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Painting nets $11,000

for Straight, 1B

Volume 13 Number 19

Band

finishes

first

The Centennial Educational Park

Marching Band captured top honors

at its first meet this season at the

West Bloomfield High School Lakers

InvitaUonal Competition Saturday.

Besides receiving the highest

score, the CEP band also was awarded

trophies fqr best drum line, best

winds and best band in Flight I.

Some 17 high school bands from

the state participated in the competition.

According to James R. Griffith,

band director, judging is based on a

combination of areas including music

effect, music ensemble and music

field, percussion, visual effect,

visual ensemble and visual field.

There are judges on the field and

in the press box. Each judge carries

a small tape recorder and tapes

comments for the band's instructional

staff.

After the competition there is a

review session with the competition

judges and the instructional staffs

from all of the participating bands

so that each band can work to improve

its show for the next competition.

Musical selections for this year's

competition, written by George Gershwin

and arranged by Plymouth

High School graduate Ralp* Johnson.

include "Swanee," 'Tascinatin'

Rhythm," "I've Got Rhythm" and

"Rhapsody in Blue."

The next competition will be Saturday

evening, Sept. 26, at the

Clarkston High School Invitational.

The CEP Marching Band instructional

staff includes Griffith; Glen

Adsit, assistant director, Jay Koupal,

marching and maneuvering instructor,

Jerry Hotchkin Jr., percussion

instructor, Chris Seipel, color guard

instructor. Helping with the percussion

instruction are Chris Johnson

and Greg Collins. Amy Johnson is assistant

color guard instructor.

Golfers in

action, 1D

Canton (£>b£ert)tr

Mock disasters help

agencies prepare, 3A

Thursday. September 24, 1987 Canton, Michigan 68 Pages Twenty-five cents

Residents got a look at the new uniforms of

the Centennial Educational Park Marching

Band at home football games the past couple

of weeks and the Sunday of Plymouth Fall

•••••••••••••••••••

New roof planned

for clothing bank

The clothing donated to Wayne-

Westland Community Schools'

clothing bank won't need to go

ugh a spin-dry cycle anymore

fare It is given away.

The Hoover School annex in

Wayne, which bouses the clothing

bank, will get a new roof this fall.

The school board recently unanimously

approved re-roofing the annex.

The clothing bank has been a

school district program for more

thin two decades. Children's clothing

donated by local people is

stockpiled at the bank and is available

free of charge to disadvantaged

families with children who

attend school In the district.

According to Wayne-Westland

officials, the annex roof is in such

poor condition that donated clothing

often gets damp following a

rain shower or snowfall.

what's inside

Brevities. . . . 8A

RiiulnMA. . . . . . . . 1C

Classified . Sections C.E.F

Index

. . . . 1F

Auto

. . . 11C

Real estate . . . ... 2E

Employment . . . . . 1F

Creative living . . . . 1E

Crossword. . . 5E

Entertainment*. 5C

Opinion ...

13A

Sporta

Suburban life . . . . .1B

NEWSLINE . . .459-2700

SPORT 8 LINE . .991-2312

WANTS ADS . .591-0900

DELIVERY. . . .991-0600

7 only wiah that we had

the money for

renovating the entire

building.'

— Kathleen Chorbagian

board trustee

The roofing project, which is expected

to cost about $26,000, will '

be funded with money from the district's

energy conservaUon fund.

ADMINISTRATORS had originally

hoped to get money for a new

roof from last spring's bond issue.

But while voters passed a millage

increase, they turned down the

bond issue at the same time.

Please turn to Page 2

homes to fit your

JLifcwttffe

® B B £ s i w i i

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

NOW IN EVERY MONDAY

AND THURSDAY ISSUE

JOHN STORM2AND/««fT photograph*

Festival when they performed in Kellogg

Park. The hat is worn proudly by this member

of the percussion section.

Bill Joyner finds life,

teaching after years

as elected politician

By PWIJ Funks

staff writer

Bill Joyner, 38. a doctoral candidate.

a college speech instructor, a

Plymouth Township resident and

formerly a county commissioner

representing Canton and Plymouth,

says, he's never been happier than

• now.

There is life after public office, he

agrees, eyes twinkling and a smile

on his lips.

"I'm very happy away from It.

I've never been more content and

comfortable I like getting up In

front of a classroom. I love the interaction

with students."

Some people find religion when

the going gets rough. Joyner found

teaching after his marriage and political

career crumbled in the early

1980s

But it took time - almost a year.

That Joyner said. Is how long he

moped around doing such "exciting"

things as reading, walking and biking

after losing a bid for a state representative

seat in the fall of 1982

He lived on savings and deferred

compensation from his countjr commission

seat, a seat that effectively

was yanked away from him by fellow

Democrats during reapportionment.

JOYNER STILL remembers the

date when be was jarred into action

- Sept 4.1985

"I was on a blind date All of a

sudden she verbally threw me up

against a wall She said. 'All you do

Is talk. Why don't you do

something." "

He did

Joyner rented out his house during

1984 and used the money to earn a

master's degree from Mtrh-

people

igan University. "I lived anywhere

and everywhere I could find a bed —

with friends, my parents."

Joyner, finding that he enjoyed academic

life, has completed course

requirements for a doctorate. He intends

to write his dissertation on the

image of the Soviet Union as projected

by Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.

Meanwhile. Joyner is teaching an

aggregate of nine speech classes at

Wayne State University. Henry Ford

Community College. Oakland County

Community College and Cleary College.

He's also forensics coach at OOC.

Tve never been as content and

comfortable In my entire life as

working with students," Joyner said.

•1 think our young people have such

potential if they can capture feelings

and ideas and learn to express

them."

JOYNER ISN'T sure where he'll

end up teaching - as long as he's

teaching.

'Tin kind of a vagabond," Joyner

said "Life is so full of experiences I

want to experience as much ss I

can."

Joyner. who said be believes Ms

emotional involvement in politics in

the late 1970s and early 1980s contributed

to the breakup of his first

marriage, married Diane Foster last

summer

turntoPaoaJ2

Fire lanes

considered

#» , • • —

for township

By Susan Buck

staff writer

The Canton Public Safety Department

will soon report on the practicality

and cost of placing fire lane

signs in subdivisions throughout the

township.

John Santomauro, public safety director,

was going to make a report

at Tuesday's regularly scheduled

Canton Township Board meeting.

Instead Santomauro has requested

a two-week delay and removal of the

item from the township board meeting

agenda, pending the return of

Capt. Art Winkel, fire marshal, from

vacation.

THREE WEEKS ago, the Sunflower

Subdivision Homeowners As-

sociation contacted Santomauro

about placing fire lane signs in the

subdivision, which is located north of

Warren Road and west of Canton

Center Road.

"They were concerned that with

cars parking on both sides of the

street, a fire truck would be unable

to get down their road." Santomauro

said.

At the last township board meeting

earlier this month, Santomauro

presented an administrative report

recommending fire lanes throughout

the township.

"I don't want to provide a quick

solution," be said. "We may not have

to go into every subdivision in Can-

Please turn to Page 2

CEP tools stolen

during vacation

By Susan Buck

staff writer

Thieves apparently were busy daring

summer vacation at Centennial

Education Park, according to police

reports filed Friday.

Thirty brand new power wood saw

blades, valued at 13,000, were reported

stolen from Plymouth Canton

High School's construction lab. along

with almost $2,000 worth of tools

and specialized equipment reported

stolen from Plymouth Salem High

School.

No forcible entry was noted at either

school.

SOMEONE SHOT out the screen

to the money machine at Community

Federal Credit Union in the New

Towne Plaza at Ford and Sheldon

with a BB gua Saturday, causing

$1,000 damage to the machine

About $4,400 of inventory was

stolen from two sheds owned by Gordon

Food Service, 41055 Joy Road,

early last week. On one shed, a

square bole big enough to admit a

person was covered by an old. flimsy

piece of paneling which was bent inward.

On a second shed, all door

hinges were reported loose and hinge

pins were replaced with screws

A toolbox and tools valued at

$1,230 were reported stolen early

last week from a residence on Brittany

Street in Canton.

BIN Joyner talks about the old days In potties and the

TC*

- '


2A(C) O&E Thursday. S«ptfnbw 24. 1987

Six Canton teens

volunteered hours

to aid health center

Chris Capaldi and Laura Fanslow,

both of Canton, spent the summer as

teen volunteers for Catherine McAuley

Health Cnetir.

Chris, 15, thought she might like to

be a pediatrician and Laura wanted

to check out a hospital setting to see

if she liked it.

The two were among six teens

from Canton who volunteered at

least four hours a week this summer

for McAuley Health Center. In all, 55

teens donated a total of 2,500 hours.

Other Canton teen volunteers

were Jennifer Miller, Maribeth Nail,

Jennifer Parise, and Tracey Vea.

"I decided to volunteer because I

thought it would be different than

working in a fast food restaurant,"

says Chris. "I thought I could learn

something here."

A sophomore at Plymouth Canton

High, Chris worked Friday mornings

in radiology at St. Joseph Mercy

Hospital transporting patients to and

from treatment She especially enjoyed

her assignment because she

was able to work directly with patients.

"I got to meet a lot of nice, new

Canton

©bseruer

663-670

Published every Monday and Thursday

by Observer & Eccentric Newspapers.

36251 Schoolcraft, Livonia,

Ml 46150. Third-class postage paid

at Livonia, Ml 46151. Address all

mall (subscription, change of address.

Form 3569) to P.O. Box 2428.

Livonia, Ml 48151. Telephone 591-

0500.

HOME DELIVERY SERVICE

Newsstand .... per copy. 25e

Carrier monthly. $2.00

Mail ^. yearty. $40.00

All advertising published in the Canton

Observer is subject to the conditions

stated in the applicable rate

card, copies of which are available

from the advertising department,

Canton Observer. 489 S. Main.

Plymouth, Ml 48170. (313) 459-2700.

The Canton Observer reserves the

right not to accept an advertiser's

order. Observer & Eccentric adtakers

have no authority to bind this

newspaper and only publication of

an advertisement shall constitute final

acceptance of the advertiser's

order.

people. And I got an idea of something

I might like to do."

Her career exploration can be

termed a success because she's still

interested in a medical career. "I

think working with little kids might

be fun — maybe as a pediatrician."

Laura, also a sophomore at Canton

High, helped in the CMHC Child Care

Center, assisting with bottles, diapers

and mealtimes and providing

an extra set of loving hands.

"The kids are fun and cute."

Laura still is not sure about a

medical career being in her future

but she plans to volunteer against

next summer to do more career exploring.

Signup for the fall volunteer program

for adults and teens is under

way. Information sessions will be 10-

11 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 7, and 7-8

p.m. Thursday, Oct. 29, in St. Joseph

Mercy Hospital Education Center on

Huron River Drive in Ypsilanti. To

sign up to attend a session call the

volunteer office at 572-4159.

McAuley operates a, a medical

center on Ford Road in-Canton and

at Ann Arbor Trail and Harvey in

Plymouth.

Chris Capaldi, 15, of Canton transports a patient to radiology

as a summer volunteer at 8L Joseph Mercy Hospital.

Joyner teaches from experience

Continued from Page 1

Diane's daughter. Dara, 15. shares*

the house as does Joyner's son Paul,

10, much of the year.

" Joyner said he's really come to appreciate

family in recent years.

He described the highlight of his

summer — a week-long baseball

luting with his son.

"We drove to Cleveland on a Friday

for a* doubleheader. Saturday,

we drove to Pittsburgh and looked at

the stadium. Sunday was a game in

Philadelphia and we stayed an extra

day for historical tours.

"Tuesday, we went to New York

where the Mets played L.A. Wednesday,

to Boston to play Chicago, and

Thursday we went to Coopers to wn"

Joyner said it isn't likely that he'll

seek political office again - although

he wouldn't rule out that possibility.

"I follow it. I never missed an

election voting."

Carrying a Democratic label is a

big liability here, Joyner conceded.

One big lesson has stood out from

both political and academic experiences.

"I've got a philosophy of politics.

It should be of issues, not personalities.

1 have a right to disagree as

long as I offer a proposal. I think

that's the way criticism should be."

New clothing bank roof approved

Continued from Page J

"I only wish that we had the money

for renovating the entire building,"

board trustee Kathleen Chorbagian

said before the vote approving

the new roof.

In other action taken by the school

board on Sept. 14:

a An out-of-court settlement of

$7,00(T was approved for former

Shop until 9 p.m. on Thursday and Friday

tfnTtt H p.w. Ofi Monday, T

teacher Delores Imbrunone.

The settlement is the result of a

lawsuit Imbrunone filed against the

now defunct Cherry Hill School District,

which was annexed by Wayne-

Westland Community Schools in

1985.

• Accepted donations totaling

$2,200 for the Kids on the Block

project.

The donations from the Westland

THE

FINISHING

TOUCH

Coach' executive

Ms. Barbara Lauder

will be in our store

on September 29

11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Livonia

to help-with your

selections. Choose

from our two

collections of

Coach* handbags...

the Classic and

the Lightweights.

Jacobsons

Rotary Club, Friendship Center and

Haverstick Towing and Storage will

help purchase the intricate puppets

for the anti-discrimination program

for elementary school children.

• Presented Wayne Memorial

High School tennis coach Make Hairbedian

with a plaque honoring him

as Michigan's 1987 Class A Boys

Tennis Coach of the Year. The board

praised Harbedian for "literally restoring"

the school's tennis program

to prominence and cited his 282 career

victories as coach.

Public safety considers

fire lanes for township

Continued from Page 1

ton and do what we have to do in

Sunflower."

TRUSTEE LOREN Bennett said

that the cost for Wayne County to

put up the signs is prohibitive.

Therefore, township officials are

linking into the possibility and liability

of purchasing the signs themselves

and having volunteers put

them up, he said.

"It's a policy decision and a political

decision," Bennett said. "Some

subdivisions are already done. Some

signs may have been put up by the

township, others by the developer."

ACCORDING TO trustee John

Preniczky. Wayne County gave a

$200-per-sign cost estimate for 45

signs.

"We thought that was an outrageous

price to pay," he said. "We can

get a post and sign for $50, cutting

our cost by a quarter."

One possibility is having the Canton

Township purchase the signs and

have the residents put them up,

Preniczky said.

"We're going toJpok at the alternatives."

by PLYMOUTH NURSERY

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own peraonal lifestyle, add equity to your horrfe. and save

you time and money over ami over

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can be designed for low

maintenance, tool

Open: Mon.-Sat. 9-6

Sun. 4 Holidays 10-6

453-5500

1 FREE Design Service

- for our customers.

PLANTING

Cool weathei (t warm soil encour

age roots. Plants will have 2 sea

son of cool weal her and rain be

fore the heat of summer Come in

today ft get started'

PLYMOUTH

NURSERY

ind GARDEN CENTER

9000 Ann Arbor Rd.

Just 7 MUas West of L275

THE NEW «8 GEAR IS HERE

9

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SKI SHOPS

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ON A GREAT SELECTION

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SALE PRICES QOOO THRU MPT. 30 13.240 TOTAL UMTS SS/S7 GEAR

Almanac Warns of Snowy Winter Ahead

Good News for Skiers

GET READY TO SKI NOW

AND SAVE

Emergency!

Community crews face

mock disaster scenario

Bill Walters, industrial risks director for Florida-based Safety

Systems and instructor for Olin Corp.'s three-day training program,

attracted a crowd on onlookers as he ignited several

barrels used in the hands-on disaster drill.

for your Information

• ME AND MY SHADOW

. New Morning School is accepting

registrations for its fall parent-toddler

classes,""Me and My Shadow."

There are limited openings in these

Classes: 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. Fridays

for ages 24-32 months, 10:30 a.m. to

noon Fridays for 30 months and older,

6-7 p.m. Thursdays for ages 2-3.

The Friday classes run Sept. 28 to

Dec. 18..

This introductory preschool class

|s for 2- and 3-year-olds and their

parents. The parent and child participate

in play, planned activities and

parent discussions. A variety of play

equipment will be available. Music,

movement, rhythm, art and language

activities will center on a

weekly theme. Instructor Linda

Zahm has a degree in elementary education

from Wayne State and special

education certifications from

Eastern Michigan. New Morning is

located at 14501 Haggerty Just north

of Schoolcraft in Plymouth Township.

For information call New

Morning School at 420-3331.

• JOB HELP

The Community Employment Ser-

. vice offered through Growth Worfc?

Inc. provides job search assistance

to western Wayne County residents.

Using a computer data base, job

seekers are matched with local employment

opportunities.

Those who wish to register with

the Community Employment Service,

and those employers with job

openings, should call 455-4093.

Growth Works is a non-profit, community-based

organization

• FREE JOB TRAINING

Eligible western Wayne County

residents who are unemployed or under-employed

who wish to obtain job

skills and full-time employment may

register now for free job training

TRTsTaTTIn fheloTTowTng ,*ras

Clerical, accounting computing,

electronics, restaurant occupations,

health occupations, auto repair, photo

typesetting The training Is offered

at the Employment and Training

Center. William D. Ford Vocatiooal

Technical Center of Wayne-

W est land Schools The center is at

36455 Marquette between Newburgh

and Wayne Roads For an appointment

call 595-2314.

• SCOUT FALL ROUNDUP

Fiegel Boy Scout Troop 1539 is

having its Fall Roundup Meetings

are held at 7 30 p m Wednesdays at

Fiegel School on Joy Road at 1-271

For information call Doug Taylor at

455-1It 1

Chore Program has been funded for

1987.

The program is funded by Senior

Alliance and provides assistance

with household maintenance tasks

that may include leaf raking, snow

removal and grass cutting. Persons

must be age 60 or older and live in

Canton. Plymouth or Plymouth

Township. For more information,

call the chore program at 525-8690.

• CANTON BEAUTIFIERS

The Canton Beautification Committee

meets at 7 p.m. the second

Thursday of each month at Canton

Township Hall, Canton Center Road

south of Proctor.

• TOUGH LOVE

Tough Love, a self-help group for

parents troubled by teenage behavior.

meets at 7 p.m. Mondays in the

Faith Community Church on Warren

at Canton Center Road, Canton

• NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH

The Plymouth Police Department

is organizing a Neighborhood Watch

program for city residents. Anyone

interested in becoming involved in

the program may call 453-8600 from

8 a.m. to 5 pro. Monday-Friday. The

program is a protection against residential

break-ins and burglaries

• SENIOR CITIZENS

The Senior Network will answer

questions and help solve problems

for people 60 and older. The program,

provided by the Out-Wayne

County Area Council on Aging, has

information about programs and

services for older people. Call 422-

1052 between 9:30 a m. and 3:30 p.m

Monday-Friday.

• HANDYMEN AVAILABLE

The Plymouth Community Council

on Aaing has senior handymen available

to do work Call 453-1234 10

a.m. to 2 30 p.m.

CHILDREN

The Plymouth Police Department

will fingerprint children ages 3-12

from Plymouth and Plymouth Township

free from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m the

first Saturday of each month Appointments

must be made To partic

ipate, the child must have a parent

or legal guardian present and have a

valid birth certificate to present

when fingerprinted All records will

be turned over to the parent or

guardian. All appointments are on a

first-come"

• COLLEGE BOUND

Tuition assistance, pen

workshops, tutoring aad Joh

support are being offered

Thursday, September 24. 1937 O&E

(CflA

staft photos by STEVE FECHT

Working as a taam, th« firefighter® moved in on the blazing barrels as a aecond group kept a shower of foam aimed at the

fire during the training exercise.

By Sue Mason

staff writer

A chemical mishap that releases

toxic fumes into the air, forcing the

evacuation of residents . . . It's a

scenario that has happened many

times in the past and will happen

again in the future.

Dealing with a hazardous materials

emergency is no simple task.

And for three days last week representatives

of at least 17 communities

got hands-on experience,

thanks to the Olin Corp. of Livonia

The firm, which manufactures a

wide range of industrial chemicals,

staged the training session as part

of its CAER (Community Awareness

and Emergency Response)

program.

"The training is an important

component of Olin's CAER program,

a chemical industry effort

aimed at ensuring that emergency

plans are in effect in all communities

where chemical manufacturing

or warehouse facilities exist

and that those plans are tested reg-

to economically and/or educationally

disadvantaged youth, ages 18-21.

who are interested in enrolling at

Schoolcraft College. A high school

diploma or GED is not required to

qualilfy. For additional information

call Jim Grimmer of Growth Works

in Plymouth at 455-4090 or Barbara

Eupizi at Schoolcraft at 591-6400.

ext. 494.

• FREE JOB TRAINING

Eligible western Wayne County

residents who are unemployed or underemployed

who wish to obtain job

skills and full-time employment may

register now for free job training

this fall in the following areas:

Clerical, accounting/computing,

electronics, restaurant occupations,

health occupations, auto repair, phototypesetting.

The training is offered

at the William D. Ford Vocational/

Technical. Employment and Training

Center of Wayne-Westland

Schools. The center is at 36455 Marquette

between Newburgh and

Wayne Roads For an appointment

call 595-2314.

• COAST GUARD AUXILIARY

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Canton

Flotilla 11-11 meets at 7:30 p.m on

the fourth Tuesday of each month in

Room 2510 of Plymouth Salem High

School on Joy just west of Canton

Center Road Anyone interested in

the organization may attend monthly

meetings

• HELPING ADULTS READ

Plymouth-Canton Community Education

can help adults read. For

more information about Adult Basic

Education, call 451-6555 or 451-6660

Open enrollment. Students can begin

classes at any time.

• NEW HORIZONS

New Horizons, a sharing exchange

for BMtttri. WUl meet toe second

and fourth Fridays of each month

9 30-11 SO a m. at Faith Moravian

Community Church. 46001 Warren

west of Canton Center Road For information,

call Mary at 455-8221

• CANTON HISTORICAL

SOCIETY

Canton Historical Society meets at

7:30 p.m the second Thursday of

each month in the Canton Historical

Society Museum on Canton Center

Road at Proctor.

• MINOR HOME REPAIRS

The Conference of Western Wayne

Minor Home Repair Program has

"'Alliance

Inc for fiscal year 1905. The program

assists homeowners fro and

For information, call

ularly," said Hal Foss. Olin's Livonia

plant manager.

"We use the training like an insurance

policy," added Lee

Nawrocki, Olin's quality assurance

manager "If we do have a problem

here or somewhere in the county,

this training is not only beneficiaL

to us, but to others."

This is the second year Olin's

Livonia plant offered the training,

the result of an "overwhelming response"

to last year's training session.

Nawrocki said

• WE'VE --UPDATED the program

and revised some of the techniques

in" handling chemical disasters."

he said.

The training was not only for 15

of Olin's in-house emergency response

employees, but emergency

care providers like St. Mary Hospital

and fire fighters from Livonia.

Redford, Plymouth, Canton. Garden

City, Westland. Farmington.

Farmington Hills and Southfield

Agencies from Flint, Pontiac.

Lansing. Adrian. Detroit and several

Downriver communities also

1CKEY FREEMAN

Representative

Jim Curry will be here

MEN'S CLOTbING

to assist and guide you

in your Hickey-Freeman

fall winter selections.

Livonia

Friday, September 25

4 p.m. 8 p.m.

Birmingham

Saturday. September 26

11 a m. 4 p.m.

participated.

The training ranged from a review

of lessons learned from handling

major industrial emergencies

and incidents that could have been

easily prevented to a pair of handson

sessions dealing with a leak. .

spill or fire scenario

The training, while geared to

help emergency personnel handle

industrial emergencies, also provided

fire personnel with the minimum

state requirements — 24

hours — for such training at no

cost to the local communities,

Nawrocki said.

01m paid for the cost of the

three-dat session, put on by Safety

Systems, a Florida firm, and hosted

by the Livonia Fire Department.

"This can be a financial burden

on local agencies, so their personnel

don't always get this special- ^

ized training." Nawrocki said. "Our

hope is that they would get this

training so that when they respond,

they respond with the knowledge of ?

how to handle such emergencies.

"WITH MORE emphasis on

Jacobsons

Stwf entil § f.m . sa Thursday aad

UMilpa « Tuesday. Wsdnesda* aad Saturday

training and awareness the greater

the possibility of minimizing the

problem of an emergency "

Olin takes its handling of chemicals

seriously Not only does it offer

programs like the one last

week, it also maintains OCEAN

(Olin Corp Emergency Action Network).

OCEAN is an advanced communications

network designed to provide

quick and accurate information

around the clock and throughout

the year in the event of an

emergency.

The network includes fully

equipped mobile disaster teams

that can assist with a chemical

emergency The teams are strategically

located throughout the country.

so that it takes only four hours

to get to a disaster site. Nawrocki

said. The team for Olin's Livonia

plant is based in Ohio, he added

The firm already has begun

planning next year's session to offer

additional training to keep

emergency personnel up to date.

Nawrocki said.


4A


6A(P.C) O&E Thursday, September 24. 1987

recreation news

• PUNT, PASS, KICK

Canton Parks and Recreation will

sponsor its sixth annual Punt, Pass

and Kick Cbritest starting with registration

at 9:30 a.m. Saturday. Oct. 3,

at Griffin Park for ages 8-13. Each

participant will try one pass, punt,

and kick with efforts judged on distance

and accuracy. Awards are given

to the top finishers in all six age

groups. Participants must wear tennis

shoes only. Local winners will

represent Canton in Metro-Detroit

regionals on Sunday, Oct. 25. in Canton

Township.

• DANCE AEROBICS

The Women's Association of the

First Presbyterian Church of Plymouth

is sponsoring Dance Aerobics

sessions through Nov. 19. Classes

will meet Mondays and Thursdays

with Beginning Dgiice Aerobics 5:30-

6:10 p.m. and Continuing Dance

Aerobics 6:30-7:30 "p.m. at the

church. Babysitting is available. The

charge is $36 for 20 classes or $20

for 10 classes. Class size is limited to

30. For registration or information

call Ann Van Wagoner at 459-9485.

• AEROBIC FITNESS

Dance and exercise to fitness this

fall with Aerobic Fitness classes at

St. John Episcopal Church in Plymouth

on Sheldon south of Ann Arbor

Trail. Morning and evening classes

are offered at all levels six days a

week. Child care is available in the

morning. Sessions run for six weeks.

For schedules and additional information.

call 348-1280.

• AEROBIC FITNESS

Get fit this fall with an aerobic

dance/exercise program aimed at

flexibility, toning and cardio-vascular

conditioning. Morning classes

will be in St. Michael Lutheran

Church on Sheldon in Canton. Child

care is available. For schedule and

additional information call 348-1280.

• SENIOR EXERCISE

A program is under way for a

class in senior citizen exercise. Anyone

55 and older can participate in

an hour of fun and exercise for an

annual membership of $7. For information

on dates and times, call Linda

Gooldy, director of The SAL

Plymouth Community Center, 9451

S. Main. 453-5464.

• SENIOR RECREATION

THERAPY

Seniors with Physical Restrictions

for Enrichment and Enjoyment

(SPREE), co-sponsored by Wayne

County Therapeutic Recreation Program

and Canton Seniors, is planning

activities such as crafts (modifled

to meet special needs), movies,

exercise (good for arthritis) and day

trips.

Plymouth-Canton residents 55 and

older who experience limited mobility

due to severe arthritis, injury, illness,

frailty, etc., are eligible to participate

The group will meet 9:30-

11:30 a.m. every Tuesday at the

Canton Recreation Center, 44237

Michigan Ave. at Sheldon. There is

no fee. Call for a reservation at 397-

1000, ext. 278. Lunch is available by

making reservation at least 24 hours

in advance by calling 397-1000, ext.

278. For those 60 and older, there is

a suggested donation of $1 for lunch;

younger people pay $2.80. Bus service

is available to Canton residents

only by calling Nankin Transit the

Friday before at 729-2710 or 729-

2711. Cost is $1 each way.

• BALLET, JAZZ, TAP

Basic ballet positions, basic techniques

of modern jazz and introduc-

Model 535X

tion to basic steps of tap dancing are

being offered through the city of

Plymouth Parks and Recreation.

Ballet lessons will be at various

times on Wednesdays beginning Oct.

7 in the Cultural Center for ages 3*i-

5. 6-9. and 9-12. Modern jazz classes

will be 6-7 p.m. Wednesdays starting

Oct. 7 in the Cultural Center for ages

7-13. Tap will be 5:30-6 p.m. for ages

5-8 and 6:30-7 p.m. Wednesdays

suiting Oct. 7 and running 11 weeks

in the Cultural Center. Register with

the recreation department between

8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through

Friday in the Cultural Center. Theodore

at Farmer.

• MEN'S BASKETBALL-

Canton Parte and Recreation is

sponsoring another 10-week session

of Men's Recreation Night Basketball

from 6:45-9:45 p.m. Wednesdays,

beginning Oct. 7. at Eriksson ElemenUry

School in Canton. The

charge-is $10 for 10 weeks. Register

in person or by mail to Canton Parks

and Recreation. 1150 S. Canton Center

Road. Canton. Mich. 48188.

• MAIN STREET CLOGGERS

Main Street Cloggers. a familyoriented

group, is offering beginning

clogging classes on Monday nights.

Clogging is easy to learn and a fun

way to exercise. Call Linda Summers

261-7958 for more information.

• FALL FLY-IN

Flying Pilgrims Model Airplane

Club will hold its "Fall Fly for Fun

Phase Out" from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 26. 27, at

Van Born and Lilley roads in Canton.

There will be monoplane minimum

80 inches, biplane minimum 60 inches,

and giant sized jets. SpecUtors

welcome.

• POLISH DANCING

Mala Wisla Dance Ensemble is accepting

registration for classes beginning

in September. Classes held in

the Plymouth, Canton area for children

between the ages of 3 and 18.

For more information, call 522-5375

or 277-1726.

• INTRODUCTION TO

SOCCER

An introductory soccer class for

women teaches the basics of the

game. Students will not only learn

the rules but also will participate in

actual soccer drills. This class is ideal

for mothers of children just suiting

soccer. Classes will be for adults

6:30-8:30 p.m. on Mondays beginning

Nov. 2 for stx weeks at Central Middle

School. Pee is $15. Register with

city of Plymouth Parks and Recreation

in the Cultural Center, Theodore

at Farmer.

• WOMEN'S SOCCER

Women's soccer teams now are

forming for the fall season. For

more information call Canton Recreation

Department at 397-1000.

• INDOOR SOCCER

Indoor soccer will be offered 10-11

a.m. Saturdays in the Salvation

Army Community Center, 9451 Main

south of Ann Arbor Road, Plymouth.

The fee is $35 for eight weeks. Mario

Said, a sUte-licensed Class D soccer

coach, will teach the fundamenUls

of soccer. For information, call Linda

at 453-5464.

• GOLF

Learn the basic skills of the game

at Dun Rovin Golf Course on Thursdays

beginning Oct. 1 for ages 8-13

from 5-6 p.m. and 14 and older 6-7

p.m. Fee is $25 for four lessons.

Golfer must purchase a bucket of

Clearance

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balls for each lesson. Register with

city of Plymouth Parks and Recreation.

• OPEN QYM

The Western Wayne County

Therapeutic Recreation program invites

families with handicapped

members to the Salvation Army's

gym on Main Street in Plymouth 6-0

p.m. every Saturday. For more information,

call 397-5110. Ext. 298.

• WALKING CLUB

Plymouth Community Family

YMCA sponsors a walking club for

Plymouth. Canton and NorthvUle

residents. The club meets the first

Monday of each month at 4 p.m in

Northville Township Hall meeting

room at 41600 Six Mile. For information,

call the YMCA, 453-2904.

Mondays, meet at 7 p.m. behind

the YMCA office on Union St.; Thursdays

at 7:45 p.m., meet at the YMCA

office and go to Kellogg Park to listen

to the Plymouth Community

Band and then go for a group walk

after the concert.

• ROLLER SKATING _

Roller skating lessons are offered

at Ska tin' SUtion in Canton through

city of Plymouth Parks and Recreation.

Lessons for ages 14 and

younger will be 10:15-11 a.m. Saturdays

for eight weeks at $16. Register

weekdays during working hours at

tbe Plymouth Cultural Center.

• YOUTH BIKERS

A Youth Biking Club, sponsored by

the Plymouth Community Family

YMCA. will travel to different destinations.

There are two age groups,

grades" three-six meeting twice a

week and grades seven-nine meeting

three times a week, from 9 a.m. to 3

p.m. Youth meet at the YMCA office

and travel different destinations

each day. Youths should bring their

own bicycle, sack lunch, beverage

and rain gear. To register, call 453-

2904.

• RACQUETBALL,

WALLEYBALL

Plymouth-Canton Community Education

offers racquetball and wallyball

6:30-9:30 p.m. Monday^ through

Friday, 8 a.m. to noon, and 1-2 p.m.

Saturday, 1-4 p*m. Sundays, at Plymouth

Canton High Phase HI. Block

times of 18 weeks are available at

$76 each. For information, call 451-

6660.

• TABLE TENNIS CLUB

A Table Tennis Club meets 6:30-9

p.m. each, Wednesday at Central

Middle School. For information, call

455-6620.

• ISSHINRYU KARATE

Isshinryu Karate classes, sponsored

by Canton Parks and Recreation,

will be 7:30-9 p.m. Mondays

and Thursdays for ages 8-50 in the

Canton Recreation Center, Michigan

Avenue at Sheldon. Sam Santilli,

fifth degree black belt instructor,

will instruct for all levels of karate.

The charge is $35 for 10 weeks of

classes. Registration is on a continual

basis prior to classes on Monday

or Thursday evenings or at the Canton

Recreation Center.

• JUDO

Judo classes for beginners and ad*

vanced will be offered at 2 p.m. Saturdays,

6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Mondays

in the Salvation Army Community

Center, 9451 S. Main, Plymouth.

The fee will be $35 for the 10-week

sessions of lVb hours per session. For

deUils, call Linda at 453-5464.

• JUDO AND KARATE

A serious study of one of the oldest

forms of self-defense to Improve

self-discipline, confidence and physical

fitness is being offered by Plymouth

Recreation Department in tbe

Cultural Center at various times on

Thursdays beginning Oct 1 for 11

weeks for ages 6-13 and 14 and older

at a fee of $30. Register during

working hours on weekdays at tbe

Cultural Center.

• HATHA YOGA

Reduce stress and dally tensions,

strengthen and tone muscles and alleviate

muscle soreness with Hatha

Yoga classes open to all levels from

beginners to advanced 7-8:30 p.m.

Tuesdays for eight weeks beginning

Oct 6 in the Plymouth Cultural Center,

offered by Plymouth Parks and

Recreation. Fee is $30. Register

from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays at

the Cultural Center, Theodore at

Farmer.

