1957 May 27 - New Page 1 - Virginia Military Institute

www2.vmi.edu

1957 May 27 - New Page 1 - Virginia Military Institute

THE VIRGINIA MILITARY INSTITUTE, LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA, MAY 27, 1957 NUMBER 29

Hurry Up Finals Audience To Hear Adm. Radford

Chairman Joint Chiefs, President's Advisor

FT-

. . . And Wait

(Above) Though they were not on television and were not

being payed a thing except a few company points> the corps

went through an extensive {iroblems course — a kind of

military "Beat the Clock" game. Here a squad has sent a

"casualty" over the ravine on a stretcher and the rest of the

troops are coming over the hard — but only other — way.

(Below) An informal company banquet on the green.

Hike's Practical Training

Proves Need In System

BY F. J. KLINE

FromWednesday's foot march to

Friday night's Tiger Trek and Tactical

Problem the Spring Hike was

a great success, in its second edition

since it was reinstated in

1956, after a lapse since World

War Two. The entire program was

ambitious, imaginative and the

manner in which the Corps of Cadets

accepted it and the performance

exhibited from beginning to

end was outstanding.

The whole program was organized

and conducted so as to be a

challange both physically and

mentally to the cadets and this

challange was accepted by all. The

training itself was thorough, efficiently

conducted by the First

Classmen Instructors, and b'eneficial

to the men who received it.

The highlight of the program

was the intensive Ranger-Airborne

Type Training which was conducted

by the Infantrymen under Captain

Murphy, Tactical Officer of

Company B. The course was organized

so as to give the cadet trainees

a sample of what is received

by those men who attend the

Army Ranger qr Paratroop School.

It included squad tactics-reconnassance

and combat patrol actons,

a compass course, and a vigerous

and physically challenging confidence

course. Trainees double-timed

from section to section and any

man who showed signs of slacking

off was to perform the traditional

airbourne pushups and many men

in the Corps had to "take ten."

The confidence course was taken

at double-time and consisted of

such obstacles as a 7 foot wall, a

raft on which men pulled themselves

across the raging Maury

River and returned hand-over-hand

on a rope stretched from bank to

bank, a 15-foot log obstacle and

ended up under a fifty-yard barb

I wire entanglement. The number of

men who "flanked-out" during the

operations of this phase of the

training was evidence of its difficulty.

At White's Farm another contingent

of cadet instructors under the

command of Captain Nelson, gave

instruction in such subjects as

technique of fire of the machine

gun, range estimation, field fortifications

—here each cadet received

the practical experience of digging

a prone skirmish fox-hole and

camoflauge. Here also trainees

double-timed from area to area.

The Air Force conducted a leadership

reaction course in which

small groups of cadets were faced

with a series of combat type problems

which they had to solve by

employment of group action and

quick initiative within a limited

time. This was novel, interesting

and practical to all hands.

Night time was not time for idiling.

Wednesday evening a demonstration

of night vision, sounds and

flares was staged for the whole

Corps. On Thursday and Friday

evening Air Force cadets participated

in the fabulous "Tiger

Trek." Tiger Trek was a proiblem

in which small groups of cadets

had to move cross-country in the

dark simulating an espionage mission

in which they obtained parts

to a bomb from several sources

and made contact with friendly

agents. It was designed to do two

things, first, to give the men training

in the type of evasive action

necessary when forced down in

enemy territory, and, second, to

give leadership tialning and the

ability to plan and organize things

as a group.

Top event for ground force cadets

was the battalion level tactical

problem lasting through the

night Friday and into Saturday

Closing A Series

Two Little 6-Pounders

Played A Very Big Role

BY S. C. TUCKER

On each side of the line of

French cannon 6n the parapet Vfrall,

is one smaller piece. These two

cannon are part of the Letcher

Battery, which was organized in

April, 1861, and created for the

purpose of State defense. The

two Cannon came to the VMI at the

same time that the French cannon

arrived. The battery was commanded

during the War between the

States by Captain Davidson of

Lexington, who was killed at Chancellorsville.

The two 6-pounaers were cast in

1862 from some of the old French

cannon that have been previously

mentioned, and that resided at

the Richmond armory. Governor

Letcher asigned the two cannon

to Captain Davidson's battery.

The cannon participated in the

battle of Mechanicsville, in 1862,

and later at Malvern Hill where

the battery lost Lt. Munford, chief

of one of the sections, and two enlisted

personnel. The guns were

in action for one hour and twenty

minutes, which was quite some

time for those days, especially in

view of the fact that the enemy

created considerable havoc fo|r

the Confederate side.

Since the horses and men that

were missing from the ranks

could not be replaced at this time,

one of the guns was ordered to

Richmond, and the other went on

with Jackson to Gordonsville. The

other six-pounder went through

many other battles, including Second

Manassas and Harper's Ferry.

