Follow-up on the National Workshop on Gender ... - ENERGIA Africa

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Follow-up on the National Workshop on Gender ... - ENERGIA Africa

ong>Followong>-ong>upong> on the National Workshop on Gender

Mainstreaming in Rural Electrification

Report

May, 2011

Prepared by:

Bantu Morolong

Nozipho Wright

Gender and Energy Network of Botswana (GENBO)

1


Contents

List of Acronyms .............................................................................................................................. 3

1. Background ............................................................................................................................... 4

2. Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 6

3. Feedback on the Implementation of the GAPs .............................................................. 8

Annex 1: List of Participants .................................................................................................... 37

2


List of Acronyms

AIDS Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

ARED Agricultural Research and Extension Division

BCA Botswana College of Agriculture

BOTEC Botswana Technology Centre

BPC Botswana Power Corporation

CBO Community Based Organizations

DC District Council

DAE Department of Agricultural Extension

EA Energy Affairs Department

ERPS Environmental Research and Policy Solutions

GAP Gender Action Plan

GENBO Gender and Energy Network of Botswana

GPPC Gender Policy and Programme Committee

HORC- Harry Openheimer Research Centre

MDGs Millennium Development Goals

MOA Ministry of Agriculture

NGO Non Governmental Organizations

PLWA People Living with Aids

PRA Participatory Reflection and Action

RE-Botswana Rural Electrification Project

RET Renewable Energy Technologies

RIPCO B Rural Industries Production Company-Botswana

RNC Regional Energy Coordinator (for ENERGIA)

SMMEs Small and Medium and Macro Enterprises

TIE-ENERGIA Turning Information into Empowerment – International Network on

Gender and Sustainable Energy

UB University of Botswana

WAD Women’s Affairs Department

3


1. Background

The Gender Energy Network of Botswana (GENBO) conducted a four day training

workshop from 6 to 9 September 2010 entitled “Mainstreaming Gender Concerns into

Energy Projects” at BOTEC in Gaborone. The training was attended by 13 participants (9

females and 4 males). The objective of the training was to equip and strengthen the

capacity and expertise of project developers, managers, planners, implementers,

electricians, private consultants and academics to mainstream gender into the design

and implementation of energy projects, activities and research. The training forms part

of the ENERGIA Phase IV programme whose aim is to build national capacity and

practical experience to mainstream gender in the energy sector. It is also follow ong>upong> to

the recommendations made during the gender audit of energy policies and programmes

in 2006, which identified lack of capacity to mainstream gender as one of the major

constraints in the Botswana energy sector.

The training involved introducing participants to conceptual and analytical skills

required to understand the gender/energy/poverty nexus. The participants were also

introduced to some of the gender analytical tools such as the Harvard Matrix, access and

control, etc, that can be used in the design and implementation of their energy projects,

and they were further given an opportunity to apply the gender analytical tools in the

field. The field work was carried out in a village, Medie, approximately 90 km outside of

the capital city Gaborone. The village was selected for two reasons: 1) it is one of the

villages where Botswana Power Corporation (BPC) and BPC Lesedi is piloting its

Renewable Energy project and 2) its close proximity to Gaborone.

Various considerations were made in selecting suitable participants for the training

workshop based on a training needs analysis which was conducted prior to the training

in order to determine eligibility of the applicants as well as the training needs. The

outcomes of the needs assessment were used to design the training material, based on

the participants’ knowledge of gender and energy as well as the knowledge they wanted

to gain. Participants at this workshop were drawn from the following key stakeholders:

Botswana Technology Centre (BOTEC), Rural Industries Innovation Centre (RIIC), BPC,

the University of Botswana, (UB), EECG Consultants, Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) and

the private sector. MOA does not have an energy project, however the organization was

invited to allow the participants from this Ministry to share some of their achievements

and challenges in their gender mainstreaming programme. MoA is one of the first

government ministries to develop a gender policy.

Out of the 13 participants, only five had been trained on gender and energy, through the

GENBO facilitated training conducted in 2009. The remaining participants had partial

knowledge, or no knowledge at all about gender, although they had basic knowledge on

energy or biodiversity issues. Five other applicants had had only a general training on

social sciences, with no particular training on gender. It was planned to take the

participants through the ENERGIA gender and energy concepts online training Module

to bring them all to the same level of understanding prior to the workshop. However,

the online Module (Moodle) was not functioning at the time and the facilitators

developed a quiz instead, which was administered on Day 1 of the training workshop.

4


A major output of the September training was the development of gender action plans.

All organizations represented in the workshop, except BPC which already had a gender

action plan, developed an action plan, which they will implement once they get back to

their workplace. The gender action plans are for the following projects:

a) Biomass Coal Briquetting (RIPCO (B)): Product development and technology

transfer.

b) Gender relations within polygamous households: energy issues and concerns

among the Bazezuru communities (University of Botswana): Pilot study

c) Assessment of User Perception and Acceptance of Efficient Wood Stoves in

Botswana: (EECG Consultants)

d) Solar Lighting for Communal Areas (BOTEC): Baseline survey, production and

installation of 150 solar lighting units in six villages.

e) Training Workshops and Policy Review (MoA): Capacity Building for the Ministry

gender focal points and review of the Agriculture Gender Policy.

This report focuses only on the return workshop, more details on the September 2010

training can be found in a separate report.

5


2. Introduction

BOTEC, the national focal point for ENERGIA in Botswana, conducted a return workshop

on 18 May 2011 at BOTEC in Gaborone, eight months after the national training. The

purpose of the return workshop was to discuss achievements and challenges with

regard to implementation of the gender action plans (GAPs) developed at the training in

September 2010. The follow ong>upong> workshop was attended by 16 participants including

facilitators (7 females and 9 males). Only six participants (3 females and 3 males)

represented the stakeholder organizations that prepared the GAPs, i.e. BOTEC, Rural

RIPCO (B), EECG Consultants, UB. The additional participants that make ong>upong> the total

(16) were members of GENBO who were scheduled to meet on the same day to prepare

a Strategy for the Network. Most of these were the newly recruited members of the

Gender and Energy Network of Botswana (GENBO) who were to invited to participate

and give feedback when the GAPs were presented. This was intended to introduce the

members to some of the ideas on gender mainstreaming that GENBO promotes and to

gain insight into some of the energy programmes in Botswana.

Almost all of the participating institutions have planned, or have ongoing energy

projects in which they had prepared plans to mainstream gender using some of the

tools, ideas and skills acquired from the September, 2010 gender mainstreaming

training workshop. Some of the participants who attended the first main workshop

could not attend the follow ong>upong> workshop due to their other institutional commitments.

However, close to full representation of all the stakeholder organisations was achieved.

This effectively facilitated achievement of the workshop objectives which are outlined

below.

Workshop objectives

� To follow ong>upong> on action plan implementation and evaluate progress made since

the last workshop.

� To continue to strengthen capacity of the institutional representatives who

participated in the gender mainstreaming trainings. The representatives are

now projects developers, managers and leaders in gender mainstreaming into

the various energy projects of their organizations.

� To assess and share experiences and challenges with regard to the overall

institutional environment for gender mainstreaming in energy in Botswana.

Workshop expectations

The participants’ expectations were as follows:

� To share and learn from each others’ experiences on gender mainstreaming and

implementation of the GAPs.

� Reflect on the aspects of the GAPs which presented problems for implementation

and to discuss possible solutions to those challenges.

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� Assess the impact of the gender mainstreaming efforts on the current energy

programmes and projects.

� Gain further insights into how to effectively implement energy projects which

take gender and energy concerns into consideration.

The Workshop process

The Return Workshop was facilitated by Dr BL Morolong and Ms Nozipho Wright. First

the facilitators gave some background to the ENERGIA capacity building programme

outlining the rationale for training on gender mainstreaming, aims and objectives, and

achievements so far. The facilitators reiterated the importance of mainstreaming gender

into energy projects and the need to continue to help others in the participants’

organisations to appreciate these efforts. A short reflection on the first workshop was

used to transit into the one day return workshop the aim and objectives of which were

presented. The next activity was the feedback presentations outlined below.

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3. Feedback on the Implementation of the GAPs

The outcome for each organisation represented at the training was an Action Plan

covering a specified six months period and showing how gender was going to be

mainstreamed into an existing project. The GAPs were to be implemented by each

participant or a team as most organisations had sent about two people each to develop a

GAP for the organisation. The participants were required to provide feedback on

implementation of their plans highlighting the successes and challenges and to receive

feedback from the other participants to encourage them to continue with

implementation of the GAPs.

Presentations on implementation during which each institution gave feedback on the

progress of implementation of their GAPs was the core session in this workshop. In each

presenter summarised the background of the project including its location, objectives,

implementation stage, target groong>upong> and expected outcomes. The presenters then

ong>upong>dated the rest of the participants on progress made. This was followed by a question

and answer session, including inputs from other participants and workshop facilitators,

on how things could be improved as the implementation continues. Emphasis in all the

reporting was on the achievements, experiences from the gender mainstreaming efforts

and application of some of the skills gained from the previous training as well as the

challenges faced by the project developers.

1. Rural Industries Promotions Company (RIPCO (B))

a) Title of Energy Project: Biomass Coal Briquetting

b) Names of project implementers: Ms Onkabetse Magakwa and Mr Fana Kelebogile

c) Description of Energy Project

RIPCO B is implementing a coal biomass coal briquetting project from 2008 to 2012. The

project partners are Morong>upong>ule Colliery which contributes to the project by testing the

briquettes, emissions, sulphur content, carbon content etc. The project is implemented

from the RIIC the operational arm of RIPBO(B). The project is at verification stage to

compare normal coal with the briquettes. The tests have shown that the briquettes are of

good quality and produce low levels of smoke.

Once the product has been validated, RIPCO will create awareness on the briquettes with

the hope to attract male and female entrepreneurs to start producing the briquettes for the

market. The technology transfer is expected to take place during 2012 when potential

entrepreneurs and members of the public will be educated on how to produce and use the

briquettes.

d) Location: KANYE- RIIC (operational arm of RIPCO B)

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e) Project period: 2008 -2012

f) Objectives:

� Use coal dust and biomass to produce briquettes which can burn better than the

Morong>upong>ule coal.

� Utilise the discarded materials (saw dust and coal dust) to produce useful briquettes.

� Train male and female entrepreneurs in briquette making.

g) Expected results (of the energy project you are working on)

� Coal Briquettes produced and women and men set ong>upong> their own businesses

� Reduce drudgery associated with fuelwood collection and use.

h) Summary of activities (of the energy project you are working on)

� Produce Design Concepts

� Produce Technical drawings

� Develop a Prototype

� Verify the briquettes performance

� Modify the briquetting machine

� Validate the briquettes according to the set parameters

� Transfer the technology to the entrepreneurs and produce all necessary transfer

package documentation.

9


Gender Action Plan: Biomass Coal Briquetting

Stakeholder Gender Goal

(Welfare,

Productivity,

Empowerment,

Project

RIPCO (B)

Efficiency)

Welfare (This

project reduces

the times of

females and

children who

travel longer

distances

looking for

firewood.

It also

empowers

females and

males who are

unemployed to

create their

own income.

Activities Likely

Impact of

Project

(Access,

Control,

Article in the

RIPCO (B)

Newsletter

elaborating on

gender

mainstreaming

of energy

projects and the

issue in general.

Skills)

Resources

(staff,

training,

funds,

technology)

10

Source of

resources

Timeframe Indicator

(SMART)

Access N/A N/A Quarterly One article

per quarter in

the

newsletter

Gender Mainstreaming

Achievements 7 months

after the Training

Two articles on gender

mainstreaming were

produced and published in

the RIPCO Newsletter. The

articles were contributed

by the two participants

who had attended the

training and developed this

gender action plan.

Copies of the articles have

been sent to BOTEC for

distribution to GENBO

members.

Recommendation: would

like other members of

GENBO to contribute

articles to the RIPCO

newsletter to increase

awareness and impact of

gender mainstreaming.


Stakeholder Gender Goal

(Welfare,

Productivity,

Empowerment,

Project

Efficiency)

Activities Likely

Impact of

Project

(Access,

Control,

Presentation to

R&D

Department as

they are the key

project

engineers in

project planning

and

implementation.

This therefore

closes the gap

of overlooking

gender

mainstreaming

in the projects

from the

planning stage

until it is

commercialized.

Presentation to

RIPCO(B)

Management

Skills)

Skill,

Control

Resources

(staff,

training,

funds,

technology)

Funds,

ENERGIA

tools

11

Source of

resources

Timeframe Indicator

(SMART)

GENBO Once (more

awareness

creation,

information

sharing will

be done at

Design

Briefs

meetings)

One

Presentation

done

Access N/A N/A Once a year One

Presentation

done in a year

Gender Mainstreaming

Achievements 7 months

after the Training

Upon return from the

training in September

2010, a Presentation was

made to the R&D

department of RIPCO B.

The presentation was also

made to the Marketing and

Corporate services

Departments as they are

the key project engineers

in project planning and

implementation.

Presentation to RIPCO (B)

Management is planned

for their July 2011 meeting.


Stakeholder Gender Goal

(Welfare,

Productivity,

Empowerment,

Project

Efficiency)

Activities Likely

Impact of

Project

(Access,

Control,

Attend Design

Briefs for

different energy

projects and

advise where it

is clear that

gender

mainstreaming

was overlooked.

Modifications of

Briquetting

Machine

Skills)

Resources

(staff,

training,

funds,

technology)

12

Source of

resources

Timeframe Indicator

(SMART)

Skill N/A N/A Every

Design Brief

for Energy

projects

Skill Technology,

Training on

how the

machine

works

RIPCO(B)

engineers

Attend all

energy

projects Briefs

Continuous Modified

Machine,

which is more

efficient and

safe to use.

Gender Mainstreaming

Achievements 7 months

after the Training

Design Review and Brief

meetings for the projects:

Milling Package, Solar

Concentrator Applications

and Advanced Fodder

Process were attended by

Mr Fana who gave gender

feedback on the designs.

Modifications have been

done to the briquetting

machine to produce

briquettes easily. The

machine was made in

China and some switches

on the machine were not

covered, therefore not

safe. These were replaced

by RIIC engineers. Another

modification was done on

the mold that makes the

briquettes, this kept

jamming and RIIC decided

to produce its own mold.


Stakeholder Gender Goal

(Welfare,

Productivity,

Empowerment,

Project

Morong>upong>ule

Colliery

Limited

Efficiency)

Activities Likely

Impact of

Project

(Access,

Control,

Morong>upong>ule

colliery as a coal

exploring

company in

Botswana does

not sell the coal

dust and this

becomes a

discarded

product and

hence RIPCO (B)

will ask for free

Coal dust from

them.

Skills)

Testing Access,

Skill

Resources

(staff,

training,

funds,

technology)

13

Source of

resources

Timeframe Indicator

(SMART)

Access Staff, funds RIPCO(B) Continuous Coal dust for

production of

briquettes

collected

whenever

needed.

Staff Morong>upong>ule

Colliery

Limited

Continuous Test results

for all sent

samples

available.

Gender Mainstreaming

Achievements 7 months

after the Training

Morong>upong>ule is in the north,

very far from Gaborone

and the distance makes

access to the raw materials

difficult. However, for

testing purposes, coal dust

is obtained from the

Gaborone depot.

Re-verification and

validation (intensive

testing of briquettes) is

being done. A report will

be produced for

Management. Positive

results from the validation

will inform the Energy

Section to transfer the

technology to male and


Stakeholder Gender Goal

(Welfare,

Productivity,

Empowerment,

Project

Efficiency)

Small to

medium

entrepreneurs

(Females and

males)

Activities Likely

Impact of

Project

(Access,

Control,

Skills)

Advise SME on

the benefits of

the product.

Train SME on

the production

of the

Briquettes

(Machine use

and mixing

ratios)

Access,

Skill

Resources

(staff,

training,

funds,

technology)

Funding,

technology

14

Source of

resources

RIPCO(B),

LEA

Timeframe Indicator

(SMART)

Twice a

year

At least four

entrepreneurs

(two females

and two

Skill males) should N/A

be trained in

2012.

Gender Mainstreaming

Achievements 7 months

after the Training

female entrepreneurs who

will produce the briquettes

while the RIIC engineers

monitor their progress.

N/A


Challenges

� Senior Management is currently concerned about the practicalities of mainstreaming

gender in the already ongoing project and has advised to target only the projects in

the pipeline, for example, the Solar Concentrate Project.

� Implementation of the proposed merger of BOTEC and RIPCO B is still pending. This

makes some of the project planning processes uncertain and difficult to finalise.

� Some of the intended modifications on the briquetting machine are hard to make as

we do not want to change the machine too much.

Way Forward

Most of our engineers are not too familiar with gender issues. Therefore, during design

reviews they are to be advised on the gender aspects and incorporation of these in the

design – e.g. concerns about the disabled persons or gender disaggregation in the plans and

designs.

We have song>upong>port from a middle manager who has in fact advised us to table some of these

ideas at the next senior management meeting. On the whole, there has been a positive

reception of gender mainstreaming ideas and we aim to do more in the next phase of

implementation.

15


2. University of Botswana

a) Title: Gender relations within polygamous households: energy issues and concerns

among the Bazezuru communities

b) Names of project implementer: Dr Keene Boikhutso

c) Description of Energy Project

This is a pilot study to determine gender relation and energy use in a very conservative,

polygamous community called the Bazezuru. The study will be undertaken using the

researcher’s own resources.

d) Location: Selebi Phikwe

e) Project period: 12 months (September 2010 to August 2011)

f) Objectives:

� To understand the impact of gender relations on access and control of energy

sources among the Bazezuru community.

� To investigate the relationship between gender, religion and ethnicity and how

these influence access and control of energy sources.

� Identify ways of mainstreaming gender and energy in teaching and learning at

higher education in Botswana.

g) Expected results (of the energy project you are working on)

Information on energy access and control within a Sezuru community.

h) Summary of activities (of the energy project you are working on)

� Resource mobilization

� Problem identification

� Development of research proposal

� Data collection and analysis

� Production of research report

� Dissemination of research results

16


Gender Action Plan: Gender relations within polygamous households: energy issues and concerns among the Bazezuru communities

Stakeholder Gender Goal

(Welfare,

Productivity,

Empowerment,

ENERGIA;

Village

Development

Committee;

Members of

Bazeruzu

Community

(men and

women);

Traditional

Leaders;

Environmental

Education

Unit, Faculty

of Education,

UB

Project Efficiency)

The project should

improve women’s

welfare by reducing

drudgery and allow

them to venture into

high-yielding

economic activities

and modern forms of

income generating

activities

Activities Likely Impact

of Project

(Access,

Control,

Articulation

of problem

area

Skills)

Literature

search to

reveal: the

impact of

power

relations on

polygamous

family set-ong>upong>

on access and

control of

energy

sources

Resources

(staff,

training,

funds,

technology)

ENERGIA

training

workshop

conducted in

Sept 2010:

Sensitization

on gender &

energy issues

and research

Funding with

respect to

subsistence

and travel

costs

Source of

resources

UB Library;

BOTEC

Library:

Internet and

other onlines

sources

Own funds

Possible

funding

from Office

of Research

and Dev.

(UB)

Timeframe Indicator

(SMART)

Six

months:

September

2010-

March

2011

Gender

Action Plan

submitted to

ENERGIA end

of March

2011

Gender

Mainstreaming

Achievements Eight

months After the

Training

Literature search has

been done, but the

process continues. An

MA Thesis by a

colleague at the

University of Cape

Town has been

identified.

I have found that a

student from the

Faculty of

Engineering and

Technology (FET-UB)

has done a project on

Gender and Energy.

He is also a

Mozezuru. This is

going to be a very

useful source.


The project should

help to increase in

particular women’s

productivity by giving

them information on

alternative sources of

energy which can

enable them to

venture into new

opportunities for

income generation

The project should

empower Bazezuru

women and men to

have a better

understanding of the

actual and perceived

challenges related to

access to energy

Research

proposal:

literature

review;

research

methodology

Data

Collection:

Focus Groong>upong>

Discussion;

Face-to-Face

interviews

Literature

review to

illuminate

issues of

energy

concern

among the

Bazezuru

communities;

how gender

intersects

with other

variables like

ethnicity and

religion and

how this in

turn impacts

on access and

control of

energy

sources.

Generation of

empirical and

gender

disaggregated

(male &

female) data,

energy use

and decision-

Not

applicable

Funding with

respect to

subsistence

and travel

requirements

18

UB Library;

BOTEC

Resource

centre:

Internet and

other onlines

sources

Interviewing

respondents

Three

months:

April-June

2011

Three

months:

July-

August

2011

15 paged

Research

Proposal to

ENERGIA end

of June 2011

Gender

disaggregated

data

collected by

end of August

2011


sources within the

context of gender

power and relations;

empower women to

participate in

activities and

decision making

which they are

traditionally excluded

from

In terms of project

efficiency, Bazezuru

men and women

should be

empowered to

explore alternative

and sustainable

sources and

encouraged to

actively take

advantage of

government

sponsored/subsidized

energy programmes

Report

Writing &

dissemination

of research

outputs

making

among the

Bazezuru

community

Empirical

results to

illuminate

gender and

energy

dynamics

with specific

reference to

issues of

access and

control

19

UB Library;

BOTEC

Resource

centre:

Internet and

other onlines

sources

One

month:

September

2011

Final report

ready for

dissemination

by end of

September

2011


Challenges and Way Forward

� There are major restructuring changes at the University of Botswana. This period

of uncertainty has impacted on our research planning activities as there are

possibilities of departmental movements and mergers.

� There is currently an ongoing public sector strike which has affected schools and

the UB teaching progamme. I had planned to use the time for teaching practice

song>upong>ervision to also collect data at minimal cost.

� I have infused into one course, ELC 211: Introduction to Development Issues and

Perspectives, some gender and energy issues without changing the content too

much. This can also be seen through an assignment and term paper on

sustainable development in energy where most topics were on poverty,

feminization of poverty. I plan to do this incrementally.


3. Energy Environment Computer and Geophysical Applications Consultants

a) Title: Assessment of User Perception and Acceptance of Efficient Wood Stoves in

Botswana: (EECG Consultants)

b) Names of project implementers: E E C G Consultants (Mr Tich Simbini and Ms

Goratwa Ramokgothwane)

c) Description of Energy Project

BPC Lesedi is an energy service company established by BPC under the RE-Botswana

renewable energy-based rural electrification project and is seeking to assess the user

perception and acceptance of efficient wood stoves which BPC Lesedi is selling through

its franchise system. RE- Botswana aims to remove barriers to the use of renewable

energy technologies, which will ultimately lead to wide spread applications of these

technologies, thereby reducing green house gas emissions and meeting the energy

needs of the majority of the population.

BPC Lesedi collaborated with the Programme for Biomass Energy and Conservation

(ProBEC) to develop the stove component meant to complement the other products.

This product was added to offer a comprehensive energy solution to households. Other

products being promoted by RE Botswana include solar home systems, rechargeable

lanterns and hot bags. The solar home systems are offered through a fee for service

model and the other products are sold. These services are offered through a BPC Lesedi

franchisee. In the period from October 2009, 233 wood stoves were sold mainly in the

areas of Kgope, Dikgatlhong, Lentsweletau, Medie, Phihitswane, Nshakashokwe, Tonota,

Francistown, Khwee, Letlhakane, Maun, Gaborone and other areas.

BPC Lesedi would like to establish the end users perception and acceptance of the

efficient wood stoves sold in this initial phase of the project so as to improve energy

service delivery to rural low income households and enhance or song>upong>port biomass energy

conservation activities in Botswana. EECG has been contracted to undertake this study

to assist BPC Lesedi in achieving the broad objectives outlined above. EECG proposed to

BPC Lesedi to include gender in the study by collecting gender disaggregated data and

identifying the energy project’s gender goal. This requested was accepted.

d) Location: Villages where the product is already available and in use and those

villages where the stove has not been introduced (17 villages in total).

e) Project period: 2 months

21


f) Objectives

� Mainstream gender in the project.

� Establish the Gender goal for the project.

� To collect gender disaggregated data and get people’s perception both male

and female on the BPC Lesedi energy efficient stoves, those who are using the

stove and those who are interested in buying the stove.

� To assess if the program implementers were gender sensitive when coming ong>upong>

with this project.

g) Expected results (of the energy project you are working on)

� During the field work or data collection process we are going to interview both

male and females who have bought the stove and male and female who have not

bought the stove.

� Produce gender disaggregated data to get a clear picture of who mostly uses the

stove and for which purpose.

� The study or survey will also help us to find out how the energy efficient stove

will improve the lives of women and children.

� The data which we are going to collect should define the gender goal and the

gender goal should be convincing enough to the stakeholders.

h) Summary of activities (of the energy project you are working on)

� Development of a questionnaire for people who own the stove and those who do

not have the stove.

� Conduct focus groong>upong>s discussions (male / female).

� Prepare a report and identify the gender goal for the project.

22


Gender Action Plan: Collect Gender Disaggregated Data for the BPC Lesedi Energy Efficient Stove and People’s Perception about the Stove

Stakeholder Gender Goal

(Welfare,

Productivity,

Empowerment,

Project

BPC Lesedi

17 Local

communities

GENBO

Efficiency)

Welfare: During

data collection

we will want to

find out how the

product is going

to improve the

welfare of

people especially

women and

children as they

are the direct

beneficiaries of

the stove.

Activities Likely

Impact of

Project

(Access,

Control,

Collaborate

temporarily

with BPC Lesedi

and help them

mainstream

gender in their

Energy Efficient

Stoves project

Prepare

Inception

Report

Assist BPC

Lesedi to

develop a

gender goal for

the project.

Skills)

As far as we

know about

the project,

it is

accessible to

the public

and we are

hoping to

find out who

has control

over the

product and

if those who

access it

have the

skills to

operate it.

Resources

(staff,

training,

funds,

technology)

The whole

process from

data

collection to

report

writing will

be funded

by BPC

Lesedi.

Source of

resources

BPC

Lesedi

Timeframe Indicator

(SMART)

2 months Gender

Disaggregated

data available

December

2010

A gender goal

is set for the

stoves project

April 2011

Gender is

mainstreamed

in the energy

efficient stoves

project from

May 2011

Gender Mainstreaming

Achievements Eight months

after the Training

Data were collected in

February and March, 2011

the 17 villages in both MHH

and FHH households.

Gender goal: Welfare

Findings:

Men are overly sensitive in the

discussions of gender issues.

Male headed Households have

a better resource base than

female headed households

and can better afford the

stove.

There are differences in use of

the stove between males and

females, and MH and FHH

headed households. E.g males

use the stove for heating while

females use it for cooking.


Observations and Way Forward

a) Gender Mainstreaming was not a big problem because BPC LESEDI already has

interest in gender mainstreaming in its programmes.

b) For EECG there is also no problem with mainstreaming gender in energy projects

as we fully appreciate the concerns but problems lie with the organizations that

we service.

c) Translation of the issues and engaging in the local language, Setswana, was a real

challenge.

Other issues found from the research which are relevant for gender mainstreaming

include:

a) An assessment of issues of ownership of the stove by gender and issues of

targeting for example, in information dissemination.

b) Those who attended the kgotla/ public meetings are the ones who have bought

the stove. There are gender dynamics here, bearing in mind the issue of who can

afford the stove.

BPC-L ESEDI has been advised to:

a) Use other forms of media to curb misinformation about the stove.

b) They could also augment the information dissemination on the stove through

demonstrations on its use and energy efficiency.

c) Translate the instruction on the stove into Setswana.


4. Botswana Technology Centre (BOTEC)

a) Title of the energy project: Solar Lighting for Communal Areas

b) Names of project implementers: Tiro Ngidi and Nozipho Wright

c) Description of Energy Project

BOTEC is collaborating with EEP programme (fund song>upong>ported by the Finnish and Danish

governments) to implement a project in which communal lights will be installed in six

villages including the Chobokwane village that has been earmarked by Government for

poverty reduction interventions. The solar street lighting project has partnered with

BPC Lesedi to augment their packages and to make the contribution of solar to meeting

the country’s energy demand more meaningful.

It has been planned to install 25 lights in one village in six districts, Additional funding is

being requested from the. The solar lights will be assembled and installed working in

partnership with BPC Lesedi, district councils, local contractors and identified local

maintenance assistants. The areas where the lights will be installed include schools, bus

stops, government offices, government clinics and other dark areas around the villages.

Assembly technicians will be employed at the start of the project to produce the lights.

BOTEC engineers and technicians will song>upong>port the production and maintenance of the

lights. BPC Lesedi engineers will contribute to maintenance and replication of the

technology while the district councils technicians will be trained to undertake

maintenance on the lights during the life of the project.

BPC Lesedi, through its franchisees, will take over maintenance and repair of the solar

units at the end of the proposed demonstration project. Future maintenance will be paid

for by the councils through a fee for service model. This involves paying a minimal

monthly fee to BPC Lesedi franchisee to be used for components and battery

replacements. Active participation of the district council technicians will be solicited as

it will be critical to the success of the project and to the replication process. To address

issues relating to monitoring of street lights, local maintenance assistants (one male, one

female) will be used to provide ong>upong>dates on the functioning of the lights. The same

maintenance assistants will be employed by the BPC Lesedi franchisee at the end of the

EEP project. This partnership will ensure sustainability of the project as well as lead to

easier replication processes.

d) Location: Six villages each in South East, Ghanzi, Kgalagadi, North West and North

East and Chobe districts.

e) Project period: 18 months

f) Expected results (of the energy project you are working on)

� Baseline data

� Installation of 150 solar street lights in communal areas

25


� Improved security

� Increase in extra curricula activities

� Reduction in number of delayed treatment at health facilities

� Reduced poverty

g) Summary of activities (of the energy project you are working on)

� A baseline study will be conducted in all the 6 villages in order to collect socio

economic data analyse the prevailing conditions and establish indicators at the

start of the project. The baseline data and indicators will be used during

monitoring and evaluation and at the end of the project to assess the impact the

lights would have made on the lives of men, women, girls and boys.

� 150 solar lights will be installed in communal areas, at commercial centres and

other community commercial projects, health facilities, and primary schools. Two

local maintenance assistants will be employed by the project and trained on

basic maintenance and to monitor the performance of the lights.

� The technology will be transferred to two or three private companies by BOTEC

working in collaboration with BPC Lesedi and the district councils. Marketing

campaigns will be undertaken for the benefit of the District Councils, farmers,

government departments and other policy makers.

� Promotional materials such as brochure, policy brief, calendars, manuals,

posters, newspaper articles, case study and a documentary will be produced and

used to promote the solar street lighting technology

26


Gender Action Plan: Solar Lighting for Communal Areas

Stakeholder Gender Goal (Welfare,

Productivity,

Empowerment, Project

Efficiency)

District

councils

Village

authorities

BPC

GENBO

Welfare: During data

collection we will want

to find out how the

communal lights will

improve the welfare of

people such as security

of women and children

as vulnerable groong>upong>s

on issues of rape and

attacks at night. The

project will empower

individual youths for

each village where the

lights will be installed.

2 individual male and

female will be

employed to monitor

the lights and ensuring

their functionality.

Activities Likely Impact of

Project (Access,

Control, Skills)

Participate

in the

Baseline

study for

the Solar

lighting of

Communal

Areas

Project.

Communal solar

street lights will be

accessible to men,

women and children

equally. Control

measures will be

available since

technicians (1 male

and 1 female) will be

employed to ensure

that the lights

operate efficiently.

Technicians will be

equipped with basic

skills on

maintenance and

production as

outlined in the job

description. The

project places a lot

of emphasis on, on

the job training.

Resources

(staff,

training,

funds,

technology)

BOTEC staff,

council

technicians,

BPC Lesedi

staff, village

authorities

Material and

equipment

to build solar

lighting units

Production

workshop

and other

facilities.

Source of

resources

BOTEC

and EEP

will

provide

the

technical

and

financial

song>upong>port.

Timeframe Indicator

(SMART)

18 months

Baseline data

150 solar

lighting units

installed in six

villages

Technology

transferred to

entrepreneurs

Gender

Mainstreaming

Achievements Eight

Months After the

Training

Draft gender

disaggregated

questionnaire has been

developed and tested.

The Questionnaire will

be administered in the

six villages in

September 2011 (after

the National Census).

Materials and

equipment have been

purchased to produce

solar lights for one

village.

Advertisements for

production technicians

were placed in

newspapers.


OBSERVATIONS AND CHALLENGES

Observations

a) From a planning perspective, this project lends itself better to gender

mainstreaming, a condition that has already been set by the donor.

b) BOTEC management is also receptive to gender mainstreaming.

c) Participation in the gender mainstreaming project for the rural electrification

programme, a project implemented from the Botswana Power Corporation and

song>upong>ported by ENERGIA, has created gender analysis skills that are being used in

this solar lighting project.

Challenges

a) The project implementers had to go through data analysis training in preparation

for the baseline survey. It was originally planned for a consultant to undertake

the baseline survey but BOTEC management later decided it would be best if

staff did the study themselves to gain knowledge and experience. All this has

caused delays for the survey which was song>upong>posed to start in June 2011.

b) A national census will be conducted in the country in August 2011 which has also

added to delay in the study. However a lot of useful information will be obtained

from the Census for use in the baseline survey of the solar lighting project.


5. Ministry of Agriculture

a) Title: Capacity Building and Gender Policy Review

b) Names of project implementers: Maduo Kesetse and Lesego Ketumile

c) Description of Energy Project

N/A

� Buy-in by top management: Re-visit the recommendations made at the training

and capacity building workshop for MOA Heads of departments, involvement of

the top management in every stage on issues of gender (should involve other

staff).

� Financial song>upong>port: Encourage the top management to incorporate the gender as

a developmental issue on the corporate plan and budget, as well as mobilizing

funds.

� Insufficient capacity by the implementers: Conduct capacity building workshop

for MOA gender focal points.

� Update the donors on the progress made by the Ministry in addressing gender

issues.

� Improve the networks by highlighting our expectations on our networks.

Describe the strategies you will engage to disseminate information on gender

mainstreaming project (activities, experiences and lessons learnt)

� Share the gender materials such as brochures and reports

� Conduct capacity building workshops

� Conduct meetings to discuss gender issues

29


Gender Action Plan: Ministry of Agriculture Gender Action Plan

Stakeholder Gender Goal

(Welfare,

Productivity,

Empowerment,

MoA

Parastatals

Farmers

WAD

Project Efficiency)

Welfare,

Empowerment,

Project Efficiency

Activities Likely Impact

of Project

(Access,

Control,

Disseminate MoA

gender

information to all

relevant

stakeholders:

� Post the

gender issues

in the enewsletter.

� Have a gender

corner at the

MoA library.

� Present

gender issues

in the agrinews

magazine

Skills)

These

activities will

help in

disseminating

the

information

about gender

issues to all

MoA staff,

parastatals as

well as

farmers.

Resources (staff,

training, funds,

technology)

The Ministry will

need the

committee

members to

carry out the

duties for the

activities

outlined.

Source of

resources

MoA

WAD

FAO

Timeframe Indicator

(SMART)

1 ST April 2010

-31 st March

2011

Articles on

gender in the enewsletter

Gender corner at

MoA

Article on gender

issues in the Agri-

News Magazine

Gender

Mainstreaming

Achievements Eight

Months After the

Training

Developed an enewsletter

which

contained articles on

16 Days of Activism

(GBV).

A Gender Corner has

been established at

the MoA library. It

contains materials

and documents on

gender, including

those from ENERGIA.

The Corner is being

managed by the

Information Unit.

Another Gender

Corner has been

developed for the

Agri-News. It

appears on every


Stakeholder Gender Goal

(Welfare,

Productivity,

Empowerment,

Project Efficiency)

MoA

Parastatals

Farmers

WAD

Empowerment

Activities Likely Impact

of Project

(Access,

Control,

Skills)

Collaborate with

Women’s Affairs

Department on

the National

Women’s

Exposition:

� Undertake

Pre-Expo

Workshops to

mobilize

female

farmers for the

exhibition;

� Identifying a

female farmer

for an award;

� Awarding the

best female

farmer.

Potential

female

farmers will

be mobilized

to attend the

Expo to

showcase

their

products as

well as

acquire skills

from other

exhibitors on

how to

expand or

enhance

their farming

business.

Resources (staff,

training, funds,

technology)

The MoA Gender

committee

members will

participate in

the preparations

for the event.

31

Source of

resources

MoA

FAO

WAD

Timeframe Indicator

(SMART)

April 2011-

July 2011

Female farmers

mobilized to

participate in the

Women’s Expo.

Female farmer

identified to

receive award

Female farmer

given an Award

at the Expo.

Gender

Mainstreaming

Achievements Eight

Months After the

Training

page 16 of the enewsletter.

This

Gender Corner

section is called

‘Page 16’.

Female farmers are

being mobilized to

participate in the

Expo which will take

place on 4 – 9 July

2011. MoA is part of

the organizing

committee.

A female farmer to

receive the award

will be identified.


Stakeholder Gender Goal

(Welfare,

Productivity,

Empowerment,

MoA

Parastatals

Farmers

WAD

Project Efficiency)

Welfare,

Productivity,

Empowerment,

Project Efficiency

Activities Likely Impact

of Project

(Access,

Control,

Review the MoA

Gender Policy.

The Policy was

approved by the

Policy Advisory

Committee of

MoA which is

chaired by the

Minister in 2005

/ 06. The Policy

came about as a

recommendation

from the Women

in Development

Framework that

advised sectors

to develop

policies to guide

them in the

mainstreaming

process.

Skills)

The policy

will act as a

reference

material for

information

and gender

mainstreami

ng process

within MoA.

Resources (staff,

training, funds,

technology)

Consultant

Funds

32

Source of

resources

MoA

FAO

Timeframe Indicator

(SMART)

March 2010-

April 2011

MoA Gender

Policy reviewed,

approved and

disseminated.

Gender

Mainstreaming

Achievements Eight

Months After the

Training

A decision was made

not to review the

Policy as there was

no strong

justification for the

Review.

A committee will be

set ong>upong> to finalise the

Policy, publish and

disseminate.


Stakeholder Gender Goal

(Welfare,

Productivity,

Empowerment,

MoA

Parastatals

Farmers

WAD

Project Efficiency)

Project Efficiency

Activities Likely Impact

of Project

(Access,

Control,

Conduct a

capacity building

workshop for

Ministerial and

district gender

focal points.

Skills)

The GPFs will

be equipped

with the

relevant

information

to drive

issues of

gender.

Resources (staff,

training, funds,

technology)

MoA Gender

committee

members.

33

Source of

resources

Timeframe Indicator

(SMART)

MoA March 2010-

April 2011

Number of

Workshops in

which focal

points are trained

on gender issues.

Gender

Mainstreaming

Achievements Eight

Months After the

Training

A workshop was

conducted for the

focal points in

Francistown on 11 –

15 October 2011 in

which the ENERGIA

Africa RNC facilitated

and trained the GFPs

on gender analysis.

District gender

committees were

formed immediately

after this training.

The purpose of the

Committees is to

become the contact

persons for gender

and to implement

gender related

activities in their

regions.


Stakeholder Gender Goal

(Welfare,

Productivity,

Empowerment,

MOA Staff

(men &

women)

Farmers

(men

&women)

MOA

Parastatals(

men

&women)

WAD (men

&women)

DONORS

GOB

ENERGIA

Project Efficiency)

To empower both

the women and

men to implement

the gender action

plan so that they

can fully

participate in

activities and

decision making in

policies,

programmes and

projects .

Activities Likely Impact

of Project

(Access,

Control,

� MOA gender

focal points

meetings.

� Conduct needs

assessment

and audit for

implementers.

� Conduct

training and

capacity

building

workshop for

MOA focal

points.

Skills)

Focal points

(women &

men) will

attend the

meetings,

have

opportunity

to participate

in the needs

assessment

and be

trained. They

will control

the activities

at their

different

departments.

Resources (staff,

training, funds,

technology)

Resource

persons

(WAD/ENERGIA)

Funds

Projector

Computer

MOA staff

34

Source of

resources

WAD

ENERGIA

MOA

FAO

Timeframe Indicator

(SMART)

October2010-

October 2011

Needs

assessment tool

crafted,

administered and

analyzed

Workshop

conducted

Reports

produced for

both needs

assessment and

capacity building

workshop.

Gender

Mainstreaming

Achievements Eight

Months After the

Training

Female farmers

were identified and

created awareness

on programmes that

they can participate

in to generate

income and reduce

violence in the

home. This was done

in the Nata and

Metsimotlhabe

villages during the

GBV awareness

campaigns.


4. Conclusion and Next Steps

On the whole, the gender action plan implementation exercise appears to be off to a

good start. A key indicator here is that all of organisations have actually gone on to

implement some aspects of their plans. Despite the challenges faced by each

organisation, the general assessment is that real inroads are being made into

mainstreaming gender in the energy projects of these organisations.

The level of enthusiasm about application of some of the ideas, concepts and tools

learnt from the 2010 workshop is also high. The participants represented their

organisations well and demonstrated a good grasp of the fundamental concepts and

principles of gender mainstreaming in energy as well as full appreciation of the

rationale and objectives of the exercise. However, there is still a need for continued

capacity building and mentoring through practical application of skills acquired

from the training workshops.

The common challenges across organisations include, organisational factors such as

changes, resource issues, planning and project timing and the challenges of

introducing an unfamiliar planning approach such as gender mainstreaming within

environments where not everybody is at the same level of understanding and

appreciation of the issues.

Specific recommendations are made on how things could be improved in individual

organisations. However, there are also areas of commonality such as a need for

training of senior managers on the issues so as to create a more receptive

environment for efforts to apply ideas from the training workshops.

The participants reaffirmed their individual commitment to the gender

mainstreaming course and that of their organisations. They also expressed hope that

there will continue to be given the same song>upong>port they have received from BOTEC

and ENERGIA in order to effectively influence change in the Botswana energy sector.

It was agreed at the end of the workshop that the individuals and organisations

should continue with the implementation efforts and strengthen networking among

themselves, for mutual reinforcement as they push this agenda. They were also

assured of the continued song>upong>port at different levels for increased capacity building

and policy influencing so that their organisations and Botswana can compete well

with the rest of the world in achieving a gender sensitive energy sector.

Next Steps

The following was agreed by the team and the facilitator in order to fast track the

process of mainstreaming:

1. The ENERGIA RNC will continue the regular contact with the participants to

give them song>upong>port and advice during implementation.


2. The participants will be invited to a stakeholder workshop at the end of July

2011 in which results of the recent studies on energy use in female headed

and male headed households and businesses, that were conducted by

members of GENBO will be presented. The participants will be given the

opportunity to present progress on the GAPs in the presence of their seniors

and stakeholders. It is expected that this will foster the required song>upong>port

from their song>upong>ervisors as well as to create awareness on actual gender

mainstreaming in the energy and agriculture sectors of Botswana. An article

will be prepared after this workshop for publication in the BOTEC, RIPCO (B)

and Agri-News.

3. BOTEC will use own funds to song>upong>port another progress ong>upong>date meeting for

the GAP implementers towards the end of 2011.

36


Annex 1: List of Participants – National Training on Mainstreaming Gender Concerns into Energy Projects

Name

Dr Keene Boikhutso

Tich Simbini

Gorata

Ramokgotlhwane

Tracy Sonny

Onkabetse Magakwa

Fana Kelebogile

Andrew Tsele

Charity Chikanyuka

Oratile O. Mahatlhe

Michael Kenneth

M / F

M

M

F

F

F

M

M

F

M

M

Position

Lecturer

Consultant

Consultant

Consultant

Engineer

Engineer

Member

Member

Member

Member

Organization

University of

Botswana

EECG

EECG

EECG

RIPCO (B)

RIPCO (B)

GENBO

GENBO

GENBO

GENBO

18 May 2011

Tel:

+267 355 2374

+267 391 0127

+267 391 0127

+267 391 0127

+267 544 5057

+267 544 5057

--

--

--

--

Fax:

--

+267 391 0127

+267 391 0127

+267 391 0127

+267 544 0642

+267 544 0642

--

--

--

--

Mobile

+267 7252 9782

+267 7137 1845

+267 7265 3997

+267 7213 0141

+267 7248 6327

+2677415 6966

+267 7113 5778

+267 7432 0516

+267 7146 6638

+267 7129 0231

E-mail

Boikhutso@mopipi.ub.bw

simbinit@yahoo.co.uk

ramokgotlhwaneg@yahoo

.com

Tsonny25@gmail.com

odmagakwa@yahoo.com

fkelebogile@ripco.bw

tankbele@gmaill.com

cchukanyuka@gmail.com

wildzempel@gmail.com

mckenneth@gov.bw


Name

K. Nthite

Moses Ivor

Gadibolae Mosienyane

Tiro Ngidi

Facilitators

B. L. Morolong

Nozipho Wright

M / F

M

M

M

F

F

F

Position

Member

Member

Member

Member

Member

Regional Network

Coordinator,

Organization

GENBO

GENBO

GENBO

GENBO

GENBO

ENERGIA /

BOTEC

38

--

Tel:

--

--

+267 391 4161

+267 355 2052

+267 3914161

Fax:

--

--

--

+267 391 4161

+267 355 4522

+267 3974677

Mobile

+267 7519 6198

+267 7279 4069

+267 7241 9780

+267 7161 4724

+ 267 7123

8028

+267 72331132

E-mail

knthite@yahoo.com

ivorleg@gmail.com

gmosienyane@yahoo.com

tiro@botec.bw

blmorolong@yahoo.com

mabebezm@yahoo.co.uk

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