• OPEN ICE SKATING

Tbe fall open skating scheduled at

Plymouth Cultural Center, 525

Farmer, is as follows:

Mondays, 1-2:35 p.m. and 7-8 p.m

(75 cents); Tuesdays, 8:30-10:40 a.m.,

1-2:40 p.m, 3:50-5:50 p.m.; Wednesdays,

8:30-9:30 ajn., 1-3:20 p.m.;

Thursdays, 8:30-11:40 a.m., 1-2:50

p.m., 3:50-5:20 p.m.; Fridays, 8:30-

11:40 a.m., 1-2 p.m. (75 cents), 7-9

p.m.; Sundays, noon to 1:30 p.m.,

1:30-3 p.m.

Fees are $1.25 for adults, $1 for

children. 50 cents for skate renul.

Tbe hours are subject to change.

# 0&E Classifieds work! • 0&E Classifieds workl #

How can a renter insure peace of mind?

No problem.

Auto-Owners Apartment Dwellers coverage protects the contents

of your apartment from loss due to theft, vandalism, fire,

water, wind and other losses. It also covei s you and your family

in case something happens to your apartment. Ask your "no

problem" Auto-Owners agent about renter's Insurance for your

peace-of-mind.

TERRY JOBBITT

IT'S TRUE

They use those logs to

make the paper we use to

print your . . .

• Advertising Pieces

• Newspapers

• Brochures

• Business Cards and Stationery

AND MUCH MORE!

Scratch Pads 10'

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Farmington* 478-1177

IT'S INTERESTING

IT'S EXCITING

IT'S STREET SCENE

Read tl every Monday

Thursday. 24. 1987 OitE + 7 A

Joins staff 1 New jail space coming — one way or other

Dr. Suzanne C. 8wsnson

an obeletrlclan-gynecologtet

at M-CARE Health Center

on Ulley Juat south of

Ann Arbor Road In Plymouth

Township. Swaneon, who

earned her degree in medicine

from the University of

lows, recently completed

her poetgrsdusts education

in obetetrice and gynecology

at the University of lows

hospitals and din ice.

Cigarette tax hike

called to fight AIDS

LANSING. Mich. (AP) - Michigan

should raise its cigarette tax to help

fund an $86.4 million effort to treat

impoverished AIDS victims and

fight tobacco use, a sUte senator

says.

Sen. William Seder burg, K-East

Lansing, Thursday unveiled a 10-

"V>int package of legislation linking

tbe two health issues and allocating

975.3 million for tbe AIDS effort. Of

that, |48 million would pay for treatment

of AIDS patienU without insurance

or ineligible for government

aid.

Another $15.3 million would pay

for free confidential testing and

counseling for every person in the

sUte, while $4 million would be

spent on AIDS education, including

sending a packet of information

about tbe fatal disease to every

Michigan household.

SEDERBURG SAID be decided to

fund the AIDS programs and tbe

anti-tobacco effort with tobacco Uxes,

including a 6-cent a pack increase

in tbe sUte cigarette tax, because

"over 50 percent of tbe diseases

we spend billions of dollars

treating are preventable."

"I think it's wholly appropriate

that revenues from these disease

causers go to disease prevention and

risk reduction," he said.

Sederburg. who chairs the Senate

Health Policy Committee, said that

universal testing would conflict with

" tbe advice of medical officials who

say tests need only be given to highrisk

groups — homosexuals, bisexual

men and intravenous drug users.

However, be said free voluntary

testing would be tbe best way to e

courage the estimated 15,000 Micl

gan residents who are infected wt

the AIDS virus to be tested.

SINCE THE deadly acquired it

mane deficiency syndrome has I

cure, the only way to stop its spre»

is to encourage those with AIDS

change their behavior, be said.

"With AIDS on the borixon, it

imperative that tbe Legislature «

Ublish a network of education, we!

ness and prevention programs

fight tbe spread of AIDS, cancer u

other catastrophic, but prevenUbl

diseases.

"Currently, we spend less than

percent of our health care dollars«

prevention. It is time now to fee

our efforts toward limiting heat

care expenses down the road."

SEDERBURG "S PLAN calls f

raising the sUte tax on cigarett

from 21 cents a pack to 27 cenl

which would raise some $72 millkx

It also would impose a 10-cent p

ounce tax on smokeless tobao

products and bulk tobacco, andplai

a new penny tax on small cigars ai

a nickel on large cigars. Those us

would raise some $14.4 million.

If the cigarette tax goes to I

cents, Michigan would join Hawi

and Massachusetts as having tbe n

tion's highest levy.

The package includes measures

discourage smoking by strengthe

ing the sUte's "Clean Indoor A

Act," banning smoking in schoc

and day care centers'and elimiw

ing billboard advertising for smok

less tobacco.

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1840 West Maple Road • 2 Miles West of Haggerty

Waled Lake

«y Wayne Peal

staff writer .

5 , Wayne County Commissioners

^ave two choices when it comes to a

recently-proposed $6 million expan-

"sion project for the county jail. They

can approve building the new jail annex

or wait for a judge to order it

Chief Wayne County Circuit Judge

Richard Kaufman indicated in court

Monday he might order the county to

.build new jail cells if the county

commission didn't approve expansion

plans by Monday, Oct. S.

One local commissioner said she

didn't believe a court order would be

necessary.

"My feeling is this is going to be

-approved." commissioner Susan

" tteiotz. R-Northville Township, said.

V'U's an excellent plan "

Others commissioners, however,

said they wondered where the county

T would find money to build new jail

cells.

"My biggest question is how are

we going to pay for it," commission-

-Oi

lor.

!>

er Milton Mack. D-Wayne, said. "It's

najtecret the county's broke."

Added commissioner Kay Beard.

D-Inkster "I don't think we have any

' objections other than how it's going

to be financed."

* ' MONEY FROM the sale of the

former Wayne County General Hospital.

as well as other sources, could

i-'-« - "

Installation Special

Will insulate any

home up to 1000 Square Ft.

tor* 795

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We're winning

the race against

Rheumatic

Heart

Disease.

Today, thanks partly to

the efforts of the American

Heart Association, the death

rate from rheumatic heart

disease has declined more

than 70 percent since 1950.

For decades, the

American Heart

Association's educational

programs have taught parents

about the dangers and

prevention of rheumatic

fever and rheumatic heart

disease in young children

Support the American

Heart Association We're

fighting for your life.

American Heart

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of MchlQOT 1

WFRE FIGHTING

FOP VOUR Lift

AOmiadWo»Agencv

be Lapped for tbe jail expansion, according

to Deputy County Executive

Michael Duggan.

"There are a number of ways we

could go," be said "We're looking at

the U.S. Marshal's program and at

federal drug money, too."

The recent Reagan drug bill establishes

grants to build prison space

for drug offenders. The county also

receives a fee for jailing U.S. Marshal's

prisoners.

Approximately $7.5 million is

available through the hospital's sale

to a private medical consortium.

Duggan said.

Beard, though, said her own esUmates

placed the hospital sale revenue

closer to 96 million. "We clearly

need hard numbers on bow this (the

jail expansion) is going to be paid

for." she said.

Design options, including reducing

the proposed three new gymnasiums,

would help reduce cost. Duggan said

•Otherwise, there would have to

be additional deputies to ride tbe elevators

with prisoners to gymnasiums.-

he said. "The design we're us-'

ing will save $700,000 a year in manpower

costs."

Tbe project would cost $12,000 per

cell. Duggan said, roughly $30,000

below tbe national average.

THE EXPANSION plan was ratified

Monday by county executive

Edward McNamara, sheriff Robert

Ficano and attorneys representing

jail inmates.

It involves a new six story wing on

Gratiot and converting an unused

13th floor gymnasium at tbe current

jail for cells. Space would be provided

for as many as 470 new prisoners.

Some county officials, however,

doubted whether that many new

prisoners would ever be housed at

the jail.

• "I think once the (state) department

of corrections gets through

with looking at the plans, the number

will probably be closer to 370,"

Ficano. said. "Still, it's an improvement

over what we have."

Ficano. however, said expanding

the jail shouldn't prompt other county

officials into believing jail overcrowding

had been fully corrected

"I still say we need a jail for misdemeanor

offenders." he said. "I

don't think the new jail buildling

should lull anyone into a false sense

of security that we have all the jail

space we're going to need."

Mack agreed jail overcrowding

wouldn't be finished as a major

county issue.

"It's almost a rule of nature that

once you build new jail cells, they

fill up fast," he said. "At some point,

we're going to have to take a look at

\ the courts and at what kind of pris-

^ oners are being sent to jail. It seems

to me that jail should be the place

for dangerous, violent felons."

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«A*» O&E Thursday. September 24. 1967

» - 4

t I i

J

L

i-

/

LAURA CASTLE/BUN photographer

P IN A PRESS conference Monday,

the musicians said they were

willing to "talk and play" once

their contract expired Sept 13.

But, said DSO violinist Stacey

Woolley. they were told by management

on Sept. 11 that once the

contract expired their pay would

be cut by 11 percent.

The minimum pay for the 104

musicians is $910 a week or

147.320 a year. Most make above

the minimum.

"Never before in the history of

DSO had wage concessions ever

been considered," said Woolley,

who is serving as media spokesman

for the musicians.

Woolley said the musicians

weren't told of the concession pro-

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"WE HAVE offered to play and

talk under terms of the current

contract," he said. But be said they

consider the immediate 11 percent

cut to be tantamount to a lockout.

"By imposing an ultimatum,

they have obliterated the old contract,"

he said "We have nothing."

Woolley blamed orchestra management

for low attendance and

endowments. He criticized a "most

dangerous policy" of what he

called an over reliance on/tate and

city grants.

He said tbe proper way to Tight a

deficit was not to slash musicians'

wages

"Attracting and retaining quality

musicians is not unrelated to

wage^ and benefits," be said.

MANAGEMENT. CITING

1986-87 deficit of at least $1 million.

had planned to exclude music

director Gunther Herbig from the

pay cut. Herbig. according to the

symphony, said he would share in

any reduction of musicians' salaries.

Woolley said Monday that Her

big had agreed to a reduction only

if the musicians also accepted a

pay cut.

This is not the first time that

concerts have been canceled because

of labor-management strife

In 1975. concerts were silenced for

nine weeks. In 1982. nine concerts

were canceled A strike was nar

rowly averted in 1985.

Negotiations "have never been

easy," said Woolley.

Mon.-Fri. ft-5 Sat. 9-2

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il pis an J to annouiict that Li 3 ton

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(R.W.Q-9A)»11A

'Reading revolution' is on its wa

By Wayne Paal

staff writer

Changes in state achievement

tests will revolutionize the way

Michigan youngsters learn to read,

local educators said. -

Michigan Educational Assessment

Program (MEAP) reading tests are

being revised to measure bow well

students understand what they read,

not how well they master reading

skills.

The new tests are expected to

have a far-reaching effect once

they're given to fourth, seventh and

10th graders, beginning in 1989.

This will definitely change the

way reading is being taught because

the MEAP test is the standard upon

which a curriculum is built," said

Richard Witkowski. who supervises

achievement testing in the Garden

City Schools.

Since the mid-1970s, tbe MEAP

test has stressed individual reading

skills by asking students to find topic

sentences and identify supporting

statements in passages the students

read. That will change.

"What's new is that what they're

doing is looking) at reading as a process

not as a collection of individual

skills," said Kenneth Johnson, director

of instruction for tbe Redford

Union schools -

IN AUTOMOTIVE terms, the new

tests will determine whether students

understand bow a car is built

not wbether\they know what's done

at each step along the assembly line.

For the first time, students' prior

knowledge will also be taken into account

Experts said the new tests can

draw distinctions between poor

readers and good readers who are

unfamiliar with the subject matter.

"For example, Bristish students

will understand a story about cricket

much more easily than American

Environmentalist

heads county DPW

Friends of the Rouge president

James Murray has been appointed

Wayne County public works director

County executive Edward

McNamara announced Murray's appointment

Monday, though Murray

was long rumored to be the leading

candidate for the job. Murray assumes

his new duties Sunday, Nov. 1.

He replaces current director James

Hamilton, who is retiring.

"I feel like the hometown boy who

has just been signed by the Detroit

DETROIT

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Murray has been Washtenaw

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1981 and was last elected in 1984.

He is best known locally for his efforts

in helping direct Rouge River

cleanup activities.

In his new post, Murray will also

oversee all storm water and sanitary

sewers in the county and supervise

the Wyandotte Wastewater Treatment

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12A don't always have the time and

cars to travel out to state recreation areas. -

OAKLAND COUNTY has shown what can be

done Its parkland toUls more than 4,000 acres

— which is almost exactly the amount Wayne

Parks are part of the quality of life.

And it's clear that we need

parkland close to home because

we don't always have the time and

cars to travel out to state recreation

areas.

County has in the western suburbs and Ham-

tramck.

In addition, however, Oakland has two waveaction

swimming pools, giant water slides, a

dome-covered driving range, a nature interpretive

center and therapeutic recreation for physically

handicapped people. And for kids who can t

be driven out to parks in summer, it has a mobile

recreation fleet with clowns and puppets

The chief difference between the counties is

that Oakland made a conscious commitment.

First of all, its people voted a quarter-mill of

property Ux. Oakland's park money is guaranteed

not subject to anyone's budget ax. In

Wayne, parks must compete for dollars with dozens

of other county activities.

But Uxes aren't the only financing option

Oakland also set up a separate parks board It

sought ways to produce revenue. It set up a private

foundation to help with capiUl improvements

and kids' camping. All of these ideas could

easily be tried in Wayne County.

WAYNE COUNTY could have a tenific park

system Its 4,200 parkland acres include small

lakes, bike paths, hiking trails, a Detroit River

boat launch and a golf course

people in Wayne County doaarv* a clpar dm-

sion

Either a commitment to the parks.

Or euthanasia.

But let's not neglect them to death

Atmosphere of fear

stifles our society

"GEE, DAD, HOW come we're the

only place that closed up the pope in

glass?" my daughter asked.

"What's the matter with us?"

Uncomfortably. I shifted in my

chair. The kid had me. Actually, she

had us all pinpointed. Dead center.

I could only stumble for an answer.

Here was one of the world's shepherds

of peace coming to our city,

and we put the guy in a glass cage

and surround him with so many security

guards that few could get

close enough to really see him.

This very short conversation took

place as we watched the pope make

his promised visit to the Indians of

the Fort Simpson area in the Northwest

Territories of Canada. The contrast

of his Canadian visit to the one

he made in Detroit was revealing.

It dramatically demonstrates that

lor all our technological accomplishments.

we have failed in our quest to

become a more civilized society.

Unfortunately, most Americans

missed the Fort Simpson visit. Many

who have access to Canadian television

didn't tune in. Our parochial nationalism

does sometimes get in tbe

way.

BUT THOSE OF US who did

watch learned an important lesson.

Having a 12-year-old daughter to interpret

made that lesson clear.

Fort Simpson is an isolated stop-

from our readers

Want a pool?

best to buy one

Here was one of the

world's shepherds of

peace coming to our

city, and we put the

guy in a glass cage and

surround him with so

many security guards

that few could get

close enough to really

see him.

To the editor

So now we have a group wanting the Ux payers

to buy them a swimming pool because Murray

Lake and Colony Swim Club have a waiting list

and cost more than some of them wish to pay, all

the area lakes are too far away, and they are too

lazy to clean a pool in their own yard.

Therefore, ail taxpayers, whether they would

ever use a pool or not, are supposed to finance

one for the elites. We are already paying higher

Uxes than ever for their elaborate schools.

Our kids went to plain, simple schools and did

all their swimming at the school pools, those

faraway lakes,- or with their friends who had

pools. We didn't demand welfare assisUnce from

the Uxpayers for our entertainment. Of course,

if we are going to raise Uxes to build a pool for a

certain few, than raise them enough to build a

bowling alley for those of us who like to bowl.

The public ones are too far away and too crowded.

If these people want a pool they should put

their little pennies together and build one for

their own private use — their own swim club If

you people want a pool, buy it. Don't expect all of

us who have no use for a pool to buy your toys.

That's more than we care to pay.

Now ready for

senior respite

over about 300 miles south of the

Arctic Circle. The pope was making

a promised visit after having been

fogged out three years ago.

Some of the Indians walked hundreds

of miles to make this mystical

rendezvous. Others drove over pitted

gravel roads for up to 20 hours.

Many spent their life savings to

charter a boat or airplane to transport

entire families.

And the meeting was touching.

The pope mingled easily among

these people, many of whom still

worship the sanctity of the animals,

trees and earth. Most have few material

goods, their education is

meager and opportunities few.

In our society many would consider

them disadvantaged, if not primitive.

D. Davison,

Plymouth

To the editor

I want to express our thanks and appreciation

Steve

Barnaby

But the pope didn't have to worry

about his Ufe among these people

There was no glass cage. It wasn't

needed. He sat and talked with the

leaders and walked freely among the

people

WHAT I SHOULD have told my

daughter was that this generation

has reneged on the commitment it

made to itself and the rest of society

during those stormy seasons two

decades ago

After all, we're the generation

that » lustily pointed its fingers at

previous ones for failing society. We

would do better when it came our

turn to grab the reins of power, we

told ourselves

But we've turned on ourselves and

devoured our own dream. Now we

must find a way to escape the polished

glass cage of fear in which we

are trapped.

to the Observer for its very fine article on Sept.

3, regarding our new Respite Services.

We hope that these programs will help to minimize

the physical and emotional strains families

face when caring for a frail, older relative. Unfortunately,

we were not as ready as we should

have been to receive and answer the large number

of inquiries that followed the article. Many

people were confused when they called because

they were referred to other offices within Child

and Family Service. We want to apologize to "all

of you and assure you that if you call us at 453-

0890 (Plymouth Family Service) we will have

someone return your call, directly to you.

I also want to add that since tbe article

appeared we have found a central location, hired

sUff, and extended our proposed hours of operation

to 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. People attending the

Day Center may attend any number of fours

within that time, and may attend any number of

days between Mondays and Fridays, depending

on their needs and interests. For more information

about In-Home respite or the services of the

Day Center, please call us at our Plymouth office.

David Breedea,

branch supervisor,

Plymouth Family Service

keeping up

with government

©bserutr & tEcrrntric Ssruispapers

Steve Barnaby managing editor

Susan Ftosfefc assistant managing editor

Dick I sham general manager

Richard Brady advertising manager

Fred Wright circulation manager

LOOKING FOR information about state government?

The League of Women Voters has a

toll-free telephone service (1-800-292-5823) that

may be helpful.

The telephone is answered from 10 30 a.m. to

3:30 p.m. weekdays.

Suburban Communications Corp

Philip Power chairman of the board

Richard Aginian president

points of view

Where beauty reigns

Now that the ghost of Michelangelo

has arrived oo schedule with the

autumnal equinox to begin tbe annual

assignment of tinting tbe billions

of leaves in Michigan's forests, it's

time for you to take a look at some

of nature's workshops

Many of us who have wandered

the length and breadth of our wondrous

state have determined a favorite

site to which we return many

~times, perhaps right close to home.

After all, how could it be otherwise

when there is so much to choose

from among some 3,000 miles of

shoreline and more than 10,000 inland

lakes?

"America the Beautiful" is just

that, startlingly spectacular in Godgiven

assets from sea to shining sea,

and you are* living in one of the

jewels. The farther north you go, the

more it glitters. However, you can't

capture the entire essence of "up

north" in one day, it grows on one.

season after season.

There are those who idolize the

Lake Huron shore, Mackinac Island,

Tahquamenon Falls and the wilderness

of the Upper Peninsula, the

great fruit orchards of the southwest

corner, the streams and rivers following

old Indian trails that now are

interstate highways, to say nothing

of the splendid attractions offered in

tbe Huron-Clinton Metropark system.

But at our house, all of that is considered

a dead heat for second place

We opt for the northwest corner of

the lower peninsula, by which I

mean everything beyond M-115 that

runs from Clare to Frankfort, and

west of 1-75 stretching from Clare to

the bridge.

Mother Goose and I thought that

over the years we had seen it all:

lakes such as Crystal, Glen. Torch

and Elk; tbe harbors at Frankfort,

Leland, Traverse City and Harbor

Springs; the shops of North port,

Charlevoix and Petoskey, the musical

magnificence of Interlochen; the

uniqueness of Gwen Frostic's River

Road nature center south of Benzonia,

plus a thousand and one other

lures to touristic adventure.

But we had not.

# 1

through

•L, bifocals -

Jfirf Fred

DeLano

IF YOUR NORTHERN color tour

in October Ukes you in the vicinity

of the 71,000-acre Sleeping Bear

Dune National Lakeshore, make tbe

7.4-mile Pierce Stocking Scenic

Drive part of your itinerary. Sure,

we had been to the dunes before, but

something new has been added, and

it's worth your time to discover it.

Pierce Stocking spent his youth

working as a lumberman in Michigan's

forest He loved the woods and

spent most of his spare time there,

developing a self-taught knowledge

of nature. He used to walk the bluffs

above Lake Michigan, awed by the

view of the dunes, the lake and the

islands.

To share this beauty with others,

he conceived the idea of a road to the

top of the dunes. Stocking first

opened such a road in 1967 and continued

to operate it until his death at

the age of 68 in 1976.

Tbe National Park Service carried

out a major road rehabilitaUon

project in 1986, resurfacing and widening

tbe road, developing large

parking areas, and building overlook

spots to park and enjoy absolutely

breathtaking views of what nature

ha« carved in tbe estimated 11,800

years since the glacier melted.

At one of these, where we stood in

August, the viewer is 450 feet above

T-ako Michigan. If the visibility is

good, it is possible to make out Point

Betsie. 15 miles to the-south as the

crow flies. To the west, it is 54 miles

across the lake to Wisconsin.

I can just imagine that when tbe

color season reaches its peak, the

beech, maple and pine forests surrounding

all this will be as ablaze

with gold as tbe sun itself.

Offhand. I know of just one comparable

view in that part of tbe

sute. It's tbe one to be had looking

down at Torch Lake from tbe first

-tee at A-Ga-Ming Golf Club, somewhere

between Elk Rapids and Eastport.

But I've vowed not to turn this into

a golf yarn, for that would necessitate

telling of how a friendly vacation

match turned into financial disaster

for an ex-schoolmaster named

Earl Gibson. I hope be found the

view to be worth every penny of it

Thursday. S*pfmt>f 24. 1967 O&E

Musings

(P.Q13A

Thoughts on a turnpike and on tour

AW. NOT HERE, too, I said to

myself as I watched the dark blue

car careen along tbe Massachusetts

Turnpike.

I insist, with authority, that

southeastern Michigan drivers are

among the world's rudest, and last

week it appeared tbe Motor City's

disease had spread 700 miles east to

the Bay SUte.

Tbe driver was exceeding the

speed limit, darting between lanes

without «ignallingr passing on the

right and Uilgating at 70 mph in order

to intimidate drivers ahead.

The dark blue car burst into tbe

clear. The plate said "Michigan,"

and the dealer's Ug said "Wayne."

Tbe idiot was one of ours! Thus, tbe

world's most boorish drivers continue

to hail from metropolitan Detroit.

Toledo and Windsor.

OUR BOSTON tour guide said

Paul Revere unfairly got all the

credit for warning the patriots in

Lexington and Concord, but others

actually delivered tbe first warning

that April night in 1775 because

Revere was briefly captured

"Paul Revere had a better press

agent," said Frank, our guide. "Can

you imagine Longfellow writing a

poem that sUrts, 'Listen, my children,

and you shall bear/Of the midnight

ride of Dr. Samuel Cartwright

and Billy Dawes'?"

Tim

^ Richard

Frank was correct. We remember

Revere today largely because of

Longfellow's stirring verse.

We also cherish ^ frigate called

"Constitution" because of a poem by

a student named Oliver Wendell

Holmes. After seeing distinguished

service against the Barbary pirates

and in the War of 1812, the wooden

sailing ship was about to be scrapped

in 1830 when Holmes penned "Old

Ironsides," with the ironic words:

"Aye, tear her batter'd ensign

down. > r

I recited the line from memory

lsat week on the 200th anniversary

of the U.S. Constitution as I stood on

the deck of Old Ironsides. It's now

safely docked in Charles town Navy

Yard, a stone's throw from where

Reveres row boat landed.

Having read neither "Paul

Revere s Ride" nor ".Old Ironsides"

in years. I vowed patriotically to buy

copies In Quincy Market, a block

from the Boston Massacre site. I

spotted a bookstore with the names

of Longfellow. Hawthorne. Thoreau

and Emerson decorating tbe door.

Guess what? Tbe merchant s poetry

shelf didn't have a single copy of

anything by Longfellow or Holmes.

It was like going to tbe Holy Land

and being unable to buy a Bible or to

Detroit and being unable to find a

title by Schoolcraft.

IN NORTHWESTERN Vermont is

Sbelburne Museum, a collection of

early Americana — homes, barns,

shops, a lighthouse, a one-room

school, an inn. cigar store Indians

and the elegant sidewheeler "S5

Ticonderoga."

Nothing important actually happened

at Shelburne It's a collection

of buildings. Great place. Highly recommended.

Got two full pages in the

376-page "American HenUge Book

of Great Historic Places "

Greenfield Village, also a collection

of buildings in otherwise unhistoric

Dearborn, is superior — in

quantity, quality and thoughtfulness

of presentation

But American HeriUge gives

Greenfield Village only one para

graph, in agate type. Makes you

wonder if there isn't some eastern

snobbery among paid historians

Footnote: Yeah. Greenfield Village

has jacked up its admission to

$8 50, but that's still $1 cheaper than

Shelburne Museum. Vermont.

World view & compassion sets pope apart

THE POPE GOT Muskied.

Certainly you remember how Edmund

Muskie won the New Hampshire

primary but lost the election

because he didn't pile up the victory

margin predicted by pundits. Instead

of sweeping into the White House, he

ended up weeping in New England.

That's called losing by winning.

Part of the story about Pope John

Paul II last week was strangely similar.

Although 90,000 people packed

into the Silverdome, 50,000 more

witnessed him parade through Hamtramck

and anywhere from 35,000 to

75,000 heard him at Hart Plaza, the

combined crowds of nearly 200,000

were called disappointing. This because

throngs of 500,000 to 1 million

were predicted.

So even though the pope pulled in

twice as many people as, say, Don

Canharn does with sophisticated

marketing, the turnout was called

small because of the prior hype.

The press can do that to you. as

Joe Biden should say and probably

will as soon as someone else says it

first.

IT IS understandable but unfortunate

that tbe pope's visit is measured

in numbers of people. It is also

undersUndable for all tbe reasons

already sUted - rain, security. TV

coverage, fear of crowds, parking

worries — that millions did not pour

into the street.

That does not at all lessen the importance

of the man, the role he

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plays in the world and the impact of

what he has to say.

Running the Roman" Catholic

church is not easy. Despite warnings

to the contrary from the Vatican, tbe

American Catholic Church is filled

with cafeteria Catholics who use

contraceptives, believe in a woman's

right to abortion and think women

should be able to be priests and that

THERE'S A BARGAIN

WAITING FOR YOU IN

TODAY'S CLASSIFIEDS

priests should be able to marry.

Despite the dissent, the Catholic

Church remains spiritually and emotionally

viul for many Americans It

is that faith that partially explains

the devotion to this courageous pope

who. unlike most world leaders (and

most politicians), is willing to tweak

the noses of despots, regardless of

their political ideology.

SATURDAY, PERCHED high

above Hart Plaza. Pope John Paul II

peered over the bronze and tense fist

of Joe Louis to look down Woodward

Avenue and saw. if not a sea, then at

least a pond of white-and-yellowflag-waving

humanity.

But he saw more that a disappointing

crowd. He saw a single

world where all inhabiunts are not

only entitled to dignified lives, but

where all are also responsible for

seeing that their global neighbors

are cared for.

Poverty, hunger, deprivation and

war are not someone else's problems.

Where they exist, they are —

or should be — our concern.

It is this world view, motivated by

genuine compassion rather than political

alignments, that further sets

the pope apart from most world

leaders

He has another difference. While

many Ulk about peace, the pope is

the most powerful man to do so

without simuluneously building up a

nuclear armament

His weapons are peace and love.

' WE'RE FIGHTING FOP NOUR LIFE

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l >0


14A*(R,W,Q-12A) O&E U*r. Thursday. inurwomy, September 24. 1967

^

Dems back curbs on imported clothing

— — — — ^ ^ M gan ... Democrats rUmAi^ql* r*rl Car! T Levin At/in and a rw4 Don- fVlfl. to In interpret int»rnr*t the t h,P 1972 anti-ballistie

ant i

Here's how area members of Con- WORLD WAR II INTERNMENT

ald lUegle.

missile (ABM) treaty in a way that

gress were recorded oo major roll — The House passed. 243 for and 141

permits advanced SD1 testing.

call 18 votes in the week ending Sept. against, a bill (HR 442) extending a

STAR WARS - By a vote of M

national apology and financial

redress to people of Japanese ances- Roll Call Report

for and 38 against, the Senate sought With this vote, ihe Senate ex.

to restrain President Reagan's plan pressed its view thai testing SDI in

HOUSE

try who during World War H were

relocated from their homes along (above) for tax-free payments of ican peace talks a chance to succeed for advanced testing of the "Star space would violate the treaty and

TEXTILE QUOTAS — By a vote the West coast to inland internment $20,000 each to an estimated 60,000 before pushing for more contra aid. Wars" Strategic Defense Initiative. should be prohibited unless sanc-

of 263 for and 156 against, the House camps.

living Americans of Japanese ances- Amendment sponsor Jesse Helms.

tioned by Congress, which also has a

passed and sent to the Senate a bill The measure, which .was sent to try who were put in camps soon af- R-N.C., called the Central American The vote tabled (killed) an amend- constitutional role in treaty-making

(HR 1154) to preserve American jobs the Senate, grants $20,000 tax-free ter America's entry into the war. peace plan "a joke, a cruel hoaxment to strike the restraints from

by limiting imports of nearly 200 to each of about 60.000 living inter- Supporter Al McCandless, R- that undercuts the contras.

the fiscal 1988 defense authorization Senators voting yes wanted to re-

textile, apparel and footwear prodnees. An estimated 120,000 U.S. citi- Calif., called tbe payments "guilt- Senators voting yes were opposed bill (above).

strain Star Wars testing by the aducts.zens

and aliens from Japan were money to soothe the conscience of to including more contra aid in the

ministration. Levin and Riegle voted

Although victorious, supporters confined under an executive order our nation "

defense bill. Voting yes were Michi- At issue is the president's attempt yes.

fell short of the 290 votes they need- issued by President Franklin D. Roo- Opponent Norman Mineta, D-

ed to ensure they can override Presisevelt 10 weeks after Japan's Dec. 7, Calif., said "our government has a

dent Reagan's promised veto of the 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor. legal and moral responsibility to

bill.

Supporter Jim Wright, D-Texas. compensate the internees for the

The bill limits the growth of tex- called the internment "one of those abrogation of their civil and human 0 Twice a week ii better 0 Twice a week is better 0 Twice a week is better

tile and apparel imports to 1 percent grotesque aberrations in America's rights."

annually over 1986 levels and political life ... for which we seek Members voting yes were wanted

freezes footwear imports at tbe 1986 to make amends . "

to eliminate financial redress for in-

figure.

Opponent Samuel Stratton, D- terned Japanese-Americans. Voting

Supporter Liz Patterson, D-S.C., N.Y., said, "Franklin Roosevelt did yes: Pursell, Ford and Broomfieid.

said the bill would counter "foreign the right thing, and if he hadn't done Voting no: Hertel and Levin.

competitors with heavy government it. he would have been probably

subsidies and closed markets." lynched."

SENATE

HQ! UWIS1MBW

Opponent John Porter, R-Ill., said " Members voting yes supported the

the bill would hurt exports and bill. Voting yes: Democrats Hertel, CONTRA AID — By a vote of 61

"shelter our dbmestic industries Ford and Levin.

for and 31 against, the Senate tabled

from the competition they must ulti- Voting no: Republicans Pursell (killed) an amendment providing

mately meet."

and Broomfieid.

$310 million in additional aid to the

contra rebels fighting in Nicaragua.

Members voting yes supported

textile, apparel and footwear import PAYMENTS TO INTERNEES - The amendment was offered to a

quotas. Voting yes were Democrats By a vote of 162 for and 237 against, $303 billion defense authorization

Dennis Hertel of Harper Woods, Wil- the House rejected-en amendment to bill (S 1174) for fiscal 1988 that reliam

Ford of Taylor and Sander Lev- eliminate financial redress for Japamained in debate.

T

in of Southfield.

nese-Americans interned by the gov- Robert Dole. R-Kan., said the

Voting no were Republicans Carl ernment during World War II. White House wanted the amendment

Pursell of Plymouth and William The amendment sought to delete tabled. He said President Reagan

Broomfieid of Birmingham.

$1.2 billion earmarked by HR 442 wants to give ongoing Central Amer-

1

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Suburban Life

Thursday. September 24, 1987 O&E

By Susan Buck

staff writer

More than $14,000 was raised last

week at a $150-a-ticket dinner reception

to benefit Straight Inc., a

substance abuse program for young

people.

All proceeds from the auction including

$100 from each of the ISO

tickets sold will be donated to the

Straight Foundation capital improvement

fund to buy a new building

An original watercolor painting by

Pat Buckley Moss, a nationally acclaimed

artist, was auctioned off at

Julie Brown editor/459-2700

$11,000 to Ralph Lorenz, a Plymouth

developer who chaired the event

with wife, Terry, a Straight board

member.

"There's nothing like funding the

thing yourself." Terry Lorenz said in

jest, adding she was not aware her

husband planned to bid on the painting.

"I didn't know until the last minute.


"The most important thing is that

there is now a lot more awareness of

Straight, that it is there for the kids."

REPORTEDLY, MOSS surprised

Please turn to Page 2

BILL BHESLER/«t«fl photograph*

Al Larson, Frameworks owner, and Amy Donoghue, Frameworks

employee, carry a Pat Buckley Moss origins! lor display

during the Straight Inc. «und-ralaer.

wmmw m

©bseruer Newspapers

Surprise buy

$11,000

Artist Pat Buckley Moss and Dave Schupp of Straight stsnd nesr Moss' "Plymouth'

fund-raiser.

Learning to read begins

lifetime of opportunities

By Julie Brown

staff writer

It's a long way from Canton to

Philadelphia, but for John Young,

that journey wasn't nearly as long as

the one he has made during the last

couple of years.

During those years. Young has

gone from being unable to read to

reading at approximately the seventh

grade level.

Young, a 57-year-old Canton resident,

was among the students at the

Sept. 10-11 National Adult Literacy

Congress, held in Philadelphia. He

roomed with a student from Alpena

during the gathering, held as part of

the celebration of the bicentennial of

the U.S. Constitution.

"I enjoyed it very much," Young

said of h»s tune spent representing

Michigan.

Young and others at the conference

discussed a number of issues

related to literacy and adult education.

He enjoyed meeting students

and tutors from other states.

- "They were very enjoyable to talk


2B(P.C)

O&E Thursday 9«pfmtof 24.

Straight benefit raises money,

Continued from Page 1

the audience when she confided that

drug abuse touched her family, too.

