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Madame Bovary - Planet eBook

Madame Bovary - Planet eBook

Madame Bovary - Planet

Madame Bovary By Gustave Flaubert Download free eBooks of classic literature, books and novels at Planet eBook. Subscribe to our free eBooks blog and email newsletter.

  • Page 2 and 3: To Marie-Antoine-Jules Senard Membe
  • Page 4 and 5: CHAPTER ONE W e were in class when
  • Page 6 and 7: thoroughly put the poor lad out of
  • Page 8 and 9: in certain conscription scandals, a
  • Page 10 and 11: swered only poorly to his notions.
  • Page 12 and 13: ger in the Rue Ganterie, who took h
  • Page 14 and 15: not reach him. He grew thin, his fi
  • Page 16 and 17: people left her, solitude became od
  • Page 18 and 19: from the warmth of his bed, he let
  • Page 20 and 21: small pots of all sizes. Some damp
  • Page 22 and 23: especially now that she had to look
  • Page 24 and 25: She always accompanied him to the f
  • Page 26 and 27: Charles’s mother came to see them
  • Page 28 and 29: CHAPTER THREE O ne morning old Roua
  • Page 30 and 31: himself better looking as he brushe
  • Page 32 and 33: But he never saw her in his thought
  • Page 34 and 35: ‘I ask nothing better’, the far
  • Page 36 and 37: CHAPTER FOUR T he guests arrived ea
  • Page 38 and 39: one long coloured scarf that undula
  • Page 40 and 41: fingers, then tried lifting carts o
  • Page 42 and 43: as he saw the cart disappearing, it
  • Page 44 and 45: house, cellar, and pantry, full of
  • Page 46 and 47: a nod; she shut the window, and he
  • Page 48 and 49: CHAPTER SIX S he had read ‘Paul a
  • Page 50 and 51: She wanted to get some personal pro
  • Page 52 and 53:

    man in a short cloak, holding in hi

  • Page 54 and 55:

    that she had latterly been somewhat

  • Page 56 and 57:

    fruit falls from a tree when shaken

  • Page 58 and 59:

    oots that had two long creases over

  • Page 60 and 61:

    Amidst the vegetation of the ditch

  • Page 62 and 63:

    not speak. But towards the end of S

  • Page 64 and 65:

    ing round the table men with grave

  • Page 66 and 67:

    women, bent over his full plate, an

  • Page 68 and 69:

    dallion bracelets trembled on bodic

  • Page 70 and 71:

    Guests were flocking to the billiar

  • Page 72 and 73:

    When she opened them again, in the

  • Page 74 and 75:

    Emma watched the turning wheels in

  • Page 76 and 77:

    satin shoes whose soles were yellow

  • Page 78 and 79:

    e there to-morrow!’ she said to h

  • Page 80 and 81:

    egance of manners with delicacy of

  • Page 82 and 83:

    of charms on the watch-chains; she

  • Page 84 and 85:

    of a new play, or an anecdote of th

  • Page 86 and 87:

    whole day long. At four o’clock t

  • Page 88 and 89:

    watched him going. But it was above

  • Page 90 and 91:

    Charles prescribed valerian and cam

  • Page 92 and 93:

    Part II Madame Bovary

  • Page 94 and 95:

    due to the quantity of iron springs

  • Page 96 and 97:

    are adorned here and there with a s

  • Page 98 and 99:

    has changed at Yonville. The tin tr

  • Page 100 and 101:

    ard on the shutters. Change my bill

  • Page 102 and 103:

    for my pen to write a label, and to

  • Page 104 and 105:

    in the midst of the town council. B

  • Page 106 and 107:

    CHAPTER TWO E mma got out first, th

  • Page 108 and 109:

    a serious nature, nothing special t

  • Page 110 and 111:

    ed Homais, bending over his plate.

