n atio n al ch am p io n s

grfx.cstv.com

n atio n al ch am p io n s

2008-09

te rier tradition

nCaa regionals ...................................130

the nCaa Years ..................................131

nCaa Champions ..........................132-135

Beanpot .......................................136-137

remembering Walter Brown arena ..138-139

What BU Meant to Me ...................140-142

men’s ice hockey


the ncaa regionals

Goterriers.com

2008-09 BoSton UniVerSitY Men’S iCe HoCKeY

Nine times between 1993 and 2006, the Terriers and Worcester’s DCU Center served as co-hosts for

an NCAA Division I Ice Hockey Regional. The two joined forces for the last time in the immediate future

on March 24-25, 2006, for the NCAA Northeast Regional. Holy Cross is the co-host for future regionals

at the DCU Center.

Beginning in 1993, Boston University has hosted more NCAA ice hockey post-season championship

events than any other school, as it was the host institution for either the East or Northeast Regionals in

1993, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005 and 2006.

What’s more, in 2004, the University, along with Boston’s FleetCenter (now TD Banknorth Garden)

served as the co-hosts of the Frozen Four. It marked the seventh time BU was the host institution for

the national championship game. The previous six years, with the national champion in parenthesis,

were 1960 (Denver), 1963 (North Dakota), 1972 (BOSTON UNIVERSITY), 1973 (Wisconsin), 1974 (Minnesota)

and 1998 (Michigan).

Below is a list of the years in which the Worcester DCU Center (previously the Centrum Centre) has

been the host venue, and which teams have advanced to the Frozen Four.

Prior to the 2003 tournament, there were just two regionals—East and West, while the field expanded

to 16 teams and four regional sites in 2003.

2006

Boston College defeated the Terriers, 5-0, in the regional final and advanced to the Frozen Four.

The Eagles lost to Wisconsin, 2-1, in the national title game.

2005

North Dakota defeated Boston College, 6-3, in the regional final and advanced to the Frozen

Four. The Fighting Sioux lost to Denver, 4-1, in the national title game.

2003

New Hampshire defeated the Terriers, 3-0, in the regional final and advanced to the Frozen Four.

The Wildcats lost to Minnesota, 5-1, in the national title game.

2002

Maine and New Hampshire won their regional games and moved on to the NCAA finals. In the

championship game, the Black Bears lost to Minnesota, 4-3, in OT.

2001

Boston College and North Dakota moved on to the Frozen Four from Worcester. Then, in the title

game, BC skated to a 4-2 victory over Michigan.

1999

New Hampshire and Maine won their regional finals, and, in the national championship game,

the Black Bears prevailed over New Hampshire, 3-2, in OT.

1997

The Terriers and Colorado College represented the East at the Frozen Four. BU then won its

semifinal game before losing to North Dakota, 6-4, in the title game.

1995

The Terriers and Maine prevailed in their regional games, and the two met in the national championship

game where the Terriers skated to a 6-2 win over the Black Bears.

1993

In the first year that BU and the Worcester DCU Centre (then Centrum Centre) co-hosted the

regionals, the Terriers and Maine qualified for the Frozen Four. The Terriers lost in the semifinals,

but Maine prevailed in the title game with a 5-4 win over Lake Superior.

130

FUtUre nCaa diViSion i

Men’S CHaMpionSHip dateS and SiteS

2008-09

reGionalS

east: Bridgeport Arena at Harbor Yard March 27-28

Bridgeport, Conn.

Yale University, Fairfield University, co-hosts

Midwest: Van Andel Arena, Grand Rapids, Mich. March 28-29

CCHA, Western Michigan University, co-hosts

northeast: Verizon Wireless Arena, Manchester, N.H. March 28-29

University of New Hampshire, host

West: Mariucci Arena, Minneapolis, Minn. March 28-29

University of Minnesota, host

Frozen FoUr

MCI Center, Washington, D.C. April 9-11

U.S. Naval Academy, Greater Washington Sports Alliance, co-hosts

2009-10

reGionalS

east: Times Union Center, Albany, N.Y. March 26-27

ECAC Hockey League, Rensselaer, co-hosts

Midwest: Allen County War Memorial Coliseum

Fort Wayne, Indiana March 27-28

University of Notre Dame, host

northeast: DCU Center, Worcester, Mass. March 27-28

College of the Holy Cross, host

West: Xcel Energy Center, St. Paul, Minn. March 26-27

University of Minnesota, host

Frozen FoUr

Ford Field, Detroit, Mich. April 8-10

CCHA, Detroit Sports Commission, co-hosts

2010-11

reGionalS

east: Bridgeport Arena at Harbor Yard March 25-26

Bridgeport, Conn.

Yale University,Fairfield University, co-hosts

Midwest: Resch Center, Green Bay, Wis. March 26-27

Michigan Technological University, host

northeast: Verizon Wireless Arena, Manchester, N.H. March 26-27

University of New Hampshire, host

West: Scottrade Center, St. Louis, Mo. March 25-26

Frozen FoUr

Xcel Energy Center, St. Paul, Minnesota April 7-9

University of Minnesota, host


4 nCaa CHaMpionSHipS • 30 nCaa toUrnaMent appearanCeS • 28 Beanpot titleS • 6 HoCKeY eaSt toUrnaMent titleS

nCaa toUrnaMent reCord VS:

School record

Michigan 5-4

Michigan St. 3-4

Minnesota 3-4

Harvard 3-0

Wisconsin 3-0

Clarkson 2-0

Colgate 2-1

North Dakota 2-3

Denver 2-2

Brown 1-0

Nebraska-Omaha 1-0

Providence 1-0

St. Cloud St. 1-0

Boston College 1-1

Maine 1-1

St. Lawrence 1-1

Colorado College 1-1

Cornell 1-1

Bowling Green 1-1

New Hampshire 1-2

Lake Superior St. 1-2

Michigan Tech 0-1

North Dakota 0-1

RPI 0-1

BoSton UniVerSitY nCaa

toUrnaMent appearanCeS

at a GlanCe

appearanCeS 30

WinS 34

loSSeS 32

tieS 0

WinninG pCt. .515

national CHaMpionSHipS 4

1971, 1972, 1978, 1995

SeCond 5

tHird 8

FoUrtH (consolation game played until 1989) 3

1950 - Second

Semifinals @ Colorado Springs, Colo.

Boston University 4, Michigan 3

Finals: Colorado College 13, Boston Univeristy 4

1951 - third

Semifinals @ Colorado Springs, Colo.

Michigan 8, Boston University 2

Consolation: Boston University 7, Colorado College 4

1953 - Fourth

Semifinals @ Colorado Springs, Colo.

Michigan 14, Boston University 2

Consolation: RPI 6, Boston University 3

1960 - third

Semifinals @ Boston, Mass.

Denver 6, Boston University 4

Consolation: Boston University 7, St. Lawrence 6

1966 - Fourth

Semifinals @ Minneapolis, Minn.

Michigan State 2, Boston University 1

Consolation: Denver 4, Boston University 3

1967 - Second

Semifinals @ Syracuse, N.Y.

Boston University 4, Michigan State 2

Finals: Cornell 4, Boston University 1

1971 - national CHaMpion

Semifinals @ Syracuse, N.Y.

Boston University 4, Denver 2

Finals: Boston University 4, Minnesota 2

1972 - national CHaMpion

Semifinals @ Boston, Mass.

Boston University 4, Wisconsin 1

Finals: Boston University 4, Cornell 0

1974 - third place

Semifinals @ Boston, Mass.

Minnesota 5, Boston University 4

Consolation: Boston University 7, Harvard 5

1975 - third place

Semifinals @ St. Louis, Mo.

Michigan Tech 9, Boston University 5

Consolation: Boston University 10, Harvard 5

1976 - Fourth place

Semifinals @ Denver, Colo.