After the engagement at Harper's

Ferry, it was replaced by a newer

piece captured from the Union

Forces. This second expounder then

joined its companion in arms in

Richmond.

The battle flag of the Letcher

battery can be found in the VMI

museum. Unfortunately, the plates

on the top of the cannon are warn

! quite smooth and it is impossible

to read the inscription bearing

the presentation of the cannon to

morning. Company's C and F under

the Command of Second Battalion

Commander J. G. Mixson by a

combined motor and foot movement

by road established a defensive

position at White's Farm. The

remainder of the Corps, under the

Command of First Cajitain W. F.

Huffcut, made a cross-country

march and attacked the defending

force at dawn. The winner of the

battle has not yet been determined,

it seems that Huffcutt's troops

claimed that the first fire they received

was from a combat outpost,

while Mixson's troops claimed

that the attacking force thought

that the combat outpost was actually

the main battle position and

so deployed way in advance for

the attack. The controversy will

no doubt someday be solved by

President Eisenhower and Field

Marshall Montgomery.

The objective of the field training

was to give the cadets experience

in as many types of situations

as could be developed; the

Corps went through training as

rigerous as any which is dished

out by any of the armed forces

(Ed. Note: Except the Marines).

This is an important trend at VMI,

an attempt to regain the practical

training which has been lacking

hero for some time. It is belived

that with a regular physical training

program, together with more

frequent field exercises, the entire

Corps would benefit — and

fewer men would be found flaked

out when the Corps takes to the

field in practical maneuvers.

the VMI by the officers of the battery.

The cannon were left at VMI

by Hunter but later were removed,

and their whereabouts unknown.

In 1874 Maj. Thomas Brander, at

one time a commander of the battery,

notified General Smith that

the cannon wTre at Fort Monroe.

Through the efforts of General

Thomas Munford, the pieces were

returned to the VMI. General Munford

had also been influential in

effecting the return of the Cadet

Battery, which we have already

mentioned.

Material for these three articles

has been obtained from Colonel

William Couper's book, One Hundred

Years at VMI, Volume III.

All three of these books are earnestly

reccomended for interesting

reading on VMI history.

'58 Waiters

Are Appointed

Each year there are new appointments

made to the waiter

positions available to cadets in the

VMI mess hall. In a recent

memorandum the appointments

for the 1957-'58 session were,released.

In addition to the list of

names fo the appointees, the extent

of their appointment was listed

as to whether it is for full-time

or part-time work.

A head waiter from among the

full-time men will be appointed

later. He will be responsible for

the proper performance of work

and will have authority to recommend

to the Superintendent the

discharge of any waiter whose

work is unsatisfactory.

Class of 1958

Bennett, H. E., Jr. 2/3

Brown, S. N., Jr. 2/3

Carnevale, A., Jr. Full

Corr, J. W. Full

Dean, H. Y. Full

Dunn, W. D. 2/3

Hayes, C. B. 1/3

Henry T. A., Jr. Full

Hickerson, R. L. 1/3

Hsiung, R. Y. S. Full

Hyatt, 0. E. Full

MarUn, E. V., Jr. Full

Menefee, M. F., Jr. 2/3

Michelsen, J. A. Full

Palmer, R. E., Jr. Full

Rea, J. M., Jr. Full

Richardson, W. L. Full

Rosenbaum, C. F. Full

Rousos, W. B. Full

Shrieves, G. M. 2/3

Smeltzer, M. K. Full

Stilwell, J. E. 2/3

Sykes, B. G., Jr. 2/3

Class of 1959

Anderson, M. C. Full

Barcik, S. J., Jr. Full

Basham, D. F. 2/3

Berggren, K. 2/3

Bingham, R. D. Full

Bradford, J. K. Full

Brooks, M. C. 2/3

Buckland, R. H., Jr. 2/3

Camper, D. L. 1/3

Chick, E. R. 2/3

Conklin, R. R. 1/3

Donner, G. L Full

Dreelin, D. P. 1/3

Fall, E. L., Jr. 1/3

Gapenski, L. C. 1/3

Hunnicutt, J. W. 2/3

King, E. S. 1/3

Loop, N. E. 1/3

Martin, E. L. 1/3

Masotti, J. J. Full

Ratner, S. S. 1/3

Ray, H. D. 1/3

Richardson, H. L., 1/3

Smith, K. G. Full

Southard, G. L. 1/3

Gloeckner, K. M. 2/3

Talks Tuesday Morning

To Graduating '57ers

BY T. T. TATE he did well in the famous class

of 1916 that produced more than

Admiral Athur William Radford, 40 admirals. After graduation he

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of got his wings at the second post-

Staff and senior military advisor war aviation class at Pensacola

to the President, will address the and moved steadily upward to com-

Corps at the graduation ceremony mand a squardron on the carrier

Finals, Tuesday June 11. Saratoga.