  • Page 112 and 113:

    sweet, amid all the disenchantments

  • Page 114 and 115:

    This was the fourth time that she h

  • Page 116 and 117:

    een taken into the house from chari

  • Page 118 and 119:

    tired poses in her armchair, then h

  • Page 120 and 121:

    to romanticism, but Athalie was a h

  • Page 122 and 123:

    One day Emma was suddenly seized wi

  • Page 124 and 125:

    piece of blue paper. In the corner

  • Page 126 and 127:

    looking straight in front of her, h

  • Page 128 and 129:

    eginning of the forest; he threw hi

  • Page 130 and 131:

    CHAPTER FOUR W hen the first cold d

  • Page 132 and 133:

    Not many people came to these soire

  • Page 134 and 135:

    ten occupied; for on Sundays from m

  • Page 136 and 137:

    CHAPTER FIVE I t was a Sunday in Fe

  • Page 138 and 139:

    clean fire that was burning, she st

  • Page 140 and 141:

    open-mouthed, he watched Emma’s l

  • Page 142 and 143:

    ‘No,’ she replied. ‘Why?’

  • Page 144 and 145:

    those pure feelings that do not int

  • Page 146 and 147:

    strap that bucked her in on all sid

  • Page 148 and 149:

    CHAPTER SIX O ne evening when the w

  • Page 150 and 151:

    ners. ‘Where is the cure?’ aske

  • Page 152 and 153:

    how it is—But pardon me! Longuema

  • Page 154 and 155:

    priest, the clear voices of the boy

  • Page 156 and 157:

    ill.’ He had stayed a long time a

  • Page 158 and 159:

    This apprehension soon changed into

  • Page 160 and 161:

    ye!’ And he gave her back to her

  • Page 162 and 163:

    ‘Ah! how far off he must be alrea

  • Page 164 and 165:

    the door, ‘By the way, do you kno

  • Page 166 and 167:

    meadow set trembling the leaves of

  • Page 168 and 169:

    She had attacks in which she could

  • Page 170 and 171:

    cheeses, from which sticky straw st

  • Page 172 and 173:

    With one bound she came down the st

  • Page 174 and 175:

    advising him to calm himself, since

  • Page 176 and 177:

    CHAPTER EIGHT A t last it came, the

  • Page 178 and 179:

    tatterdemalions!’ The druggist wa

  • Page 180 and 181:

    lic—‘ But the druggist stopped,

  • Page 182 and 183:

    down a path, drawing with him Madam

  • Page 184 and 185:

    than his.’ *Upon my word! And whi

  • Page 186 and 187:

    of which I am capable, surmounted e

  • Page 188 and 189:

    somewhat tanned by the sun, were th

  • Page 190 and 191:

    ‘Well, someone down there might s

  • Page 192 and 193:

    anced intelligence that applies its

  • Page 194 and 195:

    The chins of the other members of t

  • Page 196 and 197:

    grains of sand under a gust of wind

  • Page 198 and 199:

    ‘And I shall remain to-night, to-

  • Page 200 and 201:

    sadness or of emotion weakened that

  • Page 202 and 203:

    some advice to Binet. The pyrotechn

  • Page 204 and 205:

    the remnants of our phalanxes, stil

  • Page 206 and 207:

    head, blushing. He went on— ‘Em

  • Page 208 and 209:

    more convenient for you.’ ‘Ah!

  • Page 210 and 211:

    shimmered in the warm atmosphere. T

  • Page 212 and 213:

    set, he advanced with outstretched

  • Page 214 and 215:

    her plate between the two lighted c

  • Page 216 and 217:

    found herself in the middle of the

  • Page 218 and 219:

    CHAPTER TEN G radually Rodolphe’s

  • Page 220 and 221:

    Charles after dinner, seeing her gl

  • Page 222 and 223:

    ‘Well, you see, it’s rather war

  • Page 224 and 225:

    dalised her. Rodolphe reflected a g

  • Page 226 and 227:

    see you. It is so difficult now to

  • Page 228 and 229:

    lying flat on her stomach at the to

  • Page 230 and 231:

    hands, plunged into the reading of

  • Page 232 and 233:

    was given some heavy work, he stood

  • Page 234 and 235:

    with emotion. ‘No, no! not at all

  • Page 236 and 237:

    unable to endure it any longer, the

  • Page 238 and 239:

    The poor devil promised. The cure c

  • Page 240 and 241:

    een expected. At the grocer’s the

  • Page 242 and 243:

    his eyes staring. ‘What a mishap!

  • Page 244 and 245:

    in all the evil ironies of triumpha

  • Page 246 and 247:

    CHAPTER TWELVE T hey began to love

  • Page 248 and 249:

    her. She was six years older than h

  • Page 250 and 251:

    himself in an undertone, and with h

  • Page 252 and 253:

    distinguish, this man of so much ex

  • Page 254 and 255:

    her to give way; he knelt to her; s

  • Page 256 and 257:

    iage start, it will be as if we wer

  • Page 258 and 259:

    a word. Often from the top of a mou

  • Page 260 and 261:

    luggage to Lheureux whence it would

  • Page 262 and 263:

    ‘There is still time!’ he cried

  • Page 264 and 265:

    CHAPTER THIRTEEN N o sooner was Rod

  • Page 266 and 267:

    her interest; I am honest.’ ‘Ha

  • Page 268 and 269:

    ‘Poor little woman!’ he thought

  • Page 270 and 271:

    ead the letter with angry sneers. B

  • Page 272 and 273:

    will the spasm passed; then— ‘I

  • Page 274 and 275:

    ‘Take care; you’ll wake her!’

  • Page 276 and 277:

    on this seat; you’ll be comfortab

  • Page 278 and 279:

    So, with an embarrassed air, he ask

  • Page 280 and 281:

    her. He inquired after her health,

  • Page 282 and 283:

    decorated with many Orders”; ‘T

  • Page 284 and 285:

    neighbour. The little Homais also c

  • Page 286 and 287:

    give madame some distraction by tak

  • Page 288 and 289:

    and see dancers kicking about.’

  • Page 290 and 291:

    on winter nights, always full of pe

  • Page 292 and 293:

    came in one after the other; and fi

  • Page 294 and 295:

    ecognised all the intoxication and

  • Page 296 and 297:

    chorus delightfully. They were all

  • Page 298 and 299:

    ecalling herself to the necessities

  • Page 300 and 301:

    ange, ma Lucie!*’ Then Leon, play

  • Page 302 and 303:

    Part III 0 Madame Bovary

  • Page 304 and 305:

    side of a Parisienne in her laces,

  • Page 306 and 307:

    en background behind her, and her b

  • Page 308 and 309:

    He waited. At last she replied—

  • Page 310 and 311:

    sentiments to me?’ The clerk said

  • Page 312 and 313:

    And as they were both standing up,

  • Page 314 and 315:

    out to look at the Place. Emma was

  • Page 316 and 317:

    ‘Oh, no!’ cried the clerk. ‘W

  • Page 318 and 319:

    him back, he cried— ‘Sir! sir!

  • Page 320 and 321:

    Sotteville, La Grande-Chaussee, the

  • Page 322 and 323:

    CHAPTER TWO O n reaching the inn, M

  • Page 324 and 325:

    to all comers, was the spot where h

  • Page 326 and 327:

    ocean, which, in the storm, opens i

  • Page 328 and 329:

    till you are man yourself and your

  • Page 330 and 331:

    ed with tears, against them, smelt

  • Page 332 and 333:

    She asked what misunderstanding, fo

  • Page 334 and 335:

    with affected waywardness— ‘No,

  • Page 336 and 337:

    the first time that they had seen t

  • Page 338 and 339:

    CHAPTER FOUR L eon soon put on an a

  • Page 340 and 341:

    winter, that she seemed seized with

  • Page 342 and 343:

    CHAPTER FIVE S he went on Thursdays

  • Page 344 and 345:

    immense brown fumes that were blown

  • Page 346 and 347:

    The warm room, with its discreet ca

  • Page 348 and 349:

    Suddenly she seized his head betwee

  • Page 350 and 351:

    his wounds, and he fell back into t

  • Page 352 and 353:

    time, assuming a higher ground thro

  • Page 354 and 355:

    One morning, when she had gone, as

  • Page 356 and 357:

    not undertake it, he offered to go

  • Page 358 and 359:

    stead of sending a reply she came h

  • Page 360 and 361:

    And Charles felt relieved by this c

  • Page 362 and 363:

    This was a sort of permission that

  • Page 364 and 365:

    Homais in the kitchen of the ‘Lio

  • Page 366 and 367:

    cups of coffee!’ ‘Are we going?

  • Page 368 and 369:

    to see the fellows there. I’ll in

  • Page 370 and 371:

    turning alone along the boulevard,

  • Page 372 and 373:

    it must contain something besides b

  • Page 374 and 375:

    tled. I don’t play the fool; I’

  • Page 376 and 377:

    took little Berthe on his knees, an

  • Page 378 and 379:

    his own interest, to do it at least

  • Page 380 and 381:

    The men were whispering in a corner

  • Page 382 and 383:

    She presented herself at his place

  • Page 384 and 385:

    how much money would be wanted to p

  • Page 386 and 387:

    ly, as if to shake out napoleons. T

  • Page 388 and 389:

    ‘Go, try, try! I will love you so

  • Page 390 and 391:

    the ‘Hirondelle.’ In his hand h

  • Page 392 and 393:

    and expose the diseased parts to th

  • Page 394 and 395:

    apologising profusely for his ruden

  • Page 396 and 397:

    ‘Sir, I am waiting.’ ‘For wha

  • Page 398 and 399:

    scene, and bear the weight of his m

  • Page 400 and 401:

    had disappeared whilst they spoke;

  • Page 402 and 403:

    eyes about her, while the peasant w

  • Page 404 and 405:

    piece, smoking a pipe. ‘What! it

  • Page 406 and 407:

    ‘Well, I am ruined, Rodolphe! You

  • Page 408 and 409:

    cost him three thousand francs!’

  • Page 410 and 411:

    of the forks on the plates in the d

  • Page 412 and 413:

    He spoke to her; she did not answer

  • Page 414 and 415:

    a powerful antidote. What is the po

  • Page 416 and 417:

    less agitated; and at every insigni

  • Page 418 and 419:

    of a labourious and irreproachable

  • Page 420 and 421:

    ‘You would have done better,’ s

  • Page 422 and 423:

    their heads later on. The room when

  • Page 424 and 425:

    so that one might have thought her

  • Page 426 and 427:

    CHAPTER NINE T here is always after

  • Page 428 and 429:

    econciling him to them. He shut him

  • Page 430 and 431:

    ‘That isn’t the question. All t

  • Page 432 and 433:

    was inordinately bored, and yet non

  • Page 434 and 435:

    They sat opposite one another, with

  • Page 436 and 437:

    ‘We shall end by understanding on

  • Page 438 and 439:

    she appeared to him dead. She was t

  • Page 440 and 441:

    emembered that once, in the early t

  • Page 442 and 443:

    all over. Old Rouault on his way ba

  • Page 444 and 445:

    On the grave between the pine-trees

  • Page 446 and 447:

    accounts for professional attendanc

  • Page 448 and 449:

    ness mingled with bitterness, like

  • Page 450 and 451:

    social problem: moralisation of the

  • Page 452 and 453:

    for parting came, all his courage f

  • Page 454 and 455:

    and led her to the cemetery. They c

  • Page 456 and 457:

    He fell to the ground. He was dead.

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