. "Moss was wonderful," said Terry

Lorenz. "We didn't know all that.

Drug abuse is everywhere."

The most important

thing is that there is

now a lot more

awareness of Straight,

that it is there for the

kids.'

— Terry Lorenz

Moss was presented with a statue

of two children bearing Straight's

logo, "Hands on Hands Helping Kids

Helping Each Other."

Serving on the benefit committee

with the Lorenz's were: Sandra

Florek, director, instructional advancement,

Schoolcraft College and

president of Plymouth Chamber of

Commerce; Marcia Buhl, corporate

affairs manager, Michigan Bell-Ameritech

Co.; Denise Radtke, Wayne

County field representative for U.S.

Rep. Carl Pursell, R-Plymouih; Beverly

Farley, university circle coordi-

nator. Eastern Michigan University;

and Mary Ann Dingeman, coordinator

of endowed scholarship, Eastern

Michigan University.

ALL RESIDE IN the Plymouth-

Canton community.

The painting, titled "Plymouth,"

pictures the Mayflower Hotel Hot

Air Balloon above the Mayflower n

ship in Plymouth, Mass.

The Frameworks, an art

retail rame shop, and the Mayflower

Hotel teamed to co-sponsor

the benefit.

Everyone who attended the dinner

received a signed lithograph of the

auctioned painting. An excerpt from

a letter Moss sent to Al Larson,

owner of The Frameworks, along

with a sample lithograph, was attached

to each lithograph given at

the benefit.

It read: "The name Plymouth is

synonymous with the principles and

ethics on which our country was

founded and our Constitution written.

I am very happy to have created

this painting in the Constitution's bicentennial

year. The painting symbolizes

our greatest national treasure;

our unique freedom on land,

sea and in the air."

Moss, a Virginia resident, has an

honorary doctorate of art from Cen-

Terry and Ralph Lorenz present a bouquet of flowers to srtist Pat Buckley Moss.

tenary College and is a cultural

laureate of Virginia. She has art galleries

in Washington, D.C., and St

Petersburg, Fla.

Moss donated her time and the

painting. This year her paintings and

prints earned more than 1220,000 for

charities worldwide.

New reader spreads word to help

others understand they 'can do it'

Continued from Page 1

YOUNG WENT to work for the

Plymouth-Canton schools as a painter.

He was laid off from that job and

then went to work for Livonia Public

Schools in maintenance. On that job.

Young told his leader he couldn't

read.

* "So he'd read the orders to me before

he'd send me out in the morning."

Sometimes, Young would get to a

school building and forget just what

those orders were. In those cases,

he'd put the form on the head custodian's

desk. Young would ask tbe

head custodian if the order was correct,

in the process getting the custodian

to read the order back to him.

At one point, Young hurt his back

and wasn't able to work anymore.

His wife then died.

"I was all alone. I felt sorry for

myself."-

YOUNG'S DAUGHTER encouraged

him to learn to read. Young's

doctor also thought that would be a

great idea.

"He said it would be one of the

best things that could happen to me."

Young made an appointment to

Diabetics

sought for

hospital study

Harper Hospital, in conjunction

with Wayne State University, is conducting

a research study on individuals

using oral hypoglycemic (blood

sugar lowering) medications. The

hospital is looking for diabetics interested

in participating in a research

study, who are between 30-70

years of age and are at or above

their ideal body weight.

All visits, lab work and medications

are free. Call Harper's Diabetes

Program at 745-4784 for more

information.

Adoptive

parents class

will start

Expectant Adoptive Parent Classes

will be offered at 7 p.m. beginning

Friday, Oct 2. Tbe series of four

weekly classes in Botsford Hospital

are for families waiting to adopt an

infant up to 2 years old.

The classes will provide informa-

tion on the physical care of an in

fant, growth and development, selecting

infant clothes and accessories.

common infant health problems

and child safety

The classes also provide the opportunity

to explore parenthood and

its relationship to being an adoptive

pa rent-

To register or receive further information.

call Terry or Jim Allor.

project directors it 459-7303.

Where

there\ a need,

there's a way.

TheUmtedTOp

see a counselor at Plymouth Canton

High School. Young thought about

skipping that appointment, but went

through with it. He was referred to

Mary Kay Frey, adult basic education

coordinator for Plymouth-Canton

Community Education.

Young started classes and also

worked with a tutor, Irene Truesdell.

He's no longer working with a tutor,

but is still taking classes.

YOUNG IS grateful for the support

and encouragement he has

received from the educators and his

tutor. He has appreciated the support

his family has given him. All of

Young's children went through the

v a *

aa&

V

&

V

3SE

*

.2

TM

•.mvrHERVAM

7 hope to be a tutor afterwards and

whatever else I can help people with

that haven't had an education.'

— John Young

Plymouth-Canton Community

Schools, including attending classes

at Starkweather Center in Plymouth.

He's also grateful for tbe local

support that allowed him to attend

the National Adult Literacy Congress.

The conference was coordinated

by the Mayor's Commission on

V & V a ¥ il

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Young found he had the confidence

to travel alone. He'd like to travel to

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"I really enjoyed the trip out

there."

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4 NEWBORN CARE

I The Plymouth Childbirth Education

Association will offer a twoweek

class on newborn care for couples

expecting a baby. The class will

lie held at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept.

2ft, at Geneva Presbyterian Church,

5835 N. Sheldon, Canton. The class

gives information on the care and

development of infants from birth

gpough the age of 3 months. To reg-

Bter or for more information, call

09-7477.

4 PLYMOUTH-CANTON PWP

I Plymouth-Canton Parents Without

Partners will meet at 8 p.m. Thursmy.

Sept. 24, at Fellows Creek Golf

Club, 2936 S. Lotz. north of Michigan

O'enue in Canton. The speaker, Nan-

^ Harm, will discuss stress. A dance

ipUI follow the meeting. Price is %2,

fi after 9 p.m. For more informa-

®>n. call Ellen, 455-3851.

4 LETS DANCE

Westside Singles will hold a dance

8:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Friday,

pt. 25. at Roma's of Livonia, on

^hoolcraft west of Inkster. The

dance is for those age 21 and older,

firessy attire should be worn. For

•ore information, call the hot line.

$2-3160.

£ QARAQE SALE

•The Plymouth-Canton Mothers of

twins Club will hold its annual fall

Arage sale from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Saturday, Sept. 26, at 46023 ^Ames-

Drive, west of Sheldon and

orth of Ann Arbor Trail in Plym-

8th Township. Children's clothes,

quipment and toys will be avail-

OKTOBERFEST

The Pl^hiouth German-American

will present its "Oktober Fest"

7:30 p.m. to 1 a m. Saturday.

26, at the Plymouth Cultural

oter, 525 Farmer SL Price is $4.50

person. There will be dancing to

C

music of The Continentals. Ger-

eian food and drink will be available

(or sale. For reservations or more

Be part of

An American

Tradition

,\

Become a

Welcome Wagon

professional anit

part of An Ameri-

' can Tradition we

started 57 years

ago. Our Represent-

atives serve their

communities In an important

way. They promote

the quality of life

there and play a key part in

economic growth of local businesses

It's exciting, rewarding

work, and we're expanding our

program. If you'd like to be part

of a grand tradition and build an

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Ann Goldberg

(313) 348-9577

Answering Service

(313) 356-7720

An Airier*4n Tradition S«« 1928

Equal Opportunity Employn

Give a h o o t .

D o n t pollute.

information, call 459-4261 or 425-

0449.

• TRI-COUNTY

Tri-County Singles will hold a

dance/party from 8:30 p.m. to 1 a.m.

Saturday. Sept. 26. at the Airport

Rama da Inn, 1-94 and Mem man

The dance/party is for those over

age 21. Proper attire should be worn.

Price is $4. For more information,

call the hot line. 843-8917.

• PHOENIX I

Phoenix I will hold a two-year anniversary

party Sunday, Sept. 27.

This will be a sock hop/ 1950s dance.

Prizes will be given for the best costumes.

Country Western Night will

be held Oct. 4. Phoenix I holds dances/parties

for singles every Sunday

at 8:30 p.m. at Roma's of Garden

City. 32550 Cherry Hill at Venoy

The dances are for those age 25 and

older. Complimentary hors

d'oeuvres are served. Price is $4.

For more information, call Ruth,

471-1248.

• HANDLING MEETINGS

"How to conduct a productive

meeting" is the theme of an, Oral

Majority Toastmasters Club program.

Tbe program will be presented

at the club's regular meeting at

5:45 p.m. Tuesday. Sept. 29. in the

banquet room at Denny's restaurant,

Ann Arbor Road east of 1-275 in

Plymouth Township. For reservations

or more information, call

Phyllis K. Sullivan. 455-1635 Guests

may attend.

• ANNUAL LUNCHEON

The Plymouth Symphony League

will hold its annual luncheon

Wednesday. Sept. 30. at St. John

Episcopal Church, 574 Sheldon Road.

Plymouth. Guest speakers will be

Russell Reed. Plymouth Symphony

Orchestra conductor, and Kiyo

Morse, president of the Plymouth

Symphony Society. Ticket price is

$10; tickets may be bought from

Margaret Smith. 455-8971. Friday,

Sept. 25, is the deadline to make reservations.

• FIRST TEA

The Canton Newcomers will hold

the first tea of the season at 7:30

p.m. Wednesday, SepL 30. Guests

will meet club officers and learn

about activities sponsored by the

club. Complimentary packets from

merchants will be distributed. For

reservations or more information,

call Vivian, 981-5696.

• PWP MEETING

Plymouth-Canton Parents Without

Partners will meet at 8 p.m. Thurs-

Please turn to Page 4

Thursday. September 24. 1967 O&E

Lecture lineup r-

Town Hall season covers diverse topics

By Richard Lech

staff writer

Fine food, high fashion and the intrigue

of handwriting analysis are

part of the lineup for the 1987-88

Livonia Town Hall Lecture Series

The list of lecturers for the Town

Hall's 24th year includes Observer it

Eccentric Newspapers graphology

columnist Lorene Green, gourmet

cook Chef Duglass and a pair of fashion

experts from Jacobson's.

Duglass will kick off the season

Wednesday, Oct. 21. An internationally

known master chef, he is a graduate

of the Ecole of Paris and owns

Restaurant Duglass in Southfield.

Lorene Green will explore some of

the mysteries of handwriting

Wednesday. Nov. 18. Certified by the

American Association of Handwriting

Analysts, Green has written a

graphology column for the Observer

ii Eccentric for 12 years She also

has taught classes in the subject for

the Livonia Community Education

Department and at the Livonia Family

Y. (Her column may be found on

Page 3B this issue.)

Detroit Free Press television critic

Mike Duffy will speak Wednesday.

Jan. 20.

The season finale Wednesday.

March 16, will feature Sandy

Wloszek, apparel supervisor for

Jacobson's. and Deede Hassinger.

Estee Lauder sales consultant for

Jacobson's.

ALL OF the lectures will be at the

Town Hall'S new location. Bobby's

Country House. Bobby's is on the

Idyl WyW Golf Course at 35780 Five

Mile, west of Farmington 'Road,

Livonia.

The lectures will begin at 10:30

a.m.. but Town Hall officials suggest

that those attending arrive no later

than 10:15. The Town Hall luncheon

will follow the lecture.

Seating is limited and will be assigned

by advanced ticket purchases

Town Hall season tickets are

available for $24 ($35 fot^atrons

and $30 for sponsors) They

obtained "By" sending a check and a

stamped, self-addressed envelope to:

Livonia Town Hall Inc.. 38771 Roycroft,

Livonia 48154.

Season luncheon reservations are

$28. Send check and stamped, selfaddressed

envelope to: Livonia Town

Hall Inc., 37664 Kingsbury-, Livonia

48154.

Proceeds from the Town Hall go

to First Step, a shelter for battered

women and their children, and the

Rosalyn Bryant Foundation, which

aids abused and neglected children.

medical briefs/helpline

• DONATE BLOOD

The American Red Cross says donating

blood can save as many as

four lives. Blood can be donated by

anyone in good health between the

ages of 17-70 who weighs a minimum

of 110 pounds. Donating blood

takes less than an hour.

e Blood donations will be accepted

at a blood drive sponsored by the

Canton Lions Club 1-7 p.m. Tuesday,

Oct. 13. at the Canton Recreation

Hall, Michigan Avenue at Sheldon.

• FREE HEALTH

SCREENINGS

Free health screenings will be offered

3-7 p.m. Monday. Sept. 28. at

Arbor Health Building. Ann Arbor

Trail at Harvey. Plymouth. Hearing

0 ~

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available 3-5 p.m. and blood pressure

screening 3-7 p.m.

• BEAR FAIR

For those whose Teddy bear or favorite

doll could use a free checkup,

the M-CARE Health Center at 9398

Lilley south of Ann Arbor Road is offering

free "physicals" for bears and

dolls 2-7 p.m. Tuesday. Sept. 29. to

provide an opportunity for children

to experience health care in a positive

way. Children may bring a doll,

bear or other stuffed animal and

watch a physical examination on

their favorite cuddly creature. The

"checkups" also will include a visit

- to the lab. an X-ray of the bear or

doll for the child to keep, and a

Lorene Green

graphologist

mSF

Sandy Wtoszek

fashion coordinator

health certificate Children are encouraged

to schedule an appointment

themselves and may do so by

calling the health center at 459-0820.

Refreshments and prizes will be offered

during the M-CARE Bear Fair.

• ALZHEIMER'S SUPPORT

The Plymouth- Family Support

Group of the Alzheimer's Disease

and Related Disorders Association

will meet 7-9 p.m Monday, Oct. 5, in

the community room of Arbor

Health Building. 990 Ann Arbor

Trail at Harvey. Plymouth. Guest

speaker Allan Cary, who works in

the trust department of Comenca

Bank, will present information and

answer questions on financial planning

This group is for caregivers.

Deede Hassinger

cosmetics expect

Duglaes

gourmet chef

j^cjaa

family members, and friends of Alzheimer's

patients. For information

call 557-8277 .*

• WEIGHT LOSS

Free introductory- "Be Trim" sessions

will be 7:30-9 p.m. Tuesday.

Oct. 6. and Thursday, Oct. 8. in Arbor

Health Building. Ann Arbor Trail at

Harvey. Plymouth The free classes

illustrate a comprehensive approach

to permanent weight loss that will

focus on techniques to manage stress

and other factors directly linked to

controlling weight problems For information.

call 572-3675.

Bring the country living

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Please turn to Page 4

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4B,P.C)

clubs In action

Continued from Page 3

day. Oct. 1 at Fellows Creek Golf

Club. 2936 S. Lotz. north of Michigan

Avenue. The speaker, from Catherine

McAuley Health Center, will address

"Aids - Myths and Reality."

A dance will follow the meeting.

Price is $2. $3 after 9 p.m. For more

information, call Ellen, 455-3851.

• FALL FASHIONS

The Plymouth Newcomers will

meet Thursday, Oct. 1. at the Hillside

Inn, Plymouth. Hospitality hour

will be at 11:30 a.m., lunch at noon.

A program on fall fashions will be

presented by Sacks of Forest Avenue

Plymouth. Price is $8.50. Deadline

for reservations is noon Monday,

Sept. 28. For reservations or more

information, call 420-2407 or 453-

8960.

• WOMAN'S CLUB

The Woman's Club of Plymouth

will hold its first meeting of the season

Friday. Oct. 2, at the Plymouth

Cultural Center. 525 Farmer St. Social

hour will be at 11:30 a.m., lunch

at noon, the program at 1 p.m. A

Maurice salad buffet luncheon will

be served. The program. "Curtain

Call Fashions," will be presented by

the Meadow Brook Theatre Guild

and will feature designs and creations

from the costume shop. Julie L.

Glynn, coordinator of special projects

for Meadow Brook Theatre will

be the commentator. Price is $10 per

person. Reservations are required.

Deadline for reservations is Friday,

Sept. 25. For reservations or more

information, call Linda, 455-5510.

Members and guests may attend.

• ELVIS TRIBUTE "

Sherman Arnold will present a

"Tribute to Elvis" along with 1950s

and 1960s music and country music

at 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 2, at the Mayflower-Lt.

Gamble Post No. 6695,

VFW, 1426 S. Mill, Plymouth. Dancing

will follow the show. Ticket price

is $8 per person, including snacks. A

cash bar will be available. For tickets

or more information, call 422-

5816 or 349-6366. No tickets will be

sold at the door.

• SENIOR POTLUCK

All senior citizens 60 and older are

invited to tbe monthly potluck luncheon

at noon Monday, Oct. 5 in Fellowship

Hall, First United Methodist

Church of Plymouth, 45201 N. Territorial

Road. Please bring a food dish

to pass and your own table service.

Harger Green will show slides on

elder hostels.

24, 1987

• WELCOME TO CANTON

The Canton Newcomers will meet

Wednesday. Oct. 7, at the Faith Community

Church, 46001 Warren Road.

Canton. Hospitality hour will be at 7

p.m., the meeting at 7:30 p.m. The

program on astrology will be presented

by Maya. New and/or established

residents may attend. For

more information, call Vivian, 981-

5696.

• EQUAL RIGHTS

Fathers for Equal Rights will

meet at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct 7,

at the Alfred Noble branch. Livonia

Public Library, 32901 Plymouth

Road, one block east of Farmington

Road. For more information, call

354-3080.

• PWP DANCES

Plymouth-Canton Parents Without

Partners will host the October Regional

Conference at the Airport Hilton

Inn. 31500 Wick Road. Romulus.

The weekend will include personal

growth workshops that are free and

open to the public. The weekend will

include a sock hop dance, to be held

it 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 9, for members

and escorted guests. Prices are

$5 and $6. There will be a homecoming

dance at 9 p.m. Saturday, Oct.

10, for members. Price is $5. A

homecoming king and queen will be

crowned. Proceeds from the crowning

will be donated to the Cystic Fibrosis

Foundation. For more information,

call 455-2554.

• LUNCHEON, CARDS

The ninth annual fall luncheon/

card party, sponsored by the Ladies

Auxiliary of Mayflower-Lt. Gamble

Post No. 6695, Veterans of Foreign

Wars, will be held Saturday, Oct. 10,

at the VFW Hall, 1426 S. Mill, Plymouth.

Ticket price for the luncheon

and cards is $3.50. Those tickets will

be available by advance sale only.

Price is $3 for the luncheon only,

with tickets available at the door.

Door prizes will be given and there

will be booths with baked goods and

handmade crafts for sale. For reservations,

call Veneta Horn beck. 453-

6040,or Marion Hoffman, 422-5816.

• ARTS & CRAFTS SHOW

Handcrafters Unlimited is planning

an Arts and Crafts Show from

10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 16 and

from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct.

17 at the Northville Recreation Center,

303 W. Main, 1.5 blocks west of

Center (Sheldon) on Main Street in

Northville. More than 65 artisans

plan to participate. Lunch is available

and admission is $1.

• DINNER-DANCE

A charter presentation party dinner-dance

will be given by the Diplomats

Club of Toastmasters International

at 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 17, at

the Plymouth Elks Lodge, 41700 E.

Ann Arbor Road. Dinner ticket price

is $10 per person. Tickets may be obtained

by sending a check or money

order to: Diplomats Club, 7640 Holly

Drive, Canton, Mich. 48187.- For

more information, call 455-1024.

• MUSEUM FUN

The Plymouth Historical Museum

is celebrating Michigan's sesquicentennial

with exhibits throughout tbe

museum. The exhibits include glassware.

quilts, and materials representing

industry," the Civil War,

Michigan Indians, the schools and

other areas. A lacemaking exhibit is

also featured at the museum. The

exhibit is being held in conjunction

with the U.S. Post Office issue of a

stamp commemorating the art of lacemaking.

The museum is at 155 S.

Main. Plymouth. It is open to the

public 1-4 p.m. Thursday, Saturday

and Sunday. Admission price is $1

for adults, 50 cents for those ages 11-

17 and 25 cents~for children 5-10.

For more information, call 455-8940.

• POLISH DANCERS

The Polish Centennial Dancers of

Plymouth/Canton and Livonia are

accepting registrations for students

age 3 through adult Students will

learn Polish folk dancing, American

polkas, and jazz and novelty numbers.

Members will have opportunities

to be in parades and to dance at

festivals and community events. For

more information, call 427-2885 or

464-1263

• DIPLOMATS

The Toastmasters International —

"Diplomats" meet at 5:45 p.m. each

Thursday in the banquet room of

Denny's restaurant. Ann Arbor Road

at 1-275 in Plymouth Township. The

group is for those who want to improve

their public speaking skills,

meet new friends and have fun. For

reservations or more information,

call 455-1024.

• PLYMOUTH TOPS

TOPS No. 238. Plymouth, meets

from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. every Wednesday

at the Plymouth Salvation

Army, 9451 S. Main St. For more information

on TOPS (Take Off

Pounds Sensibly), call 453-2658 or

453-2347.

Health Alliance Plan has specialists

in all of the following locations.

I At Health Alliance Plan, we know that keeping you healthy is more than a

[job. That's why we offer you more than 500 personal care physicians and more than l.

[specialists in virtually every medical field.

I And these specialists are also located at points all over

I southeastern Michigan. Health Alliance Plan is affiliated

•with 18 major hospitals, 23 medical centers and hundreds of

I private doctors* offices. So youll never have far to go no

I matter what kind of health care you need.

For more information, call 872-8100. And find out why

I Health Alliance Plan is just what the specialists ordered.

i7

PSm

qicii- T

• INTERNATIONAL PLASTIC

MODELLERS

The Livonia Chapter of the International

Plastic Modellers meets 7-

10 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesday

monthly at Livonia's Holmes

Junior High School. 16100 Newburg

Road. The club promotes the hobby

of building plastic models of cars,

trucks, tanks, planes and figures.

For more information, call John

Shellhaas at 458-3824.

• CHILDREN'S NURSERY

The Plymouth Children's Nursery

has openings in the Monday-Wednesday-Friday

class this fall. The cooperative

nursery school is at Warren

and Haggerty in Canton. The threeday-per-week

program emphasizes

free play and parental participation,

allowing parents to take turns being

present at class sessions. The program

challenges 4-year-olds in developing

creativity and social skills

through play. For more information,

call Linda Hensley, 981-1385.

• WRITERS

Michigan Writers meets once a

month to help published and unpublished

writers sell their manuscripts.

Serious writers of short stories, articles,

books and screen plays may attend.

For more information, call

455-7739. between 2 and 11 p.m.

• PRESCHOOL

North Livonia Co-op Preschool is

accepting applications for its 3-yearold

program and 4-year-old afternoon

program, with meetings twice

a week at Roosevelt Elementary

School, on Lyndon in Livonia. For

more information on the non-profit

preschool, call 525-2285 or 474-6820.

• PLACEMENT

All employers may use the free

job placement service of Plymouth-

Canton Community Education. A

number of current and former adult

students with diverse skills and a desire

to work are ready for referral.

Employees have been screened and

are available for full-time, part-time

and seasonal work. For more information.

call Elizabeth Barker. 451-

6451.

• ST. JOHN NEUMANN

The St. John Neumann 50-Up Club

for local seniors meets at 7 p.m. the

first - Tuesday of each month at the

church, on Warren Road west of

Sheldon Road in Canton. New members

may attend. For more information.

call Betty Gruchala, 459-4091.

Please turn to Page 5


medical briefs/helpline

Continued

• BREAST

A program ori breast feeding for

prospective mowers and their families

will be 7:30-9 p.m. Tuesday, Oct.

13. at Arbor Health Building. 990

Ann Arbor Trail at Harvey, Plymouth.

The program is to help pregnant

women and women who are

thinking about becoming pregnant

decide whether breast feeding is

right for them. There is a $10 fee per

family. For information, call 455-

1908.

• MICHIGAN CUE CLUB

The Michigan Cue Club will hold

cued speech practice beginning 7:30

p.m. Tuesday. Oct. 13. in St. John

Neumann Catholic Church on Warren

between Sheldon and Canton

Center roads in Canton. Contact Lorraine

Zaksek at 459-7030 or Dorian

Marks at 455-8417.

• HEALTH SCREENINGS

Free health screenings will be 1-5

p.m. Monday. Oct. 26. at Arbor

Health Building. Ann Arbor Trail at

Harvey, Plymouth. Hearing tests,

hearing aid checks and blood pressure

screening will be available. For

information, call 455-1908.

• STUTTERING GROUP

A new adult stuttering therapy

group is being formed by the department

of speech pathology at the Oakwood

Hospital Canton Center.

Stuttering is the condition in which

the flow of speech is broken by stoppages

of sound, repetitions or prolongations

of sounds and syllables.

There also may be facial and body

movements associated with the effort

to speak. Participants will learn

techniques to control dysfluency as

well as discuss social and emotional

problems often related to stuttering.

For information, call 459-7030.

• DAYCARE FOR SENIORS

Plymouth Family Service is taking

referrals for supervised care and

a day of planned activities for people

60 and older living in Wayne county.

In-home respite care also is available;

day or overnight care. For

more information, call 453-0890.

• HEARING CHECKS

Hearing testing and hearing aid

checks will be provided by McAuley

Health Center 3-5 p.m. in tbe Arbor

Health Building, 990 Ann Arbor

Trail at Harvey in Plymouth. For information,

call 572-3675.

• BLOOD PRESSURE

SCREENING

The Henry Ford Medical Center in

Canton is offering £ree high blood

HJL

pressure screenings 4-8 p.m. the first

Tuesday of each month at the center,

42680 Ford Road

Screenings will be done by a nurse

on a walk-in basis. Tbe center

open from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday

through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Friday, and 9 am to 1 p.m. Saturday.

For information, call 981-3200.

During the screenings, three blood

pressure readings will be taken minutes

apart. The readings are compared

and graphed to determine an

accurate measure. The Canton Center

staff also counsels participants

about high blood preaoure

• LIFELINE AVAILABLE

The Plymouth Council on Aging »

informing senior citizens that Lifeline

is available at the Catherine

McAuley Health centers, including

the Arbor Health Building in Plymouth,

and from Oakwood Hospital,

Dearborn Lifeline is an electronic

device attached to a phone that contains

a button a person can push in

case of emergency. The Lifeline

links the person to a hospital's emergency

response center. The Lifeline

unit is installed free and then is

leased for $15 a month. For information,

contact the Lifeline manager at

Oakwood at l-8(M)-832-LOVE or at

McAuley at 572-3922.

• FOOT-CARE SERVICE

A foot-care service for senior citizens

in Plymouth is offered the second

and fourth Thursday of each

month 1-5 p.m. in the community

room of the Arbor Health Building at

Ann Arbor Trail and Harvey in

Plymouth. The treatment includes

foot assessment, soaks, nail trimming,

pumicing, massage and education

for proper hygiene, exercise and

footwear. Appointments may be

made in advance by calling 455-

1908. A nominal fee will be charged

at the time of the service.

• MEDICAL TOURS

Teachers, Brownie and Cub Scout

leaders are encouraged to contact

Oakwood Canton Health -Center to

learn about tours to prepare children

to visit the doctor. For more information,

call 459-7030.

• MOTHER-BABY EXERCISE

Mothers and babies can have fun

together at Mother-Baby Exercise

sponsored by Oakwood-Canton

Health Center from 10 a.m. to noon

Wednesdays in St. John Neumann

Catholic Church, Canton. Advance

registration is required and may be

done by calling 593-7694. There is a

$35 charge.

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«•

clubs In action

Continued from Page 4

• PREVENTION

The Plymouth Canton Council for

the Prevention of Child Abuse and

Neglect meets at 7 50 p.m. the second

Wednesday of each month. Meetings

are held In the library of Cast

Middle School, 1042 S. Mill. Plymouth.

For more information, call Kathy

Reilly. 459-2067.

• TOUGHLOVE

Toughlove meets at 7 p.m. Mondays

at the Faith Community Moravian

Church, 46001 Warren Road, at

Canton Center Road in Canton.

Toughlove is a self-help group for

parents troubled by teenage behavior.

• BALLROOM DANCE

The Tuesday Nigh* Ballroom

Dance Club meets 8:30-11:30 p.m.

Tuesdays at the Grotto Club of Ann

Arbor. 2070 W. StadiunuBlvd Dance

lessons are offered at 7:15 p.m. Live

music is part of the fun; refreshments

are served. Married couples

and guests may attend For more information.

call 971-4480 or 434-1615.

• CANTON HISTORY

The Canton Historical Museum is

at 1150 S. Canton Center Road. Canton.

Museum hours are 1-3 p.m.

Tuesday and 1-4 p.m. Saturday. Regular

meetings of the Canton Historical

Society are held-at 7:30 p.m. the

second Thursday of each month. For

more information, call 397-0088 during

regular museum hours.

• CANTONJAYCEES

The Canton Jaycees hold general

membership meetings at the Fellows

Creek Golf Course clubhouse. Meet-

ings are held at 7:30 p.m. tbe second

Wednesday of each month. Tbey are

open to the public. Fellows Creek is

on Lotz. north of Michigan Ave. in

Canton.

• TOASTMASTERS

Motor City Speak Easy, a member

of Toastmasters International,

meets the second and fourth Monday

of each month at O'Sheehan's in the

Highland Lakes Shopping Center,

southeast corner of Seven Mile and

Northville roads in Northville. Dinner

is at 6 p.m.. the meeting at 7

p m. Motor City Speak Easy welcomes

people who want to improve

their speaking skills. For more information.

call 459-5759.

• OPTIMISTS

Plymouth Optimist Club meets at

7 p.m. the first and third Mondays of

each month at the Plymouth Hilton

Inn, 14707 Northville Road. Plymouth.

Plymouth and Canton residents

may call 453-3425 for membership

information

• CANTON LIONS

The Canton Lions Club meets at 7

p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays

of each month. Dinner meetings are

held at the Canton Recreation Building,

Michigan Ave. at Sheldon in

Canton. For more information, call

981-1610. '

• CHORUS COOKBOOK

Plymouth Community Chorus

cookbook, "All Our Best, is available

at Plymouth Book World and

from chorus members. Price _ is

17.95.

IDEAS THAT WORK

AT

• CANTON WOMEN

The Canton Women's Club will

B.J. INTERIORS, INC.

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We're winning

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Today, thanks partly to

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rate from rheumatic heart

disease has declined more

than 70 percent since 1950.

For decades, the

American Heart

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programs have taught parents

about the dangers and

evention of rheumatic

Kver and rheumatic heart

disease in young children.

Support the American

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IT'S STREET SCENE

Every Monday

meet 9-11 a.m. the first and fourth

Thursday of the month at tbe Faith

Community Moravian Church, 46001

Warren Road, west of Canton Center.

Canton Township. New members

may attend. The ctab-i»-for women

interested in being a part of cultural

events, group discussion and recreational

activities. The club is cosponsored

by the YWCA of Western

Wayne County. For more information.

call Cynthia Nichols, area program

director, at 561-4110.

• PLYMOUTH SENIORS

The Plymouth Township Seniors

meet at the Friendship Station Club

Hall. 42375 Schoolcraft, on the following

days. Mondays from 10 a.m.

to noon for euchre and pool. Tuesdays

6:30-9:30 p.m. for pinochle, Fri-

" days 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and 6 30-

9:30 p.m. for bridge and pinochle

Seniors living in Plymouth Township

or the city of Plymouth may attend

For more information, call Helen

Krupa, 459-6259

• DANCERS' COOKBOOK

The PoliahXantenmal Dancers of

Plymouth cookbook, "Secrets from

Centennial Cupboards.' is available

from group members It features a

number of Polish recipes, along with

American recipes. The price is $5.

For more information, call Joanne

Ygeal, 464-1263.

• FAMILIES ANONYMOUS

Families Anonymous, a self-help

program for relatives and friends

concerned with drug abuse or behavioral

problems, will meet at 8 p.m.

Thursdays in St. John Neumann

Catholic Church. 44800 WarTen. Canton.

NORTHVILLE ARTS COMMISSION

PRESENTS

1ST ANNUAL JURIED

DURING NORTHVILLE'S

AUTUMN FEST '87

SEPT. 25 & 26-9 TO 6

DOWNTOWN NORTHVILLE

Make a date for a week's worth of savings on

Cabin Crafts best-selling carpet. Find new savings daily on

fine quality, high-performance carpet in styles to go with any

decor Now s the time to buy and save On the carpet

you've been waiting for. Cabin Crafts Carpets

one of the nicest things for your home

BONUS

We will tell yc

about added sa

ings when you c

your whole house.

You li— afforrl

. treated Ukc

525 Ann Arbor Rd.

Plymouth

V 7 Mi W. of 1-275

459-7200

Sate Ends Sat., Sept 26th

BANK FINANCING

AVAILABLE

PLUS

!T" : I- -i

1 I

M-F 9-9; Sat. 10-6

Thufsaay. Sept am tw 24. 1M7 O&E < PC *«

• FLOTILLA

The Plymouth/Canton Coast

Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 11-11 meets

the fourth Tuesday of each month at

Room 2511 i-eetmseTor's office).

HPtyrfiouthSalem High School. 46181

Joy Road. Canton. For more information

on boating safety, call 455-

2676

• CIVIL AIR PATROL

Air Force Auxiliary Squadron 16-1

invites interested people to attend its

weekly meetings, 6:30-10 p.m. Thursday,

on the fourth floor of the main

building. Willow Run Airport. Any

U S. citizen 13 or older may become

a volunteer. For information, call

Robert Eizen, commander, 526-9673.

- "

• ZESTERS

Zesters, a club for Canton residents

55 and older, meets at 12:30

p.m Thursdays in the Canton Recreation

Center. 44237 Michigan at

Sheldon. Membership fees are $1 to

join and $1.50 per month. For more

information about the club, call tbe

Canton senior citizen office, 397-

1000 Ext. 278.

FALL SAVINGS

MATCHING

SHOWER CURTAIN

AND BATH RUG SETS

100% cotton, hand-loomed t*arh coordinate sets - 72 x 72

Shower curtain. 2V * 36* rug - in subtle pastel styles. Machine

W


66* O&E Thursday. September 24, 1967

Your Invitation to Worship

Mail Copy To: OBSERVER & ECCENTRIC NEWSPAPERS

36251 Schoolcraft, Livonia 48150

CHURCH PAGE: 591-2300, extension 404 Mondays 9:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon

BAPTIST ^

INDEPENDENT BETHEL BAPTIST TEMPLE

BAPTIST BIBLE

-OWSHIP 29475 W. Six Mile, Livonia

525-3664 or 261-9276

Sunday School

Morning Worship ...

Evening Worship...— —--

Wed. Family Hour r. —

September 27th

H.L. Petty

YOUTH

AWANA

CLUBS

1ft00 A.M.

11:00 A.M.

_ 6KM) P.M.

. 7:30 P.M.

11:00 A.M. "Tha Perfect Lamb"

6:00 P.M. "Dictatorial Diotrephes"

King's Meaaengera Quartet

at 10*0 & 11:00 A.M.