Admiral Radford heads the Joint In the dark December of 1941

Chiefs composed of the Army's the Navy picked Capt. Radford to

General Maxwell Taylor, the Air centralize and expand the Navy's

Force's General Nathan Twining, flight training program. In 16

the Navy's Admiral Arleigh Burke, months he succeeded in uping the

and the Marine Corps' General program from 300 pilots a year to

Randolph McC. Pate.

25,000 pilots. From this job he

Before this group lies an awe- took command of one of the new

some agenda running trom the type carrier attack group in the Pacific.

and size of next year's H-Bomb

In May 1944 he went to Wash-

production to the questing reapington

where he beat loud the

praisal of the strategic war plan

drums for naval aviation and pro-

which is the blue print for U. S.

duced the Radford Report for

survival.

delivery, combat use, rotation, re-

Nine times out of ten the Joint pair and relocation of aircraft.

Chiefs reach agreement and pass

their recommendations upward to

Brought back to the Pacific in

civilian authority for final decis-

November 1944 when the Japanese

ion. When the Chiefs diagree, it

forces were dwindling fast, Rad-

is the job of Admiral Radford to

ford was appointed commander of

press them to a joint decision or

Carrier Division 6 with Admiral

to report the disagreement to

Mitsher's Task Force 58. There he

Secretary of Defense Wilson.

pasted Japanese shore installa-

Wilson will then invariably ask

tions from the South China Sea all

Radford what he thinks. More

the way to Iwo Jima, Okinawa, and

often than not what Radford thinks

Japan. His airman called him the>

will be accepted as the best reason-

"pilots' admiral" because they

ed military opinion in the U. S.

knew that he could do himself

anything he demanded of his air

"A decision," Radford said," is

groups.

the action an exectutive must take

when he has information so in- After V-J day Radford led the

complete that the answer does not famous 'Revolt of the Admirals"

suggest itself."

against (1) unification of the Arm-

Radford argues for the all time ed Forces under a strong defense

— peace time — high defense and department (2) the Air Force's

foreign military assistance budget strategic bombing concept sym-

designed to give muscle to U. S. bolized by the intercontinental B-

commitments to friendly nations 36. The Korean War intensified

as an essential element of U. S. this interservice strife.

security. The interthreading of However, Radford got a chance

military and diplomatic factors and to explain himself when President-

forces, the basic foreign policy conelect Eisenhower and Secretary of

cept of Eisenhower and Dulles, is Defense designate Wilson visited

ceaselessly advocated and practic- Korea in December 1952. The reed

by him.

sult for Radford was that Ike for<

Once, Admiral Radford was one got the old feuds and jumped

of the hottest pilots in the Navy, Radford all the way to replace

leading an aerial stunt team called General Omar Bradley as J. S. C.

the High Hatters. At Annapolis "If Radford will work for the

prep school he use to cut morn- country as hard as he worked for

ing classes to watch naval aviation the Navy," Ike said, "then he will

pioneers. At the Naval Academy do a fine job."

Bennett AikI Staff Elected;

Plan '58 Actions For AF Club

With the close of every school

year comes the election of new officers

and the formulating of new

plans for the coming year in the

various extra-curricular cadet activities.

Popular among cadets is

the Armed Forces Club, which last

week held its annual Banquet and

election of officers for the 1957-58

season. Captain Allan J. Phaup,

who leaves to join the Strategic

Air Command, was presented a

gift for his services as Advisor of

the Club for the past two years,

and it was announced that Captain

Blake would hold this position for

next year. When the haze accompanying

the elections had partially

cleared, it was discovered that

Earl Bennett ha4 emerged victorious

as the new President, Tom

Massey as Vice-President, Johnny

Schmidt' as Secretary, Doug Mac-

Arthur as Treasurer, and Wes (M.-

S.) Roberts as Program Chairman.

Significant note was made of the

relative size of those in authority,

which indicates something or

other ,but we're not altogether

sure what.

Along with the plaudits due this

year's president Joe Mixson and

his subordinates for an outstanding

job, it is always interesting to

kntw what is in store (as far as it

is possible) for members and po-

H. E. BENNETT

tential members (to be limited to

230, by the way.) Earl expressed a

desire to continue the fine series of

films presented this year, and

hinted that perhaps such flicks as

"Brother Rat," Army Combat films,

Air Force training and • combat

films, etc., would be in the offing.