Minnesota 4, Boston University 2

Consolation: Brown 8, Boston University 7

1977 - third place

Semifinals @ Providence, R.I.

Michigan 6, Boston University 4

Consolation: Boston University 6, New Hampshire 5

1978 - national CHaMpion

First Round @ Providence, R.I.

Boston University 5, Providence 3

Semifinals: Boston University 5, Wisconsin 2

Finals: Boston University 5, Boston College 3

1984 - lost in quarterfinals to Bowling Green

Most goals wins series

Quarterfinals @ BU

Bowling Green 6, Boston University 3

Boston University 5, Bowling Green 1 (OT)

1986 - lost in quarterfinals to Minnesota

Most goals wins series

Quarterfinals @ BU

Minnesota 6, Boston University 4

Minnesota 5, Boston University 3

1990 - lost in semifinals to Colgate

First Round

North Dakota 8, Boston University 5

Boston University 5, North Dakota St. 3

Boston University 5, North Dakota St. 0

Quarterfinals @ E. Lansing, Mich.

Michigan St. 6, Boston University 3

Boston University 5, Michigan St. 3

Boston University 5, Michigan St. 3

Semifinals @ Detroit, Mich.

Colgate 3, Boston University 2

1991 - lost in final to northern Michigan

Quarterfinals @ BU

Boston University 4, Michigan 1

Boston University 8, Michigan 1

Semifinals @ St. Paul, Minn.

Boston University 7, Clarkson 3

Finals: Northern Michigan 8, Boston University 7 (3OT)

1992 - lost in regional to Michigan State

East Regional @ Providence, R.I.

Michigan St. 4, Boston University 2

1993 - lost in semifinals to lake Superior St.

East Regional @ Worcester, Mass.

Boston University 4, Northern Michigan 1

Semifinals @ Milwaukee, Wis.

Lake Superior St. 6, Boston University 1

1994 - lost in final to lake State

East Regional @ Albany, N.Y.

Boston University 4, Wisconsin 1

Semifinals @ St. Paul, Minn.

Boston University 4, Minnesota 1

Finals: Lake Superior St. 9, Boston University 1

1995 - national CHaMpion

East Regional @ Worcester, Mass.

Boston University 6, Lake Superior State 2

Semifinals @ Providence, R.I.

Boston University 7, Minnesota 3

Finals: Boston University 6, Maine 2

1996 - lost in semifinals to Michigan

East Regional @ Albany, N.Y.

Boston University 3, Clarkson 2

Semifinals @ Cincinnati, OH:

Michigan 4, Boston University 0

131

1997 - lost in finals to north dakota

East Regional @ Worcester, Mass.

Boston University 4, Denver 3 (OT)

Semifinals @ Milwaukee, WI:

Boston University 3, Michigan 2

Finals: North Dakota 6, Boston University 4

1998 - lost in regional to new Hampshire

East Regional @ Albany, N.Y.

New Hampshire 4, Boston University 3 (OT)

2000 - lost in regional to St. lawrence

East Regional @ Albany, N.Y.

Boston University 5, St. Cloud State 3

St. Lawrence 3, Boston University 2 (4 OT)

2002 - lost in regional to Maine

East Regional @ Worcester, Mass.

Maine 4, Boston University 3

2003 - lost in regional to new Hampshire

Northeast Regional @ Worcester, Mass.

Boston University 6, Harvard 4

New Hampshire 3, Boston University 0

2005 - lost in regional to north dakota

East Regional @ Worcester, Mass.

North Dakota 4, Boston University 0

2006 - lost in regional to Boston College

Northeast Regional @ Worcester, Mass.

Boston University 9, Nebraska-Omaha 2

Boston College 5, Boston University 0

2007 - lost in regional to Michigan St.

Midwest Regional @ Grand Rapids, Mich.

Michigan State 5, Boston University 1

p r e V i o U S n C a a C H a M p i o n S

Year Champion runner-Up Score Site

1948 Michigan Dartmouth 8-4 Colorado Springs, Colo.

1949 Boston College Dartmouth 4-3 Colorado Springs, Colo.

1950 Colorado Col. BoSton U. 13-4 Colorado Springs, Colo.

1951 Michigan Brown 7-1 Colorado Springs, Colo.

1952 Michigan Colorado Col. 4-1 Colorado Springs, Colo.

1953 Michigan Minnesota 7-3 Colorado Springs, Colo.

1954 Rensselaer Minnesota 5-4 (OT) Colorado Springs, Colo.

1955 Michigan Colorado Col. 5-3 Colorado Springs, Colo.

1956 Michigan Michigan Tech 7-5 Colorado Springs, Colo.

1957 Colorado Col. Michigan 13-6 Colorado Springs, Colo.

1958 Denver North Dakota 6-2 Minneapolis, Minn.

1959 North Dakota Michigan St. 4-3 (OT) Troy, N.Y.

1960 Denver Michigan Tech 5-3 Boston, Mass.

1961 Denver St. Lawrence 12-2 Denver, Colo.

1962 Michigan Tech Clarkson 7-1 Utica, N.Y.

1963 North Dakota Denver 6-5 Chestnut Hill, Mass.

1964 Michigan Denver 6-3 Denver, Colo.

1965 Michigan Tech Boston College 8-2 Providence, R.I.

1966 Michigan St. Clarkson 6-1 Minneapolis, Minn.

1967 Cornell BoSton U. 4-1 Syracuse, N.Y.

1968 Denver North Dakota 4-0 Duluth, Minn.

1969 Denver Cornell 4-3 Colorado Springs, Colo.

1970 Cornell Clarkson 6-4 Lake Placid, N.Y.

1971 BoSton U. Minnesota 4-2 Syracuse, N.Y.

1972 BoSton U. Cornell 4-0 Boston, Mass.

1973 Wisconsin Denver # 4-2 Boston, Mass.

1974 Minnesota Michigan Tech 4-2 Boston, Mass.

1975 Michigan Tech Minnesota 6-1 St. Louis, Mo.

1976 Minnesota Michigan Tech 6-4 Denver, Colo.

1977 Wisconsin Michigan 6-5 (OT) Detroit, Mich.

1978 BoSton U. Boston College 5-3 Providence, R.I.

1979 Minnesota North Dakota 4-3 Detroit, Mich.

1980 North Dakota Northern Michigan 5-2 Providence, R.I.

1981 Wisconsin Minnesota 6-3 Duluth, Minn.

1982 North Dakota Wisconsin 5-2 Providence, R.I.

1983 Wisconsin Harvard 6-2 Grand Forks, N.D.

1984 Bowling Green Minn.-Duluth 5-4 (4 OT) Lake Placid, N.Y.

1985 Rensselaer Providence 2-1 Detroit, Mich.

1986 Michigan St. Harvard 6-5 Providence, R.I.

1987 North Dakota Michigan St. 5-3 Detroit, Mich.

1988 Lake Superior St. St. Lawrence 4-3 (OT) Lake Placid, N.Y.

1989 Harvard Minnesota 4-3 (OT) St. Paul, Minn.

1990 Wisconsin Colgate 7-3 Detroit, Mich.

1991 Northern Mich. BoSton U. 8-7 (3OT) St. Paul, Minn.

1992 Lake Superior St. Wisconsin # 5-3 Albany, N.Y.

1993 Maine Lake Superior St. 5-4 Milwaukee, Wis.

1994 Lake Superior St. BoSton U. 9-1 St. Paul, Minn.

1995 BoSton U. Maine 6-2 Providence, R.I.

1996 Michigan Colorado Col. 3-2 (OT) Cincinnati, Ohio

1997 North Dakota BoSton U. 6-4 Milwaukee, Wisc.

1998 Michigan Boston College 3-2 (OT) Boston,Mass.

1999 Maine New Hampshire 3-2 (OT) Anaheim, Calif.

2000 North Dakota Boston College 4-2 Providence, R.I.

2001 Boston College North Dakota 3-2 (OT) Albany, N.Y.

2002 Minnesota Maine 4-3 (OT) St. Paul, Minn.

2003 Minnesota New Hampshire 5-1 Buffalo, N.Y.

2004 Denver Maine 1-0 Boston, Mass.

2005 Denver North Dakota 4-1 Columbus, Ohio

2006 Wisconsin Boston College 2-1 Milwaukee, Wis.

2007 Michigan St. Boston College 3-1 St. Louis, Mo.

2008 Boston College Notre Dame 4-1 Denver, Colo.

#— Participation in the tournament vacated by the NCAA Committee on Infractions.