"A Church That 's Concerned About People"

GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH

Welcomes You!

"AN INDEPENDENT 13^'

BAPTIST CHURCH"

SCHEDULE OF SERVICES-

425-6215 or 425-1116

SUNDAY SCHOOL SUM. 10*0 A M

MORNING WORSHIP SUN. 11*0 AJ4.

KENNETH D. GRIEF

/>

PASTOR

EVENING WORSHIP SUM. 7*0 PJi.

WEDNESDAY BIBLE STUDY WED. 7*0 PM.

28440 LYNDON, LIVONIA, Ml

GRAND RIVER BAPTIST OF LIVONIA

(Affiliated with American Baptist Churches, U.S.A.)

34500 Six Mile Rd., Just West of Farmington Rd.

• 1 SUNDAY

9:30 A.M. FAMILY BIBLE SCHOOL

10:45 A.M. WORSHIP

WEDNESDAY

6:15 P.M. DINNER (RSVP)

7:00 P.M. FAMILY NIGHT PROGRAM

Rev. Ronald E. Cary 261-6950

ABC/

4SOOC SOUTH TERRITORIAL ROAD

PLYMOUTH. MtCMlOAN «St 70 _

455-2300

MX-

Redford Baptist Church

7 Mile Road and Grand River

Detroit. Michigan

533-2300

Sunday, September 27th

9:30 A.M. Morning Worship

"God Still Lovaa Tha Church"

Rev. Elmer E. Rose preaching

10:45 AM. Church School For AH Ages

Rev Eime- E »ow Rev Mart FieMs-Sommers Mrs Donna Gieason

Interim Pastor Associate Paste* Director ol Music

-

IJL.

September 27th v

11:00 A.M. Morning Worship

Dr. WilUam Stahl preaching

•V 1230 P.M. Church Picnic

PASTORS

-« Wm. M. Stahl. D. Min. Thos. P&.S. M. Div.

Cheryl Kaye. Music Director

a place to belong a place to become

FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH

(a ministry of the Baptist General Conference)

9:40 A.M. Sunday School •

, 10:30 A.M. Worship Service i

- now meeting in the Smith Elementary School -

(nursery

McKin ti>

•jis

'®y- Plymouth

(children's church: Rev. Peter A. Foreman, Th. M., pastor 455-1509

ST. MATTHEWS

UNITED METHODIST

30900 Six Mile Rd 0e»dT Strong.

WUrMKlMMMV Ulramr. (72-6036

10:00 A.M Worship Service

10:00 A.M Church School

(3 yrs. - 8th Grade) .

10:00 A.M. Jr. 8 Sr High Class

litis A M Adult Study Class

Nursery Provided

NEWBURG UNITED

METHODIST CHURCH

38500 Ann Arbor TraH

Livonia's Oldest Church

422-0149

Church School and Worshfo Services

9:15 8 11:00 A.M

-27th

'Overcome Evil With God'

Rev. Ed Coiey preaching

Ministers:

Edward C Coiey. Roy Forsyth

Nursery Provided

CHERRY ISLL IS8TCD METW00IST CHURCH

Rev. John R Henry 495-0035

Worship 8.30 and 11:00 A M

Church School tor a* ages at 9:30 A M

Nurssry Provided at the 11:00 Service

321 Ridge Road

|uet South o< Cherry HSI m Canity

UNITED METHODIST

NORTHWEST BAPTIST

23845 Middlebelt Rd. 474-3393

Evening Service 7:00 P.M.

Wednesday Service 7 00 P.M.

Sunday School 9:45 A.M.

Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.

Re. Richard L. Karr. Pastor Nursery AvaMabW

L\Y/J

V1V

NARDIN PARK UNITED

METHODIST CHURCH

298S7 West Eleven Mtte Road

Just West of Middlebelt

9:15 4 11:00 A M Worship Service

"You Never Know"

Or. Wm Ritter

Or WrthwnA RWier. Pastor

R«v George KSbourn

Rev Devid R Strobe. Ateoc Pastor

Mr Maivtn Rookus. Oir ot Mu«c

Mary T. Tame Owcorw M»e» of Education

ALOERSQATE

UNITED METHOOIST CHURCH

(Redford Twp.)

10000 BEECH DALY RQAfl

Derwven Plymouth and war ChtceQo

Redford. Ml 48239 S37-S170

8.30 A.M. Chapel Worship

Service

9:45 A.M. Church School -

All Agee

11*0 A.M. Worship Service

"What Is In It For Me?"

Minister of Music: Rieherd Schneider

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

of Plymouth

, 45201 N Territorial 4S3-&2S0

WORSHIP A CHURCH SCHOOL N-12

MAIWOI—

Weeneadey Emmw to

johnN 3 ,i ran * Owner - Vovm * *


SB* 04IE Thurso ay. Sop I em Dor 24. 1M7

Family affair

Th« singing group W« Art Family will perform at 6:30 p.m.

Sunday at United Assembly of God, 46500 N. Territorial,

Plymouth. The group is made up of 12 members of the

Pare family of California who are on their fourth nationwide

tour. Baby-sitting will be provided during the aervice.

E S V I!E

[• Draperies

• Shutters

U Window

Shades

l%

NEW LOCATION IN SOUTMFIELD:

SOUTNFKU) MN SeatMwM ReM W*»i 357-4710

NUMnSTM MUS: 31Z0S Ocluttf lJk( IHvMcn S< I 855-6972

STBUSC NCTS. «1S4 «w Dytt (Jin1 Herm at UVt Milt I 739-21 30

ST. cum SNOWS Call For l» horn* Ap*>mtm«r>i 977-1410

HMT HCMUTU- Call Ear la-earn* ktmmnam 6SO-1032

•VI MMTMYIU1 Call far la-Hanc A**ai*m*ai 344-0009

MB M M Can Foi la Mom, Appe MMM 971 -5244

The

Plymouth Inn

The Gracious Alternative

Someone you love is growing

older and needs just a bit more

support than he or she can get in

their current living situation. A

nursing home isn't the answer.

Normal activities like eating and

dressing aren't a problem. But

you would be happier knowing

someone was there to provide

gentle encouragement and Grm

support when needed, in a

non-institutional atmosphere.

The answer is The Plymouth

Inn. a magnificent residence

for seniors who want their

independence but need some

supervision as well. Consider

some of the many advantages:

• Spacious mini-suites for

tho^ who desire extra

comfort and privacy.

• Deluxe semi-private

accomodations, richly

appointed, with private

lavatories and showers.

• Mini-Blinds \

• Pleated Shades C2I

• Wood-Slat

Blinds J

• Easily accessible via 1-96 and

1-275; only 30 minutes from

both downtown Detroit and

the northern suburbs.

including Farmington Hills.

• Birmingham and West

Bloomfield.

• Tranquil landscaped grounds

and lovely common areas.

• Three delicious meals served

in our central dining room by a

friendly, attentive staff of

professionals.

• Extensive, varied social

programs and recreational

opportunities.

• Game room, chapel, beauty

parlor and lounges, all designed

with the special needs of our

residents in mind.

The Plymouth Inn welcomes

your inspection visit. When

you see what we have to offer

we think you will agree that

The Plymouth Inn

is a very special

place where your

loved one can .

feel secure, yet

independent. We

invite you to call

today for an

appointment

(313)451-0700

The Plymouth inn

205 Haggerty Road

Plymouth. Ml 48170

bazaars

• ROSEDALE GARDENS Garden City. 32&S0 Cherry Hill, be-

Women will have a rummage sale will be some 70 displays of country

from 9:30 a.m. to 8 pm Thursday. folk art, early Americana and an-

Sept. 24, In the Fellowship Hall of tique reproductions. Price is $1.50.

tbe church, Hubbard at West Chica- Those attending should not bring

go, Livonia. Jewelry, clothing, toys strollers. Gift certificates as door

and household items will be on sale. prizes, lunches and refreshments

will be available. For exhibit information,

call 336-3947 between 8:30

a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday.

• ST. MAURICE

St. Maurice Rosary Altar Society

will have a rummage sale from 9

a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

Sept 24-25, in the church hall. 32765

Lyndon, east of Farmington Road,

Livonia.

• GARDEN CITY

PRE 8BYTERI AN

Garden City Presbyterian Church.

1841 Middlebelt, ooe block south of

Ford Road, will have a flea market

from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Sept

26. Clothing, household items, toys

and more will be on sale. For more

information, call 421-7620.

• ST. VALENTINE

St Valentine Church will have a

rummage sale from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Saturday. Sept. 26, in tbe Church's'

Activities Building. Beech Daly and

Hope, three blocks south of Five

Mile, Redford Township. Clothing,

appliances, furnishings, toys and collectibles

will be on sale.

• CRAFT GALLERY

Craft Gallery will bold its first fall

show of the season from 10 a.m. to 4

p.m. Sunday, Sept. 27, at Roma's of

• REDFORD DAV

Redford Unit 115 DAV Auxiliary

is sponsoring a rummage and craft

sale at the DAV Hall, 25544 Five

Mile, Friday, Oct 1, from 9 a.m. to 3

p.m. and Saturday, Oct 3. Friday,

from 9 a.m to 1 p.m. Reservations

are being accepted for table rentals

Price is $10 per table. Call 537-0687

for more information.

• ST. ELIZABETH

St Elizabeth Church Rummage

and Bake Sale will take place from 9

a.m. to 1 p.m.Saturday. Oct. 3. at the

church, 26431 West Chicago, Redford

Township. • •

• MERCY HIGH

Mercy High School, 11 Mile and

Middlebelt Farmington Hills, will

have a Folk Art and Country Crafts

Festival from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday.

Oct. 3. There is a $1 admission.

which will go to tbe school's

scholarship program. For more information.

call 476-8020. ext. 241.

§ingle Point Ministries

warmly invites you to share in our

Autumn Edition

Eight Exciting, Helpful Weeks of Practical

Guidance to a Healthy Divorce Recovery

WORKSHOP SESSIONS WILL BE

HELD EACH THURSDAY.

BEGINNING OCTOBER 1st, 7-10 P.M.

AND WILL CONTINUE EACH THURSDAY EVENING

THROUGH NOVEMBER 19th. at WARD CHURCH

(KNOX HALL) - 17000 FARMINGTON RD. - LIVONIA

2 Miles North of I-96 on Farmington Road at Six Mile Rd.

The workshop is led by Andy Morgan, Minister to

Single Adults at Ward Church and will include

teaching and discussion on the following

subjects:

IDENTITY

GETTING MY "EX" IN FOCUS - FORGIVENESS

DATING AND REMARRIAGE - CHILDREN ... IN A DIVORCE

HELPING OTHERS THROUGH DIVORCE

Andy's warmth and understanding make him an

effective counselor and workshop leader.

For More Information

Call Single Point Ministries Office at 422-1854

SENSATIONAL STOREWIPE SAVINGS!

BECKWITH EVANS

Every Carpet! Every Area Rug! Every Remnant! Every NoAMax Vinyl!

Every Item In Every Store... Anniversary Sale Priced For Savings!

COMPLETELY INSTALLfD OVERQUALrTY PRIME PADOiNOl (except those carpels not requiring pa0)

SAVE $&86 YD.! DURABLE HEATHERED LOOP

Outstanding for home or office. 18 colors. Regular $16.74. Inst

SAVE $6.11 YD.! CARPET ONE NYLON SAXONY

Clearance of 6 color*. 875 sq. yds. to setl. Regular $15.99 Inst.

SAVE $4.62 YD.! CABIN CRAFTS NYLON PLUSH

A top seller in 8 very attractive color*. Regular $14.50 Inst.

SAVE $4.11 YD.! MULTICOLOR SCROLL PATTERN

Clearance of 2 colors. 545 sq. yds. Originally $13.99 Inst.

SAVE $2.62 YD.! COLORFUL KITCHEN PRINTS

4 patterns, 16 cokxs. Foam back. No pad requirad. Reg. $12.50 Inst.

COMPLETELY INSTALLED

OVER PRIME PADDING!

Outstanding value* from Lass.

Galaxy and other Una carpal makers.

Great *a lection' All first quality.

SAVE M YD.! LEES STAINBLOCKER PUJSH

Soaoalput naaao»3Mm Rag IXMm

SAVE M YD.! GALAXY THICK NYLON SAXONY

CnocaoiScorn ")*» ewbw "•«

SAVE M YD.! DEEP VIBRANT NYLON PLUSH

AnMMiogptuafti" Unc* color* flag

SAVE &51 YD.! BOLD MUUITONED SCULPTURE

'«•«*« K)loaaty caMaona Rag t


©Ije ©bseruer Heuispapers

Business classifieds inside

Marilyn Fitchett editor/591-2300

W i l l

it

j 1 1 , j _Aj i . i

11

ri

"t I * I * t 1

Thoraday, September 24. 1987 OAE *tO

Wayne Foster of Est** Furniture in Lansing

and Patrick Norton of La-Z-Boy compare

notea at a seminar sponsored by the Home

m

*

JERRY 2


2C*

business people

Scott E. Stinebangli of Plymouth

PontchartrajiT i^De^iL'stinebaugh

bad been sales manager with the

Northfield Hilton in Troy.

Alison B. Rubin of Canton Township

was named director of sales and

marketing for Hotel Pontchartrian

in Detroit. She had een director of

sales and marketing with the Airport

Hilton Inn at Metro Airport.

Nell Kurth of Plymouth was elect-,

ed president of the Wayne County Independent

Insurance Agents Association.

Kurth is owner and president

of Kurth Agencies Inc. of Garden

City.

Jack S. Friedman was appointed

senior architect with Ghafari Associates

Inc. of Livonia. He had been a

project architect with a Detroit architectural

and engineering company-

Jeff Payne of Minit-Lube in Redford

is in Salt Lake City, Utah, competing

in the company's national All-

Star Service Competition.

Merl Terry was appointed bead of

datebook

• PRESENTATION SKILLS

Thursdays, Sept. 24 to Nov. 12 —

"Successful Presentation Skill"

course offered 8-10 p.m. in Livonia.

Fee: $32. Information: 591-6400 Ext.

409. Sponsor: Schoolcraft College.

• BROKER REVIEW

Thursdays, Sept. 24 to Nov. 12 —

"Broker Preparation Review"

course offered 8-10 p.m. in Livonia.

Fee: $150. Information: 591-6400

Ext. 409. Sponsor: Schoolcraft College.

• TAX REFORM

Saturdays, Sept. 26 to Oct. 17 —

"Tax Reform Act - Update" for

CPAs offered from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

in Livonia. Fee: $32. Information:

591-6400 Ext. 409. Sponsor Schoolcraft

College.

• BUSINESS PLAN

Saturdays, Sept. 26 to Oct. 3 —

"Detailing a Business Plan" course

offered 9-11 a.m. in Livonia. Fee:

$15. Information: 591-6400 Ext. 409.

Sponsor: Schoolcraft College.

• SEARS STORES OPEN

Monday, Sept. 28 — Two stores

OStE Thursday. September 24, 1967

V

Kurth Stirwbaugh

the Aid Association for Lutherans

office in Livonia. Terry had been an

AAL district representative in

Fraser before coming to Livonia.

Thomas D. Saner joined the Merl

L. Terry Agency in Livonia as a district

representative for the Aid Association

for Lutherans.

Robb L. Howell of Westland attended

a national sales conference

sponsored by the Aid Association for

Lutherans, a fraternal benefit society.

Howell was selected based on

specializing in paint, hardware and

related products will open in Redford

Township and Canton Township.

The Canton Township store is at

42083 Ford. The telephone number is

981-3055. The Redrord Township

sotre is at 25720 Joy. The telephone

number is 425-4285.

• LIVONIA CHAMBER

Tuesday, Sept. 29 — Small business

exporting discussed at Livonia

Chamber of Commerce's Brain

Brightener Breakfast 8-9 a.m. at

15401 Farmington Road. Fee: $5. Information:

Jenny Levy, 427-2122.

• QUALITY CONTROL

Tuesday, Sept. 29 — American Soceity

for Quality Control meets in

Novi. Information: Carol Morgan.

481-7680.

• CAD

Saturday, Oct. 3 — "Introduction

to Computer-Aided Drafting and Design.

Part I" offered from noon to 5

p.m. in Livonia. Fee: $99. Information:

591-6400 Ext. 409. Sponsor:

Schoolcraft College.

• DIMENSIONING

Saturdays, Oct. 3,10 - "Introduction

to Geometric Dimensioning and

Tolerancing" offered from 8 a.m. to

noon in Livonia. Fee: $65. Informa-

Rubin

P A Y Y O U R 1985

A N D PRIOR Y E A R S

C O U N T Y T A X E S

N O W A N D S A V E

outstanding sales and service. He

placed $3.3 million in life insurance

during the last year. Since joining

AAL in 1981, he has placed more

than $33 million in insurance.

Richard P. Johnson attended a national

sales conference sponsored by

the Aid Association for Lutherans.

Johnson placed $7.8 million in life

insurance during the last yttr. Since

joining AAL in 1985, he hM placed

more than $18 million in insurance.

He is associated with the Merl L.

Terry agency in Livonia.

tion: 591-6400 Ext. 409. Sponsor

Schoolcraft College.

• SECRETARIES EDUCATION

Saturdays, Oct. 3-31 — Economics

and Business Management class offers

1.6 continuing education units

8:30-11:40 a.m. in Room AS124,

Schoolcraft College. 18600 Haggerty,

Livonia. Fee: $35. Information: 591-

6400 Ext. 410.

• LUMP SUM RETIREMENT *

Tuesday. Oct. 6 — "Retirement

Lump Sum Distribution" offered 6-8

p.m. in Livonia. Fee: $15. Information:

591-6400 Ext. 409. Sponsor:

Schoolcraft College.

• TAX SEMINAR

Tuesday, Oct. 6 — Estate-planning

seminar. "Consequences of the

1986 Tax Law," offered 7:30-9:30

p.m. in Dearborn. Fee: $5. Information:

593-5120. Sponsor Arthritis

Foundation.

• PERSONALITY STYLES

Wednesday, Oct. 7 — "Behavior

Style Inventory" to analyze your

style of approach to business problems

offered 7-9 p.m. in Livonia. In-

Beginning October 1, 1987, a $10.00 charge will be added to

each legal description in accordance with the state tax law. 1985

delinquent tax notices are now being mailed to last owner of

record. If you owe 1985 taxes and have not received a notice,

please contact:

R A Y M O N D J. W O J T O W i C Z

W A Y N E COUNTY T R E A S U R E R

208 City-County Building

Two Woodward Avenue

Detroit, Michigan 48226

Office Hours: 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

u F

Wonderland

Antiques

& Collectibles Show

m o l l

PLYMOUTH RD. A MIDDLEBELT • LIVONIA

522-4100

10 Mt.* • p.m. Monday-Saturday

Noon-5 p.m. Sunday

September 24-27

Over 35 Dealers .

a

marketplace

• CANTON APARTMENTS

Forty-one one- and two-bedroom

apartments will be built at Haggerty

and Foid in Canton Township.

Ground was broken Sept. 1 for

Heathmoore Apartments Phase II.

• TRAVEL AGENT

ENDORSED

Travel Tyme Inc. of Plymouth has

been endorsed as an International

Airlines Travel Agent by the International

Airlines Travel Agent Network.

• OBGYNs

Dr. Linda R. Tucker joined the

practice of Dr. John D. Sellers, with

three offices: 28711 W. Eight Mile,

Suite E in Livonia, 30623 Ford in

Garden City and 9365 Haggerty in

Plymouth. The telephone number is

471-0580. v

• AUTOMATION SUPPLIER

Hi-Tech Automation, a new supplier

of automation and tooling

equipment, opened at-13281 Merriman

in Livonia. Tbe telephone number

is 261-0476.

• MERVYN'S TO OPEN

Mervyn's will open a store this fall

formation: 591-6400 Ext. 409. Sponsor.

Schoolcraft College.

• TAX SEMINAR

Tuesday, Oct. 14 - Estate-planning

seminar, "Wills, Trusts and Estate

Planning," offered 7:30-9:30

p.m. in Dearborn. Fee: $5. Information:

593-5120. Sponsor: Arthritis

Foundation.

• SMALL BUSINESSES

Wednesday, Oct. 14 — Free "Financing

a Small Business" small

business fair 7-9 p.m. at Carl Sandburg

Branch of Livonia Public Li-

GRAND OPENING SALE

AT OUR NEW FARMINGTON LOCATION

FABRIC & LABOR SPECIAL,

On Drapery,

Slipcovers &

Upholstery

Large Selection of

Upholstery Fabrics

at Livonia Mall, Middlebelt and Seven

Mile.

• AD AGENCY NAMED

AK&R Communications of Uvoma

was hired as tbe advertising agency

for Chroma tech Inc. of Plymouth.

• CAN BIO ON U.S.

Circuits DMA of Livonia has been

notified by the Defense Logistic

Agency that is may bid and supply

print circuit boards to tbe military

• CHROMATECH MOVES

Chroma tech, a pxoducer of coloring

compounds for the chemical industry,

has moved from Livonia to

larger quarters in Plymouth. Tbe

new address is 409. Plymouth Road

The new telephone number is 45 lr

1230.

• WINNING PRINTER

Robins Printing Co. of Livonia

received five Certificate of Merit

awards in the 1987 Printing Industries

of America Inc. Graphic Arts

Awards Competition. The event

drew more than 6,700 entries.

• SHOPPING AREA

The Shoppes at Sheldon Crossings

brary, 30100 W. Seven Mile. Livonia.

Sponsor small business development

center of Wayne State University.

Send information for datebook

to t*usinesq.editor, Observer & Eccentric

Newspapers, 36251

Schoolcraft, Livonia 48150. Deadline

is Monday for publication in

the upcoming Thursday issue. If

your item is about something to

happen several weeks in the future,

it may be run more than

once, space permitting.

476-7790 or 476-7035

32305 Grand River (W. of Orchard Lake) Farmington Ml 49024

W e

m a k e

t h e

A m e r i c a n

c o m e

t r u e .

v

o

Co ^TuL7

will open this winter at Sheldon and

Warren roads in Canton Township.

• CARPET WINNER

A.R. Kramer of Livonia received

the 1986 Milliken Place Pursuit of

Excellence award from Milliken k

Co., which sells carpets and rugs.

• NEW DENTIST

Dr. Brian H. Andress has opened a

family dental practice in the

Charles towne Offices at Eight Mile

between Farmington and Newburgh

roads.

• SAVINGS BONDS RATES

A toll-free telephone service

makes It easier to learn the current

interest rate paid on variable-rate

U.S. Savings Bonds and other facts

about the U.S. Treasury security.

Dial 1 (800) US BONDS.

Send information for marketplace

to business editor, Observer

& Eccentric Newspapers, 36251

Schoolcraft, Livonia 48150. Deadline

is Monday for publication in

the upcoming Thursday issue. If

your item is about something to

happen several weeks in the future,

it may be run more than

once, space permitting.

H E R A L D

WHOLESALE

BALDWIN

11 of 10,000

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HOME

27041 SouthflekJ Rd. • Southfield, Michigan 44076

Member Better Business Bureeu

llseil e i % Bfhjn ari • • n it m • A aMn n

MOTHJOt Mirr>»Qin ' wmOOMng AMOOl!K)r

PHONE 557-0211

Thursa^TSMamberT*: 11)87 O&k. *ae—

H e l p i n g o t h e r s n o w c a n h e l p y o u a t t a x t i m e

It's that time of the year again.

Soon you will be asked to dig a little

deeper for your favorite charity this

year. White it feels good to be charitable,

a* sensible way to - give is to

make economically sound decisions

Variety Galore

We will identify here five types of

planned giving. Each type has advantages

and disadvantages, and not

all types are appropriate for you.

a Bequest By Will- A bequest is a

gift of personal property or land. It

is classified as specific or general.

The former is a gift of a particular

specified kind of property The latter

may be satisfied — from the general

assets of the estate.

a Charitable Remainder Annuity

Trust. This is created by a donor irrevocably

transferring money or

securities CO a trust for the benefit of

a charitable organization in exchange

for a fixed annual dollar

amount. At the death of tbe donor or

the last surviving beneficiary, tbe

assets of the trust are transferred to

the charitable organization. Tbe donor

receives a current income Ux

deduction for tbe present value of

the property, which will eventually

pass to the charity

• Charitable Remainder Unitrust.

In a "straight" unitrust, the donor

irrevocably transfers money.

finances and you

Sid

Mittra

"securities or property to a charitable

trust. Payments from the trust

(equal to a fixed percentage of the

net market value of the trust assets)

are annually distributed to named

beneficiaries. On the death of tbe

last beneficiary tbe assets are distributed

to the charitable remainder

man. The donor will receive a cur-

rent income tax deduction for the

present value of the property, which

will eventually pass to the charity.

Pooled Income Fund A trust accepts

irrevocable gifts of money or

securities from donors, comingling

said gifts with property of other donors

who have made similar trans-

B u s i n e s s n e e d n o t b e t r a d i t i o n a l

Every new business begins with an

idea This week's column is devoted

to some of the more unusual ideas

that have resulted in successful business

ventures for the entrepreneurs

behind them:

• The Teacher's Agency offers

courses on a wide range of subjects

that are taught by certified instructors

at non-traditional locations. Depending

on the demand and enrollment

size, students may be^able to

learn French at the local travel

agency or practice painting at a

nearby gallery. The teachers split

the tuition with the college or business

organization sponsoring the

class.

EVER WONDERED what happens

to all those golf balls that find

their way into the waters of America's

golf courses? They're being recovered

and resold.

One West Coast operator retrieves

more than 50,000 golf balls per

months At a resale price of 25 cents

each, the business is generating quite

a "foretime."

The "no-paper wallpaper service"

began when a hand-roller device was

created to roll wallpaper designs

onto a wall-without the wallpaper.

The no-paper wallpaper, which is really

paint, rolls up to three colors si-

focus: small business

Mary

DIPaolo

multaneously — without the lines

where sheets of wallpaper would

normally meet.

THE SERVICE has grown in popularity.

with motels and apartment

complexes representing the primary

customer markets.

Stork's Landing allows proud parents

and grandparents to announce

the birth of the newest additions to

the family in a big way. For $12 per

day, the company will rent customers

one of its larger-than-life-sized

storks that may be displayed outside

of the home or office.

Each birth anouncement package

comes with a stork and the individual

baby bundle (boy. girl or twins)

that snaps into place on the stork

signs. Show cards and delivery certificates

that may be personalized and

used as part of the announcemttit

display are included.

FUELISH OFFER

FREE GAS FOR 2 MONTHS WITH EVERY

LONG-LIVED BRYANT FURNACE WE

INSTALL BEFORE JANUARY 31.

Now's a bargain time to get a new deluxe model

Plus 90* furnace with up to 97.3% energy

efficiency. Because we'll pay you back for your

two highest monthly gas bills of the season after

Installation! And our easy-term financing makes

the best equipment available even more

affordable. Offer valid only from participating

dealers from now until January.31, 1988. Call

today for details. -

. FREE ESTIMATES • INSURED

1987— . MECHANICAL LICENSE • FINANCING

#605 AVAILABLE

LONG LIFE RUNS IN THE FAMILY

fort #one

CALL TODAY

363-8636 HEATING ft COOLING, INC

DEARBORN , _ 338-1600

HEIGHTS 19169 Beech Dely REDFORD

PEN PALS for Life is a letterwriting

service for senior citizens

that was developed eight months ago

by Steve Leonard, a 28-year-old

jewelry store manager in Denver.

For $55 per year, Leonard will

write 12 monthly letters to help

brighten the lives of older people

Each letter takes about 45 minutes

to compose, with tbe majority of

business being generated by individuals

giving Pen Pals for Life subscriptions

as gifts to parents, relatives

and family friends.

Next week's column will focus on

franchising and whether it represents

tbe right opportunity for the

would-be entrepreneur.

Mary DiPaolo ts the owner of

MarkeTrends. a Farmington

Hills-based business consulting

firm. She is also producer and

host of the cable television series.

"Focus: The Small Business Environment."

• 0&E Classifieds work! • 0&E Classifieds work! •

Bee Katt Travel pre J^ nTS

CRUISE NIGHT ± '87 FREE CRUISE

TUESDAY,

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7-10 PJI.

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FINANCIAL 1M>EPEM)E^CEWEEK

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

SPONSORED BY LEADING PROFESSIONAL AND

EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS IN THE FINANCIAL

SERVICES INDUSTRY, PUBLIC SEMINARS WILL BE

CONDUCTED TO FOCUS ON THE IMPORTANCE OF

PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNING. FEATURING

EXPERT PANEL DISCUSSIONS REPRESENTING ALL

FACETS OF SOUND PLANNING. ATTENDEES WILL

BE ABLE TO ASK QUESTIONS AND WILL RECEIVE

INFORMATION FROM QUALIFIED SOURCES

SEMINARS WILL BE HELD AT THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS ON

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24

10:00 am - 12 pm

MARK YOUR CALENDAR - CALL FOR RESERVATIONS TODAY

Baldwin Public Library

Birmingham

Reservations: 647-4333

Charge: $5.00

Oakland Community College

Auburn Hills

Reservations: 853-4241

Charge $10.00

Henry Ford Community College

Dearborn

Reservations: 274-7420

Charge $5.00

Schoolcraft Community College

Livonia

Reservations: 591-6400

Charge: $5.00

Washtenaw Community College

Ann Arbor

Reservations: 973-3616

Charge: $10.00

* * * * * * Your first step * * * * * *

toward financial security...

PLUS: Many Otter

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fers. A life income interest is retained

for tbe donor and/or his beneficiaries

At the death of the last

beneficiary, the charitable organization

severs t hp donor s share of tbe

Pooled Fund and uses it for its charitable

purposes The donor will

receive a current income tax deduction

for the present value of the

property, which will eventually pass

to the charity.

Life Insurance. By assigning insurance

to the chanty with the charity

as owner, the premiums will become

income tax deductible. Alternatively.

a donor can retain

ownership but name the charity as

primary or secondary beneficiary

Under the new tax law, a life insur-

FINISHED

CALIFORNIA

SUNSHINE

?178

$138

Canadian

ance policy remains one of tbe most

attractive and flexible methods of

making a charitable contribution

Seminar 'Your Investments, your

Taxes and Tax Reform." Tbe seminar,

sponsored by tbe Observer &

Eccentric Newspapers and Coordinated

Financial Planning, will be

held 7-9.30 p.m Wednesday. Oct. 21,

at the Kingsley Inn. 1475 N. Woodward,

Bloomfield Hills

For more information or reservations,

call 643-8888

Sid Mittra is a professor of

management at Oakland University

and president of Coordinated

Financial Planning.

We're looking for carriers to deliver The

Observer & Eccentric Newspapers.

Interested?

Call 581-0500 for route details

n n o i J

of Mecosta,

Michigan

INTROOUCES "QUARTEROWNERSHIP"...

the nation's fastest growing second home concept Pampe r

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Al waterbeds are your choice of size!

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Alpena General Hoepttal

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Leisure Living

Cultural facilities

Educational facilities

Seruor Citizen Center

AARP Chapter

For mora information Cell or write us; Reftremen! Lrwng. P O Bo* IBS

Alpena: Ml 49707. 1-800-582-1906'

Sponaorad Alpana Comnuvty CoS«0». Cmttm lor Economc Expansion

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5 3 2 - 1 3 4 0


4C*(R,W.Q-7D)

OAE Thursday. September 24. 1967

Questions to ask when

picking, planting trees

Q. Can you give me some guidelines

for picking out a tree?

A. When you visit your local nursery

or greenhouse, you'll probably

be overwhelmed by the wide range

of choices.

First, you should consider how

much space you have for your tree

and what the purpose for planting

the tree is.

You may want to choose a tree because

of its beautiful blossoms, the

fruit or nuts it will provide, its ability

to attract wildlife or to prevent

erosion.

Each species of tree has its own

preferences of climate, soil, moisture

and amount of sun it can tolerate

for successful growth.

Your county cooperative extension

service or local nursery garden

center can answer specific questions

regarding the best choice for your

area ,« j

QUESTIONS to ask yourself and

the gardening expert when buying a

tree.

c o n s u m e r m a i l b a g

\

Terry Gibb

1. Does the tree need full sun, partial

shade, or complete shade?

2. Will the tree withstand cold and

hot weather?

3. Is the tree susceptible to diseases

or to damage by insects?

4. Does it need acid soil or sweet

soil?

5. Does it need a dry area or a wet

area?

6. How big will the tree grow and

how fast?

7. Should it be planted close to a

building or to other trees, or does it

need open space?

8. Can I plant flowers under the

tree?

9. Does it need special care the

first few years?

10. Will it produce nuts, fruit,

cones, or colorful leaves or flowers?

11. Will it give good shade in summer

and winter"'

12. Is the tree smog resistant?

Find out if you are planting along a

major highway.

13. How far should I plant the tree

from a sewer or drain line, sidewalk

or driveway?

14. Does it have shallow or deep

roots and how well will it withstand

wind?

The Consumer Mailbag answers

your questions. Address

mail to The Consumer Mailbag,

Concern Detroit. One Kennedy

Square, 4th Floor. Detroit, 48226.

Easter pre-trial to begin

AP — A pre-trial hearing will be

held Friday for a woman and her

three sons charged in the July 9 slayings

of three Inkster police officers.

Alberta Easter, 69, and her sons.

Roy Lemons Jr., 47, William Lemons,

42, and George Lemons, 45,

have been bound over for trial on

first-degree murder and other

charges in the officers' shooting

3

FURNITURE

tndodM 42" Hound Formica Topped

Pwtostal with Two 12"

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SALE *799

OPEN DAILY 584 w. Ann Arbor Tr.

(B«t. Lilley Rd. & Main St

Plymouth- 453-4?

Vv*

3*

„ J" •

• V"

deaths.

They were ordered to remain held

without bond by District Judge Robert

Brzezinski of Livonia, who presided

over the suspects' three-week

preliminary examination.

The suspects are scheduled for

pre-trial hearing before Detroit Recorders

Court Chief Judge Dalton

Roberson. ,

* s 150°° REBATE

DELUXE FURNACE8ALE

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city pormtts extra

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Garden City Canton Twp. Farmington

427-6812 #81-5600 477-8600

C?y*ah^. - •

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SEASON ENDING SPECIALS

AUTOMATIC LAWN SPRINKLING SYSTEMS

SAVE 10%

If you're really serious about having a beautiful green lawn, get a

custom designed automatic sprinkling system installed by the

G.R. OSBORNE COMPANY

There's still plenty of time to get this marvelous time and labor

saver installed this year.

Order now. get our best price and then present this ad and we'll

cut 10% off the stated price. That can mean $200 or more on large

lawns. $100-5150 on most others.

Call (313) 278-0916 for a free estim

SERVICE AND REPAIR • WINTERIZATION

Serving all of Southeastern Michigan

CORNED BEEF • PASTRAMI • COOKED BEEF

QUALITY PRODUCTS DESIGNED TO SATISFY ALL YOUR

PARTY. AND LUNCHTIME NEEDS.