Also, a group of lectures is being

planed. Primary in each member's

mind, however, are the trips that

(continued on page 4)


A Point Made

The closing days of last week have left no doubt in any

one's mind that that for which the CADET has cried in past

editorials of this year is coming to be. The bivouac was

strenuous and demanding, in hot weather, and may of those

who read this editorial carry mementos of this in their

muscles. But it is a safe bet that few of the conversations

reminiscent of the hike will express any real regret other than

that normal to a military life; the eternal and morale-preserving

gripe.

Despite the fact that there are few who will stand up in

a barracks conversation and declare that they enjoyed the

whole thing for fear of the inevitable and merciless ribbing

that always ensues, for the remainder of the time between

now and Finals that it is a topic of conversation there will be

a little voice in the back of every head which will occasionally

say: "By golly, you're not so soft after all."

And about halfway through next year it will say: "Gadzooks,

what a stud."

Out Of The Woods

Things are calmer up around the headwaters of the Maury

now. The only ghost of the hike are the signs saying "Closed

25 May." The six-by's roar is forgotten by the brown cows.

The minds that planned the thing have now turned to other

interests.

But if there is going to be a hike again next year, and the

gleam in the eye of those that decide suggests there will be,

then perhaps now is a time to think of it.

The First Class is getting away from barracks after having

attended two Spring hikes, but it looks like incoming classes

will rough it through four. This points up a need for longrange

planning to avoid excessive repitition during the years.

The prograni this year was excellent but it would obviously

be less valuable used intact next year. Inspite of the many

inovations that will come, a basic four-year plan will have

to develop.

This might follow logically, with the men getting the rudiments

as Rats, the next year learning the rest of the rudiments,

following that with more complex maneuvers, and finally in

the First Class year serving as instructors (as the Firsts did

so effectively this year.)

Of course some features of the hike do not lose value in

repitition, for instance the obstacle course; these should be

hit by all every year. But a four-year program will keep the

four days at a maximum of efficiency.

Plaudits

The hike got greater depth this year, first in the very

length, but more important, in the active participation of the

Air Force. With it "Tiger Trek" and problem-solving course

the AF men showed they too could give a hike something of

value.

The First Class cadres seemed inordinately interested, almost

too much so sometimes, and the harried mess men did

a good job — had to.

MILLER MANUFACTURING CO.

MILL WORK, LUMBER, CORRUGATED BOXES

WOODEN BOXES W. M. NOFTSINGER '49 A

6th and Stockton Sts. Hollins Rd. & Kyle Ave.

Richmond, Va. Roanoke, Va.

BLUESTONE METAL CO.

• EXCLUSIVELY—SCRAPS NON-FERROUS METALS

• INCLUSIVELY—EVERY ALLOY AND GRADE

"a highly specialized organization with years of experience in

non-ferrous metals, residues and alloys, using our 'KNOW-

HOW' to better serve industrial producers and dealrs."

DEALERS — PROCESSARS — BROKERS

CORLISS STATION FEDERAL 1-2100 PITTSBURGH 4, PA.

CLAYTON'S TAXI

PASBENQeRS INSURED

DAY ANO NIOHT LKXINBTON, VI^ •

• •

[ CAR STORAGE AND CHARTER [

: B U S S E R V I C E :

• •

to worry about it too much . . . a great obstacle coursel" "Good

and rightly so, because that sort of lad . . . he made the grade!" I may

thing is to be expected when men be wrong, but it sure looks like

have to really push themselves, there's a double-standard some-

physically .(Resurrections?)

I wonder if there Was ever a

where.

resurrection that was anywhere

near as tough as that obstacle R. Lee Page & Co.

course. It's always interesting to

Well, by this time I guess everyplanning!" me to note certain parallels beone

has sufficiently recuperated After all things have been contween situations. For instance,

from the sprink "Hike" enough so sidered, it is apparent that the ac- hack in barracks, during resurrec-

that they can look back upon it complishments of this spring hike tions, if a rat passes out he invari-

with a little humor, although, at constitute the biggest single step ably has to 'be carried down to the

the time there was little to" joke forward that VIMI has taken in hospital by the guard team, where

about. For the benefit of the un- many years. The morale of the he receives extensive treatment,

itiated, the four-day spring field corps has been restored to a level and the rat line is soundly critized

training expidition consisted of rarely seen since pre-war days. as heing physical hazing. Out on

four basic phases: (1) Problem This is witnessed by the spirit that obstacle course, however,

solving and leadership reaction, shown while performing harder when a man roled, unconscious,

(2) Night visability and sound tasks than ever before required down that last hill, he usually got

identification, (3) Obstacle . . . even in the rat line ... a back on his feet and staggered to

course, and (4) Practical exercise fact which raises a few interesting the tp, in the midst of a blaze of

in field fortification and camou- questions in my mind. The corps, machine-gun fire and bomh-blasts

flage. The fifth and final exercise the commandant, the (M. S. Dept., . . . and everyone said, "Man! what

depended on the branch of ser- and the administration all seem to

INC.