the ncaa years

Goterriers.com


national champions

Goterriers.com

2008-09 BoSton UniVerSitY Men’S iCe HoCKeY

1970-71 national CHaMpionS

tHe 1970-71 BoSton UniVerSitY terrierS

no. name pos. Cl. Ht. Wt. Hometown

1 Tim Regan G Jr. 6-3 208 Providence, R.I.

2 Bob Brown D So. 6-10 180 Scarboro, Ont.

4 Peter Yetten D Sr. 6-1 185 Waltham, Mass.

5 Bill Flynn W So. 5-11 170 Stoneham, Mass.

7 Ric Jordan D So. 6-3 200 Mississauga, Ont.

8 Paul Giandomenico W Jr. 5-6 140 Walpole, Mass.

9 Steve Stirling C Sr. 5-8 160 Clarkson, Ont.

10 Ray Cournoyea W So. 5-9 155 Chippawa, Ont.

11 Wayne Gowing W Sr. 5-10 160 Kitchener, Ont.

12 John Danby C Jr. 5-10 160 Port Credit, Ont.

14 Oliver Prechac W So. 5-9 165 Versailles, France

16 Guy Burrowes W Jr. 5-10 170 Niagara Falls, Ont.

17 Bob Gryp W Jr. 6-1 189 Merlin, Ont.

18 Steve Dolloff C So. 5-9 170 Melrose, Mass.

19 Ron Anderson W So. 5-10 170 Moncton, N.B.

20 Bob Murray D Jr. 6-0 160 Quincy, Mass.

21 Don Cahoon W Jr. 5-9 160 Marblehead, Mass.

23 Larry Abbott D So. 5-10 180 Melrose, Mass.

24 Dave Warner D So. 6-0 180 Niagara Falls, Ont.

25 Peter Thornton W Jr. 5-7 165 Scarborough, Ont.

27 Mike LaGarde D So. 6-2 190 Roxboro, Que.

30 Dan Brady G Jr. 5-11 170 Canton, N.Y.

Head Coach: Jack Kelley

assistant Coach: Bob Crocker

oVerall reCord: 28-2-1

Beanpot CHaMpionS

eCaC reGUlar-SeaSon CHaMpionS

132

nCaa CHaMpionSHip GaMe

BOSTON UNIVERSITY VS. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

March 20, 1971

Syracuse, N.Y. - War Memorial Auditorium

team 1 2 3 F

Minnesota 0 0 2 — 2

BOSTON UNIV. 2 1 1 — 4

First period: BU – Steve Stirling (John Danby, Bob Brown),

5:32 (pp); BU – Bob Gryp (Wayne Gowing), 10:10. penalties: M

– Frank Sanders (charging), 5:01; BU – Bob Murray (holding),

14:18

Second period: BU – Stirling (unassisted), 9:13. penalties:

BU – Mike LaGarde (high-sticking), 9:32; BU – Ron Anderson

(elbowing), 17:18; M – Wally Olds (interference), 19:44

third period: M – Doug Peltier (Craig Sarner, Bruce McIntosh),

13:07; BU – Anderson (Steve Dolloff, Brown), 17:45; M – Dean

Blais (McIntosh), 19:44. penalties: BU – LaGarde (holding),

11:04; BU – Murray (hooking), 18:09; M – D. Peltier (offensive

check), 18:09; M – Blais (cross-checking), 19:49.

Shots on goal: M 13-11-8 – 32; BU 12-11-9 – 32

Saves: M (Dennis Erickson) 28; BU (Dan Brady) 30

penalties/Minutes: M 4/8; BU 5/10

power plays: M 0 for 4; BU 1 for 3

officials: Bob Barry, Frank Larson

attendance: 6,017


4 nCaa CHaMpionSHipS • 30 nCaa toUrnaMent appearanCeS • 28 Beanpot titleS • 6 HoCKeY eaSt toUrnaMent titleS

1971-72 national CHaMpionS

tHe 1971-72 BoSton UniVerSitY terrierS

no. name pos. Cl. Ht. Wt. Hometown

1 Tim Regan G Sr. 6-3 208 Providence, R.I.

1 Ed Walsh G So. 5-10 170 Arlington, Mass.

2 Bob Brown D Jr. 6-0 180 Scarboro, Ont.

3 Dick Brugman C So. 5-9 165 Winthrop, Mass.

4 Ray Fowle D So. 5-11 170 Niagara Falls, Ont.

5 Bill Flynn W Jr. 5-11 170 Stoneham, Mass.

7 Ric Jordan D Jr. 6-3 200 Mississauga, Ont.

8 Paul Giandomenico W Sr. 5-6 140 Walpole, Mass.

9 Jim Connors W So. 5-8 170 Brookline, Mass.

10 Ray Cournoyea C Jr. 5-8 160 Chippawa, Ont.

11 Dave Wisener C Jr. 5-8 160 Pictou, N.S.

12 John Danby C Sr. 5-10 160 Port Credit, Ont.

15 Allan Judge C So. 6-1 200 Niagara Falls, Ont.

16 Guy Burrows W Sr. 5-10 170 Niagara Falls, Ont.

17 Bob Gryp W Sr. 6-1 189 Merlin, Ont.

18 Steve Dolloff C Jr. 5-9 170 Melrose, Mass.

19 Ron Anderson C Jr. 5-10 170 Moncton, N.B.

20 Bob Murray D Sr. 6-0 160 Quincy, Mass

21 Don Cahoon W Sr. 5-9 160 Marblehead, Mass.

23 Larry Abbott D Jr. 5-10 180 Melrose, Mass.

24 Dave Warner D Jr. 6-0 180 Niagara Falls, Ont.

25 Pete Thornton W Sr. 5-7 165 Scarborough, Ont.

27 Mike LaGarde D Jr. 6-2 190 Roxboro, Que.

30 Dan Brady G Sr. 5-11 170 Canton, N.Y.

30 Joe Robillard G So. 5-9 155 Woburn, Mass.

Cliff Hamilton C So. 6-0 170 Winchester, Mass.

Head Coach: Jack Kelley

assistant Coaches: Bob Crocker, Jack Parker, Andy Fila

oVerall reCord: 26-4-1

Beanpot CHaMpionS

eCaC toUrnaMent CHaMpionS

133

nCaa CHaMpionSHip GaMe

BOSTON UNIVERSITY VS. CORNELL UNIVERSITY

March 18, 1972

Boston, Mass. – Boston Garden

team 1 2 3 F

Cornell 0 0 0 — 0

BOSTON UNIV. 1 1 2 — 4

First period: BU – Ron Anderson (Bob Brown, Ric Jordan), 10:42

(pp). penalties: C – Gordon McCormick, 8:52; BU – Mike LaGarde,

18:13; C – Larry Fullan, 18:13

Second period: BU – Jordan (Bob Brown); 10:51 (pp). penalties:

