6:30

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

12 4:45 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

TUESDAY

Fantavious Fritz

Inspired by a hypothetical grown-up

version of Holden Caulfield’s little

sister Phoebe, Fritz creates an

endearing character who embraces

the awkward, irresponsible and

defining moments of being a twentysomething.

Daiva Zalnieriunas, Jon

Gotlib and Brent Crawford star.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 8 11:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 8 6:15

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

9 9 am. Bell Lightbox Cinema 3

THE DANCING COP

Kelvin Redvers

A surreal musical satire about a

native Canadian man suspected of

theft by an overzealous police officer,

who suddenly breaks from normal

routine. William Belleau and Mikal

Grant star in the song and dance film

choreographed by Joel Sturrock.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 10 1:45 p.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 11 6:30

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

12 4:45 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

THE GENIUS FROM QUINTINO

Johnny Ma

Ricardo, played by Ricardo Dias, is a

mechanic in the suburb of Quintino

near Rio de Janeiro who can fix

anything, until a child arrives with a

broken fish toy. To repair the toy, the

mechanic must get in touch with his

T-8

forgotten past. Guilherme Ribero

and Pedro Henrique Nery also star in

the Portuguese language short.

North American Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 11 9:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 12 6 p.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 2; Public Sept. 13 2

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

WITH JEFF

Marie-Eve Juste

The French-language short about

Nyduia, a Haitian Montreal

teenager who goes on a date with

Jeff, a notorious player, debuted

in Cannes as part of the Directors’

Fortnight. The film, from

Montreal-based Voyous Films,

stars Laury Verdieu and Liridion

Rashiti.

North American Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 10 11:45 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 10 6:45

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

11 12:15 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

THE WORST DAY EVER

Sophie Jarvis

Bernard can’t quite seem to get it

right today. The young boy wakes

up to the worst day of his life in a

dark, Tim Burtonesque comedy

about a child’s fear of disappointment.

Jakob Davies, Ingo Holst,

Iris Paluly and Helen Camisa

feature in the 12-minute film.

North American Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 10 1:45 p.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 11 6:30

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

12 4:45 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

VIVE LA CANADIENNE

Joe Cobden

A lovely afternoon stroll in the

park becomes a dynamic dancing

duel of quick steps and high kicks

between burly men and a joyful

young woman, whose boyfriend

holds her purse. Cobden is a Montreal

actor-director who cut his

teeth as an international touring

street performer at age 11.

Antiviral is the debut

feature from Brandon

Cronenberg, son

of famed Canadian

helmer David.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 8 11:15 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 8 6:15

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public

Sept. 9 9 am. Bell Lightbox Cinema 3

WHEN YOU SLEEP

Ashley McKenzie

Halifax director McKenzie’s second

short film portrays a misfit young

couple who feel trapped in an

unhappy existence, just as they

deal with a rodent infestation in

their slum apartment. The short

stars newcomer Winston DeGiobbi

and Toronto’s Eve Harlow.

McKenzie’s first short, Rhonda’s

Party, starred the French Canadian

actress Karine Vanasse, who

starred on ABC’s Pan Am.

World Premiere

Short Cuts Canada

Press & Industry Sept. 10 1:45 p.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept. 11 6:30

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public Sept.

12 4:45 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 4

ANTIVIRAL

Brandon Cronenberg

The debut sci-fi film about an

employee at a clinic that sells

injections of live viruses harvested

from sick celebrities comes from

David Cronenberg’s son and offers

a chilling vision of a dystopian

future. The Sarah Gadon and

EDITED toronto_canadianpassportB.indd 8 9/5/12 6:02 PM


Caleb Landry Jones—starrer

debuted in Cannes and was

picked up for the U.S. market by

IFC Films.

North American Premiere

Special Presentations

Press & Industry, September 6 5:00

p.m. Scotiabank 2; Public, September

10 9:00 p.m. Ryerson Theater; Public,

September 12 2:45 p.m. Bloor Hot

Docs Cinema

INCH’ALLAH

Anais Barbeau-Lavalette

From the producing team behind

the Oscar-nominated Monsieur

Lazhar and Incendies comes a

drama about a young obstetrician

working in a Palestinian refugee

camp who is confronted daily by

the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and

the people it affects. Evelyne Brochu,

Sabrina Ouazani and Yousef

Sweid star.

World Premiere

Special Presentations

Press & Industry Sept. 9 2:00 p.m.

Scotiabank 8; Public Sept. 8 6:00 p.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 2; Public Sept. 10

6:45 p.m. Scotiabank 3

LAURENCE ANYWAYS

Xavier Dolan

The Montreal auteur returns to

Toronto with a transgender love

story starring Melvil Poupard and

Suzanne Clément about a man who

tries to hold on to his relationship

with his fiancée after telling her

that he wants to become a woman.

Dolan’s third feature bowed in

Cannes, where his first two films,

Heartbeats and J’ai tue m mere,

won awards.

Toronto Premiere

Special Presentations

Press & Industry Sept. 6 11:00 a.m.

Scotiabank 1; Public Sept. 13 9:00

p.m. Elgin Screening Room ; Public

Sept. 15 9 a.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 2

LIVERPOOL

Manon Briand

The Montreal director returns to

Toronto with a thriller-drama about

a coat check attendant in a bar

who decides to take an unclaimed

coat back to its owner, only to find

herself in the middle of criminal

intrigue. The Quebec film stars

Stéphanie Lapointe, Charles-Alexandre

Dubé and Louis Morissette.

Briand’s earlier films included 2

Seconds and Chaos and Desire.

International Premiere

Special Presentations

Press & Industry Sept. 9 11:30 a.m.

Scotiabank 7; Public Sept. 11 9:45 p.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 2; Public Sept. 13

6:45 p.m. Scotiabank 4

REBELLE

Kim Nguyen

Fifteen-year-old Congolese actress

Rachel Mwanza won the Silver

Bear Award for best actress in

Berlin when Rebelle, known as

War Witch in English, bowed

earlier this year. A breakout film

by the Montreal writer/director,

Nguyen brings to Toronto a love

story involving a child soldier

in Africa caught up in a violent

yet beautiful and magical world.

Marking Mwanza’s screen debut,

Rebelle also stars Alain Bastien

and Serge Kanyinda.

Toronto Premiere

Special Presentation

Press & Industry Sept. 7 2:00 p.m. Scotiabank

3; Public Sept. 14 9 p.m. Elgin

Screening Room; Public Sept. 15 3:00

p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 2

T-9

STILL

Michael McGowan

Based on true events, Still has

James Cromwell (Babe) starring as

an 89-year-old New Brunswicker

who faces jail time when the

government tries to stop him from

building a more suitable house

for his wife, played by Geneviève

Bujold, whose health is beginning

to fade. McGowan’s earlier films

One Week, Saint Ralph and Score: A

Hockey Musical, all screened

in Toronto.

World Premiere

Special Presentations

Press & Industry Sept. 11 9:15 a.m.

Scotiabank 3; Public Sept. 10 8:00 p.m.

Winter Garden Theater ; Public Sept. 12

12:45 p.m. at Bell Lightbox Cinema 1

STORIES WE TELL

Sarah Polley

Oscar-nominated writer/director

Sarah Polley brings to Toronto, by

way of the Venice Film Festival, a

genre-twisting documentary from

the National Film Board of Canada

that investigates the secrets behind

a family of storytellers. The Canadian

actor-turned-director unravels

the paradoxes to reveal the essence

of family: a messy, intense and loving

tangle of contradictions.

North American Premiere

Special Presentations

Press & Industry Sept. 7 9:45 a.m.

Scotiabank 1; Public Sept. 7 6 p.m.

Bloor Hot Docs Cinema; Public Sept. 8

11:45 a.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema 2

I DECLARE WAR

Jason Lapeyre, Robert Wilson

A group of 12-year-old kids play war

in a local forest, but their game gets

out of hand. With overtones of Lord

of the Flies, the kids make their own

guns out of sticks and toys but hear

mortars exploding all around themselves

and dodge bloody shrapnel

from grenades. Gage Munroe, Siam

Yu, Michael Friend, Eric Hanson

and Alex Cardillo star.