Insurance — Investment

Real Estate

250 MonticeUo Arcade

Compliments of a Mink of '08

Globe Record

Shop

509 South Jefferson Street

vice. For the Air Force men, there feel that this whole expedition has

was Operation Tiger Trek, which been highly successful a,nd a valu-

SYDI

Roanoke, Virginia

consisted of some behind-enemyable experience to the cadets. The

lines type problems, while the cadets themselves feel a strong

ground force men staged an all- sense of accomplishment ... the

night-long attack and defense prob- kind only possible after a hard job

lem.

well done. I wonder just where the

Enjoy your date and

a good meal at the

gHOLLINS MILL DRIVE-IN?

Lynchburg, Va.

WESTERN VIRGINIA'S

LARGEST STORE OF

LONG PLAY RECORDS.

One of the lighter moments took differences are between what we

place during the night visibility went through out in the boon-

and sound identification demondocks and the so-called, "Injuststration.

The troops were sitting ices" of the rat line. On the ob- Virginia Cafe*

in one mass on a hillside, peering | stacle course, men were passing

into the blackness ahead, as a out, throwing up and hitting the

STEAKS OUR SPECIALITY

voice called out, "Alright men, dirt right and left. Nobody seemed

now let's see if you can identify

this sound." With that, a herd of

cattle came stampeding over a LYLE D. HARLOW

nearby ridge, making the charac-

JEWELER

BIERER'S PHARMACY

teristic sound of a stampeding herd

35 S. Main St.

of cattle. The guy on my right turn-

Lexington, Va.

For Your Druj? Store Needs

ed to me and said "My God! What

[We Deliver Phone HO 3-3119

Adair-Hutton,

INC.

Lexington's Shopping

Center

CAMPUS TOG SUITS

AND SPORT COATS

ARROW SHIRTS

HAGGAR SLACKS

"It Pleases Us To Please You"

RADIO HOSPITAL

Lexington, Va.

Corsages, Cut Flowers

THE FLOWER CENTER

Dial HO 3-4521, Night HO 3-3867

Member FI»rl8t Telegraph

Delivery Association

223 South Main St., Lex., Va.

Woodward & Elam

INSURANCE

Suffolk, Va.

R. R. Woodward '26

Jack W. N«mey, Jr. '50

Richmond Life

Iii&arauce

Company

"UPHOLDING THE

TRADITIONS OF

THE SOUTH"

THE HENRY WALKE COMPANY

INDUSTRIAL SUPPLIES, MACHINERY AND

CONTRACTORS EQUIPMENT

Telepohne Ma 53271 912-014 W. 21st St. Norfolk, Virginia

R. L. HESS & BRO.

Watchmaker, Jeweler, Silver, China, and Glass

121 SOUTH MAIN STREET

FOR THE BEST DEAL ON A

FORD or MERCURY

SEE W A L T K I D W E L L

IN ROOM NO. 109

Up To 30 Months To Pay.

Substantial Discounts

Ask For Our Special

Keydet Checking Account Today

Rockbridge National Bank

Phone HO 3-2126

MEMBER F. D. L C.

WAFFLE SHOPS, INC,

1419 EYE STREET, N. W.

WASHINGTON 5, D- C.

D. Compe & Son

PLASTERING

CONTRACTORS

1421 POWHATAN STREET

ALEXANDRIA, VA.

President — General Manager

JAMES C. FARLEY '37

Vice-President In Charge

Of Manufacturing

Richmond

Engineering, Co.,

Inc.

Steel Plate Fabricators

Pressure Vessels &

Heat Exchangers

FOR THOSE BIG

AND LITTLE JOBS

SEE

Power

Equipment Co.

Richmond 1, Va.

DOYLE

&

RUSSELL

Tube City Iron & Metal Co.

GLASSPORT, PENN.

PITTSBURGH DISTRICT

JOHNNIE L. TUCKER

PURE OIL S E R V I C E S T A T I O N

801 N. Jefferson St.

Dial 29408 Roanoke, Va.

Serving V. M. I. Parents and Alumni for 6vor 7 Years

Quicl( Cleaning and Pressing

And Beautiful Sliirt Laundering

UNIVERSITY CLEANERS

7 N. Jefferson St. Lexington, Va.

Carter Real Estate Company

Union Trust Bldg., Petersburg, Va.

Sales • Rentals



Dawson Funeral

Home

East Liverpool, Ohio

Wmm^t

STATE

TUESDAY - WEDNESDAY

MAY 28-29

20lh

Centory-Fo*

pr«iant>

THURS. - FRI. - SAT.

MAY 30 31, JUNE 1

Shipwrecked on a desert

Island with TWO MEN!

•M-G-M prownui

GARDNER

STEWART

GRANGER

DAVID

NIVEN , THE

UTTLEHirr

BLUSHING

coI(ir'

SUN. - MON., JUNE 2-3

» CMtarnn(

SlUHMBOyD-MDIUlSIQI-UMESItniR

A COLUMBIA PICTURE

DAVE PITKETHLY & DUKE JOHNSTON

Pitkethly To Compete In

\ationals In Austin, Texas

Dave Pitkethly's running career

did not stop at the end of the track

season here at VMI. Dave has a

few post-season engagements, one

of the most important being the

Nationals at Austin, Texas, on the

14th and 15th of June. Pitkethly

competed the 18th of May in the

Middle Atlantic AAU at Baltimore,

Maryland. There Dave, with Art

Brandriff and Sam Horner also of

VMI, ran against the better runners

of the Atlantic Conference.

Pitkethly took a second in the %

mile run, while Brandriff placed

second in the 220 yd. sprint, and

Horner took a fourth in the century.

The wiliowly ruuner Pitkethly

again returned to Baltimore to

capture a first place in the three

mile run this past week-end. This

meet was under the sponsorship of

the Baltimore AAU, and the first

place was quite a feat and accomplishment

for the thinclad of VMI.

As everyone knows here at the Institute,

this is Dave's last season

with the Keydets, as he has accepted

a scholarship at Duke University

Medical School. Thus Dave

Hy Q—the brilliant scholar

tells how to stretch your dolW

Greyhound's the way to go—

saves you time as well as dough!

ROANAKE, VA $ 1.45 WASHINGTON, D. C. ? 4.85

BRISTOL, TENN. 5.60 PHILADELPHIA, PA. 7.45

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 8.15 NEW YORK, N. Y. 9.10

MEMPHIS, TENN. 17.55 BOSTON, MASS 13.65

MIAMI, FLA 20.75 CHARLESTON, W. VA. 4.95

LYNCHBURG, VA. 1.35 CINCINNATI, OHIO 10.45

RICHMOND, VA. 3.85 CHICAGO, ILL 16.90

NORFOLK, VA. 6.35 ST. LOUIS, MO 15.75

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 6.30 DETROIT, MICH 14.10

RALEIGH, N, C. 5.15 PITTSBURGH PA 8.90

Plus U. S. Tax

Save an Extra 10% Each Way with a Round-Trip Ticket

It'g sbcA'a comfort to take tho bus

... and leave the driving to usi

GREYHOUND^

m S. McLaughlin St. Ph.llO S mi

GKEYHOUNU TERMINAL

bring to an end a fabulous career

of running for the Big Red with

the completion of the Austin Meet

which is during the summer furlough.

No doubt, however, there

will be a few spectators from VMI

in the stands to cheer him on,

these being those men that live in

that part of the country. There

Dave will be pitted against some

of the greatest runners of the

country, and there he will be able

to run against those of his own

Extensive Facilities Available

To Sports Minded Cadet at VMI

VMI has been one of the most

fortunate colleges in the area in

that in recent years much time and

money has been put into improving

the athletic facilities for the

cadets.

Foremost among the advancements

is the work which has been

done on the football field and

track. The coming season will note

a new field of grass which has replaced

the "mud crater." Along

with this the extensive work

which has been done on the track.

The track has been regraded and

laid with additions added in order

to provide for sprint runs. These

facilities have already been put to

use this spring in that the football

team during its spring practice

spent much time there and of

course the track team will have

meets there which wjill be improved

because of the new track.

The finp pool which cadets may

MYERS HARDWARE

COMPANY

Lexington, Va.

The Parker

Studio

ROANOKE, VA.

class. "Pit" will find it hardcompetition,

but he is assured every

sports conscious man of VMI will

be wishing him the best of luck in

his endeavor, and waiting for the

papers to confirm their expectations

of him.

WHEN THE FISHING'S FINE, the gent in our Stickler spends

all day in a dory. He'll take along tons of tackle and buckets

of bait—but if he forgets his Luckies, watch out! By the time

he gets to port, he'll be a mighty Cranky Yankee! You see,

you just can't beat a Lucky for taste. A Lucky is all cigarette

... nothing but fine tobacco—mild, good-tasting tobacco

that's TOASTED to taste even better. So why fish around?

Try Luckies right now. You'll say they're the best-tasting

cigarette you ever smoked!

WHAT IS AN ANGRY NSHt

Snarlin' Marlin

WHAT IS A FAST SEARCH!

U. at ALARADA

Briuk Fritk

WHAT'S A MAN WHO STEALS

IA>Y ClOTHESf

U. OF CALIFORNIA

Diaper Swiper

WHAT ARE VERY SAAAU JOINTSI

ItUIRAV Ui

• iORtIA T(CH.

Beef' Knee*

PAGE THREE

I^st but not least among the

athletic facilities at VMI is the

field house. The VMI field house

is the only one in the area and

serves the purposes of a basket-

enjoy speaks for itself.

ball gym, indoor track practice area

In tennis we also find new

courts that have been fmished not and indoor track meet stadium.

only for the tennis team but for When the weather is bad even the

the corps as a whole. Now there baseball team practices there.

are additional courts being buUt With such improvements VMI

in order to take care of the grow- has all possible means to give its

interest in tennis.

athletic teams the best.

CADET SPORTS STAFF

SPORTS EDITOR Phil Peters

ASST. SPORTS EDITOR Ted Fletcher

SPORTWRITERS

Bob Greathead, Lee McCown, Ed Martin, Jerry Harden,

Doug Talbot, Buzz Nowlin, Tom Royster, Onza Hyatt,

Jack Trant, Pete Houck

Concrete Pipe and Products Co., Inc.

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA

Stan Navas '41 Frank G. Louthan, Jr '41

Harry W. Easterly, Jr. '44 W. B. Nugent '42

James McKee Dunlap '38 Jack M. Parrish, Jr '43

William H. Emory '43 Tom B. Phillips '50

Ashman & Marquette, Ine,

Wliolesale Distributors

M O T O R O L A

TELEVISION — RADIOS — HI FI'S

WHAT'S AN AnHACTIVE WORK OF ART!

JUD PRtTHEII.

U. OF COLORADO

NORFOLK, VA.

Fetching Etching

WHAT IS A WOODEN NICKElt

• ITTV rUtlLANO,

IIAIIQUEnt

Oahen Token

TIME'S RUNNING OUT! We're still shelling out

$25 for every Stickler we accept—and we're still

accepting plenty! But time is getting short—so

start Stickling now! Sticklers are simple riddles

with two-word rhyming answers. Both

words must have the same number of

syllables. Send your Sticklers, with your

name, address, college, and class, to

Happy-Joe-Lucky, Box 67A, Mount

Vernon, N. Y. And send 'em soon!

Luckies

Taste

Better

•IT'S TOASTED" TO TASTE BETTER . . .

CLEANER, FRESHER, SMOOTHERI

•A. T. Co. Product of i/^ i^ne/una/n ^^iuseo-^nyxan^—^^/ueeo- is our middle itams


Armed Forces

(Continued From Page 1)

are taken each year. Smaller jaunts

are in tlie planning stages to such

places as Quantico, nearby Army

posts such as Fort Lee, Monroe,

etc., inatallations, and so forth.

The big excursion for next year

will be, as it now stands, either to

spend some time on one of the

Navy's larger and newer Aircraft

carriers; to Patrick Air Force

Base, the Guided Missile center;

or to the Airborne Jump Schools

at either Forts Bragg or Benning.

Other plans by President Bennett

and his Cabinet include more

magazines for the Armed Forces

Reading Room, these being more

up to date and extensive than

those of past years, and more practical

activity in military application

for members. Along this line,

Bennett remarked that "since VMI

is an essentially military college,

it is a shame that no facilities exist

for actual firing of such small

arms as the M-1, Carbine, and .45

caliber pifetol. It may become a

project of the Club to try and establish

such a range, with the aid

of the Military and Air Science Departments."

No doubt next year

will be a memorable one in the

history of the club.

N O T I C E

BELMONT SHOE SHOP OFFERS:

Good Shoe Repairing Service, with personal touch, at a right

price, when your shoes need repairs or corrections to fit your feet.

Hamric & Sheridan

JEWELERS

LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA

GUY H. LEWIS

Contractor

PICNIC BASKETS NOW AVAILABLE

The Southern Inn

IS NOW FEATURING

Prime Steer Steaks

FANCY SELECT SEA FOOD

CHOW MEIN ITALIAN SPAGHETTI

DIAL HO 3-'t612

FOR YOUR EATING PLfcASURE COME TO US

$200.00 EASY

CAMPUS AGENCY AVAILABLE

We need a Student to sell Nationally Advertised Darwing Sets

and Slide Rules (K&E, Dietzgen, etc.) at low Discoimt prices

to entering engineering freshmen this fall. Tremendous profits.

No investment required. Free posters, etc. Write now:

Empire Engineering Supply Company; P. O. Box 114,

Canal St. StaUon, NYC 13, NY.

New Marine Film

Finally, after many, many long

years of effort, the motion picture

industry has acccinplished the

near impossible. They have made a

movie about Marines and the Corps

that even the Marines like. The

movie? THE D. I. starring Jack

Webb as the rough and tough Drill

Instructor at Parris Island, and

real live recruits as his lovable

bunch of raw recruits. The picture,

filmed under supervision of

the U. S. Marine Corps, at The Island,

is about as authentic as could

be produced and shows what life

REAIJLY is like at P. I. to a recruit

The movie itself is vivid and

tough and gives to the public exactly

what goes on in "that place."

Leatherneck,' the official publication

of the Corps, has given the

film an unprecedented writeup

and strongly recommends it to

all—^both lovers and haters of the

Marines.

Mayflower

Restaurant

HOMEMADE BREAD

AND PASTRIES

STEAKS — SEA FOOD

Southeni Fried Chicken

409 S. Main Lexington, Va.

HObart 3-t315

Seven-Up

Bottling Co.

of Reanoke, Inc-

7up

1021—4tli Street, S. E.

ROANOKE, VIRGINIA

Goodman -

Segar - Hogan

REALTORS

Norfolk, Virginia

The Stonewall Jackson Restaurant y, Parrott

An Eating Place of Exceptional Excellence

MAIN STREET LEXINGTON, VA.

& CO., Incorporated

GENERAL

CONTRACTORS

811 Boxley Building

Ropnoke 8, Va

Member of

The Associated General.

Contractors of America

JULIUS GARFINCKEL & CO.

NORFOLK, VA. F STREET AT FOURTEENTH

KITCHEN'S

VIRGINIA BEACH,VIRGINIA

'59 Officers

The Class of 1959 held its second

class officer elections last

week. Mike Maupin was unanimously

reeler^ed class president

as was Johnny Engels as Vice-President.

However a little discussion

occurred over the office of class

Historian and several nominations

were submitted to the floor for

consideration. The final outcome

was that Mark Smith was reelected

to the position.

So, as is per usual with class

elections at VMI, '59 ended up

with the same ones with which it

started out, and will probably keep

until 1959.

Julius Straus

& Sons

GENERAL INSURANCE

RICHMOND, VA.

10 So. 10th St. Phone 2-8395

Rockbridge

Radio and

SElectrical Serviees

Radio, Television,

Electrical Appliances

Sales and Repair

Lexington, Va.

MR. W. J.

Q'DONOHUE

REPRESENTATIVE

METROPOLITAN

LIFE INSURANCE

Bergener's

Service Station

Open 24 Hours

East Liverpool, Ohio

Friendly Banking Service

The First

National Bank

East Liverpool, Ohio

Member F. D. L C.

Food Service EqulpmeBt

Steel Products

Gen'l. Mdse.

Hugh R. Floyd

COMPANY

W H O L E S A L E

D E A L E R

402 West Main St

RICHMOND 19,

VIRGINIA

Telephone 2-5069

()uotations Freely Furnished

On Request

Be Three Years Ahead

With

^PLYMOUTH • CHRYSLER^

See Eagle Vaughan

Special Convenient

Prices Terms

Vaughan Motor

Co.

Lie. 746

J.A.LAPORTE,

INCORPORATED

D R E D G I N G

CONSTRUCTION

1101 WILSON BOULEVARD

Arlington 10, Virginia

TOLLEY'S HARDWARE

COMPANY

For Ail Kinds of Hardware

13 S. Main St. Phone 24

Guy E. Simpson

Inc.

Pipeline Contractors

I

Equipment Rentals

111 E. Industry Lane

MERRIFIELD, VA.

JE 2-9141

SERVICE FROM ROANOKE AND LYNCHBURG

FOR RESERVATIONS

Call your Travel Agent oi

6-0381 (ReanokeX

6-2548 (LynehboD

NEW YORK*

WASHINGTON

CINCINNATI

NORFOLK

KNOXVILLE

LOUISVILLE

COLUMBUS, 0.

CHARLESTON

and many other points

""p/BDmonr

it'^TOk R ; by'CKe5ter FieId

MORALi. .. Better yet, turn to the

BIG, BIG pleasure of Chesterfield

King! More full-flavored

satisfaction from the woild's

best tobaccos. PLUS King-size

filter action ... a better tobacc^^

filter because it's packed more '

smoothly by ACCU'RAY!

Ch*st*rfl*ld King h« evarythlnal

*fSO goes to Pauline Matterlon, Valparaito Univertity,

for her Cheater Field poem.

e UctM 4 Mf an TUmuoo Od.

FRESHI'^

Here's the way to start a feud

(If that is what you seek!)

When somebody insults you.

Return the other's cheek!

VMI... West Point of the South. Caterpillar ...

Standard of the eontruetioii ecjuipnient industry.

r ' A l l T ' l ^ R M A C H I N E R Y

^ ^ ^ " Company, incorporated

CAIERPILLAR

ROANOKE, VA. BLUEFIELD, W. VA.

1

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines