Biodiversity Challenge Badge - Convention on Biological Diversity

cbd.int

Biodiversity Challenge Badge - Convention on Biological Diversity

c h a l l e n g e b a d g e s e r i e s s p o n s o r e d b y

FAO

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CBD

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WAGGGS

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YUNGA

ong>Biodiversityong>

ong>Challengeong>

ong>Badgeong>


ong>Biodiversityong>

ong>Challengeong>

ong>Badgeong>

food and agriCulture organization of the united nations - 2010


The designations employed and the presentation of material in this

information product do not imply the expression of any opinion

whatsoever on the part of the Food and agriculture organization of

the United nations (Fao) concerning the legal or development status

of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or

concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries.

The mention of specific companies or products of manufacturers,

whether or not these have been patented, does not imply that these

have been endorsed or recommended by Fao in preference to others

of a similar nature that are not mentioned.

all rights reserved. reproduction and dissemination of material in

this information product for educational or other non-commercial

purposes are authorized without any prior written permission from

the copyright holders provided the source is fully acknowledged.

reproduction of material in this information product for resale or

other commercial purposes is prohibited without written permission

of the copyright holders.

applications for such permission should be addressed to:

chief

electronic publishing policy and support branch

communication division

Fao

Viale delle Terme di caracalla, 00153 rome, italy

or by e-mail to:

copyright@fao.org

© fao, Wagggs and CBd november 2010

This document has been financed by the swedish

international development cooperation agency,

sida. sida does not necessarily share the views

expressed in this material. responsibility for its

content rests entirely with the author.

an international year of biodiversity product.


table of contents

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introduCtion

a Warm WelCome to Children and young people

information for teaChers and leaders

introduction to biodiversity

young people and biodiversity

about the badge

The badge curriculum

age ranges of activities

how to use this badge curriculum -

guidelines for teachers and leaders

sample curriculum

be safe and sound

additional information and resources

illustrations and badge design

our air [ section a ]

Up in the air

biodiversity is linked to a healthy planet

our Water [ section b ]

protect your watershed

Think downstream

all species need water

our land [ section c ]

biodiversity on the menu

gardening for goods

protect habitats

our World [ section d ]

discover!

be creative!

reach out!

Take action!

resourCes and additional information

UseFUl websiTes and books

glossary

acknowledgemenTs


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong>

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

A warm welcome

to children

and young people

throughout the 100 years of girl guiding and girl scouting,

girls and young women have been caring for and advocating

for the protection and preservation of the environment and

the life it sustains. at the heart of the movement is respect for

nature, a respect that unfortunately is lacking in many areas,

with animal extinctions on the rise, deforestation increasing

and habitat loss growing.

now, more than ever, we need to continue and accelerate the

guide and scout tradition of leaving the world a better place

than we found it. already, young people are leading the way

in protecting and sustaining biodiversity. they are planting

trees, lobbying governments, recycling waste and raising

awareness about pollution.

We hope this resource supports you to continue to be powerful

influences in your own futures and in the sustainability of

your communities and environments.

Margaret Treloar

Chairman, World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts

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ong>Biodiversityong> is the foundation of healthy ecosystems that create

an environment we can live in, ensuring clean air, water and

fertile soils that can feed us all. for thousands of years humans

have developed new varieties of crops and breeds of animals

using the diversity of life around them and still now many of these

crops need the help of other organisms to grow – for example

bees pollinate many types of fruit trees. i hope the ong>Biodiversityong>

ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong> develops your curiosity in the wonders of nature,

encourages you to learn more, and drives you to take action to

preserve the environment that is around you.

Peter Holmgren

Director, Climate, Energy and Tenure Division, FAO

ong>Biodiversityong> is life. ong>Biodiversityong> is our life. that’s the simple

message of the 2010 international year of ong>Biodiversityong>. the

variety and complexity of life is astounding. in recent history,

humankind has been very careless; the result is that we are losing

biodiversity and the benefits it brings.

the things we do now to protect or destroy nature will shape

the world we live in tomorrow. the biodiversity challenges of

the future will be met by today’s children and young people –

the citizens and leaders of tomorrow. i encourage you to learn

and teach others about biodiversity through the ong>Biodiversityong>

ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong>. it is your creativity, curiosity and persistence

that will ultimately ensure life in harmony, into the future.

Ahmed Djoghlaf

Executive Secretary of the ong>Conventionong> on Biological Diversity

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information

for teachers

and leaders

introduction to biodiversity

‘bio’ means life and ‘diversity’ means variety,

so biodiversity (or biological diversity) is the

incredible variety of living things in nature and how

they interact with each other. it consists of all the many

species of animals and plants and other life forms, and the

variety that exists within each species. it also includes the

diversity present in ecosystems - or explained another

way - the variation we see in the environment including

landscapes, the vegetation and animals present in

it, and the various ways in which these components

interact with each other. biodiversity is very complex

and is often explained as the variety and variability of

genes, species and ecosystems.

genes are the units of heredity found in all cells.

They contain special codes or instructions that

give organisms different characteristics. genetic

diversity occurs within a species and even within a

variety of a given species. For instance, in a single

variety of tomato, the genes of one individual may

cause it to flower earlier than others, while the genes

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of another individual may cause it to produce redder tomatoes

than other plants. genetic diversity is at the individual level,

and makes everyone unique. so in fact no two living things in

nature are exactly the same.

in our world you can find a dazzling array of animals, plants,

fungi and microorganisms, all these different kinds of organisms

are called species. a species is a group of similar organisms that

can breed together and produce healthy, fertile offspring.

although we may not think about it, we see various

species as we go about our daily lives, such as humans,

goats, trees and mosquitoes. species diversity is the

most obvious type of biodiversity. our planet supports

millions of species, many of which are not yet identified!

ayhan koyun, aged 16, Turkey

animals, plants and even microorganisms live in

communities just like humans do. where communities

of plants and animals live together, and share their

space, their land and their climate, they form an

ecosystem. ecosystems are what many people call

“the environment” or “nature”. There are many kinds

of ecosystems on earth. ecosystems can be small

like puddles, or large like deserts, forests, wetlands,

mountains, oceans, lakes and rivers.

perhaps the most important characteristic

of biodiversity is that all of the components

are linked to each other. For example, if a

mouse eats a chemically-contaminated

seed, it may survive, but if a hawk eats

many mice that have eaten such

seeds, the hawk may die from a

lethal dose of the chemical.

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biodiversity linkages can also be beneficial: the restoration of coastal

mangroves forest ecosystems provides important nursery home for

fish and other marine species, improves fisheries along the coastline,

and protects human settlements from extreme weather events.

not only does biodiversity exist, it also has a function or purpose.

ecosystems provide things that humans benefit from and depend on.

These things are called ecosystem goods and services. ecosystem

goods and services include all the natural resources and processes

that maintain the conditions for life on earth.

For example, biodiversity provides us with the food we eat, cleans the

air we breathe, filters the water we drink, supplies the raw materials

we use to construct our homes and businesses, is part of countless

medicines and natural remedies, and many other things. it helps

regulate water levels and helps to prevent flooding. it breaks down

wastes and recycles nutrients, which is very important for growing

food. it protects us with natural insurance against future unknown

conditions brought about by climate change or other events. For

example, native plants in some temperate countries must withstand

hot summers and cold winters, and may have genetic material that

could be used to develop agricultural crops that can endure very

large temperature ranges. another important ecosystem service is

the cultural value of natural landscapes to people’s livelihoods,

religious beliefs and leisure activities. many people, such as

farmers, fishers, biologists and ecotourism operators, depend on

biodiversity for their livelihoods.

The importance of biodiversity goes beyond its value to human

beings: all animals, birds, insects, plants, microorganisms, fungi

and other creatures have the right to exist. Unfortunately, all is not

well for the planet’s biodiversity: biodiversity loss is occurring at

an unprecedented rate. Unless we take action, we risk destroying

nature’s rich diversity forever. but what can be done?

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The biodiversity challenge badge aims to help young people answer

this question. it is designed to raise awareness on biodiversity

issues among children and young people and to provide them with

knowledge that can help them become active agents of change in

our society. by carrying out these activities your group will identify

and take responsible actions in your communities, and therefore,

strengthen your participation in the protection, preservation and

improvement of our natural resources.