World Premiere

Vanguard

Press & Industry Sept. 10 7:00 p.m.

Scotiabank 9; Press & Industry Sept.

12 12:30 p.m. Scotiabank 9; Public

Sept. 9 4:15 p.m. Scotiabank 4; Public

Sept. 11 2:00 p.m. Cineplex Yonge &

Dundas 10; Public Sept. 14 9:45 p.m.

Scotiabank 4

BESTIAIRE

Denis Cote

The unique documentary, a

Canada-France co-production,

explores the human fascination

with animals, especially those

caged in a zoo or stuffed by a taxidermist,

as the film spotlights an

apparently widening gulf between

animals and humans as they both

watch one another.

Canadian Premiere

Wavelengths

Press & Industry September 7 4:30 p.m.

Bell Lightbox Cinema 4; Public September

14 6:30 p.m. Bell Lightbox Cinema

3; Public September 16 10:00 a.m. Bell

Lightbox Cinema 4

A MINIMAL DIFFERENCE

Jean-Paul Kelly

Shot on Super 8 using a multiplane

camera setup, Kelly’s

five-minute short presents

receding-depth images pulled

from Google, Flickr and photojournalism,

each presented as

metaphorical and factual, such

as political protests in Bangkok,

bodies piled after the 2010 Haitian

earthquake and destruction in the

Gaza Strip.

Canadian Premiere

Wavelengths

Public Sept 8 10:00 p.m. Jackman

Hall (AGO)

MANY A SWAN

Blake Williams

Dedicated to Akira Yoshizawa, the

grandmaster of origami, Blake

Williams’ found-footage short film

collapses 15 years of Grand Canyon

history and 65 years of 3D stereoscopic

cinema by way of folding

anaglyphic video planes.

World Premiere

Wavelengths

Public Sept. 7 7:00 p.m. Jackman

Hall (AGO) THR

toronto_canadianpassport.indd 9 9/4/12 6:28 PM


CANADA.

A WORLD OF TALENT.

AT THE 2012 TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

LIVERPOOL

MANON BRIAND

Special Presentations

MIDNIGHT'S CHILDREN

DEEPA MEHTA

Gala

TOUT CE QUE

TU POSSÈDES

(ALL THAT

YOU POSSESS)

BERNARD ÉMOND

Masters

CAMION

RAFAËL OUELLET

Contemporary World Cinema

BESTIAIRE

DENIS CÔTÉ

Wavelengths

MY AWKWARD SEXUAL ADVENTURE

SEAN GARRITY

Contemporary World Cinema

I DECLARE WAR

ROBERT WILSON, JASON LAPEYRE

Vanguard

LAURENCE ANYWAYS

XAVIER DOLAN

Special Presentations

THE END OF TIME

PETER METTLER

Masters

DON’T MISS THE 44 SHORT FILMS IN SHORT CUTS CANADA.

REVOLUTION

ROB STEWART

TIFF Docs

ANTIVIRAL

BRANDON CRONENBERG

Special Presentations

STILL

MICHAEL MCGOWAN

Special Presentations

KRIVINA

IGOR DRLJACA

Discovery

STORIES WE TELL

SARAH POLLEY

Special Presentations

STORIES THAT BRING US TOGETHER

DES HISTOIRES QUI NOUS RASSEMBLENT

T E L E F I L M . C A

Telefilms Back Cover D1_090712.indd 1 9/4/12 1:28 PM


WORLD

SHARING THE WEALTH

During the third annual Producers Lab Toronto this week, European and Canadian producers

are gathering to build cr0ss-continental relationships that could lead to co-productions By Etan Vlessing

GOVERNMENT FILM SUBSIDIES AREN’T WHAT THEY USED

to be. So as the Toronto International Film Festival gets

underway, 24 handpicked European and Canadian film

producers are set to speed date at Producers Lab Toronto

as they pursue one another’s soft money.

To entice a potential partner, the producers must have a preselected

film project in hand for the Sept. 5-8 financing forum with co-production

dollars providing the scent of attraction.

“In the current economic situation that we all face,

27

Projects in

development after the

first two editions of the

producers lab

every producer is looking at less funding from domestic

sources, so producers are more and more looking at

co-productions as a way to finance their projects,” Sarah

Timmins, a partner at Toronto-based Corvid Pictures,

explained ahead of attending PLT.

Dwindling government subsidies for indie film in

Canada and Europe also will have co-production virgins in

the room, especially producers looking to go from low- to midbudget

pictures aimed at the international market.

“We’ve been very fortunate to be really supported by the Canadian

funders, but as our projects grow in scope and appeal to an audience

outside of Canada, we have to start looking in other places for project

funding, and that means outside of Canada,” said Aisling Chin-Lee

of Prospector Films.

“Co-productions are the ideal way to raise money if the budget

is over $3 million to $4 million. They are an ideal way to get to that

higher number,” said Daniel Bekerman of Zazie Films, prizing foreign

audiences and financing for his Canadian projects in development.

15

24

Producers from

Europe and Canada

eyeing possible

film funding

The three days of exchanging ideas and information on film funding

and co-productions is organized by the Ontario Media Development

Corp. and European Film Promotion, in association with TIFF.

Expect the Eurozone crisis to be the elephant in the room as the

Europeans look with envy on Canadians, whose domestic film funding

system has seen much less severe cuts.

Yorgos Tsourgiannis (Dogtooth) of Athens-based Horsefly Productions,

faced with limited financing and zero state support in Greece,

is eyeing a possible Canadian partner for his latest project, the

sci-fi/fantasy 1901, by director Yiannis Veslemes, based on a

script by Tsourgiannis and Dimitris Emmanouilidis.

The idea of a co-production with Canada has always

been a thought in our minds for 1901, even in our first precrisis

talks about the project,” the Greek producer said.

“Somehow both myself and the director were warm to the

idea, and we felt that many of the requirements of the film for

talent and locations could be sought in Canada.”

Other producers at PLT similarly will weigh whether to tailor a film

creatively by adding Canadian or European elements to fill out a budget.

“Of course, times are tough everywhere, so I’m curious — having

always been in the European market — to go for the first time to a

film market in North America for financing,” said Nicole Gerhards of

Germany’s Niko Film. Elsewhere, Icelandic producer Arnar Knutsson

of Filmus Productions is bringing to Toronto his feature project The

Traveler, to be directed by Oskar Thor Axelsson, where the main protagonist

has a soul in three different bodies that live in three different

parts of the world.

day1_fea_prodlabC.indd 1 9/6/12 6:16 PM


WORLD

“For part of the day, he lives

in New York City, but that could

be Toronto for that matter,”

Knutsson explained, as he eyes

a possible Canadian co-production

partner.

And Swedish producer Peter

Hiltunen of Illusion Film &

Television has a family film

Hurricane in development as a

Swedish-language project and

will consider making the film in

English if the right Canadian

partner comes along.

“You could have Canadian

writers, a director possibly

and the financing, and then we

can do the film as a Swedish-

Canadian co-production,”

Hiltunen. Christian Juhl

Lemche, president of European

Film Promotion, said an

The Film Farm

just wrapped the

France-Canada

co-production

Foxfire and is seeking

funding for its

next film during the

producers lab.

increasingly globalized film industry has producers

looking outside Europe to create new stories with new

co-production partners.

Conversely, PLT is looking this year for Canadian producers

to collaborate more with smaller European countries, after long

partnering mainly with U.K. and French producers.

“Canada has co-production treaties with around 28 of the member

countries in EFP, and it’s nice to see that some of the smaller European

countries are represented at PLT this year,” Lemche added.

Of course the Canadians, while enjoying a more stable economic

climate, still face dwindling government subsidies at home and are

more than willing to extend a warm handshake to Europeans who

can supply financing and audiences from abroad.

Stephen Traynor of Toronto-based The Film Farm has just completed

the France-Canada co-production Foxfire, the first Englishlanguage

film by French director Laurent Cantet, and is now

developing Last Letter From Your Lover, based on the British novel

by Jojo Moyes and adapted by Canadian screenwriter Esta Spalding.

“Part of the film is shot in London or a European city,” Traynor

Funding is always on the table.

If someone writes a check, I

won’t turn it down.” — ANITA SHARMA

54

Number of films PLT

partner European Film

Promotion is backing

from 19 countries

said ahead of the TIFF industry mixer. “That’s not something we

can do ourselves, so we need to find an appropriate partner to

shoot in Europe.”

Elsewhere, Lauren Grant of Clique Pictures is developing a family

feature, Scavengers, from writers Jason and Sue Bourque.

The Canadian producer believes the sci-fi flick about a genius

teenage farm boy who meets a robot from outer space is ripe for

European partners to complete much-needed visual effects.

“I know, country-wise, that Germany, Romania, Hungary all have

strong visual effects companies. I’m also interested in the U.K. and

France,” Grant said, having tapped German visual effects creators

for Frost, a Canadian short she produced and is set to bow at TIFF.

Cross-border production also figures in Cap Diamant, a film by

writer-director Dominic Desjardins that Rayne Zukerman of Zazie

Films is bringing to PLT.

16

The visual effects for the

Canadian short Frost were

done by a German company.

The theatrical drama follows an aspiring actor in Quebec City

who enters a scam with a local art dealer which has the actor pretending

to be French to manipulate tourists.

That could have certain lead roles coming over from France to

structure a potential Canada-France co-production, Zukerman said.

“It’s all about meeting people and developing relationships,” she

said. “I’m still at the stage in my career where it’s hard to get projects

off the ground, so it’s important to forge relationships.”

Elsewhere, Anita Sharma of Studio Entertainment is bringing

Woman in Car to PLT, a feature from director Vanya Rose to be shot

in Montreal and could be ripe for French creative elements.

“Maybe we can find some [French] cast, a music composer,”

Sharma said. “Funding is always on the table. If someone writes a

check, I won’t turn it down.”

And Yanick Letourneau of Montreal-based Perepheria Productions

has a PLT slate in search of co-production partners that

includes Vacationship, a theatrical comedy written by Cynthia

Knight and to be shot mostly in the Caribbean, and X Quinientos,

a second feature at the treatment stage by director Juan Andres

Arrango, who premiered his first film, La Playa, at Cannes in May.

Letourneau said he’s also open to becoming a minority partner

on a Europe-Canada co-production.

“That’s what great about such an event — we will be together for

a couple days, you get to know the people better than five-minute

random meetings, and this is organized,” he said.

And if the chemistry is right, who knows? Some relationships

formed at PLT could be the start of a true cross-border romance. THR

day1_fea_prodlabC.indd 2 9/6/12 6:16 PM


CANADA YANICK LÉTOURNEAU PORTUGAL FERNANDO VENDRELL CANADA PATRICIA FOGLIATO

ICELAND ARNAR KNÚTSSON CANADA RAYNE ZUKERMAN SWEDEN PETER HILTUNEN

LUXEMBOURG DONATO ROTUNNO CANADA SVET DOYTCHINOV DENMARK TINE GREW PFEIFFER

CANADA SARAH TIMMINS SPAIN ISONA PASSOLA CANADA STEPHEN TRAYNOR

NICOLE GERHARDS

NIKO FILM

YANICK LÉTOURNEAU

PÉRIPHÉRIA PRODUCTIONS

ISONA PASSOLA

MASSA D’OR PRODUCCIONS

PETER HILTUNEN

ILLUSION FILM

SARAH TIMMINS

CORVID PICTURES

APRIL MULLEN

WANGO FILMS

Participating EFP members

RAYNE ZUKERMAN

ZAZIE FILMS

ADA SOLOMON

HIFILM PRODUCTIONS

ELS VANDEVORST

N279 ENTERTAINMENT

AISLING CHIN-YEE

PROSPECTOR FILMS

FERNANDO VENDRELL

DAVID & GOLIAS

DANIEL BEKERMAN

SCYTHIA FILMS

DAN WECHSLER

BORD CADRE FILMS

SVET DOYTCHINOV

YANTRA FILMS

TINE GREW PFEIFFER

ALPHAVILLE PICTURES

RAJVINDER UPPAL LAUREN GRANT

AT THE END OF THE DAY PROD. CLIQUE PICTURES

ARNAR KNÚTSSON

FILMUS PRODUCTIONS

With the support of MEDIA Mundus EFP is supported by

Sponsored by

© Carlos Ramos

STEPHEN TRAYNOR

THE FILM FARM

YORGOS TSOURGIANNIS

HORSEFLY PRODUCTIONS

MACDARA KELLEHER

FASTNET FILMS

ANITA K. SHARMA

STUDIO ENTERTAINMENT

DONATO ROTUNNO

TARANTULA LUXEMBOURG

PATRICIA FOGLIATO

ENIGMATICO FILMS

ROMANIA ADA SOLOMON CANADA LAUREN GRANT SWITZERLAND DAN WECHSLER

CANADA ANITA K. SHARMA GERMANY NICOLE GERHARDS CANADA APRIL MULLEN

Danish Film Institute, EYE Film Institute Netherlands, Film Fund Luxembourg, German Films, Greek Film Center,

ICA I.P./Portugal, ICAA/Spain, Icelandic Film Center, Irish Film Board, Romanian Film Promotion, Swedish Film Institute, Swiss Films

www.efp-online.com www.omdc.on.ca www.tiff.net contact during the event +49 160 440 9595

© Erik Molberg

CANADA RAJVINDER UPPAL THE NETHERLANDS ELS VANDEVORST CANADA DANIEL BEKERMAN

GREECE YORGOS TSOURGIANNIS CANADA AISLING CHIN-YEE IRELAND MACDARA KELLEHER

efp-online.com

European Film Promotion D1_090712.indd 1 9/4/12 1:24 PM


A DANGEROUS METHOD

COSMOPOLIS

INESCAPABLE

TIFF ® 2012 Gala Presentation

MIDNIGHT’S CHILDREN

TIFF ® 2012 Gala Presentation

THE BANG BANG CLUB

FOXFIRE:

CONFESSIONS OF A GIRL GANG

TIFF ® 2012 Special Presentation

MAD SHIP

THE WHISTLEBLOWER

CAIRO TIME

Best Canadian Feature at TIFF ® 2009

HOME AGAIN

TIFF ® 2012 Contemporary World Cinema

THE MAIDEN DANCED TO DEATH

ONTARIO FILMMAKERS MAKE A GREAT CHOICE FOR A CO-PRODUCTION PARTNER

OMDC works to bring our filmmakers together with the rest of the world to create new opportunities.

At TIFF 2012, OMDC is please to present two initiatives with our partners – the International Financing

Forum (IFF) and the Producers Lab Toronto (PLT). OMDC’s Film Fund is available for co-productions

and Canada has co-production treaties with over 50 countries. Be part of it. OMDC.on.ca

TIFF is a registered trademark of Toronto International Film Festival Inc.

We’ve got it going

Let’s Make

Movies

Together

Ontario Media Development D1_090712.indd 1 9/4/12 1:26 PM


REVIEWS

Looper

An engaging, neatly worked-out time-travel thriller

with Bruce Willis and Joseph Gordon-Levitt playing

the same role By Todd McCarthy

LOOPER IS A CLEVER,

entertaining science fiction

thriller that neatly blurs

the line between suicide and

murder. An existential conundrum

wrapped in a narrowly

conceived yarn about victims

sent back in time to be bumped

off by assassins called loopers,

Rian Johnson’s third and most

ambitious feature keeps the

action popping while sustaining

interest in the long arc of a story

about a man assigned to kill the

30-years-older version of himself.

A lively, high-profile choice

to open this year’s Toronto

International Film Festival, this

Sony release co-starring Bruce

Willis and Joseph Gordon-Levitt

in the same role should chalk up

sizable returns in the wake of its

Sept. 28 theatrical bow.

Probably the shakiest aspect

of Johnson’s original screenplay

is what it asks the viewer to buy

about the future: A mere 62 years

from now, in 2074, time travel

has become possible, but such a

momentous breakthrough is limited

to serving as a body-disposal

system. Under the prevailing

authority, time jumping is strictly

outlawed because of its potential

for messing with history. A large

criminal mob, run by an overlord

called The Rainmaker, defiantly

uses it but only as a vehicle for

assassination, with “loopers” — disreputable

gunmen living in 2044 —

laying in wait for people to execute

so no bodies or other evidence can

be found in the future.

But the premise is established in

nifty fashion; the doomed, hooded

with hands bound behind them,

suddenly materialize in an empty

field, and the looper immediately

blows them away with his blunderbuss.

One such executioner is Joe

(Gordon-Levitt), a retro-looking

hipster who drives a very old red

Miata and wears ties, “a 20th

century affectation” that offends

his crankily genial boss, Abe (Jeff

Daniels). If he can get out of this

racket, he says he’d like to go to

France, which earns him further

scorn from the older man; “I’m

from the future, you should go to

China,” he scolds.

Backed by a cynically confessional

voice-over track from Joe

that is not as self-consciously

hardboiled as the commentary

Gordon-Levitt read for Johnson

in Brick seven years ago, Looper

mostly is set in a seedy metropolis

that doesn’t look all that different

from sketchy neighborhoods in

19

Willis stars as a

man in search of

his wife’s killer.

some big cities today; there are

derelicts, bombed-out buildings,

ruined cars and enough other

signs of urban ills to suggest that,

in Johnson’s view, things will just

gradually decline over the next

three decades.

Joe hangs out in clubs, sees

a sexy woman (Piper Perabo)

who works in one of them and

tries to help a friend and fellow

looper, Seth (Paul Dano), who’s

imminently endangered by a new

development that’s come down

from on high: They’re “closing

all the loops,” meaning they’re

sending the “future selves” of all

the loopers back to be killed.

Almost immediately, Joe is in

the same jam. When, a half-hour

into the film, he goes to the field to

do his next job, the guy who pops

up to be shot is not hooded. Joe’s

hesitation allows the older man to

escape, and it’s clear who he is: It’s

Joe as his older self. And, for his

failure to kill him, young Joe is in

a pile of trouble with Abe and his

“gats,” first-class hired guns.

When the two Joes finally sit

down — across from each other in

a diner in the middle of nowhere

there’s no doubt they’re working

at cross purposes: Young Joe

is determined to kill his older

self, while old Joe is dead set on

tracking down and taking out The

Rainmaker, who would be a little

kid in 2044, so his late wife won’t

die at his hands after all.

The biggest problem facing the

makers of Looper is how to make

the audience believe that the trim,

long-faced Gordon-Levitt could

somehow change so much in 30

years that he would look like the

thicker-built and shorter-nosed

Willis. The solution lay in altering

the younger actor’s appearance,

imperceptibly at first, but gradually

to morph his dark eyes into

Willis’ gray-green and to reshape

his nose and eyebrows, either with

makeup or digitally or perhaps

both. At first, the effect is a bit

odd, and you can’t quite put your

finger on what’s off; then it feels

downright weird to be looking at a

version of Gordon-Levitt who is no

longer the actor you’ve known for a

few years now.

This is especially noticeable

during the film’s second half, much

of which takes place at young

Joe’s place of refuge, the isolated

home of feisty young farmer and

single mom Sara (Emily Blunt),

who has an unusually gifted son,

Cid (Pierce Gagnon). Even as

the temperature is kept at a low

simmer, the film’s pace deliberately

is slowed here to develop

some intimacy between these two

isolated people and give some

screen time to the kid, who pretty

obviously will provide the reason

for old Joe to eventually head for

the farm. The eventual ending is

great, the resolution to the tricky

time maneuvering very impressively

worked out.

Shot mostly in Louisiana, with

a bit done in Shanghai, the film

looks tightly made on a budget

but sacrifices nothing for that; the

world depicted looks dirty, dangerous

and ramshackle, with a few

high-tech touches here and there.

Their physical disparity notwithstanding,

Gordon-Levitt and

Willis both come across strongly,

while Blunt effectively reveals

Sara’s tough and vulnerable sides.

Daniels is particularly amusing

as the garrulous old enforcer

holding down the future’s outpost

in the past.

Production Companies

FilmDistrict, Endgame

Entertainment, DMG Entertainment,

Ram Bergman Prods.

Writer-director Rian Johnson

Cast Bruce Willis, Joseph Gordon-

Levitt, Emily Blunt

day1_reviewsA.indd 19 9/6/12 6:53 PM


REVIEWS

Franco stars as

a wanna-be gangsta

who adopts a posse

of bad girls.

Spring Breakers

James Franco, Selena Gomez and Vanessa Hudgens hit the beach and

the bong in eternal maverick Harmony Korine’s latest By David Rooney

EVEN BY THE ELASTIC MEASURE OF

James Franco’s unpredictable career,

the actor gives one of his more bizarre

performances in Harmony Korine’s Spring

Breakers. Playing a Florida white-trash

gangsta with beaded cornrows and a

gleaming mouthful of metal, he’s a cross

between Bo Derek in 10 and Richard Kiel in

Moonraker. At one point he sits poolside at

a cheesy white grand piano and sings a Britney

Spears ballad while three coeds in DTF

pants and pink ski masks do an impromptu

dance routine with AK-47s.

Sounds good? Well, like the film as a

whole, Franco’s borderline parodistic performance

is interesting only up to a point. It

might be one of Korine’s more conventional

narratives, but this is basically a porn-

pulp snort of derision at the American

Dream and the youthful search for self,

packaged as Beach Blanket Bingo on acid.

It has hypnotic visual style and a dense,

driving soundscape. But it’s also too

monotonous and thematically empty to

be seriously provocative.

More than by Franco, the film’s profile will

be boosted by the presence of former Disney

Channel cuties Selena Gomez and Vanessa

Hudgens among all the bong-hitting, boozing,

coke-snorting, breast-baring, grinding

bodies. “Poetry in motion” is how Franco’s

drug-dealing rapper Alien describes the

crowd at a beach beer blast. “Bikinis and big

booties, y’all. That’s what life is about.”

Gomez plays the pointedly named Faith,

a Christian youth group member who has

somehow remained close to three reprobate

skanks she has known since kindergarten:

Candy (Hudgens), Brit (Ashley Benson) and

Cotty (Rachel Korine, the writer-director’s

wife). Cotty has pink highlights and a sullen

streak, while interchangeable Candy and Brit

are defined only by their slutty blondness.

Desperate to get out of their dull college

town but short on cash, the bad girls wield

fake guns and hammers to hold up a Chicken

Shack, terrorizing the customers. The

adrenaline rush they get from this taste of

violent crime hints at what’s to come.

Even before they hit Florida, the action

time-shuffles Girls Gone Wild/MTV-style

montages of hard-partying college kids in

various stages of inebriation and undress.

Faith seems unsettled when her pals re-enact

the robbery for her, but she nonetheless partakes

of the proceeds as the four girls cruise

around town on rented scooters.

Here and throughout, voice-over is featured

heavily, much of it vapid stuff about wanting

all this to last forever. Korine and editor

Douglas Crise use repetition in the images

and dialogue to obsessive effect. Cinematographer

Benoit Debie’s visuals, with their sunblasted

exteriors, pink skies, neon splashes

and candy color washes, have a cool allure.

And the electronic score by Cliff Martinez and

dubstep musician Skrillex that saturates every

scene (along with a sprinkling of chart hits)

is no less propulsive than Martinez’s music

was in Drive or Contagion. But there’s a nagging

sense that a sliver of substance has been

pumped full of growth hormones in post.

20

When the girls are arrested during

a bust at a druggy party, they are hauled in

their bikini tops and cutoffs before a judge

who orders them to pay a fine or spend

another night in the lockup. “This wasn’t

supposed to happen,” says Faith in whispery

voice-over. “This can’t be the end of the

dream.” In fact, it’s the beginning of the

dream, as Korine steers things in a more hallucinogenic

direction.

Alien covers the babes’ bail, and while

they question his motives, they climb aboard

his pimped-out sports car. A dim bulb with

lots of swagger, he paints a self-glorifying

picture of himself, flashing wads of cash

and an arsenal of weaponry. In one of many

instances of Korine having fun with metatextual

cine-references, Alien’s flat screen plays

Scarface on a loop.

Faith becomes uncomfortable at his

sleazy crib. After a tense exchange in which

he comes on strong — nicely played by

Gomez — she extricates herself from the

situation and takes the bus home. Alien

insists on the other girls remaining, which

signals their endangerment. But it turns out

they can more than hold their own.

Like ducks to water, they slip into his

crime crew, provide girl-on-girl entertainment

and flip sexual domination roles with

the receptive Alien. It soon becomes apparent

that he has nothing on these girls in

terms of their appetite for excess and amorality.

Cotty takes off after being wounded

by a bullet from Alien’s turf rival Archie

(Gucci Mane), and Candy and Brit lead the

charge as they strike back. That they do this

in matching fluoro-yellow bikinis underlines

that the bacchanal is primarily a pop-art

exercise — a sour lollipop that loses its flavor.

However it’s intended, the attitudinal

posing curbs any capacity to shock. From

the minute Alien steps in, the film becomes

like a more extreme version of one of those

Saturday Night Live video sketches, with

Justin Timberlake and Andy Samberg

flaunting exaggerated hip-hop style.

The setting and aspects of the

aesthetic will attract comparison to this

summer’s Magic Mike. But while Korine

douses the air with dreamy melancholia,

Steven Soderbergh’s film came by its underlying

sense of emptiness and restless longing

far more naturally. That said, Spring Breakers

seems bound to acquire at least minor

cult status.

Production Companies Muse Productions,

Rabbit Bandini Productions, Radar Pictures

Director-screenwriter Harmony Korine

Cast James Franco, Selena Gomez,

Vanessa Hudgens

day1_reviewsA.indd 20 9/6/12 6:53 PM


Written and Directed by Anand Gandhi

WORLD PREMIERE

Fri, 7 Sep 2.30 pm - Cineplex Odeon Yonge & Dundas 7 (Public)

Sat, 8 Sep 1.15 pm - Scotiabank Theatre 10 (P&I)

Tue, 11 Sep 9.15 pm - TIFF Bell Lightbox 5 (P&I)

Sun, 16 Sep 12.00 pm - Scotiabank Theatre 4 (Public)

OPENING FILM OF “CITY TO CITY”

TORONTO OFFICE:

Suite 1853, Hyatt Regency Hotel

Hotel Phone: (416) 343-1234

E-mail: market@fortissimo.nl

Fortissimo Films FP D1_090712.indd 1 9/5/12 11:30 AM


REVIEWS

The Company You Keep

Robert Redford makes a welcome return to double-duty

as director and lead actor By David Rooney

ROBERT REDFORD DOES HIS

most compelling work in

some time as both actor

and director in The Company

You Keep, a tense yet admirably

restrained thriller about a fugitive

forced out of hiding after

30 years to prove his innocence.

Adapted with clarity and intelligence

by Lem Dobbs from

Neil Gordon’s novel and lent

distinguishing heft by its roster

of screen veterans, this gripping

drama provides an absorbing

reflection on the courage and

cost of dissent.

Recalling aspects of Sidney

Lumet’s poignant Running

on Empty from 1988, but with

a more subdued emotional

palette, the film opens with

vintage-style news footage

detailing charges against members

of radical antiwar group the

Weather Underground in the

early 1970s for plotting to blow

up buildings in multiple U.S.

cities. A second report follows,

attributing responsibility to the

same group for a Michigan bank

robbery during which a security

guard was killed. While the

robbers were identified, only one

was apprehended.

Hotel Transylvania

A scarily unfunny animated monster movie

that goes awry right off the bat

By Michael Rechtshaffen

T HE

SECOND FEATURE IN AS MANY

months to contain animated zombies

(with Tim Burton’s Frankenweenie

lurking just around the corner), Hotel Transylvania

checks in as an anemic example of

pure concept over precious little content.

Despite the proven talents of first-time

feature director Genndy Tartakovsky

(Dexter’s Laboratory), writers Peter Baynham

(Arthur Christmas) and SNL vet Robert

Smigel and a voice cast headed by Adam

Sandler and Andy Samberg, the collaboration

falls flat virtually from the get-go,

serving up half-hearted sight gags that have

a habit of landing with an ominous thud.

Back in the present, Sharon

Solarz (Susan Sarandon), who

was involved in the robbery

and has been living in hiding

as a Vermont housewife in the

decades since, is preparing

to turn herself in to the FBI

when she is arrested entering

New York state. Coverage from

aggressive young Albany newspaper

reporter Ben Shepard

(Shia LaBeouf) links her to local

civil rights lawyer Jim Grant

(Redford), who declined to take

Solarz’s case.

Eager to impress his prickly

editor (Stanley Tucci), Ben

exploits his access to Diana

(Anna Kendrick), a college

hookup now working for the

bureau. Despite warnings from

her boss Cornelius (Terrence

Howard) to back off, Ben

persists, digging for insights.

His legwork reveals that while

Jim has long been a respected

community member, raising his

11-year-old daughter Isabel (Jacqueline

Evancho) alone since the

death of his wife in an accident

a year earlier, no record of him

exists before 1979. Putting two

and two together, Ben discovers,

just ahead of the feds, that

22

LaBeouf plays a young

reporter who delves into

the mysterious past of a

civil rights lawyer.

Jim is Nick Sloan, another of the

Michigan robbers.

This establishing action is set

up with methodical efficiency

in Dobbs’ screenplay, gaining

momentum when Jim/Nick

whisks Isabel out of town and

into the care of his brother (Chris

Cooper) just as the FBI is closing

in. Meanwhile, Ben continues to

look for neat answers to messy

questions. But a prison interview

with Sharon gives him some

understanding of the commitment

and idealism of the

’70s radicals. This affecting

scene is played with perspicacity,

toughness and compassion

by Sarandon.

Propelled by another moody

score from Cliff Martinez

(Drive, Contagion) that adds a

contemporary edge to Redford’s

solidly conventional style, the

remainder of the film plays out

in pursuit mode.

While it provides for some

Being given a public airing at the Toronto

International Film Festival ahead of its

official Sept. 28 opening, the film could

benefit initially from a monster marketing

push from Sony, but it’s unlikely the “No

Vacancy” sign will be lit for long.

Assuming an unsteady Transylvanian

accent which, like his bat wings, tends to

flit in and out of the picture, Sandler’s

overprotective daddy Dracula is having

trouble shielding his daughter Mavis (Selena

Gomez) from outside elements on the eve

of her 118th birthday. Determined to shut

himself off from those elements after the

death of his wife a century or so earlier at

the hands of an angry mob, Dracula had

constructed a refuge of an exclusive resort

where he and his monstrous ilk could feel

free to be themselves.

For the most part, there’s just a lot of

Dracula shields

his daughter in

a monsters-only

hideout

passing commentary on the

journalistic process and the slow

death of print media, making the

ambitious reporter such a driving

figure perhaps mutes the focus

a little. LaBeouf acquits himself

well in the role. But tracking

Ben’s slow-blooming integrity is

a somewhat prosaic detour in the

concluding scenes, occasioning

some speechy wisdom from Nick

when they finally meet again.

The storytelling is nonetheless

robust and thematically

rich, strengthened by a fine cast.

Redford has done this kind of

earnest man of conscience countless

times before, but he brings

such gravitas and thoughtfulness

to play that he keeps us firmly in

Nick’s corner.

Production companies Voltage

Pictures, Wildwood Enterprises

Cast Robert Redford, Shia

LaBeouf, Julie Christie

Director: Robert Redford

dashing about the hotel’s cavernous hallways

as the assembled voice cast attempts to

lend some personality to the underdeveloped

characters.

Production companies Sony Pictures

Animation

Director Genndy Tartakovsky

day1_reviewsA.indd 22 9/6/12 6:53 PM


FESTIVAL SCREENING GUIDE

TODAY

8:30 White Elephant

(P&I) Special Presentation

Cinema 3

8:45 The Pervert’s Guide to

Ideology (P&I) Mavericks

Scotiabank 3

9:00 Three Worlds (P&I)

Contemporary World Cinema

Scotiabank 8; Dredd

3D (P&I) Midnight Madness

Scotiabank 13; Barbara

(P&I) Contemporary World

Cinema Cinema 2

9:15 Short Cuts Canada:

Programme #1 - 2012 (P&I)

Short Cuts Canada; Cinema

4 - Paul & Leah Atkinson

Family Cinema; Lore (P&I)

Special Presentation Scotiabank

2; Fill the Void (P&I)

Discovery Scotiabank 11;

Clandestine Childhood

(P&I) Contemporary World

Cinema Scotiabank 6

9:30 Spring Breakers (P&I)

Special Presentation Scotiabank

4; Midnight’s Children

(P&I) Gala Presentation

Cinema 1; Lunarcy! (P&I)

TIFF Docs Scotiabank 9

9:45 Therese Desqueyroux

(P&I) Special Presentation

Scotiabank 10; Stories

We Tell (P&I) Special

Presentation Scotiabank

1; God Loves Caviar (P&I)

Contemporary World

Cinema Cinema 5 - NBC

Universal Cinema

10:00 Pusher (P&I) Vanguard

Scotiabank 5; Jackie

(P&I) Contemporary World

Cinema Scotiabank 7

10:45 The Interval (P&I)

Discovery Cinema 3

11:15 Post Tenebras Lux

(P&I) Wavelengths Scotiabank

8; Hotel Transylvania

(P&I)TIFF Kids Scotiabank 13

11:30 Out in the Dark (P&I)

Discovery Scotiabank 11;

No (P&I) Special Presentation

Scotiabank 3; On

the Road (Public) Special

Presentation The Bloor Hot

Docs Cinema

11:45 Mekong Hotel

preceded by Big in Vietnam

(P&I) Wavelengths

Scotiabank 9; London - The

Modern Babylon (P&I)

TIFF Docs Scotiabank 2;

Imagine (P&I) Contemporary

World Cinema

Scotiabank 6

12:00 The We and the I

(P&I) Vanguard Cinema 2;

The Central Park Five (P&I)

TIFF Docs Scotiabank 4;

Ernest & Célestine (P&I)

TIFF Kids Cinema 4 - Paul

& Leah Atkinson Family

Cinema; A Few Hours

of Spring (P&I) Special

Presentation Scotiabank 10;

Rust and Bone (Public)

Special Presentation

Ryerson Theatre

12:15 When Night Falls

(P&I) Wavelengths Scotiabank

5; Reincarnated (P&I)

TIFF Docs Scotiabank 1

12:30 The End of Time (P&I)

Masters Scotiabank 7; Far

Out Isn’t Far Enough: The

Tomi Ungerer Story (P&I)

TIFF Docs Cinema 5 - NBC

Universal Cinema; The War

of the Volcanoes: Bergman

& Magnani preceded by

Stromboli (Public) TIFF

Cinematheque Cinema 3

12:45 The Perks of Being

a Wallflower (P&I) Special

Presentation Cinema 1;

Blancanieves (P&I) Discovery

Scotiabank 8

14:00 Watchtower (P&I)

Contemporary World Cinema

Scotiabank 5; Rebelle

(P&I) Special Presentation

Scotiabank 3; Paradise:

Love (P&I) Contemporary

World Cinema Cinema 4 -

Paul & Leah Atkinson Family

Cinema; Crimes of Mike

Recket (P&I) Contemporary

World Cinema Scotiabank 9;

Children of Sarajevo (Public)

Contemporary World

Cinema Cineplex Yonge &

Dundas 3

14:15 Picture Day (P&I)

Discovery Scotiabank 6; Camp

14: Total Control Zone (P&I)

TIFF Docs Scotiabank 10

14:30 The Sessions (P&I)

Special Presentation

Scotiabank 1; Home Again

(P&I) Contemporary World

Cinema Scotiabank 11; Dangerous

Liaisons (P&I) Gala

Presentation Scotiabank 4;

Ship of Theseus (Public)

City to City Cineplex Yonge &

Dundas 7

14:45 The Fifth Season

(P&I) Wavelengths

Cinema 5 - NBC Universal

Cinema; Sightseers (P&I)

Vanguard Scotiabank 2

15:00 Something In The

Air (P&I) Masters Cinema

A drug dealer

helps four college

girls finance their

party time in

Spring Breakers.

2; Augustine (P&I) Discovery

Scotiabank 7; The

Gatekeepers (Public) TIFF

Docs The Bloor Hot Docs

Cinema; Paradise: Love

(Public) Contemporary

World Cinema Cineplex

Yonge & Dundas 6; Imogene

(Public) Special Presentation

Ryerson Theatre; Kinshasa

Kids (Public) Contemporary

World Cinema Cineplex

Yonge & Dundas 9

15:15 The Great Kilapy

(Public) Contemporary

World Cinema Cineplex

Yonge & Dundas 2

16:00 After the Battle

(Extended Q&A - 2nd Public)

Contemporary World Cinema

Cinema 3

16:15 Blackbird (P&I)

Discovery Scotiabank

9; Artifact (P&I) TIFF Docs

Cinema 1

16:30 The Sapphires

(P&I) Special Presentation

Scotiabank 3; Bestiaire (P&I)

Wavelengths Cinema

4 - Paul & Leah Atkinson

Family Cinema

16:45 The Suicide Shop

(P&I) Special Presentation

Scotiabank 1; A Liar’s Autobiography:

The Untrue

Story of Monty Python’s

Graham Chapman

(P&I) Special Presentation

Scotiabank 2

17:00 Mushrooming (P&I)

Discovery Cinema 5 - NBC

Universal Cinema; John Dies

at the End (P&I) Midnight

Madness Scotiabank 11; Dormant

Beauty (P&I) Special

Presentation Scotiabank 4

17:15 Student (P&I) Masters

Scotiabank 7

24

17:30 Kon-tiki (Public)

Special Presentation Winter

Garden Theatre

17:45 Three Kids preceded

by Peripeteia (Public)

Contemporary World Cinema

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 3

18:00 The Place Beyond

the Pines (Public) Special

Presentation Princess of

Wales; The Perverts Guide to

Ideology (Public) Mavericks

Isabel Bader Theatre; Stories

We Tell (Public) Special Presentation

The Bloor Hot Docs

Cinema; Spring Breakers

(Public) Special Presentation

Ryerson Theatre; Shanghai

(Public) City to City

Cinema 2; Call Girl (Public)

Discovery Cineplex Yonge &

Dundas 7; Anna Karenina

(35mm Elgin) Special Presentation

Visa Screening Room

(Elgin); All That Matters is

Past (Public) Contemporary

World Cinema Cineplex Yonge

& Dundas 9

18:15 Janeane From Des

Moines (Public) Discovery

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 2

18:30 Zabana! (Public)

Contemporary World Cinema

Cinema 4 - Paul & Leah

Atkinson Family Cinema;

Roman Polanski: Odd

Man Out (Public) TIFF Docs

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 6;

Out in the Dark (Public)

Discovery Cineplex Yonge &

Dundas 10; Argo (Public)

Gala Presentation Roy

Thomson Hall

18:45 Berberian Sound

Studio (P&I) Vanguard

Scotiabank 9; The We and

the I (Public) Vanguard

Scotiabank 1; Reincarnated

(Public) TIFF Docs Cinema 1;

Gone Fishing (Public)

Contemporary World Cinema

Scotiabank 2

19:00 Reality (P&I) Special

Presentation Scotiabank 3;

Wavelengths #1 - 2012:

Under a Pacific Sun

(Public) Wavelengths Jackman

Hall (AGO)

19:15 Road North (P&I)

Contemporary World Cinema

Cinema 5 - NBC Universal

Cinema; Short Cuts Canada:

Programme #1 - 2012

(Public) Short Cuts Canada

Cinema 3

19:30 Mumbai’s King (P&I)

City to City Scotiabank 11;

Sleepers Wake (Public)

Contemporary World Cinema

Scotiabank 4

20:45 The Holy Quarternity

(Public) Contemporary World

Cinema Cineplex Yonge &

Dundas 2

21:00 The Master (Public)

Special Presentation

Princess of Wales; The Deep

(Public) Special Presentation

Cinema 2; Pusher

(Public) Vanguard The Bloor

Hot Docs Cinema; Men At

Lunch (Public) TIFF Docs

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 9;

Him, Here, After (Public)

Contemporary World Cinema

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 6;

Ginger and Rosa (Public)

Special Presentation Visa

Screening Room (Elgin); 7

Boxes (Public) Discovery

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 3

21:15 Wasteland (Public)

Discovery Scotiabank 2; Thy

Womb (Public) Contemporary

World Cinema Cinema 4 - Paul

& Leah Atkinson Family

Cinema; Fidaï (Public) TIFF

Docs Cineplex Yonge

& Dundas 10

day1_screeningguide.indd 24 9/6/12 2:38 PM


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GOTHAM

PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY. rUSSIAN STANDArD ® VoDKA. ProDUCT oF rUSSIA. 100% GrAIN. 40 % AlC/Vol. © 2012. IMPorTeD bY rUSSIAN STANDArD VoDKA, NeW YorK, NY.

AWARDS

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or call Steven Pfeiffer,

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spfeiffer@ifp.org

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P r e M I e r S P o N S o r S P r e S e N T I N G S P o N S o r

o F F I C I A l S P I r I T o F F I C I A l W I N e

P A r T N e r

o F F I C I A l A U C T I o N

P A r T N e r

INDEPENDENT FILM

NOVEMBER 26, 2012

CIPrIANI

WAll STreeT

NeW YorK

o F F I C I A l H o T e l o F F I C I A l P A r T N e r

The Gotham Independent

Film Awards, selected by

distinguished juries and

presented in New York City,

the home of independent

film, are the first honors of the

film award season. This public

showcase honors the filmmaking

community, expands the

audience for independent

films, and supports the work

that IFP does behind the

scenes throughout the year to

bring such films to fruition.

Gotham IFP D1_090712.indd 1 8/31/12 11:45 AM

Partials Page 25.indd 1 9/6/12 2:30 PM


FESTIVAL SCREENING GUIDE

21:30 Blondie (P&I)

Vanguard Scotiabank 11;

What Maisie Knew (Public)

Gala Presentation Roy

Thomson Hall; Like Someone

in Love (Public) Masters

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 7;

How to Make Money Selling

Drugs (Public) TIFF Docs

Scotiabank 1; Frances Ha

(Public) Special Presentation

Ryerson Theatre

21:45 Shahid (P&I) City to

City Cinema 5 - NBC Universal

Cinema; The Land of Hope

(Public) Contemporary World

Cinema Winter Garden Theatre;

Picture Day (Public) Discovery

Isabel Bader Theatre;

Perret in France and Algeria

(Public) Wavelengths Cinema

3; Me and You (Public)

Masters Scotiabank 3; Dead

Europe (Public) Contemporary

World Cinema Cinema 1

22:00 In the Name of Love

(Public) Contemporary World

Cinema Scotiabank 4

23:59 Seven Psychopaths

(Public) Midnight Madness

Ryerson Theatre

TOMORROW

8:30 The Place Beyond the

Pines (P&I) Special Presentation

Scotiabank 2

8:45 What Maisie Knew (P&I)

Gala Presentation Scotiabank

1; Roman Polanski: Odd Man

Out (P&I) TIFF Docs Cinema 3

9:00 The Master (P&I) Special

Presentation Cinema 1; Perret

in France and Algeria (P&I)

Wavelengths Scotiabank 6;

My Awkward Sexual Adventure

(P&I) Contemporary

World Cinema Cinema 4 -

Paul & Leah Atkinson Family

Cinema; In the Name of Love

(P&I) Contemporary World

Cinema Scotiabank 8; Reincarnated

(Public) TIFF Docs

The Bloor Hot Docs Cinema;

Out in the Dark (Public)

Discovery Cineplex Yonge &

Dundas 6

9:15 Zabana! (P&I) Contemporary

World Cinema

Cinema 5 - NBC Universal

Cinema; The Deep (P&I)

Special Presentation Scotiabank

10; Quartet (P&I)

Special Presentation

Cinema; Love is All You Need

(P&I) Special Presentation

Scotiabank 13; Ginger and

Rosa (P&I) Special Presentation

Scotiabank 3; Paradise:

Love (Public) Contemporary

World Cinema Isabel

Bader Theatre

9:30 Mea Maxima Culpa:

Silence in the House of God

(P&I) TIFF Docs Scotiabank 9;

Janeane From Des Moines

(P&I) Discovery Scotiabank

4; Shanghai (Public) City to

City Cineplex Yonge & Dundas

7; Me and You (Public)

Masters Cineplex Yonge &

Dundas 2; Far Out Isnt Far

Enough: The Tomi Ungerer

Story (Public) TIFF Docs

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 9

9:45 Gone Fishing (P&I)

Contemporary World Cineman

Scotiabank 7; Children

of Sarajevo (Public) Contemporary

World Cinema

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 3

10:00 Rhino Season

(P&I) Special Presentation

Scotiabank 11

The documentary

How to Make Money

Selling Drugs

features interviews

with dealers,

prison guards and

anti-drug lobbyists.

10:30 Museum Hours (P&I)

Contemporary World Cinema

Scotiabank 5

10:45 Inescapable (P&I)

Gala Presentation Cinema 3

11:00 Frances Ha (P&I)

Special Presentation

Scotiabank 1; The Place

Beyond the Pines (Public)

Special Presentation

Ryerson Theatre; Argo (Public)

Gala Presentation Visa

Screening Room (Elgin)

11:15 Short Cuts Canada:

Programme #2 - 2012 (P&I)

Short Cuts Canada Cinema 4

- Paul & Leah Atkinson Family

Cinema; Dead Europe

(P&I) Contemporary World

Cinema Scotiabank 3

11:30 No Place on Earth

(P&I) TIFF Docs Scotiabank

4; Night Across the Street

(P&I) Masters Scotiabank 6

11:45 The Deflowering of

Eva van End (P&I) Discovery

Scotiabank 9; Lines of

Wellington (P&I) Special

Presentation Cinema 5 - NBC

Universal Cinema; The We

and the I (Public) Vanguard

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 6;

Stories We Tell (Public)

Special Presentation

Cinema 2

12:00 When Day Breaks

(P&I) Masters Scotiabank 8;

Everybody Has a Plan (P&I)

Special Presentation

Scotiabank 13; 9.79*

(Public) TIFF DocsThe

Bloor Hot Docs Cinema;

Frances Ha (Public) Special

Presentation Winter

Garden Theatre

26

12:15 Twice Born (P&I)

Gala Presentation Scotiabank

2; The Holy Quaternity

(P&I) Contemporary

World Cinema Scotiabank

11; The Great Kilapy (Public)

Contemporary World

Cinema Cineplex Yonge

& Dundas 10; The End of

Time (Public) Masters

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 2;

Anna Karenina (Public)

Special Presentation Isabel

Bader Theatre

12:30 90 Minutes (P&I)

Vanguard Scotiabank 7;

Dredd 3D (Public) Midnight

Madness Cineplex Yonge &

Dundas 7; All That Matters

is Past (Public) Contemporary

World Cinema

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 9

12:45 Igor & the Cranes

Journey (Public) TIFF Kids

Cinema 3; What Maisie

Knew (Public) Gala Presentation

Cinema 1; Three Kids

preceded by Peripeteia

(Public) Contemporary

World Cinema Cineplex

Yonge & Dundas 3

13:00 Gebo and the

Shadow (P&I) Masters

Scotiabank 1; Tabu

(Public) Wavelengths

Jackman Hall (AGO)

13:15 Ship of Theseus (P&I)

City to City Scotiabank 10;

Short Cuts Canada: Programme

#1 - 2012 (Public)

Short Cuts Canada

Cinema 4 - Paul & Leah

Atkinson Family Cinema

13:30 Thy Womb (P&I)

Contemporary World

Cinema Scotiabank 5;

Thermae Romae (Public)

Gala Presentation Roy

Thomson Hall

13:45 Outrage Beyond (P&I)

Special Presentation

Scotiabank 3

14:00 How to Make Money

Selling Drugs (P&I) TIFF

Docs Scotiabank 4; Gangs

of Wasseypur: Part One

(P&I) City to City Scotiabank

9; 7 Boxes (P&I) Discovery

Scotiabank 6

14:15 Wasteland (P&I)

Discovery Scotiabank 11; All

That You Possess (P&I)

Masters Scotiabank 8

14:30 More Than Honey

(P&I) TIFF Docs Scotiabank

13; West of Memphis

(Public) Mavericks Ryerson

Theatre; Much Ado About

Nothing (Public) Special

Presentation Visa Screening

Room (Elgin); Hotel

Transylvania (Public)

TIFF Kids Princess of Wales

15:00 The Walls of Dakar

preceded by Joe Ouakam

(P&I) TIFF Docs Cinema

5 - NBC Universal Cinema;

End of Watch (P&I) Special

Presentation Scotiabank 2;

Call Girl (P&I) Discovery

Scotiabank 7; Satellite

Boy (Public) Discovery

Cinema 2; Imogene (Public)

Special Presentation The

Bloor Hot Docs Cinema

15:15 The Color of the Chameleon

(Public) Discovery

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas

2; Jackie (Public) Contemporary

World Cinema

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 7;

First Comes Love (Public)

TIFF Docs Cineplex Yonge &

Dundas 10; Blancanieves

(Public) Discovery Cinema

3; The Master (Public)

Special Presentation

Cinema 1

15:30 The Brass Teapot

(Public) Discovery Isabel

Bader Theatre; Seven

Psychopaths (Public) Midnight

Madness Scotiabank

1; Picture Day (Public)

Discovery Cineplex Yonge

& Dundas 6; Men at Lunch

(Public) TIFF Docs Cineplex

Yonge & Dundas 9

15:45 Comrade Kim Goes

Flying (Public) Contemporary

World Cinema

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas

3; Bitter Ash (Public) TIFF

Cinematheque Cinema

4 - Paul & Leah Atkinson

Family Cinema

16:00 differently, Molussia

(Public) Wavelengths Jackman

Hall (AGO)

16:15 Hannah Arendt (P&I)

Special Presentation

Scotiabank 3

16:30 A Late Quartet (P&I)

Special Presentation Scotiabank

4; Everybody Has a

Plan (Public WG + S2)

Special Presentation Winter

Garden Theatre

16:45 Come Out and Play

(P&I) Midnight Madness

Scotiabank 11

17:15 Gangs of Wasseypur:

Part Two (P&I) City to City

Scotiabank 9; Baby Blues

day1_screeningguide.indd 25 9/6/12 2:38 PM


(P&I) Contemporary World

Cinema Cinema 5 - NBC

Universal Cinema

18:00 The Land of Hope

(P&I) Contemporary World

Cinema Scotiabank 7;

Cloud Atlas (P&I) Special

Presentation Scotiabank 2;

Road North (Public) Contemporary

World Cinema

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 9;

Painless (Public) Vanguard

The Bloor Hot Docs Cinema;

Inch’Allah (Public) Special

Presentation Cinema 2;

Iceberg Slim: Portrait of a

Pimp (Public) TIFF Docs

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas

7; Cloud Atlas (Public)

Special Presentation Princess

of Wales; Amour (Public)

Masters Visa Screening

Room (Elgin)

18:15 The Perks of Being

a Wallflower (Public)

Special Presentation

Ryerson Theatre; The Land

of Eb (Public) Discovery

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 2;

Short Cuts Canada: Programme

#2 - 2012 (Public)

Short Cuts Canada

Cinema 4 - Paul & Leah

Atkinson Family Cinema;

Kon-tiki (Public) Special

Presentation Cineplex Yonge

& Dundas 6

18:30 The Lebanese Rocket

Society (Public) Wavelengths

Cinema 3; Silver

Linings Playbook (Public)

Gala Presentation Roy

Thomson Hall; Night Across

the Street (Public) Masters

Isabel Bader Theatre;

Lunarcy! (Public) TIFF Docs

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas

10; Capital (Public) Special

Presentation Scotiabank 1

18:45 Love, Marilyn (P&I)

Gala Presentation Scotiabank

4; Everyday (Public)

Masters Cinema 1

19:00 American Masters:

Inventing David Geffen

(P&I) Mavericks Scotiabank

11; The Girl From the South

(Public) TIFF Docs Jackman

Hall (AGO); The End

(Public) Contemporary

World Cinema Scotiabank

3; Les Nuits avec Theodore

(Public) Discovery

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 3

19:30 Juvenile Offender

(P&I) Contemporary World

Cinema Cinema 5 - NBC

Universal Cinema

20:00 The Last Supper

(Public) Special Presentation

Winter Garden Theatre

21:00 Peaches Does

Herself (P&I) Vanguard

Scotiabank 9; The Attack

(Public) Special Presentation

Cinema 2; Thanks for

Sharing (Public) Special

Presentation Ryerson

Theatre; Something in the

Air (Public) Masters Visa

Screening Room (Elgin);

London - The Modern Babylon

(Public) TIFF Docs The

Bloor Hot Docs Cinema; 90

Minutes (Public) Vanguard

27

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 2;

Roman Polanski: Odd Man

Out (Public) TIFF Docs

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas 10

21:15 The Cremator (Public)

Contemporary World Cinema

Cinema 4 - Paul & Leah

Atkinson Family Cinema;

The Act of Killing (Public)

TIFF Docs Scotiabank

4; Wasteland (Public)

Discovery Cineplex Yonge

& Dundas 9

21:30 Aftershock (P&I)

Midnight Madness Scotiabank

11; Yellow (Public)

Special Presentation

Cineplex Yonge & Dundas

7; Watchtower (Public)

Contemporary World

Cinema Cinema 3; The

Reluctant Fundamentalist

(Public) Gala Presentation

Roy Thomson Hall; Shores

of Hope (Public) Contemporary

World Cinema

Scotiabank 2; Once Upon a

Time Was I, Veronica (Public)

Contemporary World

Cinema Cineplex Yonge &

Dundas 3

21:45 Eat Sleep Die (P&I)

Discovery Cinema 5 -

NBC Universal Cinema;

Underground (Public)

Contemporary World

Cinema Cineplex Yonge &

Dundas 6; The Secret Disco

Revolution (Public) TIFF

Docs Scotiabank 3; Tai Chi

0 (Public) Special Presentation

Scotiabank 1; Mumbais

King (Public) City to City

Isabel Bader Theatre; End of

Watch (Public) Special Presentation

Princess of

Wales; A Liar’s Autobiography:

The Untrue Story

of Monty Python’s Graham

Chapman (Public) Special

Presentation Cinema 1

22:00 Wavelengths 2:

Documenta (Public) Wavelengths

Jackman Hall (AGO)

23:59 No One Lives (Public)

Midnight Madness Ryerson

Theatre THR

AV Pictures D1_090712.indd 1 9/4/12 11:22 AM

day1_screeningguide.indd 26 9/6/12 2:38 PM


TORONTO MEMORIES

1929

CANADIAN GOLD

She was born Gladys Marie Smith in Toronto, but it was as Mary Pickford

that she would become “America’s Sweetheart.” In 1929 she became

the first Canadian to win an Oscar, for her starring role in Coquette.

Pickford, pictured here with MPAA president William C. DeMille, cut

her trademark ringlets for the role and such was her star power that

the no-nonsense new bob was front-page news across America.

28

day1_endpageA.indd 1 9/6/12 3:21 PM

EVERETT COLLECTION


A FILM BY Joana Hadjithomas AND Khalil Joreige

LEBANESE

R O C K E T

S O C I E T Y

THE

The strange tale of the lebanese space race

Supported through

Doha Film Institute’s

Middle East and North

Africa (MENA) Film

Financing Grants.

Toronto International Film Festival Screenings

Sat, 08/09 6:30 PM TIFF Bell Lightbox 3 – Public

Sun, 09/09 12:00 PM Cinema 5 – NBC Universal Cinema – Press & Industry

Mon, 10/09 2:30 PM Cineplex Odeon Yonge &Dundas 8 – Public

Wed, 12/09 9:30 AM Scotiabank 5 (Scotiabank Theatre) – Press & Industry

Sat, 15/09 6:30 PM TIFF Bell Lightbox 3 – Public

Press

hello@wolf-con.com

International Sales

eric@urbandistrib.com

Doha Film Institute D1_090712.indd 1 9/4/12 4:26 PM


Shoreline Entertainment D1_090712.indd 1 9/4/12 5:54 PM

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