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FOR THE GROCER NEAREST YOU, CALL (313) 567-8000

FUELISH OFFER

FREE GAS FOR 2 MONTHS WITH EVERY

LONG-LIVED BRYANT FURNACE WE INSTALL

BEFORE JANUARY 31.

Now* a bargain time lo get a new deluxe model

Plus go"* fumece with up lo 973N energy efficiency

Because well pay you back lor your two highest

monthly gas b«lls o< tt* season alter .mullatwn' And

aur easy term financing makes the best equipment

available even more a»orrand of song, stand-up comedy

and "general bizarreness to Detroit

for his legion of fans — demented or

otherwise.

Reached by phone in Cleveland.

Addqtta is anything but weird. Actually

* wide-ranging conversation

reveals the Illinois native as a deeply

kpmane individual, with strong

viefr* oo what is and is not funny.

'Y.ve been doing comedy since

jgftf _ stand-up comedy and musical

comedy A lot of what I do is

song. My act is pretty eclectic. I go

• See related story on Mark

Ridley's Comedy Castle,

page 6-C.

from serious to nutty to redundant,

and in a show I might throw in four

songs. Actually, I have quite a catalog

of music. Your act has to be flexible,

and yet the people get confused

if you change it around."

MAYBE. BUT Addotta's act

doesn't confuse his fans who have

swelled while the comic appeared on

"The Tonight Show," worked on the

syndicated "Make Me Laugh" and

now hosts "Everything Goes" on the

Playboy cable network.

"Being a comic was a childhood

fantasy of mine," Addotta goes on. "I

never told anyone. But some things

in life made me take stock: Why

can't I be a comedian?' When tbe

Tonight Show' moved out to California.

that was the last straw. I went,

too."

* °

» - -

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AND LAS VEGAS

PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

*

.

America's •ULTIMATE^ *

Entertainment Extravaganza

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DON'T MISS IS

WORLD FAMOUS PERFORMANCE

A Sizzling Sight Yoa Will Noi Forget

Or. PhU Donahue. P M

On TV. Good Atamoon Dtm*. Plu» Mm* •*' Show*

3-3 HOUR SHOWS: SEPT 25, 26, 28

SHOW- 7:00 DOORS OPEN: 6:00

T T * /~v T> 7 ON MERRIMAN 1 BLK

RUMORZ - S. OF CHERRY HILL

Tickets: Advance, , 1O 0,, At The Door

Tickets Available at Both Cagfteys. Rumon or at the d

—1# » iMt.fttu t©a«» An ultimate coafcoMM


OSiE Thursday, Saptambar 24, 1967

/W

Achievers

lo speak

Continued from Paoe 5

THE FIRST lecture is a benefit

for the Michigan Cancer Foundation.

Charities are selected by her

advisory committee made up of a

group of 37 heavy hitters — powerful,

dedicated women in the community.

Mira Linder, a neighbor in

Bloomfield Hills, is chairwoman of

the advisory committee. Rivkin

said series ticket sales have been

excellent. Series patron tickets are

$120, individual patron $50 and

general admission $15, for reserved

seating. The general admission

series is $60. Group rates are

available.

Tickets may be obtained by calling

Mars Advertising at 354-9760,

or Mira Linder's Spa in the City at

Applegate Square in Southfield.

Rivkin is also known to the metro

poli tan-Detroit community for

her role in presenting the Michigan

Health Exposition, in partnership

with Glenda Greenwald, publisher

of Michigan Woman magazine. She

plans a fourth exposition in May,

hoping to reformat it as a family

health fair, rather than Just an

event for women.

Entertainers participate in pre-walk

A pre-walk rally featuring Borkowski

and Ttosochacki, Ortheia

Barnes, Barbara Bredius, Ron Coden,

Phil Marcus Esser, Charlie La-

timer and Josh White Jr. will be part

of Focus: Hope's Walk for Justice.

The 12th annual walk will be held

at 1.30 p.m. Sunday. Oct. 11. It be-

DINING ENTERTAINMENT

SHOWCASE OF BANDS

An opportunity to see & hear a variety of bands. Ideal for weddings,

dinner dances & special occasions. Available for functions anywhere in

the Metro Detroit area.

Tuesday, September 29, 1987

Refreshments 7:00 P.M. No admission charge

ROM.VS Ol III OOMI II I l>

2 IO l V T.l«»r;i|ili Koail

v a .

your

Amecican Express

ravel Agency

t

Stop in or call:

185 S. Woodward

Birmingham

6 4 2 - 3 3 9 0

noarfrwn Parkl»n« Tower 336-4200/Detrott Reo, Cen. 259-5030

I IMP dup

Wed.. Sat. & Sun. 1 1 Mon.-Sat.

DAILY LUNCHEONS & SNACKS Beginnlno Oct. 1st

ENTERTAINMENT FRI. & SAT.

"Playground"

Grand River at Farmington Rd. • 474-5941

; 15% OFF

SANY DINNER

We're Having You

for Dinner

at the Novi Hilton

Fresh whole steamed lobster is just one of many seafood

specialties we're cooking up for you. Come join us on Fridays

for our seafood buffet featuring some terrific catches:

Iced shrimp and oysters oo the half-shell

Smoked fish and cajun specials

Bouillabaisse and chowders

And for you land lubbers, we'll have Pastas. 8BQ Chicken or

Ribs and Steamship Round Of Beef Don'i miss the luscious

salads, delicious hot breads and assorted rolls. Then finish it all

off with a choice or two from our popular dessert table, maybe

Key Lime Pie or Chocolate Torte.

FRIDAYS 6 P.M. TO 11 P.M.

ADULTS $21.95 CHILDREN $14.95

Call now for reservations, and while you're at it. ask about our

Friday Feast Weekend Package.

X NOVI HILTON

1-27 S at B Mile Road

({1 t> 149-4000

'I've a/ways been into comedy. It's

what I know a lot about'

— Mark Ridley

Comedy Castle owner

great form of entertainment. See,

people want to laugh. Fve had guys

come up and tell me, 'Gee, I bad a

rotten week. Thanks for making me

feel good.' That kind of thing. And

you have this great club network

going, where you can aee people live.

And the times dont hurt either. Tbe

absurdity of it all."

These may be absurd times, but

they're certainly a golden age for

comedy. Tbe Showtime cable group

has Just selected a 15-clnb "Comedy

Network" for revolving shorts of

stand-up comedians. One of the clubs

selected was Ridley's Comedy Castle,

which will give the establishment

nationwide exposure.

"THEY PICKED 15 clubs across

the country, and they'll be going

around to each one for two-three

minute spots. It'll be great exposure

for Detroit-area comedians, as well

as for the Castle."

Back on stage, headliner Shell

Kay alternately insults and woos th

audience. Kay plays the evex

rowdier crowd like a violin. Everj

one is in stitches, tbe noise level i

furious and tbe dull decor is pounds

into-oblivion by laughter.

"We like just plain straight stand

up monologue," Ridley waxes philc

sophic. "Monologues, relating storie

of everyday life. We can all relate t

that"

And Friday night at the Corned

Castle, everybody is sure relating.

Mark Ridley's Comedy CastU

2593 "Woodward Ave.. Bertdei

Shows start at 8:30 p.m. Mondayi

Thursdays. There are two show:

at 8:30 and 11 p.m. Fridays-Sotui

days. Prices vary. Weekend rex

ervations recommended: 54J

9900.

Back on stage headliner Sheila Kay

alternately insult* and wooa the

audience.

tm ektertainmb

Tuesday thru Saturday

m m .

ICRIIN •

For Sporting Events/ • 9\

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Westland 459-7720

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COMPLETE DINNER

thr«Sat«rLa

When >ou take the boat horn

Amhersihurg. the nde's a little

shorter and costs a little less.

Imagine a place where lush

tropical segeiation grows in

profusion It's not the Amazon,

it's not deepest Africa, it's

Colasann's Thjpical Gardens

Go lo Windsor for the

the nightlife Lite jazz -1

Liketeck-n-rolP Ho«*

about bluegrass or

bagpipes or pops or

symphony" If >«u"re

looking for a little

night music »ou\e

5

come lo the nght

*JU can have lunch or dinner nght on the wan-: at J

place Windsor

places lite Windsor Hihon Smim von the Rw?r ot

* Lakeshore "Jferrace Ho»el down m Kmgsville Because

Windsor Essex County is practically the worH capita!

of waierfruot restaurants.

Actually there are more than five reasons to go to Windsor rvext weekena In fact, no

• tfc—> Go to Windsor for a walk along the beach, a ^° 11

^ mum ho* mam mere are " ,

m rtle paritoT take a ferry ^rideto Pelee Island. It's more than a way to gel oui

house It's a way to have a good tune Just say...

Convention 6 Visitor* Bureau ol Wlndaor, M

Eaaex County 6 W* 1 I

35i55»-* *

al Windsor Hihon. all meal* S200 1

cash foe showmo ticteU » Bob^o — _ i

and a >7S 00 fltfl owlOcay »or • ^

D*««h«*Mall M«lloVta*w I

Bureau. SO Chatham

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K (Offer ends O0 1$. 1«T)

^ Gateway to Incredible Ontario

win a • i

eekendi L_,

I Please send me more mfarmanon on Windsor ^ J

special colorful visitor's Ui

on Windsor and Ea** Co«*y

caH toB-lrea

1-

800-

265-3633

FAMILY DINING

SORRY NO DISCOUNTS APPL Y

DINNER FOR TWO

Choice ot:

Tenderloin Steak

Broiled Boston Scrod

Veal Parmesan

Chicken Cacciatore

All above include soup, tossed

salad, bread and butter fresh

garlic sticks, potato or pasta.

Mon.-Thurs. Fri-Sun.

s 10.95 11195

With Coupon • Good Thru 10/31/87

19385 Beech Daly

just SoutTt ol GrmnC

REDFORD

537-0740

27770 Plymouth

V, 8* ft w ofwwW

LIVONIA

427-1000

Thureday. Saptambar 24, 1S87

0*E

• AUDITION TIMES

The Detroit Center for the Performing

Arts is conducting auditions

for tbe play "Guilty Conscience" at 7

p.m. Thursday, Sept 24. Performances

will be Fnt^

«vemngs^r6Bn5cC23through Nov

21. There will be some Sunday matinees

Actors are requested to come

prepared with a three-minute comic

monologue For more information

call 961-7925.

• IN CONCERT

Eddie Murphy, with special guest

Paul Mooney, will appear at 7 p m

Sunday, Sept. 27. at Joe Louis Arena

in Detroit. Tickets are $17.50. Lynyrd

Skynyrd, with special guest the

Rossington Band, will perform at

7:30 p.m. Saturday. Oct 3. at Joe

Louis Arena. Tickets are $17.50 For

ticket information call 567-6000.

• LUCKY LADY

Damon Runyan's colorful characters

and the Frank Loesser score add

up to "Guys and Dolls." the opener of

the 22nd season at Meadow Brook

Theatre on Thursday. Oct. 8. on the

campus of Oakland University in Rochester

Hills. "If 1 Were a Bell.'

"-Luck Be a Lady" and "Sit Down.

You're Rocking the Boat" are some

of the popular songs Other productions

this season include "Dear Liar

(rescheduled for Nov 5-29), A

Christmas Carol," "Educating Rita.'

"Cat on a Hot Tin Roof." "Benefac-

(r.W.Q^C>*7C

tore" (rescheduled for Feb. 25 to

March 20), "Deathtrap" and "Harvey.'

Season tickets may be ordered

by calling the Meadow Brook Theatre

box office at 377-3800- Ifjdiv

ronsafiFOct 1.

• GALA BENEFIT

"An Evening on tbe Aisle." s gala

benefit oo Wednesday. Oct 7, will

herald tbe fall theater season at

Meadow Brook Theatre. The premiere

performance of the season s

opening show, "Guys and Dolls," will

be hosted by the Meadow Brook Theatre

Guild. Beginning at 6 p.m. with

a cocktail buffet, the party will take

place in' the adjoining Meadow

Brook Art Gallery and the foyer of

the theater The party's door prize is

a New York weekend supplied by

Suburban Travel in Rochester. Guild

members Flo Beck and Lois Matesa

are chairing tbe evening witb Marian

Mitchell, honorary chairperson.

Tickets for tbe black-tie optional

event are $6 per person. For tickets,

call 370-3316

• COMEDIC AUDITIONS

Stagecrafters of Royal Oak will

hold auditions for Larry Shue's comedy

The Foreigner" at 5 p.m. Sunday.

Oct. 4. and 7:30 p.m. Monday,

Oct. 5. at the Baldwin Theatre. Royal

Oak. Five male roles and two

female roles will be cast. Show dates

are Dec 4-6. 11-13 and 17-19 at the

Baldwin Theatre.

For more information, call 541-

8027

^TEAKHOS? e

• lOMC . H owm«[SS&SB** 1

WE ROAST

SLOWLY

AND CARVE

THICK.

Prime Rib Dinner $9.95

Our 12-14 pound choice prime ribs ol beef

are seasoned, seared and slowly roasted. Well

carve a thick juicy slice exactly to your order and

serve with homemade soup or salad, a baked

potato and fresh baked whole wheat bread.

17050 Laurel Park Di., S.

Livonia. 591-4145 .

Prime rib ts just one of the many good reasons

why you should visit us soon. r 5

GRILL

27522 Northwe-teni Hwy.

SotftteU. 350-3452

1555 Eat Maple Rd.

Trey, 689 8060


, September 24. 1987

8QP.C)

v o l u n t e e r s

I PROBATION VOLUNTEERS

35th District Court Probation De-

_ volunteers to

provide direct supervision of adult

misdemeanant probationers. The

only experience needed is an interest

in working with people. Volunteers

are needed to work between the

hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday

through Friday. The number of

hours per week and days per month

are negotiable. Training classes now

are being scheduled. Interested per-

sons should contact the Probation

Department at 459-4749.

• FISH NEEDS HELP

A Plymouth-Canton volunteer or-

ganization of neighbors helping

neighbors is in need of volunteers to

answer calls or drive on a once-a-

month basis. For more information

call FISH at 453-1110.

• TRAINING MENTORS

Youth Development is a diversion

program, in cooperation with the

Plymouth. Plymouth Township and

Canton Township police depart-

ments and Growth Works, for juve-

nile first-time offenders. The pro-

gram is designed for both the youth

and his/her parents as an alterna-

tive to the juvenile court system.

Growth Works trains volunteers to

- work on a weekly basis with the

youth. The training covers communi-

cation skills, empathy Ustening

skills, building and bonding relation-

" ships, alcohol and substance abuse,

decision making, consequences of be-

havior, parenting skills, and-crisis.

intervention. Training sessions total-

ing about 20 hours is open to all in-

terested people willing to commit to

at least six months of about three

hours per week. For information,

r- can Sue Davis, 455-4902 Monday

- through Friday.

- • FIRST STEP VOLUNTEERS

First Step, the Western Wayne

County Project on Domestic Assault,

needs volunteers 18 and older Jo an*

swer crisis lines, provide transporta-

tion and assist in community out-

reach. Volunteer opportunities are

available at the Westland office,

downriver satellite or at the shelter.

Anyone interested in volunteering

for First Step may call Therese Far-

ley at 525-2230 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

on weekdays.

• CANCER VOLUNTEERS

Anyone will to serve as a driver or

in another volunteer capacity in the

Michigan Cancer Foundation office

on Main Street in Plymouth may call _

the foundation s West Service Center

at 336-4110 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Volunteer drivers last year logged

more than 34.000 miles. Because ra-

diation therapy and chemotherapy

often require daily visits for several

weeks, a patient often will have two,

three or more drivers during the

course of one week s treatment, igan

Cancer Foundation is a Plymouth

Community FundUnited Way agen-

cy.

• AMATEUR PERFORMERS

The Plymouth Community Arts

Council is updating its list of ama-

teur performers who are willing to

share their time and talent with stu-

dents. The resource list is provided

by the PCAC to all elementary

teachers in Plymouth-Canton Com-

munity Schools. Particularly needed

this year are dancers, singers and

musicians. If you or someone you

know has a special skill they are

willing to share, call Pat Maclsaac

at 453-8051.

• EMERGENCY

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

The Plymouth Township Office of

Emergency Preparedness needs vol-

unteers to be trained in skills that

will be used during an emergency or

LEGAL NOTICE

INVITATION TO BID

CHARTER TOWNSHIP OF PLYMOUTH

PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS

The Charter Township of Plymouth will accept b>ds for a calendar or other

promotional piece up to 4:00 p.m on October 19.1987 -

Complete details may be obtained in the Request for Proposal i RFPi, which is

available at

Township Clerk 's Office

Charter Township of Plymouth

42350 Ann Arbor Road

Plymouth. MI 48170

45S-3840

ESTHER HULSING, Clerk

PabUsk September ~.4 and 21.1M7

Publisft September 14 and 28 IM7

disaster. Training includes damage

assessment, shelter management,

first aid, emergency operating cen-

ter support and service weather

spotting.

Training meetings are held from »

a.m. to noon on-the fourth Saturday

of each month in Plymouth Town-

ship Hall at Ann Arbor Road and

Mill. Township residency is not re-

quired. All training is free.

• WANTED: CIVIC

RADIO HELP

Plymouth Area REACT Team is

looking for members for emergency

radio communication (no experience

necessary) and other community

programs. All residents from Plym-

outh. Canton, Northville and sur-

rounding areas are invited. The

group meets at 8 p.m. the second

Thursday of each month at Plym-

outh Township Hall, Mill at Ann Ar-

bor Road. For more information,

call 455-9609 or 453-7641.

• 'RIDE WITH US'

Plymouth Area Citizens Team

program is made up of volunteers

from Plymouth and surrounding

communities who patrol the Plym-

outh area. Tbe organization is look-

ing Inr unilinear!

night (four-five hours) per month to

be tbe "eyes and ears" for the com-

munity. Those interested in going on

an observation ride with a PACT

member should call 459-2075.

• HISTORICAL MUSEUM

Volunteers are needed at the

Plymouth Historical Museum. Are

you interested in antiques and Plym-

outh history? Come in and visit your

museum and see what's there. The

museum needs volunteers for chang-

ing displays, helping in the gift shop,

typing, printing, sewing and helping

in the educational program for

school children Call 455-8940 or stop

in from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday

or Thursday to ask what you can do

to help.

• DELIVERING MEALS

Residents are encouraged to vol-

unteer their time to deliver meals

one day per week to the homebound

elderly in tbe city of Plymouth and

in Plymouth Township. Delivery

takes about 1M> hours, 11 am. to

12:30 p.m. Drivers are needed Mon-

day through Friday. Mileage reim-

bursement of 23 cents per mile is

available. For information, call

Louise Stern at 453-9703 between 10

a.m. and 1 p.m. Monday-Friday.

NOTICE OF LAST DAY

OF REGISTRATION

OF THE QUALIFIED ELECTORS OF

PLYMOUTH DISTRICT LIBRARY

COUNTY OF WAYNE, MICHIGAN

FOR THE SPECIAL ELECTION TO BE

HELD ON

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1987

TO THE QUALIFIED ELECTORS OF SAID DISTRICT:

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE thai a Special Election will be held in said District

on Tuesday, November 3,1987.

Act 269, Public Acts of Michigan. 1955, as amended, provides in part as

follows: -

"The inspectors of election at any annual or special election shall not receive

the vote of any person residing in a registration school district whose name is

not registered as an elector in the city or township in which be resides

The last day for receiving registrations for said special election will be Moo-

day. October 5. 1987. Persons registering after 5:00 o'clock p.m.. on Monday.

October 5. 1987, will not be eligible to vote at said special election Persons

planning to register must determine when the City and Township Clerk's Offices

will be open for registration.

Under the provisions of Act 269. Public Acts of Michigan, 1955. as amended,

registrations will not be taken by school officials, and only persons who have

registered as general electors with the appropriate City or Township Clerk of

the City and Township in which they reside, or through registration at a Secre-

tary of SUte drivers license bureau, are registered school electors

This Notice is given by order of the Board of Trustees of the Plymouth Dis-

trict Library. County of Wayne. Michigan

CATHERINE A DOETSCH, Board of Trustees

LEGAL NOTICE

CHARTER TOWNSHIP OF PLYMOUTH

NOTICE OF CLOSE OF REGISTRATION

To the qualified residenti of the Charter Township of PlynwuUr

Monday October 5, 1*7, will be the last day you may register for the „ facial

t o - * * -

£ R S L M M M **..

tnfiitinpossible for any unregistered qualified resident to appear at the Clerks

" 1 ? KTSYicThours icaUto the Township Clerk's office 453-3840 will

her deputy registrar will make an appointment to

E S S S Z m S t t S m

SSnhi^Pb^SDWrict Library levy against

, . iK

r>i*trirt an additional amount not to eiceed forty hundredths dot

for operating purpo^s of the Plymouth District Library?

» - F ~ r - again* the

nTn«Tm vear only beginning in December of \9U. and the funds thereby

• .•med ta be for the coostractloo of a swimming pool for publicuse l "

f U S l t p l T « d maintenance thereof to the «*-» that l^ds and

thereon. If any. are remaining from the two (1) mil

ing maintenance, operation and repair expenses Is not addressed t>> uus lS*u

TOWNSHIP PAR* PROPOSAL: .. n r r^ r t i e M ,n u*

91411 - Z *

1

. »

2 £ £ - l 35 mills tar bOlh S*12 Ortant»

rug. rual-bkia. S12S. 552-8601

CURTAINS, kllcnan S

Ota*, sol*, tovaaaat.

DARK PINE cnb a mamroaa. SWO

Br Bom S44-S7S5

APPLIANCES: 1 yaar on uaoy r.mn- C QraanAaM Sal. Sap! 2SBL.Sam

mora Mmond wMhar a E dryar. 21 5PM Fma KIR«T^ coMctabWM

_ . BAYNARO ESTATE SALES

MISCELLANEOUS:

mart D kltchan. bnao*. dolhing

chadran a MDY* daaignar Hxa 7.

ACCESSORIES SMrtmg III

Raad A Barton "Oaaart ROM

Warn eoaacbon A JaaMrJ

APPLIANCES: 2 »war OKU_atfr K*n-

mor* ' * ^

a II

BONUS Satactwo OI proMaawnaBy

mamtaanad larg* daalgnar plant*. 2

on* armad Oandit*. 3 lu» Mngtn

mink coal* (FMhar-Fltch-autumn

nazal, raocoon. ton. ooyoM (aefcat*.

oppoaaum mad coaU (MSLI. IBM

PC compuMr. color monitor a

ANEXCITING. QUALITY SALE!

Numbar* r—*»BM al 4pm Thur*. -

7 JOMT. FFL. 844-3982 or 336-S872

ANTIQUE AMERICAN

D E A R N E I G H B O R

IT you. a irMnd « a

aaMd M having _

pMaaacal Sharon

661-2681

ThM waak * MM A al: L^—_

Aparlmant*. 15700 Pro*ldanoa TT.

Apt 401. Somhhald, N. ol • MBa. W

o»Q

L»qu«daior» tar ovar 30 Yaara.

QompMM Houaahoid SAM Mgmt.

WM Buy ComptaM mvartorMa

626-6335

Mam o« MN. SocMly ol APpniaar*

ESTATE SALES 4

LIQUIDATIONS

- CONDUCTED BY -

The

Yellow Rose

SHIRLEY ROSE 425-*«26

M O V I N G

T O FLORIDA"

SAT. Sept 26 10-5

SUN. Sept 27 12-4

28369 Rivwrcraat

W olUhaar.S. 0*12 MBa

UceBeBRd IORNWOM*)

COMPLETE HOUSEHOLD

a.aRY«mg mual ba aok*

IlanradoN *oM. L»EI Ca»-

ttay ARNMI MMHOard. gMM

braM a wood Mn« AAL

map* wwmmm. " •

woodart gMM tap *C TABLE. fl_»aaMO wood

rounded comar*. il60

717 Lawn - Garden

Farm-Snow Equip

AW ENS RMmg Mower, bags*-

S450 AIM* muwblowar. 5MP MS

prop*aed. Mi Ohm a

ate T37-7l»6

w BLOOMITELD MO.WSM Fur

S T y ^ r X ^ ^ R d .

Thur* a Ffl. lOem-apm

1709 HouMhold Goods

Wayne County

I ALMOST NEW M *M maTOMi

thru Sun.

MOVING SALE SIOV* >150. r*n&-

arator >225 *nd labM*. W*c*er. tm.

Mac lurnbar >5 takaa *j > mora

Thur* thru Sal. 165SS «ouye-ay

W. pi mfealar. S oil 525-1346

REFRIGERATOR. >100. Gm MO*.

>60 Wooden deak. >25 «eyt»j

maoaona* 1966 thru Aug 1960

SSoZmy W3D*

SPACE HEATER 70* BTU toroed-

m vartad (natural gM) 3 »paed

>125 Qraal tor g*r *g* *53-1546

STROLLEE Iwm Mroaa _ .

i a i a r - M

I gauo* & baMet blue a ohM*.

uggSO/olMr 464-7052

714 Business*

Office Equipment

BURROUGHS

L3000

Bookkeepmg Ma-

il intereMed pMOM

897-7360

j TOW BAR

>60 00

lAtwood) 5000 lb

729-7879

ORIENTAL STYLE armolra.

38*80*190. beaowui maichad yam

M l >650 2 onantal *ol* MiM*.

TRUMPET good condition, >100

14*54. burtad

i. >500 i

VIP Vic Tanny U kw* UaiCwmt

w top F'M racouei a computer body ana-

« >1200 AINMleC 5000 dub*

469-7833 IJiebonaMe. 425-3144

PLYMOUTH, LIVING ROOM. 126 Ward*

IB 15 ai fl l'aao»i With baa-

>175 53^0571

AIR CONDITIONER-10 000 BTU


FILTER OUEEN

power noczM a —

condMon. co« 11.000

FILING CABINET - 2 Orewar* Deak

MM 5 drawer* Caah -egtw o 6B- f

IN ORDER TO MAKE ROOM

lor new truck loada mu« *e« cur-

rant >200.000 new mvanioryol;

OFFICE FURNITURE a SUPPLES

50% to 80% oil name brand* 175

852-1042

LIQUIDATION BARN

Naw erfhee lutipUM 8 tix«lure40

to BO% a« Mon thru Fn 9am-6pm.

Sal 10am-4pm 32242 E«hl MM

Rd.. Farrmnglon M. 476-3170

OFFICE FURNITURE tor MM - 5 X

r- metal deak a 78 X 34" I

leemer couch. 1 bMck Math*r a

wwnot char 2 gold twae^tItabrtc8

wamul chaw* Can 64S-7177

476-1818 CONCRETE muiar 1/4

motor. 2 cu R Lawn C M mower, a

HP Bngg* a Stralton • ^ n a ^ ^

CRAFTSMAN TRACTOR - 141^

brand new. >1300 68l-!»906

GAS CHA1NSAW 16" Sear* 2 cu

ai carton. >165 w-

i. li ma* 1 g»8nn lub ok 53t-*6>6

KEMP ELECTRIC Leal Shredder.

>125 Ca» ah*r 5pm

KENWORTH TRACTOR. 197%

3C OOC mM* on compiaM major

torn Haaper cab a*-.

— ~!t»r >13.200 Oak

Jack 8am-5pm weekday* 459-2000

Lawn Moww Leel Vecuum/*hredd-

wbegger SnowbPwar 5 HP^m-

pacity ndmg mower 336-6983

PARKER heavy duty lawn iiimpif

>75 Cycione *eed 8 lertHUar

•preeder >50 both trectw^puJMd

POWER MOWER BoMn* 22 M«-

mAcrong mower A* new

Cow >300 Sa«>t2S 64A-3Q32

RIDING LAWN MOWER. 8MP, 32

dock with (nowtwada >300 or DM

592-1831

FREEZER - UPRIGHT. 13 cu

>125 Refrigerator 17 cu fl >55

642-5470

« a*

TEN STATION Baeuly Shop Mdkig

SEARS IS HP twm cyknder tractor

•ini 4 ft mower deck >»50 Aher

8pm 591-0192

SEARS 6 HP we< muichar MtAclM*

Mave* 20 bag* lo 1 ratio Like new

Muel**« Sift

SNAPPER RH»NG MOWER - wWh

•now plow. Cham* a wel MM*

naw engine OOC' ftrm 8S5-2775

S r S T ^ S S f c ' ? r » T &

MOVING 2 piece *e— —.v- —-

a and labia*. Mr a Mr* Chair*. »

pec* lam«y room Mi*»* trod.

mapML Lowrwy Holiday DMu*e Or-

< cherry v 25 M*Qnevo. qorv-

. 1924 Singer alactric. rug (9'» X

ITTU, pano XIIIJIM*. MMC

31B40 SMn-n CbcM.

..-ssraat

553-9778 - 358-S883

DINETTE

tabM. 4 cane back

DINING ROOM SET. tabM. 3

i DINING ROOM tabM a 4 CNH. 2S

color conaolo tv. doubM bad. Mmpe

i CoWee labM 8 mac.

DINING labM a chaW. 42 « 700 or beel ofier

Mvs80a | *1 Frt. Saf Sept »,

SARCOLOUNGER. navy MO^ O-Ml

IL goto weddmg

Ml - mil >150

Oeye 2S2-6744 Ew* »1-38S4

BARGAIN - Nontaka Blua Rjdge

dMhe*. Mmtoe tor 12.

47M815

SEAUTyUL. handcraWad. ctawMel

daagn on Mg* Champraar. tabM

Mad* m spam naw. 2 large .to

m After 6pm 852-8666

air*. MM top dWng room

4chaK2bedroom aaM;cd-

orod TV. typawrlMr. book*. M*reo.

Zero*, mtonl a cnadren

ESTATE SALE. 330W CcMngten

Club Or, Farmmglon HIM. Apt 86

Of* 14 MM bilwMn MMk>>eC)eit m

BiaMUm Sd -Sun Sept 29-

27 >0em-4pm Waahar dryer. loM

d mac Hem*, mack-knock*. —

FLEXSTEEL COUCH

Avocado/GnktV Lka M*

5:30pm 363-5317

FRENCH SUPER Aubuaeon

>850 Ej10*8ant eondWon. 91* *SVi

I >1.250. 396-4511

SOFA. LOVE SEAT a Cher - 3PMC-

M. creem color E*cdMnt a^d^op

>250 or beel o«ar 533-5919

422-5150 e*1 204 FRlGlDAlRf "EAVY duty wedMr 8

»7^4S99

cudom gM dryar >325 pea,

t condition Mowng

USED OFFICE FURNITURE

color 13 chair* a * connacttngtabM

top* aiiceaanl cononer. ***>175

84". red.

456-2873

464-0746 or 451-1060

BEDROOM SET

(KxM

175

good 961-6760

BEDROOM Sd- droeeer with mirror

ched. bookaha*. dght dand.

qudtty >375 >61-4782

SOFA 96' - brown/rud Contempo-

rary dnmg room tabM. 2 lea»*e.

pad* 6 uphddared chair* >200

*ch or >350 both 562-4878

GAS RANGE

conimuou* clean, gold, good ccmd^-

ton. >150 /bed 397-3916 715 Computers

GAS STOVE Smn Kenmore, goto

$120

W7 - n

SNOW BuAO€ 42 weight* 8

ch*n* lor John Deere 110 300

826-7042

GE eMctrtc range maw

eelf cMenmg oven >200

COMMOOORE 128 with dMk dm*.

r«n, progr«n* >350 or bM^Ooug

TRUNDLE BED (IramM Ortyl. Nke

« ,5 ° - — 4 ^ 6

937-8352

GE ponabM dMhwadMr weaiMrt

>150 851-4076

BEDROOM SET

• •

>400

2 night

453-6368

BEDROOM SETS (2V chad o»

drawer* mm a 4 kitchen chaa*.

bad Couch a chair Irom

278-4667

ro* awe. bad Couch 8

1920 * bmmg room ad

538-5640

I SET

wood, two tving

chair*, one wood

After 6pm

4 pMce. cherry

426-7662

TWM BED WIN. 2 mattreeeeeoak

bookcaM heed board «ceBeni

>125 464-2674

GE RANGE. MI* cMnint.JOM*.

1 condition 396-5507

USE0 HHP Ward* ndmg treat*

working condition >300 flrai

BoMn* muichaig mower >75 CdJ

between 6pm-9»im 352-2870

718 Building Materials

COMMODORE 64 . 2-1541 drive,,

1525 printer, parallel pnnMr "Mr- \ CAST IRON Bat- tub WwOOy MM

face caaedto pMyw "2;

ra >375 IWm. 8S2-6267

UNKXIE opport^nty 2 r*r*. hand-

cralMd pure *8k lypd*. t-aud^Y

Ik* ofer 525-9182

GE MH-cMemng Move 8 rehigaiMOr

•nh ee a water daperawr "door

Almond (2 »eer* oM) »90 HUM

nawl After 4 30pm 661-5265

DIGITAL RAINBOW 100. 25«K.

RAM. MSDOS. CRM 86/80 8 pMC-

iftwere LA50 PrWrtar.

>2.250 464-3548

WARD Signdure pt

machine. 10 yr* old

397-6662

GE super stove with micro >200

iherp Carouael counter top "aero

>75 737-2269

WATERBED KMG K». compMM.

Mm. I* nil aokd oak bookcaM

naaririnarrl >350/o«er 422-3014

HOT

uke POINTE wH-LiMnmn c

new >75 536- 7025

buttonnoM*. dc 1972 modd me

on monthly payment* or >53 caah

UNIVERSAL

SEWING CENTER

334-0905

„_. d S5S Odk brown lormlc*

entertammant iM 8 malcMhg *oM

tabM >250 Da Mini mudWon

eti Tttrn

— Of

>130; crtb matU M*.

6a.-*" i

O P E N I N G S O O N

-The MAHOGANY STORE"

(AntKjuM & Hne Fumltur*)

owental R»QS

very i *aannehM. 1^87-3559

BEDROOM SUITE

SLUI

.Med board a 3 »l X 4Ifl. mlrron*

>4270. tor MM d >2300

PLAY

FULL

INTERIOR

BEDROOM SET, 5 PMCe dark pma.

quean MM. >S50 GM Caloric dove.

gold. >125 422-2699

BROYHILL 10 pc dl oak bedroom

*at wa6 udl. droaaer. mcmrn* con-

•Man. Mud M8 453-4007

WATERBE0 tang *B*. heeled

mirrored headboard. *torage

drawer*. >400 AIMr 8aM 0»^

KELV1NATOR WASHER - 1964

Lara capacity Cjciaa*nl condition

sFsbor^Midler 421-5315

KENMORE GAS dryer >45 397-0953

710 Misc. For Sale

Oakland County

640 K Ram 2 DSOO Noppy drive

1(360*1 HercuM* Monochrome

graphKa dMpiay and *dap«ar 'RS

232 Port. 1 u *»*•*' Ron 8161 En-

nenced Keyboard >850

•M djh MMty. *k* — ?!£££

arear >130 42^-3664

FOOTE BROS 2 -> cu

moar wrtti 2 . HP B 8 S *ngm*

New never u*ec M0C 336-378:

IBM PC Jwttor 126K dak dmM.

«40r monaor *

were program*. >750 453-2561

KAYPRO 2X with WordStar

CdcSlar Reportstw

>500 • 569-1*46

CHINA CABWET

46*17*68 MapM

I nor AIMrSPM:

AOULT MC4MUED

425-7223

Tradbonal groan/gold

i, green endr >50. and

COLONIAL COUCH 8 Chew >300

PMe labM. 4 chaw* >300 Large oa

pdrtlng. >100. W1-6278

COLONIAL dyto loveeed. >50.

matching chak >30 (rud 6 brown

Itord on beige oedcortxaidl. Belga

wai hugger reebner. 1*0. LJO« njd

rocker, nmm. >75 478-4793

CONTEMPORARY FumMM~

Erterldnmanl Canter. -—

um tan aola 8 loveeed >500 Oek

and tabM* - 1 aquare. i oc-.agor

>125 2 braM lamp*. »100A*V^

yr* old, anc *8ent. 4»-3406

COUCH - good condition >7S TooM

aiWengiackM 451-05M

COUCH

ainpe >225. , — —

MbM>50 ExCWMnlCQodt^^

COUNTRY ENGLISH aokd oafcdm-

mg tabM 6 Cher*. Md >1.750 o»

reMonehM o*Mr By*Cpt 274-9361

CUSTOM COUCH, cream 8 odery,

eueaent eondHton. >375 Lary

acanc MnJacac* oa P—^mg.

After 5pm *^' 7 1 7

DEARBORN ESTATE Sale- Don '

•MM WM one Sapt 25-260V 'Oam-

5pm

OcprwunyM, •• "V"

lamp* 8 crtand*er» Every room M

d coaecubM* Ne*l to St Red s

Lutheran American Chwdv 21901

Beach SI S Mock* S d Ml

baiween Monroe a Oakwood

DMjSaMa 561-7565

DINETTE SET Pma Harved labM

5 chdr*. lajtch >300

lortzed tncyda >120

reo Gror.dVMa*aeec.

>85 Salon hdr dryer. >35 Sokd

wood core 10 pend door. «*iueed.

>65 Oto Zarvlh. Armetoe

ASSETS F«M. stuOent

>39 96 Executive chair* W W

Copier 8399 96 Typewriter* >49 50.

IBM >119 00 Relrtgerdor*. ——

caah ragMMr*. word proca

binding mactwiM >299 96 7 .

dinette. >149 96 New Burner

>996 66 OecdMlor >349 99 P*per

Shredder* >399 00 CompuMr lumi-

tur* Rapaw* d IBM PC computer*,

typewriter*, COPMT* Canon ~

•ndgM rellBed DMCOunt*

231 W. 9 MM,

30635 W 10 MM 474-3375

BABY BUGGY strokw 'Od>«r

Wonder Char C^mOmanon G«^s

Schwinn McycM. 20 toy* 553-2331

COUCH. 85" idtow 8 °r*hgk- 9 r mt

tor ooaaga H* >50 TS-X30 Pioneer

j,5 Cooktop

KENMORE SkM by S-M Ralngara-

lor wNh ice maker coppertone.

>250 Kenmore gM range, corttrw-

Seenatg oven, coppe-

>125 GE 'abigaraior. »0

more tred. u»m*aor S4Q A8 w

good «hape Aher 4pm 47>a28<

KENMORE waeher 5 yr* oM. >100

Froadree .ebigeidor. >1» >>*,

>100 Upnghl Ireewr S200 ched

ire» >iS AJ T Eaoaaantj

928- '085

KENMORE WASHER 8 Dryer, 4

years old. very good condnkw >150

•O I -COicU

KENMORE Waaher 8 gM dryer

>175 Gold Whwlpoc* Stoe by Sid*

rofngerdor «th ce mak«

After 5pm

KENMORE A WHIRLPOOL weaher

a dryer >125 lor wadM. and >100

tor dryer 595- '473

MOVING G E Refrigerator Kan-

more dakixa weaher 8 dryer l^ny

MACINTOCH Piu* d m * drive

ssrsd'oar"- SSR

NOVA BUSINESS SYTEMS

I Progrema Cudomod

- * T r«mmg.

Eve /weekend appt* 569-3180

TANADY TRS-6C Modd 4. 126K

dud dMC drive, dd main* pmMr

S1.100 After 4pm 569-4171

Ti PC PORTABLE - MS DOS. 512K.

duel drive color monitor. 3 planed

greprac* IK-rd Brond

WOOD WINOOW true drvtdec dou-

_ hung with pictur* center.

9 iS e witr aluminum dorm*,

a i noil a cemeni m >85 476-379"

720 Farm Produce

APPLES - YOU P«C* O- Re*dy »ic*ae

Country Store. Cider MM. Donutv

Wagon RKM* weekend*

SPICER ORCHARDS

Oper oair, 9-8 Beiween Bnghtor 8

Femon US 23 N IO Ctyde Road

exit - 632-7692

GRAPES U-PlCX

Boric container >8

Neer -94 8

Evenings 1275

422-6256

716 Commercial

industrial Equip.

DELTA TABLE SAW 10 inch with 8

J^Mbto -id T *qu- * ~ * ~

GRAPES - YOU PICK

f Sa5^J& ASS^o^T

n* Rd . 2 blk* N d Long Lake

Troy 'Oem ic 6pm every day

^ 474-3219

RD

Out Monday

nAHC PICKED Mecmioeh AppMe-

>6/buanw 15034 Bemoriog* oB 5

ua. i Wk E d Mammen. LNonM

U-PICK APPLES

>7 a buanei 8348 N

Plymouth

Rd

453-2063

722 Hobbies

Coins & Stamps

more appkancM > 'ool*

NEW Maytag Waaher or Dryer Zero

down- 90 dey* payment ca*h_>25

par mo Eaay larma- aeay credn

PRESSURE WASHER newl Soep

in peel or Hoi weter burner CMr*

MCM* a»gr«m eqdpment V000 TZ3 JOweiry

P S I 1WV motor PortabM Rata®

>2.320 Cad. price >1.295 477-1970

AQUARIUM 25 gel* plu* *quto-

ment 8 fid. >6C 642-732S

Move" Hotpomt: copperlona. >50 gj a Rod s Appkance 425-5Q40

- - -- wrlh leu- —— - , „

STEAM CLEANER - 86 Hydro-Me*-

Mr Aquecat w«h had -dw-ir

350 hour* 420-2224

Bathroom Hnk. blue chma

cd >40 Seer*MMreo «dh 2 *p*ak-

er*>50

600 L trtpM deeeer a

, aa 1-02111

BEDROO*

pdbeami

5 piacaa. md-

421-0281

BUTCH1R Stock dnalM

erowave 250

Cm

GE RANGE TOR 8 GE ovarhtMd Ian.

Catoric ddwaahar 8 Geme^araga

G I JOE Arcrafl Carrier brand nam.

tT* orb-dMr CekOonnMd

S£T

>100 Chevy angme. dg bto700 855-214S

REFRIGERATOR . .. .

pom Stove doubM oven, dedhc

gZq. Weaken, a >200 M 459-2061

SEARS •utomehc I Mhir.

SSy good condtton >100 626-8644

SEARS KENMORE

8 dryar. J

>475

st *c liable

h*. wf*M

455-0664

WARDS deep - -

Cu n low energy >275

WASHER AND ELECTRK. dryer

>100 tor both cm 649-3511

WASHER/DRYER >200

good condBon. AIMr 4, 591-0106

OREXEL Obdig room *d cabmd 8 VIC TANNY

471-4297

WASHER Montgomery •^dA»

M toad. 9 year* oM S75-6M.

DUNCAN PHYFE dnmg room dbM

6 d d t , Mfver .

YAMAHA T977 7SO 3J00 ndaa.

TffscMwaoabmaL>260 46S-67S7

EXECUTTVf 78*42 KM.

3757

S 4

711 Misc. For Sale

Wayne County

tm. Sawae, madWia

IMtMtnO

mover. >46 S32-0043

Mac Iremec pkSuroa 86-810 La*-

dar bad. d d U0 12 MrtnggdMr

>75 •eM^odcarrter >fc D ^

M* bad lit 'f'J

A N ^ C ^ - ^ ^ d

ATM I

LMng/

aaroi tn mm

* * * * adMIMIMI -WW-

s s a t t a r t U m a 1

WESTINGHOUSE refrigerator,

•none ade b, dda. »

nghoue. decanc d aju,

537-4723

. add dNc dkie 8 OOM-

>190. TaM-capaon.

ueed ooudi a » dan.

711-77»1

875

aiesrvx* - WM wy —

Md. iMndd gold. 2 year* aia

Tapper, gaa riove >M* anra m

MDI "W • « » Wmrmm —

Eeriw- 1KK» Well

OAjErtSAOS - H990 MKST^

IJuat S di-a®

(S12SI A*ar Bpm

Ml*»W'

>UWC SALE-nwr-Sd.

341*3 AM. Arbor Tr

FMl r«x*a mmm

SfMBT/gidJ'qiaiSa

iyj|iiinid

n i l

ISM Cdi

abr^i 427 C 1

332-263?

L 375-1202

'wi. m w v •

. no *mudaa »ad». Me iw.

M.S27T3af6 7S7-46S7

WHIR POOL 1> 9«u « upryi

->150

525-7333

711

APPLES

CIDER * DONUTS

Pic*erf in our tnahem - MeNv|

»o«h AppMa BartMR Pear*

ALSO - pi666Ti86. hond

map!* syrup and papoom

FOREMAN

ORCHARDS

3 Mttss W of NorthvSta

or 7 MM* R^ ^

HUWhr IT boye d *

>ao 4-n*—a

art*

4TT-

YOU PICK * SEASON

20 DIFFERENT MflFTIf 5

OF APPLES

MEUROTH'S

OeSTBAUN ORCHARDS

A CIDER mm

9252 Currw

4 Miles W ot Northville

batwedr 7 & 8 Mil*

349-5569

Donuta and dried tlcmmrs

Open Sat. A Sun.

10-a P M

HED ft YELLOW DBJOOUS-

EMPIRE. IDA RED

MACINTOSH, JONATHAN

TOMATOES

GREEN REPPERS

WHITE ft YELLOW CORN

PCKED0AM.Y

RASPBERRIES

'""""'TfSkSS®

•LAKES ORCHARD

To p*»c0 your ad In

(Ma directory.

Sue *

"Q vagatao

«0 plant your

10% S*rapr Camn Odcoui

2 Aft50 W. 9 Mil* RO

UMK TOP OUMJTY amis

Easy You Ptcfc or As«aii

OA VIES OACHAM)

ft CIO€R KMLi.

4007C wnaoM Rd MMNMX.

dva*!

.Daars-7


Thursday. September 24. 1987 04E (R.W.G-BC)* 11C

10C»(R.W.Q-aC)

728 Musical

Instruments

O&E Thursday. September 24. 1987

726 Musical

Instruments

VIoL Monde Kay

pato Beet oltor Evette Clarinet

19921 Rytond. S*pl 26 A 27.

ARMSTRONG atudenl Hut*.

twM.Aondlllon.S12S. 844-7619

6«u

FLUTE wflh case. $195.

Mo Sax with cut. $250- Attar

737-4527

ARTLEY opan-hotod KuM. $195.

Wooden cttMi. S7S. both axcal-

476-3995

BASV GRAND piano, walnut. Brurrv-

bacher $2500 or (Mai aflar

661-1422

BABY

carved

$1500.

PIANO rsr, til

(not 3 lag*) very

PIANO BALDWIN AcroeonK Con-

sole with bench. menogsiw. Excel-

lent condition 11,150. 848-0473

PIANOS: 2 STEINWAY A S Mshog-

any. $8,500 Walnut.. $10,500.

642-2038

PLAYER PIANO - Storey 1 Ctar*.

electrified, W player rata. esceBeni

SSW Attar 4pm. 420-2452

RENT A MEW WurlHzer Piano from

$37 mo piua oaiwary & tuning You

can rani tor 12 ol 6 mo.) *

all money pma tm be applied to-

ward* ma price ot ma piano il you

"

C r **^Sno^

287-4460

buy It Subject to^CradM^appfo.at

Wuriraar MuaK-

prng Center. Taylor. Mich

BALDWIN CLASSIC

i CONSOLE PIANO

INTERLOCHEN SPECIAL

Regularty $3495, now only

$2495 In Walnut. Oak or

Pecan. Now It cost no

more to own the best.

Sate ends Sept. 30.

Ojoomltold Store Open Sun 1-5

dVOLA MUSIC CO.

BLOOMFtELD HILLS

2184 TELEGRAPH

N. OF SQUARE LAKE

334-0566 425-1102

SCHIMMEL grand piano walnut M-

pokshed IWWsh. hand made m Ger

many, IS year* old. worm $16.000.,

sacrifice $9,200 Mutt aaa. excellent

condition 254-3352

735 Wanted To Buy

BOAT TRAILER tor 12 IL Muminum

boa* Can 721-4809

CHINA-CASH tor Ml or partial tela:

Csstieton. Syracuae. Lano^Mmion^

Noritske 8 other brands. 338-8463

Newspapers

& Metal Wanted

Always buying newspapers comput-

er paper. IBM cerda. copper, radm-

tors, braaa. slummum 8 carbide

LSL RECYCLING

34939 Brush St. Wayns

721-7436

(Wayne/Westland area)

OLD WURLITZER 8 Seeburg Juke

bo.ee wanted, working or ML Caah

paid 453-2065

OLD WURLITZER 8 Seeburg luke

boxes wanted, working or nor Caah

paid. 453-2065

SET OF PEARL International Drums

(Ave) 421-7820

CABLE NELSON SPINET Piano

walnut Bntoh. daaaic Unas. $600

Bacft Stradtvarlus trumpet, nevei

used: $400. 398-2765

Uon. $150

- Bundy, exosaeni condi-

645-5911

CLARINETS 8 FLUTES

Uka Now - Guaranteed

Reasonable - W Oskvet

By Sand Dlractor 843-3427

CLARINET,

Hon, $140

\ na 1 - — -Ji

VITO, exceiieni cor>ui-

647-3090

DRUM SET 3 piece. OUngorlins

DeiuKS. good condition.

$150. 846-1482

ORUM SET: 5 piece Pearl Drum sat

Uka brand naw |6 mos okft $450

Ask tor Ed, 422-4741

ESTEY Baby Grand, about 40 yr*

old. carved dark

lag*. Ivory keys

brown wood. $1500 851-8523

EVETTE CLARINET reconditioned

mcktdaa case, books 8 stand $150

729-9356

FLUTE - Armstrong witti case. Uke

newr: $125. Can 661-0652

FLUTE.

silver. open f

$550. After 6

condition, sterling

hole Pa.fl $950. s**mg

851-5903

FLUTE - GemewhafO! beginner*

doaafl hole Tlute with case $125

645-0375

FREE HAMMOND ORGAN wflh en-

tertainer. with the purchase ol 6

year old Wurhtzer f*ano Excellent

condition $1500 Or best offer

Between 4 8 9522-7209

GERMAN VIOLIN 1969, $360 Call

anytime after 4pm 826-8522

GUITAR - Magnum axce»en! condi-

tion. $50 with case

455-4712

HAMMOND ORGAN, model L-112.

excellent condition, $500 or beet oi-

ler. Atto Magnavox catunet stereo

record player. $125 or best oiler

Can weekdays alter 5 30 am Set.

KIMBALL PIANO. exceMant condi-

tion beeuWui tone $600 Alter

6PM, 326-5846 or 644-0636

KING FLUTE - Uke new, with case.

$300 or beet oiler

After 6 PM. call: - 661-4875

KING TRUMPET with

Excellent condition

After 6pm

Be, $175

422-7118

KOHLER 8 CAMPBELL conaole pi-

ano, Uke new, $1200 961-2690

TRUMPET, Conn Director excellent

condition with ceae 8 stand. $195

RECORDS wanted - ok) 45 s. LP'S,

conucs. cards, movie memorab»B-

Ehns, Beetles items. 264 1251

421-5646 : #lc

STREISAND MEMORABILIA want-

ed Original 8 color vinyl sttwn*

TRUMPET - Signet, excellent condi- TOP DOLLAR PAlO

lion $175 Caae Induoed 851-5833 LP Records (33% rpm>. any type

UPRIGHT PIANO. $200 "«£££, I g f f g g g S g " " " 775^.770

' WE PAY CASH to. LP records,

caaaaftaa 8 $6 00 and up tor com-

pact discs Small or lerge *£>£«

Free home pick-up 777-3840

UPRIGHT player piano, manual or

electric, wood finish

$700 661-0689

^^.ng*»50 qu- " v El *° P ~ n 738 Household Pets

334-1351 642-8570 ADORABLE CFA registered Hlmala-

yen kittens 2 teal points 8 1 Heme

point. $200 Can Beth (tvemngar

398-1886

VIOLIN - V* size,

German made, 2 bows.

$190

WURLITZER SPINET Organ, $150

Ca* 531-6615

YAMAHA ELECTRONIC Piano Mod-

al CP30. complete New condition

Very little use, $950 476-3016

ADORABLE KITTENS

2 small, black $5 each

Call

AKC Alaskan Mattmute puppies,

champion blood Una, $350

YAMAHA PF15. full 88 xey* stand

excellent condition. $850 459-7833 AKC GERMAN Shepherd Pupplee.

Champion Blood Line Fuky «iarsn-

teed Arectis Aunbus 313-428-9217

727 Video Games

VCR's - Tapes

AKC German Shepherd PuPP*"-

Black 8 Tan. large boned ahots. 9

i old. 67&-2312

BUCK ROGERS video m»cWne in

mint coodrtKXi foe $300

862-2

AKC Golden Retriever Pupa. 12

weeks old. wormed, snots. dew

clewed. 3 meles. $225 4-4907 1-82S-5744

YAMAHA. 1981. 1100

1 owner, n

$1,000

814 Campers, Traders

A Motor homes

AIRSTREAM. 1999. 23ft. aa* con-

tained earning, ti.tsltril CTOdWctL

$3500 1-878-3748

APACHE. 1970. popi«>

I, furnace.

mint. $900

T.

now dree,

534-3324

COACHMAN 1983 Class A Motor-

home. under 17,000mlee ufceneart

Cal tor more Information 427-0705

it all in classif ie

appliances automobiles

J

COACHMAN 1995 28\ A*, earning.

5/50 warranty, generator

condition $24,990

CROSS COUNTRY 1998 Ctoee

37ft Motor Home, low mile

S51.99S

ERHARD BMW

352-6030

piek-up. 81-80.

p trick.

375-0721

dftton. no ruel. bed cat

L nil mi. $4800 nogoUab

Livonia. 525-4487

FORD 1973 pick up. $850 522-1588

FORO 1974 F-MW. Straight 8 with

cap K m good $1,800 or beel at-

474-2128

FORO.

Rune C

1974. F-250 heavy duly

»d 4 apaed slick aMfl Cal

FORD 1978 - F-150. pk* up.

lent oondtoon. 47.000 maee. 302 V-8

cap. $2200

steering, em

0 387-1

-1132

FORD. 1988. F-150 4*4. 8 Cyi

26.000 maee. ruetprooled. duraanar

astro cap. power

$9,000 Fenwno

n 478-42W2

JEEP 1990 CJ8 - Vary i

AM-FM ceaaette. $1200

Days: 333-0473. Evee 681 -5708

W8 S-15 4X4. auto, pwr

window*, pwr locks. AM/FM. «ereo.

shim ah Mia. toia'

$12,995

JACK CAULEY CHEVY B5&-0014

RANGER 1985 Explorer 5 epeed,

TOYOTA 1988 4-natner. air. al op-

tiona. low mlee. exceaent $12,995

PAGE TOYOTA 352

825 Sports A

Imported Cars

OATSUN NISSAN 1994

W M toe. Mta naw. $4

llam

$ spead.

009. AfMr •

483-0KW

OATSUN J10GX. 1979.

botfy Mr. rune good Baei

S spaed,

oltor

525-1309

FUEGO 1993 i sgtsd.

'•aback top, exoskent In

Asking $4^10

automatic

side 8 out

887-7SSB

HONOA ACCORD U0 1997 Hattfi-

beck. automatic sunroof 3,900

rnaes. 7 year werr^ huatpmotod

$12,300 or beel After 8 274-4484

MONOA Accord LX 19

brakes 8 steering. 5 aps<

*2. poster

m. Mr. ruel

brake* $4,295

478-7548

HONDA CfVIC 1994. 4

automatic, ak. stereo, ra

•tree mc atari condftn

CaB altar 9pm

loot, tkvwr

Mr Michekn

3n. $5500

483-8399

HONOA PRELUOE 199

red. greal oendtoon. sir.

eo n at t ht 1 owner

4-S speed,

am-knater-

478-8973

HONOA 1979 Accord Blue. 5

treaL $1500. negotiable

422-2423

HONOA 1990 Accord. 2 door. sack.

SJiLSkenl condition S Ikes S2.000

After 5pm, 982-2738

HONOA 1993 Prelude 5

rool. stereo ceesene S

lent condmofi. $7,880

942-2438

HONDA. 1984. Accord LX Sedan

automatic, sir. slareo. s»csBsnt

PAG^TOYOTA 382-9890

HONOA 199S Accord LX - 4 poor,

48.000 mBee. exceaent condBton.

$8 300 After 5PM 471-4839

HONDA 1965 - PTSSuOe. ma. 2

door 5 Speed. Mr. aunroof 20.000

ntoaa. Caoekenl condition $10,500

CaB. 829-0996

HONOA 1996 Prelude - MM 00M»-

Uon. tow rn Beans, with extras.

99 950 CaB. ask tor Leon Cnmnkna

681-2000

"What a nice

Salesperson.

ACURA INTEGRA LS 1997- 5 door

muet sat. $13,000 or oltor Laavi

298-8888

ACURA "LEGEND". 1999 Automat-

ic. V6. Loaded! Aslro-roof. $ 18,500

JACK CAULEY CHEVY 855-0014

AUO. 1981. 5000S Gray, sunroof

good condition $3750 or

beat ofler. 388-3484

AUDI. 1983 5000 Turbo DtoeoL ex-

ceaent condtoon, loeded. $5,500.

Cal alter 5:30 PM. 477-1997

AUOi 1994Vt - OT Coupe.

condition. 20.500 mlee. red.

speed, sunrool. stereo tssssltt. air

ndo*8

After 7pm 881-7473

AUDI. 1994 4000 Quaftro 5 speed.

Mr. sunroof, paw windows. Al ami

drive Check II outl

BILL COOK AUDI

471-0800

AUOI 1994-4000S-4 Ooot. 5 speed.

Ivory wtth brown mtartor. sunroof

veryoaen 540-2286

AUOI 5000S. 84 thni 88 4 door, eu-

tomehc air. aunroof Al aetofy m-

spected Rood reedy 6 to chooee

BILL COOK AUDI

471-0800

These are tbe

lowest prices

around.

HONOA 1998

tm4m

$7600

Civic SI. 5

sunrool. mM.

4S3-S779

$16,995

PAGE TOYOTA

KARMANN-GHIA. 1991

sedsn. psrtlslly restored, runs wsl.

$2,000 Cal between 5 PM and 7

LE CAR 1992 dakne Sunroof, looks

tranaportetton

421-3293

good,

$700

MAZDA RX-7. 1992 Great shape

fkms awl. $6,750 or bast

844-9200. Ext. 270.

MAZDA 1992 GLC Sport. 4 spaed,

sm/fm grey, hatch beck 54.000

mass, esking $2300 421-3838

MAZDA 1998, RX-7.

•""Be

MAZDA. 1988 RX7 GLX Auto. 3.900

maee. loeded. Super Ntoe. $13,900

ERHARD BMW

352-6030

BMW 1976 - 3201. fek condition

stick Shin, am-lm Stereo air. aun-

roof $3000. After 6pm 476-1022

GMC 1982 SIS. 38.000 I

glees cep. automatic.

% brakes, locks, hitch, undarcoet-

Nb ruel Cjicsaenl condition $4250

Days 523-8925. Evee. 421-7329

GMC 1995 Jknmy S-15 Sierrs Cue.

sic. 4*4. 5 speed. Extrae. 30,000

Mgraaey maee First S8.900 tokea

BMW 1982 528E Auio-Qoid.

ERHARD BMW

352-6030

MAZDA 828 1964 4 door, automat

ic. AC. Alpine AM/FM neat ana. aBoy

Evee.. 393-5407

MERCEDES BENZ. 1988 190E. 16

^RHARD BMW

352-6030

REBATES

%

APR „

FINANCING

J u p i c ^ i o O O

SELECT MODELS!

t W* 1 ' "

Chevrolet fr


12C*(R.W.G-10C)

825 Sports A

Imported Cars

O&E Thursday. September 24. 1987

VOLVO 'MS Ot atallon wegon. es-

ceOenl condition. lorn mUBl rrwsn,

nun. $1 '290 354-196 1

3181 A. 1965 2 t>OOr sulo. low maes.

J 14.800

E R H A R D B M W _

352-6030

528i. 1980 5 Speed. leetner.

"'ERHARD BMW

352-6030

•unroot. Mr.

BBS Wheals, $8,995.

ERHARD BMW •

352-6030

5331 1984 5 speed. showroom n*n,

;$17.900

• ERHARD BMW

; . 352-6030

635CSI 1985 5 Bpwed 17.000

miles. loaded, $28,900

ERHARD BMW

352-6030

7331. 198 1 2 to choose from

ERHARD BMW

: 352-6030

852 Classic Cart 856 Buick

mvtERA I«m|

or A chrome • i

$2600 or bast oMar

sppraMM

$38-8088

T-BIRD 1966. Shay Reproduction. 4

— IPo —"— - '-*—

Mr. AmFm LI4IHI

$7,000-/1

MrOTO-t

10 «5o

981-5554

ESTATE WAGON. 1977 Oood con-

dition. V-8. air. power Meeting 4

brake*, new asltery $ — •

J1W0/8e«l 728-3706 01

I-B.R0 1900 - 2 door. nildi work.

podyfiir. wl nnmt SSOCLacJMaj

WANTED - 3arege to wore CleeMc

Car m W BtoornaMd/BkiMr'—

854 American Motors

ALLIANCE 1963. 18.000 mBea, 4

M>eed. red. lectory stripe. 2 door.

AmFm. beel ofler $42-5181

ALLIANCE 1884 - 2 door. 5 speed,

cassette, ruatprooted. no air. axcel-

lem. $2900 o* beet 844-0322

LESABRE LTD.. 1984 VS. 4 door.

Mr. stereo, til. cn*s, V* seeM.

pwr windows, pwr door locks. Clean

i Ready!!

BILL C O O K B U I C K

4 7 1 - 0 8 0 0

ALLIANCE 1965 OL. 2 door. 24.000

mBee, air. am/Tm cassette, sun root.

ALLIANCE 1987 HWchOec*. raw.

32 mBee. won m drawing. BeM ortst-

280- 2870: After 8pm. 383-5949

AMBASSADOR 1970, 380 _

rebuilt tront and. new rear Ores, per

•act tranaportalton. $250 557-1593

$7,500

ENCORE, 1988. GS. sport coupe,

black. 5 speed, low maee. smtm

stereo, ak, rear window delog. Iront

wheel drive, lofl hems.sharp.

$7350'beet 484-74SS

-flM. 1983 S speed. sunrool. only

36 000 miles

ERHARDBMW

: 352-6030

£52 Classic Cars

.ANTIQUE. 1906, Rrehose Cart, re-

.alorad. appraaed M O O ^

.$500 After 4 PM

•B6N1LEY 1934 3'4 Uter. Parkward

"bor'j

"Mad

>pm

"b) Mmtl $10,000 After

540-7722

-CADILLAC 1976 Coupe. Last 0* twg

-frame classics. 29.500 mBee. never

-winter-d condition. 961-4858

CENTURY Llmtled 1985. 4 door,

loadad. Ml options, low mSea. mint.

Warranty $7,950 553-4029

CENTURY. 1981 Unwed. Immacu-

late condition, loeded. only $1,696.

Tyme Sakee 455-5568

CENTURY. 1982. front wheel drive

Ml power, stereo tape deck. 2 door,

sir. 64.000 maee. $2,700 478-3945

".LINCOLN CONTINENTAL 1969.

' Florida car. excellent condition.

'-$950 Call after 4pm . 589-4171

CENTURY, 1982 Good condition,

hilly loaded . 981-3779

MODEL A 1929 Roadaler pick up,

' restored to sell at auction See sec-

• lion 700

» MONTE CARLO 1970, vary deen.

••aw Mack trim, loaded, original

. $4000 477-1491

I-MUSTANG GT. 1966. 289 V-8, 4

.-carrei tront diac brakea. good con-

•dilion Beat offer 644-6843

^MUSTANG LTD I984V»7 Pink con-

' vertible. a*, auto top Al ongmM

.unique Show-car Stored 15 years

•j$8.000 478-6541

•'MUSTANG 1965 convertible, sum-

*" mar car Cea after 8pm

>•

644-5853

/•MUSTANG 1968 Hardtop, low mBe-

^age, Georgia car good condition.

,i£oO 642-9162

CENTURY 1983-2 door auto, power

steermg/brskes. 4 cytmder, Mr. njsi

prooied naw tires t brakes Baautl-

ful condition. $4,650 531-4028

REGAL. 1961. V-6. automatic, air

AM-FM stereo, power steering/

brakes, very dean. $2,000 CaB

mornmgs. 981-2677

REGAL. 1961 2 door. L.

Landau pwr steering, pwr brsftee

Extra Clean 4 Reedy Sale price"

BILL C O O K B U I C K

4 7 1 - 0 8 0 0

SEDAN DEVILLE 1963. perfect oon-

dmon. low miss. CaB

SEDAN OE VlLLE 1965. loatfed. ex-

cehent condition. Bke naw. grav.

maroon mterior $12,700 346-1675

SEDAN OEVILLE 1967

white/blue, loeded.

$18,600. Eves^aakend

8000 mass,

excellent

». 465-8377

SEVILLE 1976*

Good engine- $500

CaB afterTPMHlM

Damaged Mda.

10 or beet oiler.

835-2157

SEVILLE 1981 - 2-Wne burgundy

sunroof wire wheals

$5600. 459-7835

SEVILLE 198

miAM, yoeO*c3

$13.9W.

»- 4 door. 31,000

exceaent condition.

731-4110

860 Chavrolat

REGAL 1963

$7000 or beet

or weekend

CaB Evenings

476-7436

CENTURY 1984 Custom - creme. 4

door. Mr. power steenng/brakee/

locks, automatic, srtvfm. sicaBenl

condition. 48.000 miles. $4,800

844-2707

REGAL. 1965. Limited

options. 29.000 mlee. gray with gray

w v Landau, am-tm stereo cas-

sette. tat. crulee. rear delogger. wire

wheels. $8,250 After 6pm 549-2872

CENTURY, 1984. 2 door. 24.000

maas. automatic, air. aula's car.

$8600 or beat. After Spm 522-2196

REGAL. 1967. 2 door. L .

tat. cruras pwr windows, pwr locks

I mora, only 4.000 m«as Better

'"BILL C O O K B U I C K

4 7 1 - 0 8 0 0

CENTURY. 1965. Limited 4 door,

air. kicks, arrv-fm extra dean, under

17.000 mBee. Eves 476-4406

or Days: 355-7054

RIVERiA 1980 Loaded New brakes

$ exhaust $4,700.

Evenings: 369-9184

CADILLAC ELDORADO 1960 FuB

rar saatsn

427-5710

CLLIUIVWW. ' —

power. Inckxang dual power saatsf

$8,975

GORDON CHEVROLET

CADILLAC. 1985 FLEETWOOOL

BROUGHAM Baby Urol Loaded!

Warranty 26,000 mBee! $1000 caahi

REBATE Now only $ 12.966

Huntington Ford 852-0400

CAVAUER. 1966. 224 Am-bn. pow-

sieermg 6 brakee. '

rp $7600.

aharp.

726-4113

CELEBRITY CL, 1964 V6. Mr; auto-

matic. sunrool. luggage rack- Ntoe

can $4,660 476-WOB or 535-9020

CELEBRITY, 1964 4 door. V-6. ak

automatic, tat cnHaa. stereo

ereo Very

559 rn^n

CELEBRTTY 1964 Euroeporl-4 door.

V-6, Mack, loadad. low mBee. L»a

naw. vary nloa. $5,700. 422-3638

CELEBRITY 1964, CL. automatic.

air, and moreH $5,775

GORDON CHEVROLET 427-5710

'62 RELIANT. Mr. automatic. 26.000

mass, muet see

'66 DOOGE FuB Mae pickup 4x4,

Mr. automatic. V-6. extra aharp.

Many more to choose from

F A R M I N G T O N HILLS

CH RYSLER-PLYMOUTH

531-8200

CELEBRITY 1963 4 door. 18.000 ac-

AC. Power door!o

sets de-logger, w.—

Mess. $4600 474-1219

LASER 1964 - Mack. 5BP

^^HcondMon, 40.000

LuataaB. $6800

CHEVELLE 1968 - with 1978 ename.

naw pamt. $3365 522-1058

LASER 1964 Turbo. 5 spaed, many

options, low niBsagi. wea mam-

CHEVETTE 1976-4 door. 62.000

maee. sm-im. excellent condition.

$675/baat Altar Spm 626-7607

LE BARON GTS - 1965 Air, auto-

ctton Ex-

645-0306

CHEVETTE 1978. dutch ^•P* $]1CO

CH EVETTE 1979.

runs wea. 4 speed. CTS 474-6326

LE BARON, 1964 Convertible. Town

Country, woodgrain " "

.Hcroee leather. mM

36.000 maes, $8,995

CHEVETTE. 1986 4 door, automal

IC. 17.000 maes. Clean. $3 868

L O U L a R I C H E

C H E V Y / S U B A R U

Plymouth Rd - Juei Weet ot 1-275

4 5 3 - 4 6 0 0

LaBARON 1966'tGTS

Automatic. Turbo Pc— - - .

thmgl Loaded) 15.000 mMM Excel

lent cundMonl $6,400. " "

LeBARON. 1966. 4 door, power srtrv

dowa* door locks. anv4m. muni,

steering $ brakes. ML kaury

M $6,500

CHEVROLET. 1965 ConvarMon

Csptian's Chairs. Van $ Moral

$9,695

North Brothers ForlJ 421-1376

NEWPORT 1979. r—

W

92 0 0 0 * ^ . 7 5 0 ^

CAMARO 1975 Auto, am-fm stereo

cassette/ equMizer New sn(

brakee. ttrea.axhauet system.