C – Dave Elenbaas, 9:13; BU – Anderson, 9:44; C – Fullan, 9:44

third period: BU – Anderson (Don Cahoon), 1:39; BU – Jordan (Cahoon,

Anderson), 13:13. penalties: BU – Peter Thornton, 3:24

Shots on goal: C 14-12-13 – 39; BU 8-11-13 – 32

Saves: C (Elenbaas) 28; BU (Tim Regan) 39

penalties/Minutes: C 4/8; BU 3/6

power plays: C 0 for 1; BU 2 for 2

officials: Bob Barry, Frank Larson

attendance: 14,995

national champions

Goterriers.com


national champions

Goterriers.com

2008-09 BoSton UniVerSitY Men’S iCe HoCKeY

1977-78 national CHaMpionS

tHe 1977-78 BoSton UniVerSitY terrierS nCaa CHaMpionSHip GaMe

no. name pos. Cl. Ht. Wt. Hometown

1 Brian Durocher G Sr. 5-9 157 Longmeadow, Mass.

2 Brian O’Connor W Fr. 6-3 211 New Haven, Conn.

3 Bill Cotter W Fr. 5-10 175 Charlestown, Mass.

4 Marc Hetnik C Jr. 5-10 170 Brookline, Mass.

5 Tim Kimball D Fr. 5-11 176 Beverly, Mass.

6 Scott Nieland D So. 6-0 185 Minneapolis, Minn.

7 John Fox W Jr. 5-9 167 Willowdale, Ont.

8 Paul Miller C Fr. 5-9 170 Billerica, Mass.

9 John Bethel F Jr. 5-11 180 Roxboro, Que.

10 Dave Silk W So. 6-0 180 Marshfield, Mass.

11 Bob Boileau W Jr. 5-11 190 Pte. Claire, Que.

12 Mark Fidler C Fr. 5-8 175 Charlestown, Mass.

14 John Corriveau W Jr. 6-1 190 Manchester, N.H.

15 Bill LeBlond D So. 6-0 185 New Canaan, Conn.

16 Mickey Mullen W Jr. 6-1 176 Courtwright, Ont.

17 Jack O’Callahan D Jr. 6-0 180 Charlestown, Mass.

18 Tony Meagher W-C So. 5-9 166 Belleville, Ont.

19 Daryl MacLeod W Fr. 5-10 183 Melrose, Mass.

20 Matt Marden W Sr. 5-10 170 Malden, Mass.

21 John Melanson F Jr. 5-11 170 Wakefield, Mass.

22 Vince Mullins W Jr. 6-1 186 Tecumseh, Ont.

23 Dick Lamby D Sr. 6-1 195 Auburn, Mass.

24 Todd Johnson C Fr. 5-9 165 Wayland, Mass.

27 Bill O’Neill D Jr. 5-10 175 Danvers, Mass.

30 Jim Craig G Jr. 6-1 185 Boston, Mass.

35 Bob Wels G Jr. 6-4 208 Buffalo, N.Y.

Head Coach: Jack Parker

assistant Coaches: Andy Fila, Bob Murray, Don Cahoon

oVerall reCord: 30-2-0

Beanpot CHaMpionS

eCaC reGUlar-SeaSon CHaMpionS

134

BOSTON UNIVERSITY VS. BOSTON COLLEGE

March 25, 1978

Providence, R.I. – Providence Civic Center

team 1 2 3 F

Boston College 2 0 1 — 3

BOSTON UNIV. 3 1 1 — 5

First period: BU – Mark Fidler (Dick Lamby, Jack O’Callahan), :38

(pp); BC – Joe Mullen (Joe Augustine), 11:00; BC – Bobby Hehir

(unassisted), 13:26; BU – Dave Silk (O’Callahan), 14:44 (pp); BU

– Tony Meagher (Lamby), 17:24 (sh). penalties: BC – Augustine

(holding), :09; BU – Lamby (hooking), 2:39; BU – O’Callahan

(high-sticking), 5:51; BU – Bill LeBlond (high-sticking), 9:23;

BC – Mike Ewanouski (tripping), 14:26; BU – Bill O’Neill (slashing),

15:47; BU – O’Neill (high-sticking), 18:07; BC – Charlie

Antetomaso (tripping), 18:43

Second period: BU – Meagher (Bob Boileau, Marc Hetnik), 7:05.

penalties: BC – George Amidon (Tripping), 4:28; BC – Antetomaso

(tripping), 8:06; BU – Lamby (hooking), 8:29; BU – LeBlond

(holding), 12:56; BC – Augustine (interference), 13:53; BU

– Fidler (slashing), 16:47; BC – Paul Hammer (cross-checking),

17:33; BC – Antetomaso (tripping), 18:20

third period: BU – Fidler (Silk, Lamby), 1:01; BC – Steve Barger

(Mark Switaj, Bill Kennedy), 3:30. penalties: BU – John Bethel

(high-sticking), 8:53; BU – John Bethel (roughing), 8:53; BC

– Joe Casey (high-sticking), 8:53; BC – Joe Casey (roughing),

8:53; BU – Lamby (holding), 10:03; BC – Paul Barrett (highsticking),

15:18.

Shots on goal: BC 8-9-14 – 31; BU 13-14-9 – 36

Saves: BC (Paul Skidmore) 31; BU (Jim Craig) 28

penalties/Minutes: BC 10/20; BU 12/24

power plays: BC 0 for 10; BU 2 for 8

officials: Joe Faucette, Medo Martinello

attendance: 11,038


4 nCaa CHaMpionSHipS • 30 nCaa toUrnaMent appearanCeS • 28 Beanpot titleS • 6 HoCKeY eaSt toUrnaMent titleS

1994-95 national CHaMpionS

tHe 1994-95 BoSton UniVerSitY terrierS

no. name pos. Cl. Ht. Wt. Hometown

1 Shawn Ferullo G So. 5-8 158 Lynnfield, Mass.

2 Kaj Linna D Sr. 6-2 210 Helsinki, Finland

4 Chris Kelleher D Fr. 6-1 214 Belmont, Mass.

5 Doug Wood D Jr. 6-1 200 Sudbury, Mass

7 Rich Brennan D Sr. 6-2 200 Guilderland, N.Y.

8 Bill Pierce W So. 6-1 195 Burlington, Mass.

9 Shawn Bates C So. 6-0 183 Medford, Mass.

10 Peter Donatelli F Fr. 5-10 180 North Providence, R.I.

11 Bob Lachance W Jr. 5-11 183 Bristol, Conn.

12 Mike Grier W So. 6-0 242 Holliston, Mass.

14 John Hynes W Fr. 5-9 168 Warwick, R.I.

15 Mike Sylvia F Fr. 5-10 170 Newton, Mass.

16 Ken Rausch W Sr. 6-0 189 Danbury, Conn.

17 Jay Pandolfo W Jr. 6-0 197 Burlington, Mass.

18 Chris Drury F Fr. 5-10 184 Fairfield, Conn.

19 Steve Thornton C Sr. 5-11 179 Gloucester, Ont.

20 Jeff Kealty D Fr. 6-4 190 Framingham, Mass.

21 Mike Prendergast W Sr. 5-9 182 South Boston, Mass.

22 Matt Wright W So. 6-1 180 Belmont, Mass.

24 Jacques Joubert C Sr. 6-2 201 South Bend, Ind.

26 Jon Coleman D So. 6-0 192 Canton, Mass.

27 Shane Johnson D So. 5-10 185 Brandon, Man.

35 Derek Herlofsky G Sr. 5-10 173 Minneapolis, Minn.

Head Coach: Jack Parker

assistant Coaches: Blaise MacDonald, Mike Eruzione, Bill Berglund

oVerall reCord: 31-6-3

Beanpot CHaMpionS

HoCKeY eaSt reGUlar-SeaSon Co-CHaMpionS

HoCKeY eaSt toUrnaMent CHaMpionS

135

nCaa CHaMpionSHip GaMe

BOSTON UNIVERSITY VS. UNIVERSITY OF MAINE

April 1, 1995

Providence, R.I. – Providence Civic Center

team 1 2 3 F

Maine 0 1 1 — 2

BOSTON UNIV. 1 2 3 — 6

First period: BU Steve Thornton (unassisted), 14:57 (pp). penalties:

BU – Mike Sylvia (high-sticking), 2:13; M – Tim Lovell

(high-sticking), 2:13; BU – Shawn Bates (interference), 8:32;

BU – Shane Johnson (interference), 11:26; M – Brad Mahoney

(roughing), 13:50; M – Jamie Thompson (cross-checking), 16:25;

BU – Chris O’Sullivan (cross-checking); 17:53.