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young people and biodiversity

many current and anticipated challenges are linked to biodiversity.

while many of the problems must be addressed at the global level,

there are many things that can be done by individuals and groups in

their communities. These steps start with gaining an appreciation and

respect for biodiversity and progress to taking concrete action.

children and young people are eager to shape a more positive

future. They are creative, thoughtful and capable citizens whose

enthusiasm, fresh approaches and boundless energy can fuel

innovative solutions at local and international levels alike. young

people’s embracing of learning and new technologies puts them in

a position to act as convincing communicators. The involvement of

young people in biodiversity is critical to finding lasting solutions to

our world’s biodiversity challenges.

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eva bartoleschi, aged 8, italy


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about the badge

This biodiversity challenge badge is a tool to allow teachers and

youth leaders to guide young people in learning about biodiversity

and developing action-oriented projects.

age-appropriate activities introduce biodiversity concepts

and stimulate exploration through action-based learning. They

encourage participants to get to know the natural world in

their community, to find out why certain species and habitats

are struggling to survive, and to understand the links between

biodiversity and the well-being of people around the world. The

badge activities help young people gain knowledge, skills and

values to protect, preserve and improve biodiversity.

The badge is jointly produced by the Food and agriculture

organization of the United nations (Fao), the secretariat of the

convention on biological diversity (cbd) and the world association

of girl guides and girls scouts (wagggs), through the youth and

United nations global alliance (yUnga) and The Green Wave. These

organizations are committed to addressing biodiversity challenges

and to helping young people participate in protecting, preserving

and improving biodiversity in their communities.

This badge is the second in a series of badges jointly produced by

yUnga. other challenge badges, including the climate change and

Food security challenge badge, are available at www.yunga.org

additional resources, including The Youth Guide to ong>Biodiversityong>, support

this badge. For additional details, see the back of this booklet.

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the badge curriculum

The badge curriculum is divided into four categories. To make it

easier to find the activities in the booklet the following labelling

system has been used.

[ section a ]

[ section b ]

[ section c ]

[ section d ]

our air

our Water

our land

our World

To earn the badge, participants must complete two activities from

each category. The first or second activity listed in each category

must be completed by everyone as it provides an overview to the

topics. These compulsory activities are best done in a group.

individuals can then choose from the list of optional activities the

ones that are most relevant and interesting to them.

This badge has lots of different kinds of activities to appeal to young

people all around the world, surrounded by lots of different forms

of biodiversity, and with different levels of access to resources

and technologies. not all activities will be possible in all parts of

the world: it’s hard to explore tidal pools when you’re far from the

ocean, or to play online biodiversity games when you don’t have a

high-speed internet connection. be sure to choose activities that

are relevant and can be done in your area.

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age ranges of activities

To help you and your group select the most appropriate activity a

coding system is provided to indicate the age group for which the

activity is most suitable.

next to each activity you will see a code, for example ‘levels 1 and 2,’

which indicates the activity should be suitable for five to ten year

olds and eleven to fifteen year olds. please note that this coding

is only indicative.

you may find that an activity listed at one level is suitable for another

level in your area.

leVel 1

leVel 2

leVel 3

five to ten years old

participants will learn about different

species and ecosystems in their

neighbourhoods.

eleven to fifteen years old

participants will learn how to describe the

different components of biodiversity and

ecosystem services, and be able to give

examples in their surroundings.

sixteen to tWenty years old

participants will gain a more in-depth

understanding of biodiversity components,

ecosystem services and of the work going

on at the international level.

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how to use this badge curriculum

- guidelines for teachers and leaders

step 1

encourage your group to learn about

biodiversity. we recommend you

begin by introducing the concept

of biodiversity with activity d.01

in the our world section. before

doing other activities, make

sure everyone understands the

three levels of biodiversity - genes,

species and ecosystems - and that

they are all interlinked. From there, take

the learning outside! Visit your local botanic

gardens, neighbourhood library, or natural history museum, invite a

scientist to talk with your group, look online or explore the outdoors.

resources such as the Youth Guide to ong>Biodiversityong>, The green wave

website (greenwave.cbd.int) and the other resources listed at the

end of this booklet are great places to look.

step 2

let the group and the individual members choose which activities

they want to do. There are a few activities that everyone needs

to complete because they provide the necessary background and

understanding of the different topics. apart from these activities,

participants are encouraged to select the activities that best match

their needs, interests and culture. some activities can be done

individually, others in small groups. if you have another activity

that is especially appropriate for your group, you may also include

it as one of the options.

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everest shi, aged 16, canada


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step 3

allow enough time for the group to carry out the activities. some

activities, such as playing a biodiversity game or making animal

masks, can be completed in one hour or less, while others, such

as observing things decompose or growing a biodiversity garden,

require some work over several weeks. it’s helpful to first decide

how you want to complete the badge (e.g. during your meeting or

at camp) and then select appropriate activities that you can do.

support and guide them throughout the process but ensure they

carry out their tasks as autonomously as possible. many activities

can be conducted in several different ways. encourage participants

to think and act creatively when undertaking their activities.

step 4

have participants present the results of the challenge badge to the rest

of the group. do you notice any changes in their attitudes and behaviour?

encourage participants to think about how the objects and activities

in their everyday lives affect biodiversity. discuss the experience and

reflect on how they can continue to apply it in their lives.

step 5

organize an award ceremony for those who successfully complete

the challenge badge. invite families, friends, teachers, journalists

and community leaders to participate in the ceremony. encourage

your group to be creative and present the results of their project to

the community. award them with certificates and challenge badges.

challenge badges can be ordered at the wagggs online shop:

www.wagggs-shop.org

step 6

share with the Fao, cbd and wagggs! send us your stories, photos,

drawings, ideas and suggestions: children-youth@fao.org

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sample curriculum

The biodiversity challenge badge can be completed at a camp or

over the course of several meetings or classroom sessions. each

child has to do 2 activities from each of the 4 sections (our air,

our water, our land and our world). all you have to do is select

the most appropriate activities for your group. remember you can

also develop new activities, you don’t have to use the ones in this

booklet. provided below are examples of a camp and meeting based

curriculum for the three different age groups.

at camp

at meetings

individuals aged five to ten (level 1):

individuals could do two biodiversity hikes such as activity a.02 (on page 21)

and activity b.07 (on page 33). carry our two activities such as a.11 (on page 26)

and c.10 (on page 44), undertake two crafts such as b.01 (on page 31) and

d.01 (on page 53) and do two activities such as c.01 (on page 41) and d.06

(on page 55) at the camp fire.

the other examples below just provide the codes for quick reference.

individuals aged 11 to 15 (level 2)

hike (a.02), games and activities (a.09, b.27, c.07, d.16), crafts (b.01, d.01),

campfire activities (c.01)

individuals aged 16 to 20 (level 3)

hike (a.02, a.11), games and activities (b.02), crafts (c.13, d.01), campfire

activities (c.01, b.24, d.18)

individuals aged five to ten (level 1) :

Field trip (a.01),games and experiments (b.13, c.11, d.19), crafts (a.06, b.01,

d.01), guest speaker (c.01)

individuals aged 11 to 15 (level 2):

Field trip (a.01, c.31), games and activities (a.07, b.05, c.12), crafts (b.01,

d.01), guest speaker (c.01, d.07)

individuals agend 16 to 20 (level 3):

Field trip (a.01, b.02, c.09), games and activities (a.17, d.20), crafts (c.13,

d.01), guest speaker (c.01, b.20)

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Be safe and sound

exploring the natural world is a fantastic way to learn about nature,

however it is important to take some precautions to ensure nobody

gets hurt. remind your group of the following guidelines described

in Eco-fun: great projects , experiments and games for a greener

Earth by david suzuki and kathy Vanderlinden.

protect yourself

>> be careful when using sharp objects and electrical appliances. young

children should seek the help of an adult.

>> don’t look directly at the sun.

>> don’t taste things you find unless you are certain they are not

poisonous.

>> wear gardening or rubber gloves when handling soil.

>> wash your hands after finishing an activity.

>> in some activities, you have the option of uploading pictures or

videos to the internet on websites such as youTube. always make

sure you have the permission of everyone in the pictures or video,

and their parents, before you post anything online.

protect the natural world

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!

>> Treat nature with respect.

>> be careful with the animals you work with; wear protection if necessary.

be gentle. make sure they have appropriate food, water and air. when

you’re done, put them back where you found them.

>> never pick protected species. before collecting plants or picking

flowers, get permission. only take what you need and make sure you

leave at least one third of anything you find in the wild. if possible it

is best to not pick anything and to leave everything as you found it.

>> when you do activities, especially the outdoor ones, make sure you

leave no trace.

>> as much as possible, recycle or reuse the materials used in the

activities.

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additional information and resources

at the end of this booklet, there is a list of useful links to resources

and activity materials which may help your group carry out the

badge activities (pages 62 to 67). if you join our free e-mail list

(see the news box below) you will automatically be informed when

new resources become available.

this badge is one of several complementary resources and

activities developed by fao, CBd, Wagggs, yunga and other

partners. We would appreciate if you shared news and photos on

how your group did the challenge badge, especially if you came

up with novel ideas and activities. please send your materials to:

children-youth@fao.org

To saVe paper we sUggesT ThaT yoU Use only one copy oF

This docUmenT and share iT wiTh yoUr school and groUp

lorna atim okeng, aged 20, Uganda

Johann siegfried cumagun, aged 6, philippines

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neWs

Fathmath shiyana, aged 16, maldives


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illustrations and badge design

The illustrations used in this booklets are a selection from the

over 3000 drawings which were submitted to the international

biodiversity art competition.

The badge design, although not derived from a specific drawing,

took inspiration from the many drawings submitted.

To see other drawing from this and previous competitions visit the

following sites: www.yunga.org

www.yunga.org/scans/gallery_en.asp

This challenge badge is part of a series of challenge badges being

developed by yUnga.

badges have or will be developed on climate change, Forests, Fish

and hunger and other themes.

To see existing badges go to:

www.fao.org/climatechange/youth/63380/en

and www.yunga.org

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our

section a

air

do either a.o1 or a.02 and one other aCtivity

of your ChoiCe. after Completing our air

aCtivities you Will Be aBle to:

>> knoW and appreciate the species in your

neighbourhood that live in the air

>> oBserve and learn about biodiversity by

exploring the nature around you

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leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

a.01

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

a.02

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explore biodiversity that lives off the ground. put

a large piece of paper or a bed sheet under a low

branch. shake the branch. watch what flies away

when you shake the branch. examine the things

that fall off the branch, such as leaves, insects,

mushrooms and plants. how do these creatures get

up onto the branch? why would these creatures live

above the ground? how do these creatures interact

with each other to find food and shelter? what other

animals might visit the branch in search of food,

shelter or even a nesting site? discuss your answers

with your group.

explore biodiversity that lives off the ground.

walk around your neighbourhood, with a pair of

binoculars if possible. what do you see just above

the ground in the bushes? what is living halfway

up the trees or grasses? what is at the top of the

canopy (tree tops)? do you see leaves, insects,

mushrooms and plants? what else? how do these

creatures get up onto the branch? why would these

creatures live above the ground? how do these

creatures interact with each other to find food and

shelter? what other animals might visit the branch

in search of food, shelter or even a nesting site?

discuss your answers with your group.

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group aCtivity

group aCtivity

our air

our Water

our land

our World


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong> | our air

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up in the air

leVel 1 2

aCtivity

a.03

leVel 1 2

aCtivity

a.04

leVel 1 2

aCtivity

a.05

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

a.06

look around your home, school, garden or park. what

travels in the air? what methods do animals use to fly or

glide? how do plants (their seeds and pollen) travel by

air? draw or photograph two traits that allow animals and

plants to move through the air.

in fall and/or spring, visit a park or conservation area

where bird-watching is possible. which migrating bird

species stopover there? Try to see them and listen to

their songs. create posters or drawings, or take photos

for your school or home.

biodiversity is full of change - just think of a caterpillar who

starts out its life crawling and feeding on leaves, and then

changes into a butterfly! look for butterflies and moths in a

field, a forest or a garden. draw three types (or species) that

live near you. where did you see them - on a flower, near water,

next to animal droppings, flying in the forest canopy, ...? how

big were they? what colours and patterns were on their wings?

were they easy or hard to find (e.g. were they camouflaged)?

share your answers with your teacher, leader or group.

make a bird feeder out of recycled materials. Find out what types

of food different species of birds prefer (e.g. some like fruit,

others like seeds). choose food for birds that are indigenous

(native) to your area. place your bird feeder in a place where

the birds will be safe from predators. record the number and

types of birds that visit your feeder for two weeks.

www.rspb.org.uk/images/recycled_bird_feeder_tcm9-207420.pdf

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denisa Valentina huma, aged 10, romania

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leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

a.07

leVel 2

aCtivity

a.08

plant a ‘nectar bar’ for hungry bees, wasps and flies. grow

a garden with a mixture of flowering plants and shrubs.

choose plant species that flower at different times of the

year to ensure a constant supply of food for your insect

guests. you might want to plant your nectar bar away

from entrances to buildings and busy walkways.

mushroom seeds are called spores, and are often dispersed by

the wind. each species of mushroom has a unique spore print

(like a fingerprint). collect three different mushroom species

and make a spore print of each. For more information on

making spore prints: www.mushroomexpert.com/spore_print.html or

www.rspb.org.uk/images/sporeprint_tcm9-202043.pdf

Be very Careful, do not use poisonous mushrooms,

get expert help. don’t forget to Wash your hands

When you have finished.

alia safira, aged 11, indonesia

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our air

our Water

our land

our World


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong> | our air

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

leVel 2 3 insects have many special traits that allow them

aCtivity

a.09

suck in air through

the end of this tube

huslin cover stops

insects being sucked

into your mouth

to live under all sorts of conditions in different

habitats around the world. catch insects in a pitfall

trap, sweepnet or pooter (a special collecting

bottle to catch insects or crustaceans by sucking

through a tube). make an insect field guide of the

different species you collected. release the insects.

if possible, invite an insect specialist (entomologist)

to join you. For tips on making a pooter:

www.amentsoc.org/bug-club/fun/experiment-pooter.html

and a sweep net:

www.rspb.org.uk/images/make_a_sweep_net_tcm9-195580.pdf.

h o W t o m a k e a p o o t e r

modeling clay holds

the tubes in place

26

hold this end above

the insect you want

to catch

pifall trap

don’t forget to proteCt yourself, espeCially When handling

inseCts that Bite or sting! young partiCipants should only try

this aCtivity With adult supervision.

group aCtivity


C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

leVel 2 3 many animals including mammals, fish and butterflies

aCtivity

a.10

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

!a.11

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

a.12

migrate. draw the migratory routes of five different bird

or insect species on a world map. how far do they travel?

how long does the migration take? where does the animal

breed, stopover to rest or eat and overwinter? how do the

animals not get lost? list some possible advantages and

disadvantages of migrating. why do some birds travel

during winter to warmer places? why can’t they find food?

participate in a citizen science project. a citizen

science project is one in which people without any

special scientific training go out in nature and collect

scientific data, which are then used by scientists.

birdlife international runs a fantastic global citizen

science project on birds called worldbirds. Visit the

youth link on the website for instructions on how to

participate or download the guide.

www.worldbirds.org

Find out which bat species live in your area and what their

habitat and food needs are. make a bat box and set it

in a suitable place. over several weeks, observe it in the

evening and into the night to see if bats move in. record

your observations. For building instructions visit

www.hww.ca/hww2.asp?id=323

or the bat conservation international website

www.batcon.org

27

great aCtivity

our air

our Water

our land

our World


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong> | our air

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

ong>Biodiversityong> for healthy planet

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

a.13

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

a.14

different animal species have different strategies

for keeping warm or cool (such as growing thick fur

coats in the winter and lighter coats in the summer),

and for keeping dry or moist (such as having waterrepellent

feathers and living under a rotting log).

make a list of some bird, mammal, amphibian,

reptile, fish and insect species. what strategies do

these species use? play a game about the animals

and their strategies. (older youth can invent and

lead younger children in these games). will these

strategies work as the planet’s climate changes?

why or why not?

after they die, plants and animals provide food for

tiny creatures called microorganisms. even though the

microorganisms are too small to observe directly, you can

see clues of their presence when you make biogas. with

adult help, put rotting organic matter such as dirt, plants

and fruit and vegetable scraps into a plastic bottle. stretch

an un-inflated balloon over the opening of the bottle.

place the bottle near a heat source or in direct sun. what

happens to the balloon over the next five to ten days? why

does this happen? Think of how useful microorganisms are

in the world, and what would happen if they did not exist.

For more biogas ideas visit

www.pge.com/microsite/safety_esw_ngsw/ngsw/basics/experiment2.html

28

group aCtivity


C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

sofi a Victoria martinez, aged 9, argentina

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

a.15

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

a.16

go on an ‘energy diet’ for two weeks. create a plan to

reduce your energy consumption at home, when moving

from one place to another and at school. carry it out. how

much energy does each action save? how does using less

energy and fewer resources save biodiversity? challenge

your friends and family to try your plan.

as the climate changes, some species will have to move

upwards (literally up a mountain) or towards the poles

to stay in the same type of climate. what are some of

the species in your area that might need to move to find

cooler weather or wetter or drier conditions? what are

some of the difficulties these species might have if they

need to move? draw what you think your environment will

look like if these species move away.

29

hiu wing chan, aged 17, china

our air

our Water

our land

our World


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong> | our air

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

a.17

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

a.18

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

a.19

draw a map of your community. include both natural

features such as forests and rivers and human features

such as buildings and roads. identify the possible sources

of pollution on your map. remember, some pollution

comes from a single source (like a pipe) while other

pollution comes from many small sources (like runoff

from land). how does the pollution affect biodiversity?

on your map, draw arrows linking the pollution sources to

the biodiversity they affect. what can be done to minimise

pollution? share your findings with your group.

investigate the links between creatures that live in the air

and the food we eat. Visit an apiary or invite a beekeeper to

talk with your group. list the fruits, berries and vegetables

that grow in your garden or around your school, parks and

playgrounds that are pollinated by insects. which insect

species are the pollinators? do these species pollinate

wild non-food plant species? how healthy are pollinator

populations in your community? what are the threats to

insect pollinators in your community? identify one thing

you can do to help insect pollinators ... then do it!

biodiversity can help to reduce the effects of climate

change. make an original video or poster showing, for

example, how trees capture carbon dioxide from the air

and store it. Upload your video to youTube or present your

poster to your group or school. make sure you have the

permission of everyone in the video, and their parents,

before you post it.

30

group aCtivity


yae chan park, aged 12, republic of korea

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

leVel 3

aCtivity

a.20

leVel 1 2 3

emissions trading (or cap and trade as it is sometimes

called) is a tool for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. it

also impacts biodiversity. learn about emissions trading

and related programmes such as Reducing Emissions

from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing

Countries (redd). what programmes are already in place

in your community? who is affected by them? how are the

world’s poor affected by emissions trading? present your

findings to your group. For more information see

www.forestsclimatechange.org/simplyredd1.html and

storyofstuff.com/capandtrade

do any other activity

approved by your

teacher or leader.

Tomoe ito, aged 20, Japan

hana richelle, aged 13, philippines

31

our air

our Water

our land

our World


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong>

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

our

section b

Water

do the first or seCond aCtivity in this seCtion

and one other aCtivity of your ChoiCe. after

Completing our Water aCtivities you Will Be

aBle to:

>> knoW and appreciate the species and

ecosystems in your area that depend on water

>> take action to help raise awareness or to

protect water-related biodiversity

32


C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

!

some aCtivities in this seCtion require partiCipants to

go near ponds, lakes, BeaChes, oCeans or other Water

Bodies. Be sure to take Water safety preCautions and to

do the aCtivities under qualified supervision.

leVel 1 2 3 learn about your local watershed - an area of land that

aCtivity

B.01

catches rain and snow, and drains into a larger body

of water such as a marsh, stream, river, lake, ocean

or groundwater. make a model using soil, bark, rocks,

papier-mâché or recycled materials of your watershed.

don’t forget to include all the inputs to the water

including natural streams and runoff from farms or

industrial areas. how do plants and trees on land fit into

the watershed? how do land and water-based animals fit

into the watershed? explain how your model works to your

leader, family, friends or group.

leVel 2 3 learn about your local watershed - an area of land that

aCtivity

B.02

catches rain and snow, and drains into a larger body of

water such as a marsh, stream, river, lake, ocean or

groundwater. create a guided tour of your watershed.

invite your family, friends or group to participate in

the tour. point out all the inputs to the water including

natural streams and runoff from farms or industrial

areas. explain how plants and trees on land fit into the

watershed. explain how land and water-based animals

fit into the watershed.

33

group aCtivity

group aCtivity

our air

our Water

our land land

our World


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong> | our Water

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

protect your watershed

leVel 1 2

aCtivity

B.03

leVel 1 2

aCtivity

B.04

draw a picture or take photos of two plants: one that lives

on land and one that lives in water. label the different

parts of each plant (e.g. flower, stem, blade, holdfast).

how are the plants similar? how are they different?

animals living in water have evolved different body

adaptations (traits that help an animal survive and/or

reproduce) to help them move in their environment.compare

different animals such as coral, zooplankton, flying fish,

tuna, sharks, seals, orcas, sea horses, manatees, jellyfish

and sea stars. what are some of their adaptations? how do

these animals move? what are some examples of human

inventions that copy sea animal movement? if possible,

visit an aquarium to see sea creatures in action. share your

finding with your group.

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

B.05

make some puppets. invent a puppet show that

teaches people about the importance of healthy

watershed and what they can do. look outside to

see how water runs in your environment and get

your puppets to explain the differences between

water running in a built environment (gutters,

parking lots, etc.) and in natural systems. make

sure you observe the differences during rain and a

few hours afterwards. invite your family and friends

to watch your puppet show. older participants can

perform their show for younger children.

34

group aCtivity


C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

B.06

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

B.07

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

B.08

organize or participate in a beach clean-up. monitor

the progress of recovery. what can be done to make

sure the area stays clean? if the beaches in your

area are already clean, visit a beach once after a

storm, then again at another time after the beach

has ‘cleaned’ itself. what are the changes in the

diversity of life along the beach and the shore?

discuss your findings with your group. Be Careful of

sharp or toxiC items, use appropriate proteCtive

equipment, suCh as gloves.

explore a stream or pond. examine the life inside. Take a

water sample and examine it under a magnifying glass or

microscope. record what you see. return the water and

the creatures back to the stream or

pond. different species can tolerate

different amounts of pollution.

(if possible ask your local wildlife

experts which species you would

expect to find in clean water

sources and polluted water

sources in your area). how polluted

is your stream or pond?

build a hibernaculum (a place where animals hibernate) for

amphibians. don’t forget that amphibians require humid

environments, so the hibernaculum should be near water.

observe the animals that come.

www.rspb.org.uk/advice/gardening/reptiles_amphibians/hibernacula.asp

35

group aCtivity

ko pik sum, aged 17, honk kong

our air

our Water

our land

our World


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong> | our Water

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

leVel 2 3 build a pond to create a new habitat for insects,

aCtivity

B.09

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

B.10

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

B.11

amphibians, plants and others. make sure you

plant only native species. ponds Can Be Breeding

grounds for mosquitoes or other disease-

Carrying inseCts. if this is a proBlem in your

area, Be sure to stoCk the pond With fish speCies

that eat inseCt larvae.

some species are important for cleaning water and making

it available to other species living in the ecosystem. These

filtering species can remove bacteria, viruses, heavy

metals, toxins and/or debris. compare the methods used

by different species, such as oysters, mosses and trees,

to filter water. make your own water filter using natural or

recycled materials. For ideas on making water filters visit

www.ewb.ca/en/whatwedo/canada/projects/hso/teachers/w4w/workshop.html

or library.thinkquest.org/04apr/00222/filter.htm

meet with a local government or local

conservation agency responsible

for a stream or river. invite them

to make signs that will encourage

people to protect these areas.

Volunteer to paint and to help put

up those signs.

36

aulia syaffi tri, aged 15, indonesia

group aCtivity

yae sung park, aged 15, republic of korea


C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

think downstream

leVel 1 2

aCtivity

B.12

leVel 1 2

aCtivity

B.13

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

B.14

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

B.15

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

B.16

make a rain barrel out of clean recycled material. list all

the possible uses for the collected water. Use the water

for some of the examples on your list.

pollution can hurt biodiversity. do an experiment to find

out how an oil spill can damage a bird’s feathers. Take two

feathers. Use a cotton ball to rub one feather with a few drops

of cooking, bike or lubricating oil. pour some water onto each

of the feathers. what happens? how do you think an oil spill

would affect birds? share your answers with your group.

The sea and sea life appear in many folk tales, novels,

poetry, songs and works of art. Find some examples.

which aspects are real and which ones are make believe?

where do you think the make believe aspects come from?

create your own artistic work of the sea or sea life.

The biodiversity in oceans provide humans with various

nutritious foods, including plant-based foods. make a

poster or drawing of all the different uses that humans

use marine biodiversity.

marine ecosystems can help protect coastal regions

from damage from storms. what would happen to these

regions if the marine ecosystems that protect them are

destroyed? create a poster, comic, play or other suitable

medium to teach people about the value of these marine

ecosystems.

37

our air

our Water

our land

our World


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong> | our Water

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

B.17

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

B.18

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

B.19

leVel 3

aCtivity

B.20

learn how bacteria in sea water and marine mammals help

to breakdown and remove waste and pollution. share your

findings with your group.

did you know that, in the case of fresh wild-caught fish,

it is better to buy certain species in certain months?

This ensures the fish aren’t caught during their spawning

season. prepare a calendar showing when it’s okay to

eat different fish species. For each month, draw images

of that fish species that can be eaten without harming

wild populations. hang the calendar at your school or

community centre.

Visit a grocery store and inspect the fish counter and

canned fish aisle. record the brands and fish species

that carry a logo indicating they are harvested or farmed

sustainably (such as the marine stewardship council

logo). make a poster encouraging people to buy these

brands and species. ask the store manager if you can hang

the poster in the store.

investigate grey water recycling. invite a representative

from your local government water department to talk with

your group. what is grey water recycling? when and where

is it appropriate? what regulations does your area have for

grey water recycling? design the ideal grey water recycling

system for your home or school. present your findings to

your friends, class or group.

38

robin bonar-law, aged 16, italy


C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

all species need water

leVel 1 2

aCtivity

B.21

leVel 1 2

aCtivity

B.22

seung min ryu, aged 9, republic of korea

Visit a wetland near your home. observe different species

of birds that catch their food in the water. how do they

hunt - by wading, by diving from the air, by dappling?

what are the shape and size of their beaks? what are the

shape and size of their legs? which traits are best suited

for different ways of hunting? draw three birds and point

out how their beaks and legs are suited to their way of

catching food.

learn about unusual modifications that plants and animals

have evolved to adapt to environments where water is difficult

to find. Find five examples for plants, and five examples for

animals. present these examples to your group.

39

sahda samiya, aged 10, indonesia

our air

our Water

our land

our World


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong> | our Water

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

leVel 1 2 3

leVel 1 2 3

atalanta shi, aged 14, canada

aCtivity

B.23

aCtivity

B.24

do an experiment to test the effects of acid rain on plants.

grow three plants in three separate pots under identical

conditions except for the watering. water the first plant with

100 percent water. water the second plant with a mixture

of 90 percent water and 10 percent lemon juice or vinegar.

water the third plant with a mixture of 50 percent water and

50 percent lemon juice or vinegar. what happens? how do

you think acid rain affects plants and trees? share your

finding with your group.

organize a masquerade party. have everyone come

wearing a mask of an animal that lives in the sea. ask

each person to learn three facts about their chosen

species. play water-themed games. older participants

can design and lead these games.

40

group aCtivity


C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

B.25

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

B.26

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

B.27

go out in a boat. observe all the plants (seaweed) and

animals (birds, fish, shellfish, etc.) you see, hear and

smell. create a short report summarising your findings.

praCtiCe safe Boating. take Water safety preCautions

and make sure there’s qualified supervision.

go rock pooling in tidal pools. build an underwater viewer

to get a fish’s eye (or crab or sea cucumber or ...) view.

draw the beach and where you find the different species.

which species are closest to and furthest from the shore?

what special features do the species have that allow

them to live in intertidal zones? share your findings with

your group. www.rspb.org.uk/images/rock_pooling_tcm9-193626.pdf

make yourself a hide (a camouflaged shelter where you

can observe animals without disturbing them) next to a

lake, pond or stream. The hide will keep you hidden from

wildlife. spend a day in your hide recording the insects,

mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians that come to

the water.

leVel 2 3 Visit a water body at least once a season over the

aCtivity

B.28

leVel 1 2 3

course of a year. photograph or draw a picture of

the plant and animal life present in each season.

record the temperature and describe the weather

conditions. how do the seasonal conditions affect

plant and animal life over the year?

do any other activity approved by your teacher or leader.

41

group aCtivity

our air

our Water

our land

our World


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong>

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

our

section c

land

do the first aCtivity and one other

aCtivity of your ChoiCe. after Completing

our land aCtivities you Will Be aBle to:

>> knoW and appreciate the land-based

species and ecosystems in your area

>> desCriBe some of the uses of biodiversity

42


leVel 1 2 3 interview a grandparent or elderly friend (or even

aCtivity

C.01

an adult pretending they were born many years ago)

about the foods they grew and ate as a child. how

were these foods prepared? why were these foods

grown and not others? are the foods different from

the ones that you grow, cook and eat today? why

or why not? if possible, try preparing some ‘oldfashioned’

food. share your findings with your

friends, group or to bioversity international’s ‘oral

history project’. Visit the website:

diversityforlife.org/about-the-campaign/activities/oralhistory

43

martyna gauronskytè, aged 12, lithuania

group aCtivity

our air

our Water

our land

our World


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong> | our land

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

ong>Biodiversityong> on the menu

leVel 1 2

aCtivity

C.02

leVel 1 2

aCtivity

C.03

leVel 1 2

aCtivity

C.04

leVel 1 2

aCtivity

C.05

what do you need for a healthy diet? Find out how

biodiversity contributes to good nutrition by imagining

what would happen if there was only one type of fruit, one

type of vegetable and one type of meat available. share

your findings with your teacher, leader or group.

invent a game about seeds and biodiversity. For example,

you could invent a matching game where players have to

match actual rice, corn, wheat or other seeds with clues or

drawings of the plant. play the game with your friends.

ask an indigenous person (sometimes called First nations,

aboriginal or native person in different parts of the world),

your parents, grandparents or elderly friends to teach you

how to recognize wild edible herbs and plants. make a

collage showing the herbs and plants and their uses. don’t

piCk and eat any plants BeCause some poisonous plants

look very similar to non-poisonous ones.

Visit a market or grocery store. look for examples of

species diversity and genetic diversity, two levels of

biodiversity. (The third level is ecosystem diversity.)

count the number of vegetable species (such as carrots,

cucumbers, lettuce). Find a species that has several

varieties, for example potatoes. This is an example of

genetic diversity within a species. how many varieties of

potatoes are there? how are they similar? how are they

different? what other foods have multiple varieties? why

is it important to have genetic diversity in crop plants?

share your finding with your class or group.

44


C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

kavanz constant, aged 14, antigua and barbuda

C.06

C.07

record what you eat for five days. how many different

things did you eat? which animals and plants did your food

come from? at the end of the week, help prepare a meal

that uses lots of biodiversity. share it with your family

and friends. during the meal, talk about the biodiversity

in each dish.

predator-prey dynamics are important to healthy

ecosystem functioning. play the survival game with your

group. what happens when one species goes extinct?

what role does disease play? what effects do humans

have? how would climate change affect the survival of

the animals? The rules of the survival game are at

dragon.sleepdeprived.ca/games/wide_games/wide_games_15.htm and

www.snowleopard.org/catfactsclassroom/classroom/resources.

our air

our Water

our land

our World


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong> | our land

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

C.08

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

C.09

pick a food item that is eaten in several

countries around the world such as

bananas, beans, tomatoes or maize/

corn. where did the food originate? are

there different varieties in different

countries? how is the food cooked in

different countries? Try three recipes

from three different countries. share

your culinary creations with your family and friends. how do

you think biological diversity relates to cultural diversity?

discuss your answers during the meal.

in a grocery store, find five foods that are genetically

modified. is it easy or difficult to find them? how are they

different from their relatives that are not genetically

modified? how are they the same? Find three arguments

for and three arguments against genetic modification

of foods.

gardening for goods

leVel 1 2

aCtivity

C.10

leVel 1 2

aCtivity

C.11

inspect a handful of soil and describe the biodiversity.

look at a sample under a magnifying glass or a microscope.

draw the creatures you see.

how long do things take to decompose? Fill a box with

soil. bury ten samples (e.g. newspaper, apple core, tinfoil,

glass bottle, leaf, plastic bag, candy wrapper and animal

fur) and mark the location of each. add some water so the

soil is slightly damp. once a week, dig up each sample and

check how decomposed it is. record your observations

46

ryanna Tee, aged 15, philippines


C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

C.12

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

C.13

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

C.14

for six to eight weeks. based on the results of your

experiment, how long do you think it will take for your

garbage to decompose? if you live in a cold climate, try

this experiment in a warm season.

grow a vegetable, herb, fruit, nut or spice garden.

nurture your green thumb in a container garden, a

community garden, a rooftop garden or a backyard

garden. keep track of how much water and sunlight

different plants need to grow best. what kinds of

animals visit the garden? why do you think animals

come to the garden? which animals help the plants

by pollinating flowers or spreading seeds? discuss

your observations with your group. For information

on setting up and running a group garden, see

www.fao.org/docrep/009/a0218e/a0218e00.hTm.

before the invention of artificial chemical dyes, clothes

and other fabrics were coloured with natural dyes from

roots, nuts, berries, flowers and other things found

in nature. make your own natural dyes from natural

materials found in your neighbourhood, grocery store or

market. dye a t-shirt, bandana or other material.

Be very Careful and avoid using any poisonous plants.

www.pioneerthinking.com/naturaldyes.html

learn about composting. what is it? what creatures are the

workers in a compost? what can you put in a composter?

what can’t you put in a composter? what are the benefits

of composting? Try composting - in a vermicomposter,

backyard compost heap or compost box.

47

group aCtivity

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ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong> | our land

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aCtivity

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aCtivity

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Find out what kind of soil plants prefer with a soil core

experiment. dig a hole 50cm deep. Fill one pot with topsoil

collected in the top 2cm. Fill a second pot with subsoil

collected 15cm from the surface. Fill a third pot with

subsoil collected 50cm from the surface. grow a plant

in each of the pots. chart each plant’s growth for 6 to

8 weeks. why do you think there are differences? why is

the erosion of topsoil a concern for farmers? share your

findings with your teacher, leader or group.

Visit three farms in your area that use different growing

techniques and/or grow or raise different agricultural

products. For example, you could visit a dairy farm, an

organic market garden, a vineyard or a conventional

cereal farm. ask the farmers what sort of challenges

they are facing and how biodiversity helps them face

those challenges.

For thousands of years, biodiversity has provided humans

with natural medicines and remedies. Find out which plants

in your community have medicinal purposes. do not piCk

the plants they Could Be poisonous as it Could Be a

different speCies or the Wrong part of the plant.

identify five rare varieties of crops or plants that grow in

your community. what are their special characteristics?

where are these rare varieties grown? how are they similar to

and different from their common variety relative? Find out

what you can do to help conserve these rare varieties, then

try it! if possible, do this activity as part of a farm visit.

48


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aCtivity

C.19

look at the labels on your clothing. make a list of all the

different materials found in your clothing. sort them into

two categories - natural and synthetic. what are the

characteristics of natural fibres and synthetic fibres?

where are natural fibres grown? which lasts longer - natural

or synthetic clothing? why would clothing manufacturers

blend different types of fibres? write a short report or tell

your teacher or leader about your findings.

protect habitats

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insects are everywhere. studying them is a fun way to

learn about nature and how different parts of biodiversity

are linked to each other. Find a colony of ants and observe

it regularly during two seasons. Find out what ants carry

to their colony. Follow their path and measure it. what

happens to ants and their home before or after a rainfall?

do all ants do the same work?

reducing, reusing and recycling is good for biodiversity.

one tonne of recycled paper saves 17 trees. more recycling

means more habitat is saved for other plants and animals.

recycle paper by making your own. Use the paper to make

a craft. or, write a letter to someone special and send it to

them. don’t forget to write that the paper is homemade!

For ideas, see www.pioneerthinking.com/makingpaper.html or

www.wipapercouncil.org/makepaper.htm

49

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walk through a field with tall grasses wearing

trousers that collect a lot of seeds. at the end of your

walk, change into a new pair of trousers and inspect

the seeds that have collected on your trousers.

how big are the seeds? are some seeds found only

at certain heights? how do you think these seeds

would be dispersed in nature? you can also try this

activity wearing different kinds of fur to mimic the

different mammals that would walk through the

field collecting and dispersing seeds. are certain

furs better for holding seeds than others? share your

findings with your group.

if you Walk through a farmer’s field, don’t

forget to ask permission first!

create a biodiversity-friendly yard that offers lots of

homes for species. Use recycled goods or material that

might otherwise end up in the trash. bee houses can

be made from bundled bamboos straws, toad homes

can be made from an old half-buried teapot. Use your

imagination! watch the wildlife that takes up residence

in your yard.

go for a walk in a forest. record what you see, hear, smell and

feel. don’t taste anything - it Could Be poisonous.

observe from different vantage points. For example, look

down, look under a fallen log, close your eyes and listen,

make a bark rubbing, feel the texture of the soil, etc.

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yuyan ho, aged 17, honk kong

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leVel 1 2 3

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aCtivity

aCtivity

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C.25

go for a walk in a natural area such as a forest or park. look

for animal signs such as browsed leaves or bark, animal

tracks, holes in trees or in the ground, nests, fur, feathers

and scat. investigate the traces that animals leave behind

(hair from their bristle, feathers, excrements, imprints).

if possible, invite a biologist to come along. make a

drawing of three things you discovered, and present them

to your group.

climb a mountain. note the plant and animal life

along your hike. what sort of changes do you observe

at different elevations? how does the temperature,

humidity and wind change? are the same species found

at both the top and bottom of the mountain? why or

why not? discuss your discoveries with your group.

51

hiu wing chan, aged 17, honk kong

group aCtivity

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our World


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong> | our land

doris lee, aged 14, canada

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leVel 1 2 3

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research rare tree species native to your area. why are

they rare? what animal species use these tree species for

food and shelter? choose one of these tree species and

plant it in an appropriate location.

collect seeds and small plants (including the roots) from a

ditch or alongside a road. plant them in an open or closed

terrarium, creating a miniature ecosystem. care for them

as they grow. if you dispose of them, be sure to put them

back where you found them so you are not introducing alien

species. www.stormthecastle.com/terrarium/terrariums-for-kids.htm

adopt and clean a natural area. Take an inventory of the

plants and animals that live in that area. describe their

location in relation to each other. how do they depend on

each other? explain your findings to your group in words or

in pictures.

52

harsh hera, aged 15, india


C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

leVel 2 3

aCtivity

C.30

leVel 2 3 Find a tree in a forest or natural area and plot a one metre

aCtivity

C.31

leVel 1 2 3

sammy Xiawu, aged 15, canada

what is a seed bank? Find out where seed banks are

located in your area and country. Visit one, if possible.

Find out how you can get involved in a seed bank.

radius around its base. on a piece of paper, draw all of the

life forms you find within that area (e.g. grasses, mosses,

lichens, insects, fungi, frogs, etc.). Try to identify the

species names. if possible, invite a biologist or naturalist

to help you with the activity.

do any other activity approved by your teacher or leader.

daniela karaivanova, aged 16, bulgaria

mohamed lassan khaleel, aged 6, maldives

53

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ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong>

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our

section d

World

do the first aCtivity in this seCtion and

one other aCtivity of your ChoiCe. after

Completing our World aCtivities you Will

Be aBle to:

>> desCriBe the three components of

biodiversity - genes, species and ecosystems

>> list some threats to biodiversity

>> take action to protect biodiversity and

share your efforts with other people

54


Justino hermandez gonzalez, aged 20, mexico

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leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

d.01

make a collage, poster or video clip showing examples

of all three components of biodiversity - genes,

species and ecosystems. present your collage to your

class or group and answer the following questions.

how do the different parts interact with each other?

why is each component important? what are some

of the threats to biodiversity around the world?

55

group aCtivity

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leVel 1

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discover!

aCtivity

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aCtivity

d.03

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aCtivity

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d.05

choose a threatened species in

your area. where does it live?

what does it eat? what animals

eat it? what are its habits? why

is it threatened with extinction?

who is responsible for that? write

a story or present a skit about what

the environment would be like if that

species goes extinct.

listen to podcasts about interesting species with your group.

submit answers to the challenges including recording what

you think a sea cucumber sounds like when it squirts!

www.education.eol.org/podcast

explore a biodiversity website such as

www.biodiversity911.org or www.eol.org . play two online games.

For example, learn how species are named by playing a

species matching game at www.eol.org/games/identify_the_image.

Visit one interactive map. Take one online quiz.

pick three countries that you would like to visit some

day. what types of ecosystems are found in each of these

countries? what is the national tree, flower, bird and

animal of each country? what are the major threats to

biodiversity in each country? Try to find some pictures

showing nature in these countries.

56

mihaela bogatu, aged 18, romania


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leVel 1 2 3

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learn about endangered species and how consumer

choices affect them directly and indirectly. For example,

eating shark fin soup directly affects sharks because

they are hunted for their fins. eating lots of meat can

indirectly affect endangered species living in rainforests

because their habitats are destroyed to create pastures

for grazing cattle. prepare a poster portraying the most

endangered species in your country, region or continent

and the challenges they face.

learn how indigenous people use biodiversity for their

survival and in their cultures. (indigenous people are

also called First nations, aboriginal and native people

in different parts of the world.) if possible, invite an

indigenous person to talk about biodiversity with your

group. identify one example per continent of how these

communities use biodiversity. share your findings with

your group.

different groups of people use and conserve biodiversity

in different ways. Find three examples of how biodiversity

is used differently by men and women, or by people living

in the cities and people living in the countryside.

pick a room. identify the objects in it that originate from

biodiversity, for example a wooden table was once an

oak tree. make a collage showing the links between the

objects in the room and their biodiversity origins.

interview a scientist about a biodiversity issue. record it,

then share it with your group.

57

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leVel 2 3

aCtivity

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aCtivity

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aCtivity

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what is a biodiversity hotspot? why do you think they

exist? where are biodiversity hotspots found around the

world? Take the biodiversity hotspots Quiz on

planetgreen.discovery.com/games-quizzes/biodiversity-hotspots-quiz.

invent a way of explaining biodiversity and its three

components using at least two senses. For example, make

a video with pictures and sound, or create a game where

players learn about biodiversity through taste and touch.

explain biodiversity to your teacher, leader or group and

answer the following questions. how do the different

parts interact with each other? why is each component

important? what are some of the threats to biodiversity

around the world?

learn about in-situ and ex-situ conservation. what are

the goals and challenges of each type? when would you use

each type of conservation? Find some examples of each

type in your area and/or country. present your findings to

your group.

research how habitat fragmentation can affect

genetic diversity within a species. have a group

debate on a relevant case study in your area. assign

roles to each person (such as town mayor, biologist,

indigenous person, animal affected by habitat

fragmentation, developer, etc.).

research international treaties that aim to protect

biodiversity, either in its entirety or a specific part

of biodiversity. share your findings with your group

in the form of a play or poster. group aCtivity

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Be creative!

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aCtivity

d.17

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d.18

oana gabriela bejinari, aged 12, romania

invent a game that helps people learn about the

importance of biodiversity. play it with your group.

older participants can design and lead a game for

younger children. an example of a biodiversity card

game can be seen at:

www.bgci.org/education/article/443

make an art object out of natural materials. encourage

other members of your group to also make objects. host

and display your creations in a natural art exhibition

with stories about the materials and the message your

art is sending.

biodiversity inspires fashion: designers create fabrics that

looks like animal skins, jewellers make pieces using shells,

bark and other natural material, and clothing companies

use natural fibres such as cotton, hemp, wool and silk.

create an article of clothing or a piece of jewellery that

uses or is inspired by biodiversity. host a biodiversity

fashion show with your group.

59

group aCtivity

rainbow Tse lok ya Tse, aged 13, hong kong

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aCtivity

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aCtivity

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d.21

animals move in all sorts of different ways.

participate in an animal yoga class where all of the

exercises mimic the movements of different animals

found around the world. Take turns leading the

movements. older participants can design and lead

a class for younger children.

write a radio script about a biodiversity issue that is

important in your community. encourage your local radio

station to record and broadcast it. you could offer yourself

and your friends to be the voice actors!

To make life easier and more enjoyable, people invented

tools, appliances and new materials. many of these things

remind us of nature. what is nature’s equivalent of: an

excavator, parachute, flipper, sonar and paper? what

are four other examples of human inventions that were

inspired by nature?

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group aCtivity

gwanghui Joe, aged 17, republic of korea


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reach out!

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aCtivity

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aCtivity

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d.25

make a commercial about biodiversity. record it and post

it on youTube. monitor the number of hits (the number of

people who watch your commercial) and the comments

on the website for one month. report back to your group.

make sure you have the permission of everyone in the

video, and their parents, before you post it.

on the international day for biological diversity

(22 may) organize activities and celebrations to

raise people’s awareness on the importance of

biodiversity. Use posters, songs, poetry, artwork,

concerts, drama, sports, contests, photos, slogans,

workshops, newsletters, e-cards, taste-testing,

videos, etc. you can also join events held by other

people in your country. Visit cbd.int/idb for ideas.

hold your own backyard species inventory called a bioblitz

using the activities found at

www.education.eol.org/bioblitz/activities.

share photographs or drawings online at

www.education.eol.org/bioblitz/gallery.

organize and host an environment-themed workshop.

invite your family and friends to participate.

61

group aCtivity group aCtivity

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aCtivity

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Visit three online platforms where young people

share information and support each other’s actions

on biodiversity and environmental issues. Join and

contribute to one of them. some examples are:

www.tigweb.org, greenwave.cbd.int and uniteforclimate.org

start a biodiversity blog (an online journal where readers

can comment on the journal entries) or diary. record tips

on what young people can do for biodiversity. if you prefer

working offline, share your blog or diary in your school

newspaper or on your school radio station.

get a newspaper and read all articles about biodiversity.

Use one of the articles as a starting point for a letter to the

editor. submit your letter to the newspaper. if you don’t

have access to newspapers, you can modify this activity

to respond to radio or other media stories.

take action!

leVel 1 2 3

aCtivity

d.29

conduct a waste audit in

your house, school or other

location. create an action

plan to reduce the amount

of waste you produce and

to divert waste away from

landfill. carry out your

plan. For ideas, visit

www.globalfootprints.org/pdf/waste_num34.pdf

62

dario Fernàndez, aged 17, spain


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write to your government representative about a

biodiversity issue that concerns you. don’t forget to offer

some solutions.

get involved with biodiversity conservation. Join a

conservation organization. Visit a wild animal rescue

centre and offer to help in the centre for a period of time.

report to your group on your activities, what interests

you and how your efforts are helping biodiversity.

encourage your friends and group to participate in

The Green Wave. Find out more at greenwave.cbd.int.

organize and host a fundraiser for a biodiversity cause.

become a community organizer. organize an event

to raise public awareness about a specific local

biodiversity issue. have a specific goal. make a

banner and posters to publicise the event. contact

your local media (TV, radio and newspapers) and ask

them to cover the story. Try and get as many people

as possible to come out to your event.

do any other activity approved by your teacher or leader.

63

group aCtivity

group aCtivity

group aCtivity

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ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong>

ww

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

resources and

additional

information

to help you and your group undertake this

challenge badge a number of resources are

being put together and can be found on the fao

Children and youth Climate Change Web site:

www.fao.org/climatechange/youth/60638/en

speCifiC resourCe materials will also be

developed for the activities listed in this

booklet and will be placed at the web link

above. if you would like to be automatically

informed of new resources, please write to us

and register for the free yunga newsletter:

children-youth@fao.org

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65

aby adraham, aged 12, Qatar


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong>

ww

Useful websites

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

and books

Bioversity international has many resources on agricultural biodiversity:

www.bioversityinternational.org

on the Birdlife WeBsite, learn about birds, their habitats, global

biodiversity and examples of conservation projects:

www.birdlife.org

the ong>Conventionong> on BiologiCal diversity youth pages have information

about the cbd and biodiversity and lots of activities and resources for

young people:

www.cbd.int/youth

the enCyClopedia of life is an online reference and database of all

species known to science:

www.eol.org

the fao Children and youth Climate Change portal contains activities,

resources, events, competitions and projects related to biodiversity,

climate change and other issues that concern youth:

www.fao.org/climatechange/youth/en

the green Wave website is your gateway to an exciting biodiversity

project for young people. it has lots of resources and stories about how

youth around the world are celebrating biodiversity:

www.greenwave.cbd.int

the royal soCiety for the proteCtion of Birds in the U.k. has an

excellent programme for children. Visit the wildlife explorers website for

great resources and activities. several activities in the wildlife action

awards inspired activities for this badge:

www.rspb.org.uk/youth

66


w

david suzuki and kathy Vanderlinden. (2001). eco-fun: great projects,

experiments and games for a greener earth. Vancouver (b.c.): greystone

books.

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

tunza is the children and youth programme of the United nations

environment programme. The website has information about youth

activities and campaigns, as well as publications and multimedia

resources:

www.unep.org/tunza

the united nations CyBersChoolBus is a global teaching and learning

project that covers topics such as peace, human rights, environment,

health and oceans:

www.cyberschoolbus.un.org

the WorldBirds WeBsite is your entry point to an incredible global

citizen science project on birds:

www.worldbirds.org

the Wagggs WeBsite contains many resources and news on environmental

issues such as the Together we can change our world badge about the

millennium development goals:

www.wagggsworld.org

WWf takes you from the basics of biodiversity through to the intricacies

of soil, climate change and fisheries:

www.biodiversity911.org/default.html

see what other challenge badges and activities are available on the

yUnga web site www.yunga.org

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C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

glossary

>> adaptation: special characteristic that helps an organism to survive and/

or to reproduce.

>> amphibians: a large group of animals that usually have moist skins and most

live in or in association with freshwater - including frogs, toads, newts and

salamanders. most have eggs without shells, laid or developing in water or

moist environments.

>> ong>Biodiversityong>: the variety of life on earth, at each of the genetic, species and

ecosystem levels, and the relationships between them.

>> ong>Biodiversityong> hotspot: an area especially rich in plant and animal life, but in grave

threat of being destroyed. To be recognized as a biodiversity hotspot, the area

must: have at least 1 500 endemic species of vascular plants, and have lost at

least 70 percent of its original habitat.

>> Climate change: a change in the overall state of the earth’s climate caused by

natural and human causes such as the build-up of greenhouse gases, such as

carbon dioxide, in the earth’s atmosphere.

>> Conservation: changing needs or habits with the aim of maintaining the health

of the natural world, including land, water, biodiversity, and energy.

>> ecosystem: the physical and biological components of an environment, and

their interactions. an ecosystem is relatively self-contained and is defined

by the types of organisms found there and their interactions, (e.g. forest,

grassland, lake).

>> ecosystem goods and services: the benefits that the environment, including

humans, obtains from ecosystems. The four types of ecosystem services are:

provisioning, regulating, cultural and supporting.

>> ex-situ conservation: off-site conservation in which plants or animals are

removed from their natural habitat and placed in a new location such as a zoo or

seed bank.

>> fragmentation: process whereby parts of a habitat become separated from

one another because of changes in a landscape. Fragmentation makes

it difficult for species to move throughout a habitat, and poses a major

challenge for species requiring large areas of land.

>> gene: a chemical structure inside a cell that determines certain characteristics

of an organism, and which is passed down from parent to offspring.

>> genetically modified: see living modified organism.

68


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>> genetic diversity: the variety and richness of genes in a population or species.

>> habitat: the local environment in which an organism is usually found.

>> indigenous peoples: are any ethnic group who inhabit a geographic region with

which they have the earliest known historical connection.

>> in-situ conservation: on-site conservation in which plants or animals are

protected in their natural habitats, either by protecting or cleaning up the

habitat, or by defending the species from disease, competitors and predators.

>> living modified organism (lmo): an organism produced by modern biotechnology

in which scientists have taken a single gene from a plant or animal cell or from

a bacterium, and then inserted it into another plant or animal cell. lmos are

commonly known as genetically modified organisms (gmos).

>> microorganism: a creature too small to be seen by the human eye alone, but can

be seen through a microscope. in ecosystems, they help in recycling nutrients.

>> natural resource: something from nature that can be used to make something

else; farmers need natural resources, such as land, air, water and sunlight,

to grow food.

>> organism: an individual living creature such as a spider, walnut tree or human.

>> pollinator: an animal that carries pollen from one seed plant to another,

unwittingly aiding the plant to reproduce. common pollinators include bees,

butterflies, moths, birds and bats.

>> reptiles: snakes, lizards, crocodiles, turtles and tortoises etc. some are

terrestrial (land living), others live on both land and in water, some exclusively

in water (e.g. freshwater turtles). most have eggs with shells which are laid

and develop out of water.

>> species: a group of similar organisms which are able to breed together and

produce healthy, fertile offspring (offspring that are able to produce young).

>> trait: a characteristic or distinguishing feature that identifies an organism,

like curly hair or tallness. in agriculture, important traits include those that

affect a plant’s yield or resistance to disease. some traits are inheritable and

others are not.

>> Watershed: an area of land that catches rain and snow, and drains into a larger

body of water such as a marsh, stream, river, lake, ocean or groundwater. a

watershed (sometimes called a drainage basin) can be as small as a few

hectares or as large as thousands of square kilometres.

69 lossary


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong>

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

acknowledgements

Gratitude goes to Chris Gibb for coordinating the development of

this booklet and to Margherita Ascione, Alessia Battistoni, Veronica

Barria, Chiara Padellaro, Diana Remache Cerda, Alessandra Silvi,

Giulia Tiddens and Maria Volodina for their efforts on the project

and inputs and contributions to the text.

A big thank you goes out to everyone who made the biodiversity

challenge badge a reality. Thank you to BirdLife International,

the Encyclopedia of Life, the Royal Society for the Protection of

Birds, and to all the enthusiastic Guides and Scouts in Australia,

Canada, Ireland, Italy, Singapore, St Lucia, Trinidad and Tobago,

Turkey, U.S.A. who thoughtfully reviewed and tested the initial

drafts of the badge.

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C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

This badge has been developed with the kind financial support of the

Swedish International Development Agency (Sida).

www.sida.se

this ong>Badgeong> Was developed By:

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

FAO leads international efforts to defeat hunger. Serving both developed

and developing countries, FAO acts as a neutral forum where all nations

meet as equals to negotiate agreements and debate policy. FAO is also a

source of knowledge and information, helping countries to modernize

and improve agriculture, forestry and fisheries practices and ensure good

nutrition for all. www.fao.org/climatechange/youth/en

Secretariat of the ong>Conventionong> on Biological Diversity (CBD)

The ong>Conventionong> on Biological Diversity came into force on 29 December 1993

with the objectives to conserve biodiversity, use it in a sustainable fashion

and to share its benefits fairly and equitably. The CBD Secretariat manages

biodiversity policy discussions, facilitates the participation of countries

and groups in biodiversity processes and supports the implementation of

the ong>Conventionong>.www.cbd.int/youth

World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS)

WAGGGS is a worldwide movement providing non-formal education where

girls and young women develop leadership and life skills through selfdevelopment,

challenge and adventure. Girl Guides and Girl Scouts learn

by doing. The Association brings together Girl Guiding and Girl Scouting

Associations from 145 countries reaching 10 million members around the

globe. www.wagggsworld.org

the green Wave

The Green Wave is a global campaign to educate children and youth

about biodiversity. The main activity centres around local tree-planting

celebrations held each year at 10am local time on the International Day

for Biological Diversity on 22 May. Collectively, all of these Green Wave

celebrations create a ‘green wave’ that starts in the far east and travels

west around the planet.www.greenwave.cbd.int

Youth and United Nations Global Alliance (YUNGA)

YUNGA was created to allow children and young people to be involved and

make a difference. Numerous partners, including UN agencies and civil

society organizations collaborate in developing initiatives, resources and

opportunities for children and young people. YUNGA also acts as a gateway

to allow children and youth to be involved in the UN related activities

such as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), food security, climate

change and biodiversity. www.yunga.org

71


ong>Biodiversityong> ong>Challengeong> ong>Badgeong>

C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

your

not

72


C B d / / f a o / / g r e e n W a v e / / W a g g g s / / y u n g a

es

73


prinTed in iTaly on ecological paper - noVember 2010 - design and layout: studio@bartoleschi.com


for further information:

>>

youth and united nations gloBal allianCe (yunga)

food and agriCulture organization of the united nations (fao)

Viale delle Terme di caracalla, 00153 rome, iTaly

e-mail: children-yoUTh@Fao.org

web siTe: www.Fao.org/climaTechange/yoUTh

seCretariat of the ong>Conventionong> on BiologiCal diversity (CBd)

world Trade cenTre

413 sT. JacQUes sTreeT, sUiTe 800

monTreal, QUebec, canada h2y 1n9

e-mail: secreTariaT@cbd.inT

websiTe: www.cbd.inT

World assoCiation of girl guides and girl sCouts (Wagggs)

world bUreaU, olaVe cenTre, 12c lyndhUrsT road

london nw3 5pQ, england

e-mail: wagggs@wagggsworld.org

web siTe: www.wagggsworld.org

I1885E/1/11.10

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