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Routing and Multicasting Strategies in Wireless Mobile Ad hoc ...

Routing and Multicasting Strategies in Wireless Mobile Ad hoc ...

Routing and Multicasting Strategies in Wireless Mobile Ad hoc

University of California Los Angeles Routing and Multicasting Strategies in Wireless Mobile Ad hoc Networks A dissertation submitted in partial satisfaction of the requirements for the degree Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science by Sung-Ju Lee 2000

  • Page 2 and 3: c Copyright by Sung-Ju Lee 2000
  • Page 4 and 5: to my loving parents, grandparents,
  • Page 6 and 7: 2.3.4 Other Considerations . . . .
  • Page 8 and 9: 4.5.3 Delay . . . . . . . . . . . .
  • Page 10 and 11: 7.6 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . .
  • Page 12 and 13: 11.1.3 Ad hoc Multicast Routing pro
  • Page 14 and 15: 13.3.3 Unicast Experiments . . . .
  • Page 16 and 17: 4.4 Throughput. . . . . . . . . . .
  • Page 18 and 19: 8.5 Packet delivery ratio (40 sourc
  • Page 20 and 21: 12.9 Number of control bytes transm
  • Page 22 and 23: 13.2 DVMRP with a local source. . .
  • Page 24 and 25: Verra Morgan for making sure I stay
  • Page 26 and 27: of IEEE International Conference on
  • Page 28 and 29: Sung-Ju Lee, William Su, and Mario
  • Page 30 and 31: Abstract of the Dissertation Routin
  • Page 32 and 33: CHAPTER 1 Introduction 1.1 Backgrou
  • Page 34 and 35: in wireless mobile ad hoc networks.
  • Page 36 and 37: 1.3 Related Work 1.3.1 Routing Prot
  • Page 38 and 39: 1.3.2 Multicast Protocols Many diff
  • Page 40 and 41: We extend this work in Chapter 3 by
  • Page 42 and 43: 2.1 Routing Protocols Review 2.1.1
  • Page 44 and 45: ecords routes the node has learned
  • Page 46 and 47: Piggybacking on Route Discoveries:
  • Page 48 and 49: stability with its neighbors depend
  • Page 50 and 51: LQ processes can be performed at mo
  • Page 52 and 53:

    Table 2.1: Summary of DBF, DSR, and

  • Page 54 and 55:

    Control Overhead (kbps) 1600 1400 1

  • Page 56 and 57:

    Average End-to-End Delay (ms) 35 30

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    Storage Overhead (# of table entrie

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    DSR has a better LDP/LIP property.

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    CHAPTER 3 Performance Evaluation of

  • Page 64 and 65:

    Table 3.1: Parameter values for WRP

  • Page 66 and 67:

    Table 3.3: Parameter values for DSR

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    3.1.5 Distance Routing Effect Algor

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    Table 3.6: Summary of protocols. Pr

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    hoc configuration. The access schem

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    give different ratios (especially i

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    On-demand routing protocols (DSR an

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    Avg # of Data Packets Transmitted /

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    ecall that in our measure, control

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    Packet Delivery Ratio 1 0.9 0.8 0.7

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    3.3.7.1 Mobility Description In the

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    Avg # of Total Packets Transmitted

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    these protocols cannot be applied t

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    CHAPTER 4 Ad hoc Routing Protocol S

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    networks. When a link break in an a

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    local state information, a minimum

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    4.2.1 Route Discovery Route discove

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    to the small number of nodes in the

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    When re-discovering a route after a

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    S S D D S (a) Link break in active

  • Page 104 and 105:

    Table 4.1: Summary of room sizes. #

  • Page 106 and 107:

    Table 4.2: Parameter values. Parame

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    Bytes Delivered to Destinations 9e+

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    Hop Distance 100 80 60 40 20 0 0 20

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    Routing Packet Transmissions 2e+07

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    End-to-End Delay (ms) 200 150 100 5

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    poor throughput performance due to

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    CHAPTER 5 The Effects of MAC Protoc

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    outes as long as the source node re

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    Table 5.1: Summary of MAC protocols

  • Page 124 and 125:

    transmission attempts. Similarly, w

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    Table 5.2: Parameter values. Parame

  • Page 128 and 129:

    97 Figure 5.3: Data packets deliver

  • Page 130 and 131:

    FSR remains fairly constant while t

  • Page 132 and 133:

    101 Figure 5.9: Control packet over

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    103 Figure 5.12: Normalized routing

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    to the conclusion that table-driven

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    1980s. Duct routing, however, suffe

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    source of the route, the primary ro

  • Page 142 and 143:

    S A B C D (a) S A B C D (b) S A B C

  • Page 144 and 145:

    S A B C D W X : Primary Route : Alt

  • Page 146 and 147:

    Packet Delivery Ratio 1 0.98 0.96 0

  • Page 148 and 149:

    Number of Data Transmitted / Data R

  • Page 150 and 151:

    Packet Delivery Ratio 1 0.95 0.9 0.

  • Page 152 and 153:

    CHAPTER 7 Split Multipath Routing w

  • Page 154 and 155:

    S D (a) RREQ propagation (b) Availa

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    the first RREQ the destination rece

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    order delivery and re-sequencing bu

  • Page 160 and 161:

    Packet Delivery Ratio 1 0.9 0.8 0.7

  • Page 162 and 163:

    Normalized Routing Load 2.5 2 1.5 1

  • Page 164 and 165:

    End-to-End Delay (ms) 7.5.4 Delay 2

  • Page 166 and 167:

    CHAPTER 8 Dynamic Load-Aware Routin

  • Page 168 and 169:

    A X Y 000 111 000 111 000 111 000 1

  • Page 170 and 171:

    B S A E H D C 7 F G 2 7 8 4 5 5 Rou

  • Page 172 and 173:

    sufficiently strong signal in the p

  • Page 174 and 175:

    Packet Delivery Ratio 1 0.9 0.8 0.7

  • Page 176 and 177:

    End-to-End Delay (msec) 200 150 100

  • Page 178 and 179:

    the number of packets queued at the

  • Page 180 and 181:

    S R R R R R Join Query Join Reply F

  • Page 182 and 183:

    S 2 R 1 R 2 B A C S 1 S 3 Figure 9.

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    9.4 Soft State In ODMRP, no explici

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    the time when the node was last ref

  • Page 188 and 189:

    CHAPTER 10 Improving the Performanc

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    d = y i ; y j. Note that when v i =

  • Page 192 and 193:

    (3, 5) S A (1, 2) B (4, 5) (2, 4) C

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    A B C A B Transmission Passive Ack

  • Page 196 and 197:

    of the waiting time is not straight

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    at 18 km/hr and the multicast group

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    Packet Delivery Ratio 1 0.9 0.8 0.7

  • Page 202 and 203:

    End-to-End Delay (millisecond) 20 1

  • Page 204 and 205:

    Control Overhead (Bytes) 4e+06 3e+0

  • Page 206 and 207:

    Avg. # of Total Packets Transmitted

  • Page 208 and 209:

    CHAPTER 11 Performance Evaluation o

  • Page 210 and 211:

    Table 11.1: Parameter values for AM

  • Page 212 and 213:

    Table 11.2: Parameter values for OD

  • Page 214 and 215:

    parameter values are shown in Table

  • Page 216 and 217:

    Table 11.5: Summary of protocols. P

  • Page 218 and 219:

    tation because our data packets wer

  • Page 220 and 221:

    Packet Delivery Ratio 1 0.8 0.6 0.4

  • Page 222 and 223:

    movements, packet collision, or con

  • Page 224 and 225:

    Number of Data Packets TXed / Data

  • Page 226 and 227:

    Number of All Packets TXed / Data P

  • Page 228 and 229:

    Number of Control Bytes TXed / Data

  • Page 230 and 231:

    Packet Delivery Ratio 1 0.9 0.8 0.7

  • Page 232 and 233:

    critical links can be reduced. In a

  • Page 234 and 235:

    11.4.3 Lessons Learned While implem

  • Page 236 and 237:

    CHAPTER 12 Exploiting the Unicast F

  • Page 238 and 239:

    S i j k Query Propagation Reply Pro

  • Page 240 and 241:

    12.2 Simulation Model and Methodolo

  • Page 242 and 243:

    Packet Delivery Ratio 1 0.9 0.8 0.7

  • Page 244 and 245:

    Avg # of Control Byte Transmitted /

  • Page 246 and 247:

    Avg # of Total Packets Transmitted

  • Page 248 and 249:

    Avg # of Control Byte Transmitted /

  • Page 250 and 251:

    CHAPTER 13 ODMRP Implementation in

  • Page 252 and 253:

    13.2.1.2 Hardware Ad hoc network no

  • Page 254 and 255:

    13.2.2.2 Forwarding on Virtual Inte

  • Page 256 and 257:

    Signal-to-Noise Ratio (dbm) 80 70 6

  • Page 258 and 259:

    C E Receiver Sender A 0000000000000

  • Page 260 and 261:

    more control packet losses, with hi

  • Page 262 and 263:

    Table 13.3: ODMRP with a local sour

  • Page 264 and 265:

    Table 13.4: Unicast bandwidth distr

  • Page 266 and 267:

    Table 13.6: Unicast bandwidth distr

  • Page 268 and 269:

    Table 13.7: Unicast bandwidth distr

  • Page 270 and 271:

    Figure 13.7: PingPlotter operating

  • Page 272 and 273:

    CHAPTER 14 Conclusion Wireless mobi

  • Page 274 and 275:

    Reliable multicast Congestion and a

  • Page 276 and 277:

    port, Computer Science Department,

  • Page 278 and 279:

    [30] C.-C. Chiang, M. Gerla, and L.

  • Page 280 and 281:

    [51] J.J. Garcia-Luna-Aceves and E.

  • Page 282 and 283:

    [71] J. Jubin and J.D. Tornow, \The

  • Page 284 and 285:

    [91] S.-J. Lee, W. Su, and M. Gerla

  • Page 286 and 287:

    [110] J. Moy, \OSPF Version 2," Req

  • Page 288 and 289:

    [131] M.B. Pursley and H.B. Russell

  • Page 290 and 291:

    [151] W. Su and M. Gerla, \IPv6 Flo

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