No ruat 67.000 mBee $1800

881-3533 or 7764700

CAMARO Z-26. 1963 Corhe « See

this One' $3,975

GOROON CHEVROLET 427-5710

^PORSCHE 1956 Red 356-A. Stgnifi-

>canl reatoratlon Including sngme.

^rransmission, interior Very BOOG

^conation. $6,500 851-2672

•f—

CENTURY. 83 thru 86 Ak. stereo,

fu» power & much more 6 to

chooee. Sale prtpedtl

BILL C O O K B U I C K

471-0800

RIVERIA. 1981. exceaent condition.

totaBy loadad. newer shocks, ex-

haust. tires, battery, tune up- Priced

to saB $3900 or beet otler. 476-8187

RIVERIA 1963. Frost Baioa enter.

I Sable velour manor V-8. 51.000

I maee. alarm. Non-amokar. new-car

an) $7,250 624-1770

CAMARO. Z-28 1964. Automatic.

Mr. ONLY 35.000 mBee RaM Shar-

pey$8.188

L O U L a R I C H E

C H E V Y / S U B A R U

Plymouth Rd - Just Weet o» 1-275

4 5 3 - 4 8 0 0

CHEVY. 1965 CavaBer Sedan Auto-

matic. Mr. STK >670872 $4,995

Bob Jeannotte

Pontiac

453-2500

CITATION 1960 Blue. 4 cykndar, 4

Ml. am-fm slareo

set la power brakee/Maarina. Good^

deen conttllon. $660.. 626-5333

CITATION 1980. 5 door, ouatom In-

terior. loadad. 45.000 mBee. Good

condition. $1660 661-3121

CAMARO 1978- LT. power steertng-

brakee. ak. tM. crulee. dean m 8

out. runs 8 looks good New shocks

Ts. $l500>beet

ELECTRA 1962-Ail power, am-fm

caaaane. 61.000 maee, »ary good

condHon. $2,950 477-5626

'86 TOPAZ

Air, stereo cassette,

power steering and

brakes, rear defroster,

tinted giass

>6995

'86 GRAND AM LE

-aFuel injection, air, stereo

' cassette, cruise control,

tilt wheel, flip roof, rear

defroster. Like new.

* 8 5 6 6

'83 MUSTANG GT

5 speed. 5.0 liter engine,

air, stereo, power steering

and Brakes, rear defrost-

er. must see and drive this

one *5995

'84 COUGAR ~

[Automatic, air, stereo

(cassette, cruise control,

Ititt wfieerf. power windows

land locks, rear defroster.

*6475

'86 T E M P O

S P O R T

5 speed, air. stereo cas-

sette. cruise control, tilt

wheei. rear defroster

*6795

'82 CAMARO

BERLINETTA

IA utomatic, air, stereo

cassette, rear defroster.

*4683

R A N G E R S

' 8 3 ' s & ' 8 4 s

4 speeds ard automat

stereo, cruise. 3

choose

F r o m ' 2 7 9 5

Eagle GT a. j

641-7617

RIVIERA 1966. low mBee,

landau loo Showroom «

Must aaBI Price negotiable.

346-6425

RIVIERA. 1967 T-type. Ak. stereo/

cassette, iwo-lone paint 6 much

mora, only 2.900 mBee. Save thou-

ssnds

BILL C O O K B U I C K

4 7 1 - 0 8 0 0

CAMARO 1979. 228, brown. Ian In-

terior. 350 automatic, power steer-

mg/brakea. Mr. m. am-kn caeeette

5 "ooo ortginM mBee. DioaBanl con-

U.200 533-6532

CAMARO 1960 226. loaded, low

maes, norual. adult osmaft S3600.

or beat oftar. 463-0929

SKYHAWK 1962. Mr, power sleer

mg/brakes 4 speed Ctean! Greet :

shapal $2.900 After 6pm 522-2723

SKYHAWK. 1978 42.000 mBee.

lomatic. stereo, haiehbaek. new

.. mora $1900 522-1624

6 month 6,000 mile l.miU

Now offering low used car i

CAMARO. 1961 Automatic, V-6.

Mr, rear defog. no rust, stereo cas-

sette $3500 344-9796

CAMARO, 1962. ak. tat. amlm cas-

sette rear detog. 64.000 mBee. naw

Ikes, vary sharp. $4,300. 729-1763

CITATION 1961. V-6. Mr. - .

IS repMr. drtvebie, good condl-

$950 ftrm.

lion

471-5677

CITATION 1962- 4 door helchback.

6 cylinder, automatic, ak. r

steering 8 brakes. 50.000 a j l

$2400 or beet 661-1403

CITATION. 1962. Automatic. Mr.

amfm stereo. Super Clean. Miat-

prooted. $3,388

L O U L a R I C H E

C H E V Y / S U B A R U

Plymouth Rd - Just WsM ol 1-275

4 5 3 - 4 6 0 0 .

CORVETTE. 1961 Red Red Leath-

er. Very Nicafl $10,975

GOROON CHEVROLET 427-5710

SKYHAWK. 1962, dark Hue. air.

power steering/brakes, tat. AM-FM

CAMARO 1964 BarttnaRa - red, au-

tomatic. loadad. 24.000 mBee. GM

extended warranty imt* 6/68. re-

mote theft alarm, mint condition

$6.S00/oflar Evenings

CORVETTE.

Clean! 1

$14,475

GORDON CHEVROLET

$3200 After 6:30pm 474-7064

SKYHAWK. 1965. automatic, air, 1

ar. aacriUca $3,750. Tyme Sales.

455-5566

CAMARO 1964 228, 5 spaed H O .

charcoal loadad. t-tope. AJpma ces-

sans stereo, alarm system $7,900/

H oner 476-0674

CORVETTE

Clean 11

$14,475

GOROON CHEVROLET

SKYHAWK. 82 thru 66 2 door 6 4

door, automatic. Mr. loadad wtth op-

tions 6 to cnooaefl

BILL C O O K B U I C K

4 7 1 - 0 8 0 0

CAMARO. 1964 2-28. T-tops. Whits,

axcaBent condition. $7,600

CaB altar 6 PM. 540-3834

CORVETTE 1987 Convertible Au-

tomatic. Loaded! $31.465

JACK CAULEY CHEVY BS5-0014

CAMARO 1965 Bertkietta. loaded.

36 000 maee. 2.8 V8. excaBent oon-

dttkm.649-0978 or 545-2078

EURO SPORT 1965 CxcaaaM con-

dition Loaded MuM sea $6500/

oft. 456-1123

SKYLARK. 1877

matlc. mM prooK

reer tslndow Oefoi

2 door. V-8. eulo-1

td. Mr. anvJm. Ml.

j $1300 867-4887

SKYLARK 1880. ba^a

reer detogger. stereo,

tton $1 tOO After 5pm

2 door. air.

good oomS-

' 437-8832 j

SKYLARK 1881

oondMon Power

Brm.

1MB

Pad

d, sncsBanl

aoe $3000

386-31»|

SKYLARK 1881.

is. 88.000 mBea

S1B80

ortgM

/aryck

al osmer. aa

lan.

»6-0020 j

CAMARO. 1985. koc 2. TP1. a

mane OA), t-tops. aB options, new

black pamt. brakee, beautiful, muat

seel 111,000/beet otter 326-0113

IMPALA. 1871 Automatic, rune

good OependebM transportation.

l200 591-6636

CAMARO. 1965. V-6. loaded, ruat-

prooiad. vary low mBaags. axoaBant

condition $8200 Beiora 2 30pm.

522-0504 after 2:30pm. 937-9365

CAMARO 1966, 2-26, loadad. Ota

new. KM. maes $9,200

CAMARO 1986 Sport Coupa. H

i AM-FM umbo caastta. ERS aound.l

19.000

aleertng/brakee nr. —. _ .

oatroat auto, sunrool. mM prooted.

tat wheM. 6 more ExcaBent ootid!- 1

tlon $5650 or baM 646-6665

CAMARO. 1966 Sport Coupe. O

** Ch " re ^laJ'$8700 a 463-6268

IF Y O U D O N T K N O W U S E D C A R S -

K N O W Y O U R D E A L E R I

4 1 0 0 1 P l y m o u t h Rd.. P l y m o u t h

4 5 3 - 1 1 0 0 4 5 3 - 1 3 2 7

L Clean $7,177

L O U L a R I C H E

C H E V Y / S U B A R U

Plymouth Rd - JuM Weet ot 1-275

4 5 3 - 4 6 0 0

I CAMARO 1967

350 engine. 5 7

' n taction.

10 000 m

koc 226. loadad.

trs. tuna port k. 6.000

_ $8,500

261-72W

EXT 1962-Exceaent running ooryk-

,«n MuM aad $2500 or baatoltir

Doug or Move m tssaga. 455-0661

427-5710

MUSTANG 1960 - good oondMon.

Noon to 4pm 259-6766

12 noon 6 5pm- 10pm

CaB 10am-

962-5062

MUSTANG 1961-4

apaed. 85.000 mi

beet offer. After 5pm

cylinder.

$1500 or

522-9056

MUSTANG.

$5 395

North Brothers Ford

874 Morcury

CAPRI 1982 - 4 Speed, aunroof.

goodcood«^.$3«»^ t 9

CAPRI 1965 GS. -

premium sound, speed control, con-

$6600

Evee. $79-6629

COUGARL977.

$1000

33.000 MILES

349-7413

COUGAR 1964-Orlgmai 72.000

— — • ~

, M

V 7 a i

COUGAR 1977. YaBow. 2 door

33.000 maee Good Mneportatton

$1000 349-7413

COUGAR. 1979 XR7, 361 WM99T

$1600 or beel ofler 522-5563

COUGAR 1962. 4 door _

ZSLXSS:

COUGAR 1962. 8 cylinder, power

M ^ h 6 brakes, automatic. Mr.

326-6611

Grs. From

421-1376

MUSTANG 1964 convartMa. dart

red metaMc, atate top 6 kitortor;*

1979. 2 door, 4 cjd. 4 extras Ike new $7200 666-2776

FAIRMONT. _ ,.

spsafl. brand near ckjtch 6 trana-

cHt>on must sea $800

FAIRMONT. 1960, 2

condition $800 or beM ofler

_ „ £ x v MUSTANG 1964 GT

534-3747 brlghl ^ L n " " "

apiaa. $6300 .

6001 9 X 0 MUSTANG. 1*5

FuBy

condition. 5

501-3161

CHARGER 1975, $500 Rune good^

CHARGER 1966. $4660 or beat o»-

iwer steering 6

area. 481-&67

COLT i960 - Hatchback, automatic.

Super condMom Vary good rubber

new spare. iwrfBar. brakes. After

SPM

COLT 198 C vary good oondMon.

saver *Wi stripe, ak. am/M» stereo,

reer defroM. $1500/beet 396-5396

DAYTONA TURBO 1964

$4500

474-9240

DAYTONA TURBO 1965. Mr. power.

•reo. $6,991 *

TOWN 6 COUNTRY DODGE

Mas 8 Grand RNar 474-6666

FAIRMONT 19_. .

Steering, power brskea. ak. alarao.

good ehape 4 cyBnder MMd.

SlOOO After Spm: 469-5607

GT 5,0. 5

367-3286 ak, tape Only 19.160

$9.995... Hkiea Part Uncoki Marco-

ry 425-3036

FIESTA 1979. new tkaa 6 battery,

rune weB. good tranaportatlon 8

body, caeeette. $450/beei

After 6 866-9274

FIESTA 1979 Looka 6 rurw greet

Good tkaa. neede Wekee lWX c*

bkat ofter After 4 30pm. 937-1561

FORD CLUB WAGON. 1967 XLT

Loadad. 8 paaaangar. 8.000 mBee.

$13,555

L O U L a R I C H E

C H E V Y / S U B A R U

Plymouth Rd. - Just West ol 1-275

4 5 3 - 4 6 0 0

MUSTANG. 1966 LX

Low MBaS- Uke New. $6,796

North Brothers Ford 421-1376

MUSTANG. 1996. GT Convertible

White, sin: sBsnt shepe, 5 speed

white leather interior. 20.000 mBee

wife's car. bMck top. s Mt erMrtor

$11.960 455-03*8 or 463-6664

MUSTANG. 1966, LX bMck tas*-

- f o g

PINTO 1977 - Rune. good. BeM

oftar CaB 9AM-3PM 344-6667

PINTO. 1977. 4 spaed, rune good

needs wort $250 or beM otter

CaB 729-3312

$1.900

COUGAR 1965.

Loadad. $7300

476-3361

COUGAR 1967 XR 7-Loaded. wWe s

low maegaa. ajusBanl condi-

tion- $1200 524-1108

FORD MUSTANG. 1964. GT. Load-

ed $6,905

Bob Jeannotte

Pontiac

453-2500

GRAND MARQUIS. 1961 4 door,

dart blue, low maaags. axcaBan'

condtoon. $4250. 729-6768

GRAND MAROUIS 1961. muM aaB.

4 door. 61.000 mBee. rustproof

Loadad! ExcaBsnt 83.900.496-1760

GRAND MAROUIB 1996. 4 door,

many optlone. >aidMC«Mad. Jow

m6aa. $8,200 or baM oWar. 464-2022

GRAND MAROUIS. 1963. LS. wag-

on. loadad. dean, leather, naw tkji,

$6700 844-1758

GRAND MAROUIS, 1983 LS. fuBy

equipped, excellent eondtoon^^^

SQUIRE WAGON. 1977. 67.000

DAYTONA 1964. 5

prooied. excakem

28.000 mBas $4,600

ruM-

453-3UIS

OAYTONA. 1965, Turbo 2-

Mack. M options muM aaB

852-9137

FORO LTO, 1084 Crown victoria

Extra Clean. $6,495

Bob Jeannotte

Pontiac

453-2500

966-0147

DIPLOMAT, 1977. naw Ores, brakes.

57.000 ongmM mBee. $750

ft. 456-6474

FORO 1066, fuS stts staOon

2 to diooea Same d M|

I BILL BROWN USED

DOOGE CARAVAN. 1966

K. ak. cruteel Very Clean

$7,996

GOROON CHEVROLET 427-5710

FORD 1962 EXP. good condition.«

53.000 mBee

$1,600 66B-5473

FORO. 1964 Turtle-Top oonverMon.

Raeae Hitch Pop Top. ExoMMM

DOOGE. 1996 250 RoyM SE. Travel

" w a s

BILL BROWN USED CARS522-0030

0 Mae S Grand Rtoar

FORD. 1986- F-250 Pickup. 13X>00

mllee. automaOc.

GORDON CHEVROLET

DOOGE 800 1984 4 cylinder Turbo,

automatic. M power, ak. loadad

CjoaBani Gondii ion $4,995

MALIBU Statwnwegon 1977-35C

I, Mr. ermaa. rool rack, naw

i/i adIMor/aitemator. Runs ax-

kit $650 425-3406

MALIBU. 1977. Claaaac Coupe.

35.300 orlglnM maas. no ruM. runs 6

looks auras $2,800 626-5296

MALJBU. 1960

Wagon Motor needs work

$1200

Station

MONTE CARLO, 1978 dssn I akaBIS

,. $700 961-5062

MONTE CARLO 1966 SS. black. I-

42.000 mBee. very

437-3037

wsr

MONTE CARLO 1979. 75.000 mBee.

asoaaent condition ak. automatic.

12250 563-9212

MONTE CARLO. 1977 Saver 6 Red!

Automatic* $405

GORDON CHEVROLET 427-6710

NOVA. 1970,

condtoon. $686

CaB efler 6PM

NOVA. 1976

rune good, var

$800

S T E M ' S G E M S

GRAND OPENING!

Low miles, loeded, excellent condition

1983 FORD ESCORT

Autometlc, 4 door, sherp

1983 FORD F100

Low maea. must see. stick

1983 CHEVY CAVALIER

Automatic, air. afierp

1977 MONTE CARLO

S»ver, loeded. 56.000 mHea

1977 CHEVY CAPRICE

4 door, automatic

'4388

961-1153

LASER. 1964 16.000 mBas. Ml tab-

" \ - s s r r 3 » s s s , ' , & & " '

9 MBa 6 Grand Rhrsr 474-6061

OMNI i960 LOW mass, good irane-

portation $ condtoon Naw Urea 8

$1200 861-6898/861-6054

888 Ford

CROWN VICTORIA 1964.

condtoon. fltoM options. $7960

476-0626

CROWN VICTORIA, 1964 Wagon.

tamBy spedM $7,495

North Brothers Ford 421-1376

CROWN VICTORIA WAGON. 1

36.000 mass. Uks Naa

$7,475

GORDON CHEVROLET 427-6710

ESCORT GL 1064 - Automai

GrsM shepe AM-FM $3750

CaB PM 477-

ESCORT L. 1983.

Hon. low ""BISBS naw

stereo automatic ak.

827-9212

W m are*. Biwi

k. $2800 Dawe

CMS. 476-4190

ESCORT L

6 $

1983 8 apaed. power

see. am-kn. good

or beM 274-3177

ESCORT L 198614 -wagon, power

brakps. stereo, naw battery, reer I

window dalfoaL $4200 464-7470

ESCORT L 1986 Wegon. very daarv

axcaaent condMon. 37 MPG. caa-

muffler, exceaent condition, must

^ 5 4 7 3 ^ 3 4

GRANO MARQUIS. 1983. 4 door

looadad. good condition. 66.000

mBee. 85500 After 5 626-4386

GRAND MARQUIS 1986 - 4 door.

excaBent condition. aB optima.

$10,750 563-38(21

T-BIRD 1985. VS. Loaded

ExoaB

Troy,

524-0287

GRANO MAROUIS SEDAN. 1065 2

tone. V-6, Loaded $10,996

PAGE TOYOTA 3S2-6660

T-BIRO, 1980, , -

brakes, ak. cruise 6 mora. Good

-condition, dean No n«L 90.000

maee. $1.400/beat 553-5906

T BIRO 1980. Loadad

condition. Garage kept $2,100

849-0867

T BIRD

45.000

4pm

>3 Heritage. Lt

$6200 CaB after

524-9036

427-6710

T-BIRO 1983. sBvwr deercoet. und-

eted - no ruM. naw brakee.

hauM. 66.000. 1 owner

$5.300/o«er 333-0728

HERES 20 GOOD

REASONS TO

BUY AT

AVIS FORD

7, UNCOLN TOWN CA^ Low.

, MBaa may aqulpl- $17,986

1987. MUSTANG OT. 3 000 mBaa.

amomauc ak. Sharp. 413.398

1986. FORD E350 Van. Automatic

Heavy Duty 86008

1066. MUSTANG GT 6 SVO Large

selection most years aveli-

L.. From $8,996

LTO- 4 door, good

Low mBee From $4 996

1986. ESCORT. 2 do

$4,996

T BIRO 1983

Loaded. Oart red- $4,695

T-BIRD 1965 - automatic. Ml power

ak. crulee. laanm. sxi Msnt

condklon. $6,900 349-3726

1966. MUSTANG LX CONVERTI-

BLE 8 cyandar

maps $6,888

1986. FORD Conversion van Cap;

tains Chain.

• $11,996

ESCORT. 2 door.

$2 899

1984. OLOS TORNADO Mr.

$7,188

346-6424

T-

$10,000

Elan. Loadad.

456-7036

T-BIRD 1886 Turbo Coupe. Ua

. js. Loaded* ExoaBant condtoonf

$11,500 OrbaM ' 364-3615

s = r a , 5 o o v ^ l 762-5649

lent condtoon" $6,900 or baM oltar

426-8977

TEMPO GL 1964 4 .

ar brakes/Hearing,

moon roof $3,800

TEMPO GL. 1984

Btue/blue dot

Aaklng $3,660

34,000

TEMPO GU 1988 2 door, autom

«, power, crulaa. low i'ilia

$5,991

TOWN 6 COUNTRY DOOGE

8 MBa 6 Grand RNar 474-81

TEMPO 1964 GL. automatic Mr

GRANO MARQUIS 1964 Ford Ex-

ecutive car. TrlpM brown, loaded. 4

door. sequentMl lighting, power wki-

power door locks, seats 4

pernor trunk. Turbine srfioaN. auto-

matic overdrtve $8500 or beM ofler

274-7167

LN7 1982 - -—

good tkee 6 brakes, $1000 or beet

after 7pm 422-0270

LYNX GS 1981 eutomatic, 47.600

maee. good condition- $1500 CaB

after 5PM 421-4492

LYNX L 1982.

red. 4 Speed, ak. am/kn. 80.000

IB- $2000 477-6646/563-4166

LYNX L 1986. 2 door>atoiao. aurv

roof $3,491

TOWN 6 COUNTRY DOOGE

9MBs6Grandnvsr 474 "

LYNX 1982. G8

spaed, naw

$2J60/oear

279-1017

LYNX 1962 GS. 4 speed, loadad. ex-

cedent oorKMon $2360 471-7962

LYNX 1982 Power ilsartng-brakae

AmFm ceeeetle. 4 speed Oepend-

$1,450 $63-7837

MAROUIS 1977-Good

door. Mr, crulaa power tteortag.

must aaB. $700. After 8pm 456-1827

MAROUIS 1880 -ego

maea. $1800

"458^7752

MAROU8. 1884 BroMQpam sMBon

non. $8,800 Caa 478-SS78

MAROUIS 1888 Brougham Loededi

Power tu-tone grey. 18.000 rMMa.

S8B80 277-1817

MERCURY ZEPHYR. 1* 10 2 door

OOROON CHEVROLET 437-sriO

328-7448

1988-4 ESCORT. 2 door, low

M.sssAVIS FORD

)OOTaMorapR/l2MBe

355-7b00

2 4 9 5

1 3 9 5

1979 CHRYSLER LaBARON $^. Q J.

Automsttc, air. mint cdndltton

1995 C A D I L L A C FLEETWOOO

Loaded

1977 FORD LTD

Autometlc. aa. power

• 1 1 , 5 0 0

• 5 9 5

S T E M ' S A U T O S A L E S

29944 Ford Road, Cardan City

V. M i l * Wast of Middlebelt

2 6 1 - 5 1 7 0 J

"ickowski

Buick, Inc.

Chevrolet, Oldsmobile, Cadillac, lac.

DETROIT BAD AXE

LEASING

ALL MAKES- ALL MODELS

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

VANS & TRUCKS

-CONTACT KATHY BENNETT

313-886-0000

TEMPO 1964 GLX 4 BE

low IT lias. BgM gray. $4,300 or beM

386-6316

TEMPO 1886, GL.

•Mm. Clean. $4,948

LOU LaRICHE

CHEVY/SUBARU

H Rd - JUM Weardf 1-275

453-4600

Equipped Only $6.486

Bob Jeannotte

Pontiac

453-2500 •

TEMPO. 1998 GL. 4 door ak. power

steering'brakea stereo 33 000

mass. ». 196 Altar J PM 67S-8188

'EMPO

TEMPO 1987 OL

L Sport 2 door. $

$7000 Alter 8pm

229-7188

MERCURY. 1964 Capn M Alia

toys $8 985

Bob Jeannotte

Pontiac

453-2500

MERCURY 1984 GRANO MA ROMS-

LS 4 door VS. smuniattt. Loaded

Ltaaay water »1000 CAS"

BATE. Now Ore, $8,996

Hunt log too Ford >52-0400

THUNOERaMDS • COUGARS

aOSELECTON

8S/S4

maas 86 800 or oftar

22 000

TNUMOER6IRO

COUP •

t 1868 TURBO

88. leaded New

Tta. afMiMWy SMOO CASH RE-

BATE Now Oaly 99.396

Huntington Ford >52-0400

VENTURA 187$. 2 doer feawgoed

takonndtoar. $300orbeMoMw

872 Lincoln

CONTINENT AL.

rsias-

MOMAACM qmm i8Ta 2 dees. se.

ea. Mar maee v 4SB4»i2

MOWTEOO IB

eo. 83 000 mas

78 MX. i 6am +*»

a. $7o8 837 $038

TOPAI 1884.

dMOA, 6m0Gr

amar.

•elue $31|S ar Beet

82*-7*47

TOPA2. 1888.

Mi ares ugga

m 88300

$48-2118

TOPA2 1888

loaBeB $4888 - 4 door. $ seeed,

420-$ 182

ZEPHYR OB

trtMs

4 doer aa.eear-

no rvM $ I 190

si-sr'"-

door, loaded, sport pkg

$8 900 956-1483

CUSTOM CRUISER 1982 Wagon,

a car muM aaB ,

t81 3ff8ff

CUTLASS CRIMER Wagon 1887

loadad. V-6. low "Hisgs

nun

TORONAOO 1994 - very good oorv-

',7800.

After 8pm 464-0594

TORONADO. 1964. WhftM Lbededl

$$ 996

PAGE TOYOTA

FIERO, 1964 «*vta wNh gray mlen-

or. 4 speed, crulaa. tat. aluminum

wheeM. new Urea 6 brakes. 60 000

maes. $3,990 Dose. 982-6640

FIERO 1964-2 M4-SE. autometlc.

loaded

[536-3186

878 Plymouth

ARIES. 1982. red. biack vinyl top.

oondtoon. 44.000 BCSuM

il -"w- T j5l6

FIERO 1864-4 apssd. 34.000 fMMs.

extra deen . $4 500 , .-

After 5pm 522-7883

FURY 1970 - 4 door. 316 anqtna.

runs greet $600 After 5. 536-1372

or 422-7840

• Supreme Broughem.

condtoon. ~

CUTLASS -

1877. IBM oondtoon. T-tope Too

wdi to BR. MuM aaa to appredeto

$3200 or baM altar. After 5PM

522-6666

CUTLASS. 1971 Supreme Rocket

860 V-6. automatic. 4 door $750/

421-6436

CUTLASS. 1878. Supreme. Runs

graaL T-Tope. 70.000 mBas. $780

tam. Befors 5pm 25S0706

CUTLASS 1877.

HORIZON 1979.

dejan. no ruat. only $750_^Tj>ne

HORIZON. 1980. sutomeoc, TC3

eo. 81.000 maes. $800 851-6419

HORIZON 1986-fuay

der warranty

$4,300 or beet

421-7078

HORIZON 1967 AmFm a

70.000 MBa Warranty 1-0516

HORIZON 1987 - 20.000 mBee. Mr

power. $6800 Mke 546-5666

536-4175 LASER. 1986 Turbo. 15.000 mBaa.

Gun MatM Blua. ascaBanl oondtoon.

CUTLASS 1877 - Supteme. 4 i

80.000 mBaa. rune good. $1000

CUTLASS 1979 Baton. 6 _ .

SSA "

PLYMOUTH 197$. 4 door.

areM. Mtofnas parte. SMS or

beet ofler 928-4328

CUTLASS 1980

juat. engine

$1700.

rune good.

'11-3117

CUTLASS 1960-Ak, power brakes,

new transmission, shocks 6 brskss

tin sBunit oondMon. $2500 or beat

oftar Jeff aAar Spm 459-4543

CUTLASS. 1881 Brougham. 4 door

SP_. very CM~. no «

CUTLASS.

. Ctora. Brougham,

ir. dean.

662-7932

CUTLASS 1964 Clara Brougham. Ml

, 76.000 mBas. $4600

349-7764

CUTLASS. 1965. Clera Broughem

$6,400 CaB 534-1786

CUTLASS 1965 CKRA Brougham.

8ght chaatnut mMtMc, loaded.

wMa s cer $7,100 624-8811

CUTLASS 1886.

apa-to

stilt

$8,800

ruet-prooied.

420-2167

CUTLASS. 1987 Clera. MateBc

Gray/Burgandy interior, loa

15.000 mitae. $11,000.

Days 471-0920 Eva's.. 626-6866

DELTA ROY ALE 1962

T8L

Brougham

1. 6 Much

$2,975

GOROON CHEVROLET 427-6710

RELIANT SE 19S5. 4 door. 43.000

a. Mr. power. exceBent ocndk

Bon. CaB 553-0798

RELIANT. 1981 Good tranaporta-

tlon. runs good, starts good

ful body 6 interior. good Mr condi-

tioner 6 heeler, arrv-fm 721-

REUANT 1963 - 2 door. grey, am-

bn stereo ceaeetts. ak. a.iaiBint

condition $2300 455-2992

SUNOANCE 1987. 5 .

amfm slareo. crulss 6 much more

MuM aaB by montha end BeM oftar

476-5670

TC-3. 1979. 2 door, hetchpeck. AM-

FM. rear defroet, 4 speed. $/50

After 5 PM, 533-1836

VOYAGER. 1986 SE TBI. cruMe. ak

auto, sunscreen, roof rack. 29.000

mBas. 1 owner. $10,500 or Best. wBl

tMLS trade. 427-6386

FIEPO 1985 QT, Mr. autometlc.

$7.8»S Mines

Par* unooai Mercury 425-3036

FIERO 1985 AUK xnettc air. k*

powar. survrool cn ursa control, am-

Im caaaana tn mt. 27000 nxiaa.

$7,200

FIERO 1M< aulorr vatic. Mr. AM-FM

ceeaatla & mora 1

o»er peyr fonts $280 lor 38 months

CaB evenings

463-7405

PHOENIX 1983. sk^power sseermg-

387-0495

> caaaane. «• 6

condrtfccwv CaB

V-4. 4

K ^ 7 T l 2 ^ ^ " J ! r S ^ 6 PONTUC60B0. 1883 LE

HAM. 1877 Ak. stereo. *nyi top. a asveo crulet

troaL power Maarkig 6 brakea. Mr

427-6710 t*0~*cor*mo«. ^

882 Toyota

CAMRY LE. 1887 Wagon. 0.500

c*ed

882-0381

CAMRY 1986 Tk . — -

New! $7S60. PrWaBS. CMI Mr Hsrt.

CEUCA GT 198$. 10.000 I

loaded, excellent condition

$10,290

$1*75

GOROON CHEVROLET

PONTIAC 8000

».4dOor.SS.9B^^

GORDON CHEVROLET 427-5710

wtth BAM shift.' new T/As. sport

wheels, louvrss new paktt 6 mora.

Pappy 6 runs great. $1,800 or beat

522-0900

1979,

bon. new pekM |ob Sea to a ill* el

$2,650 After 8 PM. 478-0144

PONTIAC. GRANO AM. 1986 LE

VB. automatic ak. loaded $'000

CASH REBATE Now OrBy $7 J86

Huntington Ford >52-0400

PONTIAC. J2000. 1962

tomebc. Mr. power

brakas. ceeeetle. rear «

deen $2400/BeM 882-671?

PONTIAC STATION WAGON. 1879

Fkma wear Lscksgoodt88.96

GORDON CHEVROLET 427-6710

PONTIAC STE. 1964 Rust-proof

V6 Loeded! Very good oondtoon

$7.500 471-6824

PONTIAC STE 1864, loededl loed-

GORCiONCHEVROLET 427-6710

PONTIAC. STE. 1964 4 Door. Load-

POS4TIAC. 6000 1886. 2 door aule;

make. cruMa ak. sunroof. tBI. $7,996

JACK CAULEY CHEVY >56-0014

PONTIAC 8000. 1886 Sto. Loeded.

LRe Naw $11,900

CEUCA 1980 OT. BR bask, powar

mg 6 brakes, auiomwoc

tor.^M

COROLLA. 1880, UHberk, 5 speed.

AMFM. good condBkkv^WO

ThurBday. September 24. t»67 O&E

1884 Vo&swagan

(R.W.Q-1 IC)* 13C

COROLLA. 1882. T

door. eeooBart ana*

$1,860 466-1888

•rosl MM. 2

COROLLA. 1886

low mlea enceM

$7400

^uloiaBc. air.

ml condition

848-1787

MR2 1886 33 000

Four anow Urea Va

Bon $8250 negoUetn

maaa. loadad

ry good oondi-

M. 421-8082

SUPRA 1883. 5 ac •eed. Mr. laps

or#r 48.000 ongan*

M* new. 88.sST>

00m-Mercury

Bnea Part Un-

428-3038

TERCEL 1884 - auSomaalc BV. tar,

good condMon. $4,000 Agw

TORONAOO. 1881 V-8. M power

$6,486

362-8680

TOYOTA CAMRY 1884 LE. 4 door.

amomaBc. air. «wool parr alaar-

BILL COOK BUICK

471-0800

RABafT IP

45MPG. secrMoe. 9rM $860 takes

Tyme 8 Mas

SUPER BEETLE 1974. aao

ossnp- laBoe. toe new. $1200 or

SSrttaT^ 464^828

884 Vofeawagan

VW BUS 1986

tm atareo. luB

refngeretor. a

at WWbeM

456-0312

VW 1873

TOYOTA 1886, CoroBe SR5. loadad

Newvaaen anow ^ 1403

884 Volkswagen

BUG. 1972. good condWcn AM-FM

stereo ceaeette. very dean, rune

good, $675 CaB 421-0142

CABRIOLET 1986 - convertl

28.000 miles mint condition

85 OLDS CALAIS

2 door, hardtop, low

maes. loeded.

'7495

COROLLA. 1881

low nMoe. $1450 Tyme I

GT!. 1888.

niBsaas, W

sd. 8*750

DICK SCOTT

BUICK

200 W. Ann Arbor Rd.. Plymouth

453-4411

FIREBIRD 19B0

setts new area, good condHlon.

$2,600 or beat Evenlnga 862-3036

FIREBIRD 1961 Eaptrtt Supar cieen

In 6 out $3,700 ^

FIREBIRD. 1961, SBver, mtn! corjd-

Hen. 32,000 mBas. 3J6-7W3

FIREBIRD, 1962. low mBee, loeded

wtth aB opaona. sport ahasis, aadrt-

Itoe $3695 Tyme Sataa 456-5666

FIREBIRD 1994 SE. charooOIgrev

every option. V-6. Hops. $6300

Troy Weekdars 362-1712

GRANO AM LE 1965. 2 door, auto-

matic. loaded, dark red with grar 2-

tone $7999 After 6pm. 729-174

GRANO AM SE 1967- mint

$11,300 634-6324

GRANO AM. 1965. LE. loeded. low

irllsags, red 6 grey $6500 CaB

651-4768

GRANO AM 1966 - LE. Burpmdy 6

grey. 4 cylinder. 5 speed, sk. ML

am-fm i: aassm stereo, rear detog

$10,000 474-4907 1-626-5744

GRANO AM 1966 LE V-6. ejrtandad

warranty, pfciah ntartor. loaded,

perfect $8600 12pm 474-9614

880 Pontiac

BONNEVILLE 1964 Broughem. ruM

Mr loed-

349-2846

kik LButMsns car. Ml power, load;

ad $6,500

BONNEVILLE. 1986. 388 oub Indt.

automatic, red wtth biack interior.

origmM pMnt. no rust, looks 6 rune

goS $1100 946-2637

BONNEVILLE tSte, wagon,

power. 6 cyBnder. 65.0(» i

643-6824

GRANO AM 1986 LE. loaded surv

roof, kHMtccar.$7,500-

GRANO AM. 1968 LE Ak, esct

97 496

PAGE TOYOTA jSj-SSSg

GRANO AM, 1

ak.'

CaB

V-6.

$7200

626-5097

GRANO PRIX U, lUUi li l| • •

ac. iendau lop. velour miMtor. JBUl

crulee $4.000./0r Beat) 387-6163

OELTA 86 RoyMe 197a good condi-

tion. UN loaded. 1 owner. $i.000

$46-7877 or

OELTA

1878.$:

DELTA $8 1977 Very good coneB-

Bon. $860 or beM ofter

Alter 7PM 479-7537

DELTA 86 1964 Royal Broughem. 4

door. Ml aslraa MicaSant condition.

36400 mBes $7750 861-1964

DELTA 86 1986 BroughemLS-er-

$8600/dtar.

^•>16 or 522-4411

DELTA 8a 1885 Royals

42.000

$aooo

Brougham.

M options,

offer over

489-5874

OLDS -SS. 1979

seats. Ms srlng. t _

$660 CaB altar 4pm.

MSsrkig. brakes 6 rear defog

425-2142

OLDe 98 1966 - Regency, broug-

kam. 4 door. aflordabM luxury

$6,000 mBaa. loadad. «cfc*ang

alarm, cuatom top • oon^-g 1

luxe aound. ale. $10J00.

346-2649

OLDS 96 1966 - Regency broug-

. 28.000

326-5868

OLDS 96 1967 - Regency broug-

ham Stlckar $20 250 knmaajMM

oondtoon. Isellisi interior Onfy

10.400 n — , , 5 . ^ ^

MORE For Your MONEY!

•3495

•7995

'83 MIRADA

Automatic, air, black Deauty, sharp

'84 VOYAGER LE

Loaded. 7 passenger

'84 CAMARO

ak, Bharp.

9 9999

'85 OLDS 98 REGENCY BROUGHAM

Loaded. SPECIAL *9995

'85 CITATION 4 DOOR

Automatic, air. dean. SPECIAL 3®®"

'82 MONTE CARLO

Automatic, air.

'86 ENCORE LS 4 DOOR

Automatic, air. 10,000 miles.

TO RELIANT L.E. 4 DOOR

Automatic, air.

*87 SUNDANCES 4 DOOR

Automatic, air, stereo, plus more.

2 left.

TO LEBARON GTS TURBO

'84 RELIANT 4 DOOR

Automatic, air.

ranty! $7,995

Huntington Ford >52-0400

PONTIAC T1000- 1994. low mBeS.

good tranaportatlon-82900.

After 430pm: 256-1129

PONTIAC T-1000 1961 Power

stoertng/brakee. 4 door, automatic,

ak No ruet $1,600.

Alter 6PM 427-4734

PONTIAC. 1964 (BOO LI WAGWt

Two tone, windows locks. Mr

GORDON CHEVROLET 427-57100

PONTIAC. 1985. 6000LE. Take Over

I II i - 1 yr left Car loeded. aaey

terms- Ask tor WML 261-1400„or

59»-

PONTIAC 2000 1963 t m

mSaega, 5 speed ovardrtva Good

condtoon. n>d. duKh t ^ o r

PONTIAC 6000 LE

828-0243

PONTIAC 6000 IE 1885 Wkgon. VS.

ga A weak-

256-9982

PONTIAC 6000 LE 1965. 2 lone aB-

S i n ' s x r L

ar mndows, locks, antenna. ML

crvsee Naw condition 60.000 mass.

I must aaa. wBBng lo daM $6700 or

beet ofler by end ol week.

Days. 525-1900: Alter 6. 346-4310

PONTIAC 8000. 1882 LE Ak.

endaa. amlm atoreo. $3,939

LOU LaRICHE

CHEVY/SUBARU

Ptymouth Rd. - Jua* WeM of 1-77

453-4600

SUNBIRO SE. 1986 Automaac Mr.

crxxea. ML caaaada. $7,500 477-2648

SUNBIRO 1980 automM

steering, am-fm sserec

maok$1400orbeMoRBr

Alter 6:30pm

RO 19B

good condition

81J00. Altar 6pm.

THE 1988

FORDS

AREJIERE!

OVER 150 NEW 1988 CARS & TRUCKS AVAILABLE!

trs deen Loaded

474-731$

SUNBIRO 1965 Turbo 4 door A^l>-

madc. loaded. 2 tone 6 stnped. M

power, premkan saaid. art

werrertfy 40.000 rrMes Ex.

condMon. brand near Turbo

$7.300/oRar A reM buy

Deys: 986-2*35 Evas 647-81891

&

477-4837

SUNBIRO 1065, $6,300 CMI

alter Spm 474

SUNBIRO 1966 GT, feM krto.

speed. 4 door btock 6 sBvar. tape

deck a*lh eq '

tras- $7.800

SUNBIRO. 1886 Power steering ll

brMies. sk. am-tm star "

IC. 10.000 maea $7500

TRANS AM 1882

tertor. T-top. new ikes H«i per-

formenca Loaded! $B200 437-7166

NEW! 1968

ESCORT PONY

1.9 Uter etoctrorMcaIfy fuaMrv

(actefl engine. 4 apMd c*m-

cJnve trMiamliMon. ckrth rp-

ckntng seels rear Oafrostar.

AM radio Slock a0525

SPECIAL PRICE '6932

-rTax and P!«lk»

NEW1 1968

ESCORT GL 2 DOOR

Air conditiening. pow«r

steering and brakaa, auto-

maiic tranarmaaion. roar dpf-

roeter ctovcoat pakrt. duM

electric remote mirrors.

AM/FM stereo, tinted glass,

7 more options! Stock

S0506

SPECIAL PWCE 8409

- Tax and Ptaies

NEW! 1968

EXP LUXURY COUPE

Air conditioning. 5 speed

transmission, AM/FM cas-

sette power steering and

brakes, speed control. UH

wTieei. rear defroster tinted

glass. duM electric mirrors,

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Sports Brad Emons, Dan O'Meara editors/£&1 -2312

Thursday, Saptambar 24, 1867 O&E

Chiefs halt

sister duo,

top WLW

Plymouth Canton got tough defensively

in the second half Tuesday

and shut down the Hall sisters, enabling

the Chiefs to take a 47-38 victpry

from WaUed Lake Western in

girls basketball.

Canton, 1-0 in the Western Division

of the Western Lakes Association

and 2-4 overall, held 6-foot-2

junior Michelle and 6-1 senior Diane

Hall to just six second-half points after

the pair caused problems for the

Chiefs in the early going.

The Halls scored 20 of their combined

26 points in the first half, and

the Warriors jumped in front 16-11

in the opening quarter. Michelle finished

with 14 and Diane, who was

held scoreless in the last half. 12.

"We made a few adjustments on

the Hall sisters," Canton coach Rob

Neu said. "Those two are hard to

stop if you allow them to catch, turn

and score. - , ,

"We tried to get the backside

guard to double down. You've got to

guard those kind of players with

more than one player."

Canton rallied to take a 28-26 halftime

lead behind the offensive play

of Heather Miller and Karen Boluch.

Miller scored eight of her 14 points

in that quarter, Boluch six of her

game-high 17.

The Chiefs held on through the

second half as they continued to play

tough defense on Western's big offensive

threats. The Warriors were

limited to single-digit scoring in the

last two quarters, and Michelle Hall

had just six points (two field goals) in

the half.

"Candi Jones and Boluch did a

nice job of closing down on the

Halls," Neu said.

The Chiefs also stepped up the intensity

by pressuring the ball and

cashing in on some Warrior turnovers.

Please turn to Page 2

Sttje ©bseruer Sfauispapers

BILL BRESLER/«t«ft photograph*

Chria Braidwood follows through on hla driving motion during

Monday's gott match with Canton. Braidwood la tha veteran

loadar on Salom'e toam.

Relays competition keen

North edges Lakes foes

By Dan O'Meara

staff writer

The results of the Western Lakes

girls swimming/diving relays confirmed

what coaches said about the

league in the preseason: The WLAA

appears headed for its most competitive

season yet - t

North Farmington became the

first team other than Livonia Stevenson

to win the relays, and a mere

yjy thfr top three

teams.

Winning four relays and setting

records in two, the Raiders compiled

226 points to edge out runner-up

Livonia Stevenson (224), and Livonia

Churchill was a close third with 220.

Furthermore, fourth-place Plymouth

Canton and No. 5 Northville finished

within 34 points of the top with

198 and 192 toUls, and sixth-place

Plymouth Salem would have finished

higher if not for two disqualifications.

"You're going to see the league

meet about the same way," Stevenson

coach Greg Phill said. "That's

exactly the way the championships

are going to go.

"THE LEAGUE is getting tougher

and tougher every year."

North used a combination of good

swimming and good fortune to win

such a highly competitive meet, according

to Raider* coach Pat Duthie,

adding North was hurt by some

teams and helped by others in cer-

Um events

The Raiders did their part by

garnering the most first places of

any team. North did not compete in

ad no second places and was

third in one event

North s Liz Worthen. Marcy Mulbarger.

Kerry Doran and Laurie

Oswald esUblished a meet record of

4:15 *8 in the 400-yard medley relay,

and Amy Meneilley, Meaghan

O'Brien. Mulbarger and Cmdy

Cramer did the same In the 200

breaststroke with a 2:15.84 time.

Worthen, O'Brien, Doran and

Cramer teamed up to win the 400 iadividua!

medley in 4:27.55, and Jenay

Williams. Joacelyn Komer,

Meneilley and Oswald captured the

crescendo relay in 5:81.44.

"We put some good thought into

some of the things we did." Duthie

said, "but you have to have the kids

who are able to win

"AND, IF you have the kids who

can win, you have to figure out how

you can best utilize them.

"When you have 12 teams, you just

don't know where other teams are

going to put good people," he added.

"It s a guessing game. The key really

is to utilize your personnel as best

you can."

As evidenced by the close scores,

the meet was not decided until the

final event - the 200 freestyle -

and the Raiders needed help from

Rai»m to edge the Spartans.

Salem's Tracy Meszaros, Dawn

Shiek, Jodi Thomas and Heather

Bunch won the event in 1:50.71 and

slipped past second-place Stevenson

(1:51.38). North was fourth. A Spartan

win would have given them an

additional four points and the meet

victory.

North was not entered in the twoperson

diving since it has only two

divers and one had a prior commitment.

But Northville won that event,

edging Stevenson and denying the

Spartans another opportunity for

four more points.

"When you have 12 teams in a

league like ours, somebody can put

something together somewhere,"

Duthie said.

"SOMETIMES it balances out and

sometimes it doesn't Since we came

out on top, I'd have to* say it balanced

out pretty well."

Stevenson and Churchill, which

knocked off the Spartans in a dual

meet last week, had one victory

apiece. The Spartans' Lisa Dotxenroth,

Gina Bennetts, Dana Carlen

and Amy Harrison won the 200 backstroke

(2:08.8), and the Chargers' Ka

tie Hamann. Cathy Ankenbrandt MicheHe

Rerrv and Audra Martin captured

the 200 butterfly (1:58.56).

Canton's strong finish was based

i&four second places Salem coach

Chuck Olson, who* team also had

three thirds, was pleased by

team's performance and was left

with thoughts of what might have

been after his team was disqualified

from the breaststroke and crescendo

relays.

"It should give as a little confidence,

knowing we can actaally

compete with the powers in this

league," he said, estimating the

Rocks might have ended up with 208

(toul) points.

The points were there; we just

gave them away. Not to

turn to Page 2

A

Salem's revamped team

has fast start in '87 golf

By Dan O'Meara

staff writer

Tbe weeks ahead will provide a lot

of answers for Plymouth Salem's

golf team, but one thing appears certain:

The Rocks have come back

with another quality squad.

Salem lost six seniors from a team

that qualified a second straight year

for the Class A meet, but the Rocks

have started out 4-2 this year after

trimming rival Plymouth Canton

215-226 at Brae Burn Golf Course

Monday.

Senior captain Chris Braidwood is

the only returning player with varsity

experience, but coach Rick Wilson

has successfully reconstructed

his lineup.

Salem, which shared the Lakes Division

title with Farmington last

year and is 1-0 thus far, faces Westland

John Glenn, the Falcons. Livonia

Stevenson and North Farmington

in the next two weeks.

"At 1-0, we have a shot like the

rest of them," Wilson said. "If we're

3-0 at the end of the week, I'd say we

have a chance at the division title."

BRAIDWOOD. a four-year varsity

player, averages 39-40 strokes a

match, though he tied fellow senior

Dan Kruescher for Salem's No. 5

spot Monday with a 45, and is tbe

only firm link between last year's

"solid group" and a relatively new

club.

But senior Matt Braun and junior

Jeff Jagacki, who were co-medalists

with 41s against Canton, are some of

the players who have come on to fill

key spots on the roster.

Junior Brian Fennelly carded a 42

and senior Lamar Crayton 43 to

complete Salem's scoring against

the Chiefs. In addition, junior Gregg

Speaks has been Salem's No. 2 man

in terms of average, but lost a chal-

BlLL BflESLER/ataff photograph*

Canton's Shawn Dudaah prepares

to putt while Salem's

Brian FannoMy watchea In tha

background.

lenge match prior to the Canton con-

"So far, it's been a fun year," Wilson

said. "We've had pretty good

competition among our players

trying to get into a match.

Wilson is hopeful the Rocks, with

the progress they've already sto-a

will be ready to earn a third trip to

the sute meet at Michigan State's

Forest Akers Golf Course next

month.

"ITS JUST a real bonus to make

it to that," be said. "We can have a

Dick Scott

Presents Plymouth

High Schools'

(P.C)1D

successful season and not qualify,

but that's so exciting I wouldn't

trade that for anythipg

The Rocks qualified lor state at

tbe Hilltop course in Plymouth the

last two years, but this year's regional

will be at Oak Pointe (formerly

Burroughs Farm) Oct. 9 The league

meet will Uke place Oct. 5 at Huron

Meadows near Brighton.

Canton's top players are freshmen

Rod Jaesena and sophomore Geoff

Allen, who carded 42 and 45, respectively,

in the Salem match With

them, the future looks bright, but the

Chiefs are 1-3 this season

"We've got some real fine freshmen

coming up," first-year Canton

coach Fred Libbing said. "I see some

real interest in golf in the district."

The Chiefs have also had some

tough breaks. They shot a 197 team

score against Walled Lake Western

but still lost the match. Canton suffered

a close loss to Northville Tuesday,

220-228

JAESENA shot a 43 on the difficult

Meadowbrook course and Allen

44. The underclassmen are the

team's "big pounders," and Libbing

predicts they'll both be all-sUters

eventually.

Seniors Chris Trim and Mike Tou-

Unt and juniors Shawn Dudash and

Sean McFarlane round out the

Chiefs' top six golfers. Trim. TouUnt

and Dudash shot «7s Tuesday.

"Although they've turned in some

real fine scores, we've lost some

heartbreakers." said Libbing, referring

to the WLW match.

"I'm pleased with what tbe kids

are doing. I don't measure it against

wins and losses. We've got a team

out there trying, and I'm happy to

work with them."

OF THE WEEK

Karen Bolvch, Heather Miller

CANTON BASKETBALL

9 9

33 Stacy Sovine, 43 Dena Head,

10 Keri McBride

SALEM BASKETBALL

A PLYMOUTH HIOH SCHOOL fLASHBACt *

On October 4. 1963. with 3 conference games ieff to go, T^e KiymouTn toot ball

team defeated Redford Union 26-7 to maintain 1st place in the Suburban Six

League. Coach Mike Ho ben'a team was out In front earty in the flame due to the

superb offensive playing of fullback Dave Agnew. 4 Interceptions by

Redford Union. The closing touchdown came on a seven yard dash by the Rocks

left halfback, Roger Toby.


i

20(P.C) O&E Thursday. September 24. 1967

Canton girls dethrone Falcons at S'craft

By Brad Emont

staff writer

Farmington, Plymouth Canton and Redford

Bishop Borgess came up the big winners Saturday

in the 22nd running of the Schoolcraft College Invitational

cross country meet. (See statistical

summary).

• Farmington won the boys team title for a

record fourth time minus two of their top performers,

Ron Smedley and Steve Quenneville.

Both were out with injuries.

• The Canton girls captured their first title

with 63 points, unseating defending champion

Farmington, which tallied 80.

• Borgess, meanwhile, boasted the boys individual

winner (Matt Smith) and the girls individual

winner (Michelle Gayney).

Smith, a senior, zipped past Walled Lake Western's

Brian Grosso on the final loop to win the

5,000-meter race in 16:22.6. Grosso finished second

in 16:32.0. Rounding out the top five were

Plymouth Salem s Doug Vergari (16:59.7), Canton's

Jay Swiecki (17:03.3) and Farmington's

Brandon London (17:10.6).

"WE TOLD MATT to follow the leader and let

the other guy do all the work," said Borgess boys

coach Floyd Wells. "We wanted him to try and lay

back and then kick.

' "Matt's time is almost a minute better than last

cross country

year. He's just in better shape. He's very selfmotivated.''

Gayney and teammate Michelle Gross also had

a plan to finish one-two.

Cantons Lori Penland, who finished fourth

overall, took the early lead and then surrendered

it to Salem's Jenny Sample, who eventually finished

second behind Gayney.

A junior, Gayney hung back in a pack of five

runners and like Smith, made her move in the

1,000 meters. She was clocked in 20:58.38, five

seconds ahead of Sample. Gross, meanwhile, ended

up fifth and Farmingtoo's Bonnie Stecker

moved into to third.

Only 31 seconds separated the top 10 finishers

•We call them (Gayney and Gross) MGsquare,'"

said Borgess girls coach John

McGreevy. "I told them go for it — one-two. At

worst I thought they'd be in the top five. It's really

a tossup between them. They're so close and

they're good friends."

FARMINGTON BOYS COACH Jerry Young

feared Canton and Salem would push his team

but when the final points were tallied, the Falcons

prevailed by a comfortable margin.

Chiefs defeat Western;

Salem drills Lakes foe

Continued from Page 1

Jenny Russell, in her starting debut, was instrumental

in applying the backcourt pressure that helped keep

the ball out of the Halls' hands and also performed well

when putting the ball in play for Canton. Neu said.

He also said Canton's rugged early-season schedule

- the Chiefs were beaten 61-34 by Catholic League

power Birmingham Marian last Saturday — helped it

overcome WLW.

"The girls deserve a lot of credit for coming back to

take this game after getting blown out on Saturday."

he said. "That shows a lot of character."

SALEM 84, W.L. CENTRAL 47: The Nos. 1 and 2

teams a year ago in the Lakes Division opened division

play against each other Tuesday, and the Rocks left no

doubt they're still a cut above Walled Lake Central.

Dena Head had another outstanding game, which included

a game-high 30 points, as Salem rolled over the

Viking en route to its fifth win in six games. It was the

first loss for Central, 4-1.

"We dealt with their pressure really well and got a

lot of easy baskets off the transition." Salem coach

Fred Thomann said.

It was a big victory considering the Vikings played

the Rocks even-up last year, he said.

Head also had 16 rebounds, nine assists, nine steals

and four blocks. In addition, center Barb Krug scored a

career-high 19 points and had eight rebounds, and

Save a life. _

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girls basketball

guard Jill Estey registered 16 points, eight assists and

eight steals.

Central's Shannon Flood scored 15 points and Leah

Vlisides 10. Salem held quarter leads of 23-10, 46-20

and 74-31.

MARIAN 61, CANTON 34: Marian used a fast start,

leading 20-2 at the end of one quarter, to overwhelm

the Chiefs in non-league action.

- "They flat out came after us with everything they

had" Neu said.

The Mustangs shot nearly 85 percent in the first half,

he said.

"I've never seen anything like it. I've never seen a

girls basketball team shoot like that."

All-State center Kathy Phillips scored 22 points to

lead Marian. 4-1. Mary Rogers added 11 and Jennifer

% Shasky 10.

Canton was led by Boluch with 10 points and Susan

Ferko with seven. The Chiefs trailed 31-14 at halftime

and 47-27 after three quarters.

"The fact is we just never got started," Neu said.

"They were looking forward to us, and they got us."

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D a G HEATING & COOLING

19140 FARMINGTON • LIVONIA

Tbe Falcons appear to be a formidable team,

even with the departure of last year's Schoolcraft

Invitational winner Chris Inch, an all-stater now

at the University of Illinois, and Al Stebblns, another

standout now at Ferris State.

"We don't have the up-front strength, but we're

still a solid team," Young said. "We've Just got to

get them healthy. It's going to be the end of the

season before we're really ready for a good

team."

London, fifth overall, was followed by teammates

Matt Walter (12th), sophomore Rob Holloway

(13th), Brad Moore (14th) and Matt Langdon

($7th).

"We knew we had a good shot here, but because

of injuries, it would be tougher than usual," said

Young.

GEORGE PRYZGODSKI, the Canton coach,

said his girls all had the same idea when they

arrived at .early Saturday morning at the Schoolcraft

course.

"I think everybody came here with the purpose

of winning — and we did," said the Canton coach.

"Our kids, talent-wise, are close together. They're

all very competitive and that helps.

"I can't ask for anything more. I'm happy for

them because they do all the work."

Penland was tbe Chiefs' leader, finishing fourth.

Close behind were teammates Lynda Scbendel

(eight). Missy Jasnowski (12th), Sherry Figurski

(17th) and Cathy McCabe (22nd).

North captures WLAA relays

Continued from Page 1

thing away from Canton and Northville,

but I was surprised we were

right there."

CHURCHILL coach Larry Hein

also was encouraged by his team's

showing. The Chargers were sixth in

diving, but finished no lower than

fifth in any other event.

"We did as well as I anticipated,"

he said. "As far as swimming relays,

I was really pleased.

"After the meet, I reminded the

girls we came out oo top in tbe dual

meet, but they weren't happy losing

to Stevenson.* All in all, I was pretty

happy to finish in the top three in a

big relay meet."

Duthie and Phill echoed Hein s position

that more importance will be

placed on the dual-meet schedule

and end-of-the-season league meet.

"I hate to say it was just a relay

meet, but that's exactly what it

was," said Duthie, adding the upcoming

season should be more

suspenseful than previous ones.

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urn Shingle* Of M phy. The second-place bowler will

receive $400 on down to $50 for the

r4os 25-32 finishers.

On Saturday. Oct. 17. bowlers will

bowl four games and use their best

three. Men will receive 80 percent of

their handicaps from 190 and women

90 percent from 190. The top 32

bowlers will return for double-elimination

match play Sunday. Oct. 18.

PROFESSIONAL bowler John

Gant will participate in a charitable

aspect of tbe event. A drawing will

take place Saturday, and the winner

will receive a new bowling ball and

the opportunity to return at the conclusion

of the tournament and bowl a

two-game match against Gant. The

prize is the money collected for the

drawing, but Gant will bowl for a local

charity.

Gant also will be available Sunday

to sign autographs and answer bowling

questions The 29-year-old from

Independence, Ky., was PBA Rookie

of the Year and won the Denver

Open in 1984 and received the PBA

High-Average Award in 1986.

Gant, a left-hander nicknamed the

Buzz Saw, won the True Value Open

and was one of 16 PBA members selected

to bowl in the World Invitational

in Tokyo last year.

For more information, bowlers

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can contact one of the tournament

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sports

• PUNT, PASS, KICK

Canton Parks and Recreation Department

is sponsoring its sixth annual

Punt, Pass and Kick contest for

boys and girls age 8-1S at 10 a.m.

Saturday, Oct. S, at Griffin Park.

Registration will take place at 9:50

a.m. There is no fee.

Each participant will try one punt,

pass and kick, and his/her efforts

will be judged on distance and accuracy.

Awards will be given to the top

finishers in all six age groups.

Participants must wear tennis

shoes only. No football or soccer

shoes, cleats or turf shoes will be allowed.

Local winners will represent Canton

in the metro Detroit regional

Sunday, Oct. 25, in Canton Township.

• RUTHTRYOUTS

Tryouts for Georgetown Realty's

1988 Babe Ruth travel baseball team

(boys age 13-15) will take place 1-4

p.m. Saturday, Sept. 26, at Field No.

1 in Griffin Park.

For information, call George

Harris at 981-2093 or Al Turri (after

8 p.m.) at 397-4 548.

• NIGHT BASKETBALL

The Men's Recreation Night Basketball

League begins a new season

Wednesday, Oct. 7.

Games will be played every

Wednesday at Erikson Elementary

School from 6:45 to 9:45 p.m. The fee

is $10 for 10 weeks.

Players must be Canton residents.

Call 397-5110 for further information

or mail registration information

and fee to. Canton Parks and Recreation

Department, 1150 S, Canton

Center Road, Canton, MI 48188.

• CAGE RECRUIT

• Plymouth Salem graduate Dave

Collins has signed a letter of intent

to play basketball for Quincy (IU.)

College, an NCAA Division II school.

The 6-foot-8 Collins averaged six

points and six rebounds for the

Rocks, who were 22-3 last season. He

shot 58 percent from the floor.

Collins, who also lettered once in

football and three times in track,

plans to major in biology. He is the

son of Mr. and Mrs. Gail Collins.

• ARCA RUNNER-UP

Dennis Pace of Canton Township

was runner-up in the Automobile

Racing Club of America season point

standings for Figure-8 drivers at

Flat Rock Speedway.

Ben Benedict of Richmond won

the season championship with 1,875

points. Pace had 1,760 and third-

place Parker Wade of Riverview

1,700.

• BADMINTON PLAY

Anyone interested in playing badminton

is welcome to participate in

Tuesday night competition at Plymouth

West School, at the corner of

Sheldon and Ann Arbor Trail roads.

The badminton players will meet

every Tuesday from 7:30-10 p.m. If

anyone would like further information,

they can call Kit Henderson at

474-4992.

The standard of play varies from

intermediate to advanced, according

to Henderson, but beginners who

have only previously played the

game in their backyards are welcome

as coaching is available.

• SOCCER SIGN-UP

The Canton Soccerdome is accepting

registrations for its first season,

which begins Nov. 1. Openings are

available in youth, co-ed, adult men

and adult women divisions.

The cost for the eight-game season

is $575 per team ($325 for under-8

teams). Practice times will be available.

For information, call 483-5624

between noon and 8 p.m.

• HOCKEY TOURNEY

The North American Junior Hockey

League Invitational Tournament

will be played Oct 9-12 at Compuw

a re-Oak Park Arena _

Competing teams include Detroit

Junior Red Wings, Bloomfield Jets,

Redford Royals, Compuware Juniors.

Chicago Young Americans, Mississauga

Torspos, Oshawa Legionnaires

and Windsor Bulldogs.

Tickets, good for an entire day,

are $3 for adults, $2 for seniors and

children. Four games will be playe, 22 26 89 25

jean Goddard (Stevenson). 22 31 9 V 26

Donna Chube (N Farmmgton) 22:35 19 27

Carolyn Zavrei (Yp*>. 22 38 41: 28 Suzanne

Moore (Stevenson). 22 39 82 29 Tma Koons

(Frankim). 22 41 26: 30 Judy McKeever

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w 24. 1987 O&E (*6DXF)60

swimming rankings

The lollowtng is a list, ol the Observer s best

girls swimming times, compiled by Plymouth

Canton coach Hooker WeUman Observer

area coaches should report their beat times to

WeUman at 451-6600. ext 313. from 2 30-

3 30 p m Monday. Tuesday Wednesday or

Friday The best girls times wHi appear m

Thursday s edition ol the Observer

North Farrrxngton

Livonia Churchill

Plymouth Canton

Ptyrnouth Salem

200 MEDLEY RELAY

200 FREESTYLE

Nicole Drake J Canton)

Cmdy Cramer (North)

Laurie OswaW (North)

Amy Mene>aey (Nortel

Kerry Doran (North)

Kane Hamann (Church*)

Ke«y Fiiscne i.Canton)

DawnSNek (Saiem)

Katie Vesftaugf' (Salem)

joJo Wikiund (Saiem)

200 INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY

Audra Manm (Churcn*)

Kerry Doran (North)

Cindy Cramer (North)

Marcy Mmoarger (North)

Cass


«0(p.c) Q&E Thursday. Saptambf 24. 1967

Salem-North showdown

heads list of grid contests


By Brad Emons

and Dan O'Meara

staff writers

. It's time for midterm exams for

several Observerland- high school

football teams this weekend.

Two area teams will collide Fri-

day when North Farmington (3-0)

travels to Plymouth Salem (3-0) in a

key Western Lakes Activities Associ-

ation game.

State-ranked Westland John Glenn

(3-0), which has rung up impressive^

35-6,,49-7 and 40-0 victories so far,

will get its stiffest test to date

against Livonia Stevenson (1-2).

Both games will go a long way in

determining the Lakes Division

champion of the WLAA. -

In the Western Division, over-

whelming favorite Farmington Har-

rison (3-0) will travel to face Walled

Lake Western (1-2).

• On Saturday, two sets of rivals

will collide — Livonia Churchill (2-1)

at Livonia Franklin (1-2) and Red-

ford Bishop Borgess (2-1) against

Redford Catholic Central (2-1).

Last week O'Meara nudged ahead

of his grid prognosticating counter-

part, correctly picking 10 of 14

games. Emons. going 9-5, is 33-12 for

the year, one game behind O'Meara

at 34-11.

This is a midterm exam for these

two as well:

FRIDAY GAMES

(all 7:30 p.m. unless noted)

Garden City at Edsel Ford (3:30 p.m.):

The Cougars were stung for the third

straight week, this time by Woodhaven.

Highly-explosive Edsel Ford (2-1) is

gunning for another Northwest Suburban

League croWn Picks — The Edsel is not

obsolete.

Redford Union at Ann Arbor Huron:

Tbe Panthers (0-3) have played a mur-

derous schedule thus far and things don t

figure to get any easier against Huron (l-

2), a team with losses to state-ranked

Catholic Central and East Lansing. Last

week the River Rats gained their first

win against another NSL team. Dear-

born, 28-12. Picks — The River Rats go

paddling down the Huron with no prob-

lems.

Redford Thur*ton at Allen Park; The

Eagles (0-3) moved the ball for the first

time in three weeks, but still couldn't

score in a 7-0 loss to Melvindale Allen

Park (3-0) appears headed for a Tri-River

League title behind the quarterbacking of

John Jaskowski Picks — The Jaguars

make it four in a row. _

grid predictions

Westland John Glenn at Livonia Ste-

venson: Tbe Spartans, playing their first

home game, are a disappointing 1-2 and

appear to have their hands full with a

Glenn team that is dangerous through the

air as well as on the ground. Stevenson's

team speed has become suspect Picks —

It's a test, but Glenn passes.

N. Farmington at Plymouth Salem:

This Lakes Division battle pits North's

stingy defense against Salem's wishbone

North opened a few eyes up last week in

beating Stevenson. The big play could

determine this one. Picks — Emons likes

Salem at home in a squeaker O'Meara

sees it the other way

Plymouth Canton at Northville: The

Mustangs (0-3) are hungry for a win. Can-

ton (1-2) needs to get its offense re-

charged after a dismal showing last week

against Walled Uke Western. Picks —

It's a tossup. but Canton bounces back.

Farmington Harrison at Walled Lh.

Western: Has Western (1-2) ever beaten

Harrison? Why should this year be any

different' The Warriors are dreaming.

Picks — Hawks soaring to their fourth

straight.

Lincoln Park at Wayne: This could be a

revenge game for the Zebras (2-1), who

were knocked from tbe unbeaten ranks

by Lincoln Park a year ago. Tbe Rail-

splitters (3-0) come in confident. They

need to shut down Wayne's improved

pacing attack, led by quarterback Mike

Heard Picks — Emons says Wayne re-

turns the favor. O'Meara sees Lincoln

Park winning No. 4.

Hamtramck at Uv. Clarenceville: Two

starters may be suspended by coach

Ralph Weddle for disobeying orders in

last week's galling 8-7 loss tt> Bloomfield

Hills Cranbrook But even a visit from

the pope can't help the Cosmos, who were

shelled last week by Auburn Heights

Avondale. 40-0 Picks — Clarenceville

evens its record at 2-2.

saturday games

Livonia Churchill at Livonia Franklin:

The Chargers (2-1) have regrouped after

a stinging 42-0 opening-game loss to Ster-

ling Heights. Franklin (1-2). meanwhile,

is gunning for an "early" city title with a

win over Churchill Picks — Nobody is

city champ this year, Churchill prevails.

Walled Lk. Central at Farmington:

Spell it backwards and you have the

' Sselniw Bowl." The setond letter is pro-

nounced silently, of course. It's two win-

less teams foreign to victory trying to

stav out of the celler in the WLAA. Picks

— Central picks up a win.

Farm. Lathernn Northwest at Luther-

an Westland: Forget the Old Oaken Buck-

et or the Little Brown Jug. this game is

for the 1 Narehtul Cup," pitting two area

Lutheran schools. But the winner may

only keep the cup a week. The two teams

meet again on Oct 3 Picks - Westland

says double or nothing. Emons predicts.

O'Meara will second that.

Bishop Borgess vs. Catholic Central

(7:38 p m. at Clarenceville): Last year

Borgess surprised CC 25-8. The Sham-

rocks haven't forgotten and will have re-

venge on their minds. Tbe dangerous Bor-

gess offense will be paired against CCs

solid defense Picks — CC wins, but not

by much. ~

sunday's game

Gabriel Richard vs. St Agatha (4 P-«n.

at Ann Arbor Pioneer): Who needs NFL

football? These guys aren't scabs and

they play on Sundays for free. No com-

pensation necessary, only a $3 donation,

required at the gate. It's a good Catholic

League C Section matchup between two

teams favored to win the division. Picks

— Tbe Fighting Irish don't need help

from their friends in South Bend. Agatha

falters.

The .

man teams lost to the

by respective scorta of 2M

14-4.

Quarterback I I

passed to Stove Borke for

JV touchdown, and Tad _

raced 70 yank for the freshn*

The Stealers will play Ann

~ ta

Lions go 0-2-1

The Canton lions suffered a

pair ol losses and settled lor a tie

out 12-0 „

Scott Wilson scored the

team's touchdown, and Dos Bon-

oett kicked the extra point

The Lions entertain the

Romohis Flyers at 1

It's lost weekend

for S'craft squad

The lost weekend — there's DO other way to describe Schoolcraft College s

mens soccer team's trip to the Lakeland Invitational . . .

The Ocelots suffered three losses in four days^Lakeland CC beat them 3-2

Friday. Vincennes CC defeated them 1-0 Saturday, and on Mooday at SC.

Triton CC was a 3-1 overtime victor.

Injuries to forward Bobby Neumann and fullback Phil Neumaier and nud-

fielder Paul Burrill's bout of mononucleosis took their toll oo SC But so did

costly defensive lapses and a failure to finish scoring plays.

Against T upland SC took the lead at the 27-minute mark on Enrol Parks