Second period: BU – O’Sullivan (Thornton, Mike Grier), 7:27;

BU – Jacques Joubert (Kaj Linna, Mike Premdergast), 9:15 (pp);

M – Lovell (Tony Frenette, Thompson), 14:51. penalties: BU

– Chris Drury (interference), 3:19; M – Dan Shermerhorn (interference),

8:42; BU – Johnson (interference), 18:20; BU – Linna

(slashing), 19:44

third period: M – Trevor Roenick (Jacques Rodrigue, Jeff

Tory), :31 (pp); BU – Sylvia (Bates, Jay Pandolfo), 5:23; BU

– O’Sullivan (Rich Brennan, Grier), 8:30 (pp); BU – Bob Lachance

(Thornton), 18-47 (sh). penalties: M – Reg Cardinal (holding),

7:41; BU – Linna (holding), 12:17; M – Jason Mansoff (holding),

15:26; BU – Joubert (elbowing), 15:26; BU – Bench (too many

men, served by Ken Rausch), 16:59.

Shots on goal: Maine 9-5-9 – 23; BU 11-14-14 – 39.

Saves: Maine (Blair Allison) 33; BU (Tom Noble) 21.

penalties/Minutes: M 6/12; BU 10/20

power plays: M 1 for 8; BU 3 for 4.

officials: Frank Cole (r), Scott Leavitt (r), Bill Jones (l).

attendance: 11,484

national champions

Goterriers.com


the beanpot

Goterriers.com

1st — December 26, 1952

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 4, Northeasten 1

Harvard 3, Boston College 2 (OT)

December 27, 1952

Boston College 2, Northeastern 0

Harvard 7, BoSton UniVerSitY 4

2nd — January 11, 1954

Harvard 3, BOSTON UNIVERSITY 2

Boston College 8, Northeastern 5

January 12, 1954

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Northeastern 3

Boston College 4, Harvard 1

3rd — February 7, 1955

Harvard 12, Northeastern 3

Boston College 9, BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5

February 8, 1955

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 4, Northeastern 3

Harvard 5, Boston College 4 (ot)

4th — February 6, 1956

Boston College 7, Northeastern 1

Harvard 6, BOSTON UNIVERSITY 1

February 8, 1956

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 9, Northeastern 3

Boston College 4, Harvard 2

5th — February 1, 1957

Boston College 6, Northeastern 0

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Harvard 3

February 5, 1957

Harvard 5, Northeastern 3

Boston Coll. 5, BoSton UniVerSitY 4 (ot)

6th — February 3, 1958

Northeastern 5, Harvard 4

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Boston College 4

February 10, 1958

Harvard 7, Boston College 1

BoSton UniVerSitY 9, northeastern 3

7th — February 2, 1959

Boston College 6, Harvard 4

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 7, Northeastern 4

February 9, 1959

Harvard 4, Northeastern 0

Boston College 7, BoSton UniVerSitY 4

8th — February 8, 1960

Harvard 5, Northeastern 3

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Boston College 2

February 15, 1960

Northeastern 6, Boston College 5

Harvard 3, BoSton UniVerSitY 2

9th — February 6, 1961

Boston College 15, Northeastern 1

Harvard 3, Boston University 2 (OT)

February 13, 1961

Northeastern 6, Boston University 2

Boston College 4, Harvard 2

10th — February 5, 1962

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Northeastern 4

Harvard 6, Boston College 1

February 12, 1962

Boston College 4, Northeastern 0

Harvard 5, BoSton UniVerSitY 0

11th — February 4, 1963

Boston College 2, BOSTON UNIVERSITY 1 (OT)

Harvard 4, Northeastern 3 (OT)

February 11, 1963

Northeastern 4, BOSTON UNIVERSITY 2

Boston College 3, Harvard 1

12th — February 3, 1964

Boston College 7, Northeastern 4

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 3, Harvard 2

February 10, 1964

Harvard 7, Northeastern 5

Boston College 6, BoSton UniVerSitY 5

13th — February 8, 1965

Boston University 5, Northeastern 4 (3OT)

Boston College 5, Harvard 4 (OT)

February 15, 1965

Northeastern 3, Harvard 1

Boston College 5, BoSton UniVerSitY 4

2008-09 BoSton UniVerSitY Men’S iCe HoCKeY

14th — February 7, 1966

Harvard 5, Northeastern 1

Boston University 6, Boston College 4

Febuary 14, 1966

Boston College 5, Northeastern 3

BoSton UniVerSitY 9, Harvard 2

15th — February 9, 1967

Northeastern 6, Boston College 5 (OT)

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 8, Harvard 3

February 13, 1967

Boston College 6, Harvard 5

BoSton UniVerSitY 4, northeastern 0

16th — February 5, 1968

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 7, Northeastern 4

Harvard 6, Boston College 4

February 12, 1968

Boston College 6, Northeastern 4

BoSton UniVerSitY 4, Harvard 1

17th — February 3, 1969

Harvard 8, Northeastern 4

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 4, Boston College 2

February 10, 1969

Boston College 6, Northeastern 3

Harvard 5, BoSton UniVerSitY 3

18th — February 2, 1970

Boston College 5, Northeastern 0

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Harvard 3

February 9, 1970

Harvard 5, Northeastern 4 (OT)

BoSton UniVerSitY 5, Boston College 4

19th — February 8, 1971

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 12, Northeastern 2

Harvard 10, Boston College 4

February 22, 1971

Boston College 8, Northeastern 2

BoSton UniVerSitY 4, Harvard 1

20th — February 7, 1972

Harvard 8, Northeastern 3

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 4, Boston College 2

February 14, 1972

Boston College 5, Northeastern 4

BoSton UniVerSitY 4, Harvard 1

21st — February 5, 1973

Boston College 9, Northeastern 8 (OT)

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 8, Harvard 3

February 12, 1973

Harvard 8, Northeastern 5

BoSton UniVerSitY 4, Boston College 1

22nd — February 4, 1974

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 6, Northeastern 1

Harvard 11, Boston College 6

February 11, 1974

Northeastern 4, Boston College 3

Harvard 5, BoSton UniVerSitY 4

136

Sean Fields received both the Beanpot MVp and eberly trophy as the tournament’s

outstanding Goalie in 2004, marking the second straight year he received both awards.

He thus became the first goalie in the history of the Beanpot to win both the MVp and

eberly trophies in back-to-back years.

23rd — February 3, 1975

Harvard 9, Northeastern 0

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Boston College 3

February 9, 1975

Northeastern 5, Boston College 3

BoSton UniVerSitY 7, Harvard 2

24th — February 2, 1976

Boston College 5, Northeastern 3

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 6, Harvard 5

February 9, 1976

Harvard 4, Northeastern 2

Boston College 6, BoSton UniVerSitY 3

25th — February 7, 1977

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 10, Northeastern 5

Harvard 4, Boston College 2

February 14, 1977

Boston College 6, Northeastern 4

Harvard 4, BoSton UniVerSitY 3

26th — February 6, 1978

Harvard 4, Northeastern 3 (OT)

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 12, Boston College 5

March 1, 1978

Boston College 3, Northeastern 2 (OT)

BoSton UniVerSitY 7, Harvard 1

27th — February 5, 1979

Boston College 7, Northeastern 2

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 4, Harvard 2

February 12, 1979

Northeastern 5, Harvard 4

BoSton UniVerSitY 4, Boston College 3

28th — February 4, 1980

Northeastern 6, BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5 (OT)

Boston College 4, Harvard 3

February 11, 1980

Harvard 7, BOSTON UNIVERSITY 4

northeastern 5, Boston College 4 (ot)

29th — February 2, 1981

Harvard 10, Northeastern 2

Boston College 5, BOSTON UNIVERSITY 2

February 9, 1981

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 9, Northeastern 2

Harvard 2, Boston College 0

30th — February 1, 1982

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Harvard 1

Boston College 3, Northeastern 2 (OT)

February 8, 1982

Northeastern 6, Harvard 5 (OT)

BoSton UniVerSitY 3, Boston College 1


4 nCaa CHaMpionSHipS • 30 nCaa toUrnaMent appearanCeS • 28 Beanpot titleS • 6 HoCKeY eaSt toUrnaMent titleS

John Curry posted a tournament-record .985 save percentage in 2007 en route to

claiming both the Beanpot MVp and eberly trophy. Curry finished his career a perfect

5-0 in Beanpot contests, including wins in each of the last three title games.

31st — February 8, 1983

Boston College 5, Harvard 4 (OT)

Northeastern 4, BOSTON UNIVERSITY 3

February 14, 1983

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Harvard 4

Boston College 8, northeastern 2

32nd — February 6, 1984

Northeastern 7, Harvard 3

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 6, Boston College 5

February 13, 1984

Boston College 5, Harvard 2

northeastern 5, BoSton UniVerSitY 2

33rd — February 4, 1985

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Harvard 3

Northeastern 4, Boston College 2

February 11, 1984

Harvard 6, Boston College 5

northeastern 4, BoSton UniVerSitY 2

34th — February 3, 1986

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 8, Northeastern 5

Boston College 4, Harvard 2

February 10, 1986

Harvard 7, Northeastern 1

BoSton UniVerSitY 4, Boston College 1

35th — February 2, 1987

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 6, Boston College 3

Northeastern 5, Harvard 4 (OT)

February 9, 1987

Boston College 7, Harvard 6 (OT)

BoSton UniVerSitY 4, n’eastern 3 (ot)

36th — February 1, 1988

Northeastern 4, Boston College 0

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 6, Harvard 4

February 8, 1988

Boston College 4, Harvard 2

northeastern 6, BoSton UniVerSitY 3

37th — February 6, 1989

Harvard 5, Boston College 4

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Northeastern 4 (OT)

February 13, 1989

Boston College 4, Northeastern 1

Harvard 9, BoSton UniVerSitY 6

38th — February 5, 1990

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 4, Boston College 3

Harvard 5, Northeastern 4

February 12, 1990

Boston College 8, Northeastern 4

BoSton UniVerSitY 8, Harvard 2

39th — February 4, 1991

Boston College 5, Northeastern 3

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 8, Harvard 2

February 11, 1991

Northeastern 5, Harvard 0

BoSton UniVerSitY 8, Boston College 4

40th — February 3, 1992

Harvard 6, Boston College 4

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Northeastern 4

February 10, 1992

Boston College 5, Northeastern 3

BoSton UniVerSitY 5, Harvard 2

41st — February 1, 1993

Harvard 7, Northeastern 5

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 8, Boston College 2

February 8, 1993

Northeastern 4, Boston College 3

Harvard 4, BoSton UniVerSitY 2

42nd — February 7, 1994

Boston College 5, Northeastern 4 (2OT)

Harvard 4, BOSTON UNIVERSITY 2

February 14, 1994

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 8, Northeastern 0

Boston College 2, Harvard 1 (ot)

43rd — February 6, 1995

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 6, Northeastern 2

Boston College 7, Harvard 6

February 13, 1995

Northeastern 4, Harvard 2

BoSton UniVerSitY 5, Boston College 1

44th — February 5, 1996

Northeastern 4, Harvard 1

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 4, Boston College 1

February 12, 1996

Boston College 6, Harvard 2

BoSton UniVerSitY 11, northeastern 4

45th — February 3, 1997

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 7, Harvard 1

Boston College 4, Northeastern 1

February 10, 1997

Northeastern 2, Harvard 0

BoSton UniVerSitY 4, Boston College 2

46th — February 2, 1998

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 4, Northeastern 1

Harvard 5, Boston College 4 (OT)

February 9, 1998

Boston College 4, Northeastern 1

BoSton UniVerSitY 2, Harvard 1 (ot)

47th — February 1, 1999

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 3, Boston College 2 (OT)

Northeastern 4, Harvard 3 (OT)

February 8, 1999

Boston College 6, Harvard 4

BoSton UniVerSitY 4, northeastern 2

48th — February 7, 2000

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 4, Harvard 0

Boston College 6, Northeastern 0

February 14, 2000

Harvard 3, Northeastern 1

BoSton UniVerSitY 4, Boston College 1

49th — February 5, 2001

Boston College 4, Harvard 1

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 6, Northeastern 4

February 12, 2001

Northeastern 8, Harvard 7

Boston College 5, BoSton UniVerSitY 3

50th — February 4, 2002

Northeastern 5, Harvard 2

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Boston College 3

February 11, 2002

Boston College 4, Harvard 0

BoSton UniVerSitY 5, northeastern 3

51st — February 3, 2003

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 2, Harvard 1

Boston College 5, Northeastern 2

February 10, 2003

Harvard 4, Northeastern 1

BoSton UniVerSitY 3, Boston College 2

1995

tony amonte Boston University

Joe Cavanagh Harvard

Art Chisholm Northeastern

Bill Cleary Harvard

John Cunniff Boston College

Tom “Red” Martin Boston College

Joe Mullen Boston College

Jack parker Boston University

Vic Stanfield Boston University

Paul Skidmore Boston College

Jack o’Callahan Boston University

Wayne Turner Northeastern

Bruce Racine Northeastern

1996

Gene Kinasewich Harvard

Edward J. Powers Boston College

Herb Wakabayashi Boston University

1997

Mark Fusco Harvard

John “Snooks” Kelley Boston College

Bob Marquis Boston University

1998

John Cullen Boston University

Herb Gallagher Northeastern

Tim Sheehy Boston College

1999

Billy Hogan Boston College

rick Meagher Boston University

Ralph “Cooney” Weiland Harvard

2000

Fern Flaman Northeastern

Randy Roth Harvard

2001

Dave Archambault Northeastern

Jack Kelley Boston University

2002

Walt Greeley Harvard

Richie Smith Boston College

137

52nd — February 2, 2004

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Northeastern 2

Boston College 4, Harvard 1

February 9, 2004

Northeastern 3, Harvard 1

Boston College 2, BoSton UniVerSitY 1 (ot)

53rd — February 7, 2005

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 2, Boston College 1

Northeastern 2, Harvard 1 (2OT)

February 14, 2005

Boston College 4, Harvard 1

BoSton UniVerSitY 3, northeastern 2 (ot)

54th — February 6, 2006

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Harvard 3

Boston College 5, Northeastern 2

February 13, 2006

Harvard 5, Northeastern 0

BoSton UniVerSitY 3, Boston College 2

55th — February 5, 2007

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 4, Northeastern 0

Boston College 3, Harvard 1

February 12, 2007

Northeastern 3, Harvard 1

BoSton UniVerSitY 2, Boston College 1 (ot)

56th — February 4, 2008

Harvard 3, Northeastern 1

Boston College 4, BOSTON UNIVERSITY 3 (OT)

February 11, 2008

BOSTON UNIVERSITY 5, Northeastern 4

Boston College 6, Harvard 5 (ot)

B e a n p o t H a l l o F F a M e

In February 1995, to help commemorate Boston Garden’s final year and the final Beanpot Tournament

at the historic venue, the All-Boston Garden Beanpot Team was announced. A committee

of five representatives from each of the four schools, the media and the Boston Garden staff selected

the players. The original team comprised of 13 former players who helped define the great

tournament. Since then, the Beanpot Hall of Fame has grown to 45 members. Below is a list of

the Beanpot Hall of Famers, their school and the year in which they were inducted.

2003

Rod Isbister Northeastern

Steve Stirling Boston University

2004

Bob Bland Harvard

Jim Logue Boston College

2005

Scott Cashman Boston University

Jay Heinbuck Northeastern

2006

Walter Brown Boston Garden

Bill Daley Boston College

Dave Poile Northeastern

2007

David O’Brien Northeastern

Jim Tiernan Boston College

2008

Jim Averill Northeastern

dan Brady Boston University

Bill Flynn Boston College

dan BradY

the beanpot

Goterriers.com


walter brown arena

home of bu men’s hockey: 1971-2005

top left: The Terriers take the ice for the final

time at Walter Brown.

top right: Brad Zancanaro scores the final goal in

Walter Brown Arena. He would also score the firstever

goal at Agganis Arena the next night.

Below left: Thanking the fans.

reMeMBerinG BroWn arena

On January 2, 2005, the Terrier hockey team played its final game at Walter Brown Arena, bringing the curtain down on more than 32 years of exciting memories. From the first game

played at Brown Arena against Yale on November 27, 1971, and running through the last home game played there on January 2, 2005, against Minnesota, the Terriers played 528 home

games. Their record was 362-129-37 for an incredible .721 winning percentage. Players, coaches and fans alike have memories of games played there. Below are some of those memories

through the eyes of those who coached, played and watched games at Walter Brown Arena over the years.

JaCK KelleY was the architect of the Boston University hockey tradition

both on and off the ice. An outstanding player for the Terriers

from 1949-52, he returned to his alma mater in 1962 to take over

a program that had won just 17 total games during the previous

two years. During the next 10 seasons, Kelley compiled a 206-80-8

record for a .714 winning percentage. His 1970-71 and 1971-72

teams won back-to-back NCAA titles with a combined record of

33-5-2. On November 27, 1971, Kelley was the Terriers’ head coach

when BU played Yale in the inaugural game of Brown Arena. He went

on to coach the Terriers through the 1971-72 season and compiled a

12-1-1 career record at Brown Arena.

“I remember wondering if the Arena was ever going to be built. Once it was built,

though, all the frustrations and disappointments we went through were worthwhile. We

used to play and practice at the old Boston Arena, and we would have to take cabs and

buses to get there. And, we would have ice time at all different hours. Now, we had our own

rink on campus. I remember the first game and the facility wasn’t completed, but we were

in there. A lot of people paid a heckuva price to get the rink, but it was the players who

created the legacy that is there now.”

donald “toot” CaHoon is the only person who has played at Brown

Arena, been an assistant on the Terrier coaching staff and brought

a team there as an opposing coach. As a player, he was on the ice

against Yale in that first game in 1971. He was credited with the first

game-winning goal and first hat trick at Brown Arena. He was Jack

Parker’s first full-time assistant coach, serving from 1974-79 then

again in 1987-88 and during the 1990-91 season. As the head coach

at Princeton from 1992-99 and the coach at Massachusetts since the

2000-01 season, his record was 1-8 in the Arena.

“I remember how special we all felt that first time we went into Brown Arena. I

remember living in West Campus and being able to take an elevator from the dorm to the

rink. In the middle of the winter, I was able to wear shorts and a t-shirt to practice because I

didn’t have to go outside. I also remember hanging the banners from the ceiling. We couldn’t

do it at Boston Arena, and now that we had our own rink, we could hang the banners and

show the tradition of BU hockey. Later, bringing teams in there, those banners and the crowds

were intimidating. The first Princeton team I brought in there, I told them to forget about

the banners. This is just another rink, and BU is just another team. We got beat badly (7-2).

Then, there are the deafening crowds. You can’t hear yourself think. Two of the games that

I remember the most were the 1991 NCAA games against Michigan. Jack (Parker) could not

coach that game because of a one-game suspension from the NCAA. So, I was the head coach

and everyone pitched in and was great and we beat them, 4-1. The next night, Jack was back

on the bench, and we beat them, 8-1. Even before he went into the locker room to talk to the

guys, he came over to me and kidded ‘I just wanted to put you in your place. I am twice as

good as you are.’ Brown Arena has been a terrific place. I will always have a special feeling

for it and I am proud to be among the group of alumni who have been part of the tradition.”


MiKe erUzione played at Brown Arena for four years before he went on to

captain the 1980 U.S. Olympic gold medal-winning hockey team. During his

four-year Terrier career, he played 46 games at Brown Arena and his teams

compiled a 40-5-1 record for a .880 winning percentage. His first three

years, his record at home was 32-1-0.

“I remember putting on the game jersey the first time and skating onto

the ice and feeling that it was a dream come true. When I was in high school,

I would drive by Brown Arena and think what it would be like to play here

but never thought I would be good enough. My first impression was walking

into the locker room the first time and seeing the director’s chairs with everyone’s names on them.

The crowds were deafening. Remember, BU hockey was a powerhouse during the early Seventies,

having won the 1971 and 1972 national championships. This was where you wanted to play. Since

my family lived so close, they could come see me play, but I needed 15-20 tickets for every home

game. That’s why I tried to be close to the guys from Canada. They didn’t need their tickets, and

they would give them to me. I think the games that were extra special were the ones against BC

and Harvard. One night, we were playing BC, and I think the final score was 8-7. Ricky (Meagher)

would score for us then (Joe) Mullen would score for them. And, it went that way all night. The

problem was that I was assigned to cover Mullen that night. I miss the noise of the crowd, but

Agganis Arena is unbelievable.”

MiKe SUlliVan played at Brown Arena from 1986-87 through 1989-90. The

Terrier captain his senior season, his four-year record at home was 38-24-6

for a .603 winning percentage. With an older sister and brother having gone

to BC, and his graduating from BC High School, it seemed certain that Mike

would attend Boston College. Instead, he chose Boston University. After

graduating, he began an 11-year career in the National Hockey League. He

then spent a year coaching the Providence Bruins before being elevated

to the head coaching position with the Boston Bruins in June 2003. The

youngest head coach in the NHL, Sullivan guided the Bruins to a 41-19-5

record and a berth in the playoffs.

“My initial memory of Brown Arena was how vibrant it was. The crowd was loud, the band

was great and there was a huge student turnout. I think one of the games I remember most was

the one I came to when I was being recruited. I brought my girlfriend, who is now my wife (Kate)

JaCK parKer never played at Brown

Arena, as his home rink was Boston

Arena during his Terrier playing days.

He did, however, coach 496 games at

Brown Arena as the Terriers’ head coach.

His record was 343-118-35 for a .727

winning percentage.

“What I will always remember

about Brown Arena is the noise in

the building. It is one of the all-time great buildings that

generate enthusiasm. Our players loved to hear the noise,

and it kept them going. It was a real great advantage for

our team. Over the years, it was a real showcase for us. I

remember playing Michigan State in Tony Amonte’s first year

(1989-90), and we beat them (6-4). After the game, (State

coach) Ron Mason came up to me and said he couldn’t

believe how noisy the building was. The one game I will

always remember is the 1995 North Dakota game. That was

the game that Travis (Roy) was injured. His number (24) is

now hanging from the ceiling as the only number we have

ever retired, and it will be there forever. Any BU—BC game

at Brown Arena was also special because of the electricity in

the building. It really captured the rivalry. We have created

this same excitement in Agganis Arena.”

Below left: The Section 8 student section.

Below right: The 2004-05 team along with former

BU hockey players assemble at center ice following

the final game at Walter Brown Arena.

and we were sitting in the section just below the band. BU was playing Northeastern that

night, and the NU goalie was trying to clear the puck out of its end. The puck came over

the glass and hit my girlfriend in the shoulder. I felt that was a sign that I should come

here. I think one of the first things I remember are the director’s chairs. I thought how

special it was that each guy would have a director’s chair with the BU logo on the front

and his names on the back. I still have my chair at home. I remember the camaraderie

that existed here. We used to love to come down for practice and just hang out afterward

as a team. In 2003-04, I came back for a few games, and the atmosphere hadn’t changed.

I don’t think there is a college rink in the country like it, and I love the fact that I was

part of it.”

Bernie CorBett has experienced Terrier hockey at Walter Brown

Arena from a variety of perspectives. First as a Pee Wee hockey-playing

fan and devoted season ticket holder attending games with his

family from 1971-78. Next as the Terriers’ varsity hockey manager

viewing the games from the bench and later charting the games

from the press box. Most recently, for the past 23 seasons Corbett

has had the privilege of calling the games as the radio “Voice of

Terrier Hockey.”

“When I think of the Walter Brown Arena experience the things that

immediately come to mind are tradition and passion. The Arena has personified the longtime

success of the program. I’ve always thought the banners alone have been worth a goal

a game. The passion of the fans is palpable. There has been no better home-ice advantage

in college hockey. The old barn can really rock. The most vivid memory I’ll take with me is

the ‘curtain call’ that the team took, returning to the ice for a victory lap after the deciding

third game of the 1990 NCAA First Round series victory over North Dakota. The fans simply

refused to leave until captain Mike Sullivan brought the boys back for a twirl. The tradition

of the program and passion of the fans have helped to make a smooth transition to Agganis.”


what bu meant to me

Goterriers.com

“One of the reasons I am where I am today is

because of my year at Boston University. I played

with great players at BU like Tony Amonte and

Shawn McEachern, and Coach Parker is one of the

best coaches I have ever played for. Plus, Mike

Boyle’s strength and conditioning program helped

develop me into a much stronger player. My

career turned a corner at BU even though I was

there just one year. In fact, I was told that I was

drafted in the first round because the scouts knew

I was going to BU. The other great thing about

the program is how you feel like you are part of

a family. I go back every year for the annual golf

tournament, and I will visit with guys who played

10 and 20 years before me or guys who have

played after me, and we all feel very close to one

another. I know that players from other schools

don’t have that same feeling. I feel very fortunate

for what BU has given to me, and I wouldn’t

change a minute of it. It was the best year of my

life, and who knows where I would be if I hadn’t

gone there.”

KeitH tKaCHUK

St. loUiS BlUeS, F

2008-09 BoSton UniVerSitY Men’S iCe HoCKeY

“Everything at BU from my recruiting trip until I

received my diploma was a great experience. They

were four great years of my life. It wasn’t just

that I was playing good hockey or that I was play-

ing for Jack Parker that made it so memorable. It

was everything and everyone associated with the

program. BU has all the angles covered. All along

I knew I had made the right decision, and my

experience was better than I had expected.”

CHriS drUrY

neW YorK ranGerS, F

140

“I made lifelong friends during my years at BU.

It is the same as a family. It also prepared me

for the NHL. The coaching I received from Coach

Parker plus Mike Boyle’s strength and conditioning

program prepared me both physically and

mentally for the next level. For me, BU was the

best choice, and, if I had it to do over again, I

wouldn’t change it at all.”

SHaWn MceaCHern

16-Year nHl Veteran, F

aSSiStant CoaCH, UMaSS loWell


4 nCaa CHaMpionSHipS • 30 nCaa toUrnaMent appearanCeS • 28 Beanpot titleS • 6 HoCKeY eaSt toUrnaMent titleS

“I only played at BU for two years, but in that

short period of time, I made friends that I will

have forever. I will never forget my rookie year, we

were playing a game against the L.A. Kings. When

the game was over, Paul Fenton, who was playing

for the Kings, came over to say hello and welcome

me to the NHL. Fenton had played at BU during

the early Eighties and was a veteran NHL player

when I was a rookie. I remember how impressed

I was that he would come over to me, but that’s

the way it is with former BU players. I know when

I am playing I will go over to a BU guy after the

game and say ‘Hi.’ One of the things that has

always impressed me about the BU program and

Jack Parker is that they always stay ahead of the

demands of the game. When I was in school, there

wasn’t the emphasis on strength and conditioning

that there is now. Jack realized what was happen-

ing with the game and hired Mike Boyle to oversee

strength and conditioning, and Mike has done

things with the program that no one else has.

There is a standard set here that they don’t have

at other places.”

SCott YoUnG

20-Year nHl Veteran, F

“Boston University hockey is like a family. I made

friends that I know I will have the rest of my life.

I have talked with guys in the NHL who played

at other schools, and they have said they didn’t

have that feeling where they played. There is also

a great tradition here like playing in the Beanpot

and in the NCAA tournament. And, you don’t have

this at other schools. As far as the physical aspect

of playing hockey at BU, the record speaks for it-

self. I wanted to play at the next level, and I felt

BU was the place for me. It worked out well for

me, and I wouldn’t have done it any differently.”

Joe SaCCo

13-YEAR NHL VETERAN, F

HEAD COACH, LAKE ERIE (AHL)

141

“There is a bond that develops here that I am

not sure you have at other schools.This is a bond

that develops out of respect. Everyone who plays

at BU has respect for those who played before

him. There is no question that BU got me ready

to play in the NHL. Jack Parker taught me how to

play the game the right way on the ice, and Mike

Boyle got me ready physically. For me, it was a

once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to be part of a suc-

cessful program, and I am glad I didn’t miss that

opportunity.”

MiKe Grier

San JoSe SHarKS, F

what bu meant to me

Goterriers.com


what bu meant to me

Goterriers.com

“I picked BU not just because of its outstanding

tradition or because Jack Parker has a way of get-

ting the most out of his players or that Mike Boyle

did an outstanding job with the strength and

conditioning program. I picked BU because I felt

comfortable here during my recruiting trip. I liked

the guys, and I could see how everyone got along.

And, that’s the way it was during my four years. It

was a close knit group of guys, and everyone hung

out together even after we left the rink. And, I

know that doesn’t exist in every place. BU was a

great experience for me. I know it prepared me to

play in the NHL. More important, though, is that

there are great people involved with the program,

and there is terrific atmosphere around BU hockey.”

JaY pandolFo

neW JerSeY deVilS, F

2008-09 BoSton UniVerSitY Men’S iCe HoCKeY

“I would not be in the position I am now if it

weren’t for playing hockey at Boston University. It

gave me the opportunity to develop and mature

as a student-athlete. The best thing I found

about playing here was the family atmosphere

that exists on the team. The guys I played with

became like brothers, and I still stay in touch with

everyone. There is also a tradition of excellence

here that enables you to become a winner in life

and in sports.”

MiKe erUzione

Captain, 1980 U.S. olYMpiC Gold

Medal HoCKeY teaM

direCtor oF SpeCial oUtreaCH, BU

atHletiCS

142

“The older I’ve gotten and the longer I have been

away, the more I’ve realized that BU hockey was

a huge part of my life, and it continues to be. I

learned never to quit and never to give up. Those

are lessons that you can transform into any walk

of life. You also learn never to quit in relationships

you have with people. You learn to suck it up and

get back in there. Life is not always six-million-dollar

contracts and people living happily ever after.

In life, you hit tough stretches, and if you learn

never to quit, then you can make it through those

rough times. That is one of the most important

lessons I learned at BU. I have also seen the family

atmosphere that surrounds the BU hockey program.

It doesn’t matter how good you were while you

were playing; the only ID you need is that you wore

the BU sweater. You are always part of the family,

and you don’t always have that at other places.

You also have the feeling of always being part of

something special. No matter when you played, you

feel that you are part of that lineage and part of a

great tradition.”

daVe SilK

MeMBer, 1980 U.S. olYMpiC Gold

Medal HoCKeY teaM

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines