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Persuasion - Planet eBook

Persuasion - Planet eBook

Persuasion - Planet

Persuasion By Jane Austen (1818)

  • Page 2 and 3: Published by Planet eBook. Visit th
  • Page 4 and 5: ing, for the information of himself
  • Page 6 and 7: second marriage, needs no apology t
  • Page 8 and 9: and leading the way to the chaise a
  • Page 10 and 11: interval of several years, felt wit
  • Page 12 and 13: quishing their comforts in a way no
  • Page 14 and 15: of those who possessed them. Hersel
  • Page 16 and 17: gentleman! No, he would sooner quit
  • Page 18 and 19: had been too little from home, too
  • Page 20 and 21: Chapter 3 ‘I must take leave to o
  • Page 22 and 23: liot, of your own sweet flower gard
  • Page 24 and 25: I shall not easily forget Admiral B
  • Page 26 and 27: family, and mentioned a place; and
  • Page 28 and 29: Mr Shepherd was all gratitude. ‘W
  • Page 30 and 31: Chapter 4 He was not Mr Wentworth,
  • Page 32 and 33: to himself. He was brilliant, he wa
  • Page 34 and 35: to enter a state for which she held
  • Page 36 and 37: lieved, would ever be whispered, an
  • Page 38 and 39: him any where; and the Admiral, wit
  • Page 40 and 41: none, was a very sore aggravation.
  • Page 42 and 43: Walter, Miss Elliot, and Mrs Clay t
  • Page 44 and 45: ‘Yes, I made the best of it; I al
  • Page 46 and 47: concluded you must have been oblige
  • Page 48 and 49: now like thousands of other young l
  • Page 50 and 51: all gone away to be happy at Bath!
  • Page 52 and 53:

    there was her being treated with to

  • Page 54 and 55:

    so much at home as to lose her plac

  • Page 56 and 57:

    their pleasures: they would come at

  • Page 58 and 59:

    age of emotion she certainly had no

  • Page 60 and 61:

    lose him before he reached his twen

  • Page 62 and 63:

    and seeking his acquaintance, as so

  • Page 64 and 65:

    ideas. It was an afternoon of distr

  • Page 66 and 67:

    The child had a good night, and was

  • Page 68 and 69:

    ‘Yes; you see his papa can, and w

  • Page 70 and 71:

    Perhaps indifferent, if indifferenc

  • Page 72 and 73:

    since all had been given up. How ab

  • Page 74 and 75:

    Miss Musgroves, if they could catch

  • Page 76 and 77:

    each other! Now nothing! There had

  • Page 78 and 79:

    time. Lucky fellow to get anything

  • Page 80 and 81:

    ‘Ah! those were pleasant days whe

  • Page 82 and 83:

    ‘If you had been a week later at

  • Page 84 and 85:

    ‘Now I have done,’ cried Captai

  • Page 86 and 87:

    the continued appearance of the mos

  • Page 88 and 89:

    deal disturbed by it, and to think

  • Page 90 and 91:

    say, was very sure that he had not

  • Page 92 and 93:

    out of her head, and I have very li

  • Page 94 and 95:

    ‘Well, I am very glad indeed: but

  • Page 96 and 97:

    But not a bit did Walter stir. In a

  • Page 98 and 99:

    Chapter 10 Other opportunities of m

  • Page 100 and 101:

    ut in vain; and that being the case

  • Page 102 and 103:

    ‘Had you?’ cried he, catching t

  • Page 104 and 105:

    seat for herself on the step of a s

  • Page 106 and 107:

    they should be firm. If Louisa Musg

  • Page 108 and 109:

    side by side nearly as much as the

  • Page 110 and 111:

    he could not see her suffer, withou

  • Page 112 and 113:

    Chapter 11 The time now approached

  • Page 114 and 115:

    was the most eager of the eager, ha

  • Page 116 and 117:

    ing, soon found themselves on the s

  • Page 118 and 119:

    drew back from conversation. Captai

  • Page 120 and 121:

    that she was convinced of sailors h

  • Page 122 and 123:

    ought to taste it but sparingly. Hi

  • Page 124 and 125:

    as Dr and Mrs Shirley, who have bee

  • Page 126 and 127:

    Wentworth looked round at her insta

  • Page 128 and 129:

    a baronight some day.’ ‘There!

  • Page 130 and 131:

    as unable as any other two readers,

  • Page 132 and 133:

    get down the steps to the lower, an

  • Page 134 and 135:

    which he could not give. Anne, atte

  • Page 136 and 137:

    y Captain Wentworth, Anne was sure

  • Page 138 and 139:

    followed, for the parlour door was

  • Page 140 and 141:

    in the lowest part of the street; b

  • Page 142 and 143:

    great pleasure; and when it became

  • Page 144 and 145:

    his father had at first half a mind

  • Page 146 and 147:

    carriage exceedingly welcome; and y

  • Page 148 and 149:

    him and Louisa. When this was told,

  • Page 150 and 151:

    exertions as great. This was handso

  • Page 152 and 153:

    for an answer, and the Admiral, fea

  • Page 154 and 155:

    than to suffer. Charles Hayter had

  • Page 156 and 157:

    Elliot’s charms.’ ‘And I am s

  • Page 158 and 159:

    This decision checked Mary’s eage

  • Page 160 and 161:

    thank her most cordially, again and

  • Page 162 and 163:

    Chapter 15 Sir Walter had taken a v

  • Page 164 and 165:

    now been a fortnight in Bath, and h

  • Page 166 and 167:

    ly appeared, in Mr Elliot’s wishi

  • Page 168 and 169:

    thirty frights; and once, as he had

  • Page 170 and 171:

    so easy, so particularly agreeable,

  • Page 172 and 173:

    Chapter 16 There was one point whic

  • Page 174 and 175:

    were an immediate recommendation; a

  • Page 176 and 177:

    gave her to understand that he had

  • Page 178 and 179:

    Laura Place,’—‘Our cousin, La

  • Page 180 and 181:

    our pride, if investigated, would h

  • Page 182 and 183:

    travagant; and at his death, about

  • Page 184 and 185:

    a strong understanding would supply

  • Page 186 and 187:

    listening to. Such varieties of hum

  • Page 188 and 189:

    to-morrow: she is not so near her e

  • Page 190 and 191:

    to gain Anne in time as of his dese

  • Page 192 and 193:

    knew what was right, nor could she

  • Page 194 and 195:

    Chapter 18 It was the beginning of

  • Page 196 and 197:

    him too; but I have my usual luck:

  • Page 198 and 199:

    yours. How Charles could take such

  • Page 200 and 201:

    each other, and Louisa, just recove

  • Page 202 and 203:

    hand when he encountered an old fri

  • Page 204 and 205:

    our chairs, and are snug as if we w

  • Page 206 and 207:

    our partiality, Sophy and I cannot

  • Page 208 and 209:

    Chapter 19 While Admiral Croft was

  • Page 210 and 211:

    see if it rained. She was sent back

  • Page 212 and 213:

    make use of it, if you are determin

  • Page 214 and 215:

    and now, if she were by any chance

  • Page 216 and 217:

    she felt all over courage if the op

  • Page 218 and 219:

    concert, their conversation began t

  • Page 220 and 221:

    and beginning to breathe very quick

  • Page 222 and 223:

    out before the evening were over, a

  • Page 224 and 225:

    had a concert bill between them.

  • Page 226 and 227:

    speaking. ‘A well-looking man,’

  • Page 228 and 229:

    Such was her situation, with a vaca

  • Page 230 and 231:

    Chapter 21 Anne recollected with pl

  • Page 232 and 233:

    ‘No, that was what I dreaded. It

  • Page 234 and 235:

    than is really the case. I am sure

  • Page 236 and 237:

    ing to me. Should he ever propose t

  • Page 238 and 239:

    young man. Was he at all such as he

  • Page 240 and 241:

    his conduct then, with regard to my

  • Page 242 and 243:

    and we were a thoughtless, gay set,

  • Page 244 and 245:

    most overpowers me. I wish nature h

  • Page 246 and 247:

    Mrs Rooke let me thus much into the

  • Page 248 and 249:

    as he could spend, nothing to wish

  • Page 250 and 251:

    spects to be in company with him, b

  • Page 252 and 253:

    distress upon distress, which in fo

  • Page 254 and 255:

    ger deceived; and one of the conclu

  • Page 256 and 257:

    mind which could not be opened to L

  • Page 258 and 259:

    patible with their relationship; an

  • Page 260 and 261:

    for his known engagement seven mile

  • Page 262 and 263:

    setshire. In the centre of some of

  • Page 264 and 265:

    sighed as she rejoiced, her sigh ha

  • Page 266 and 267:

    home. She was entreated to give the

  • Page 268 and 269:

    herself, but Anne did not mean to s

  • Page 270 and 271:

    Elliot. Consider, my father’s hei

  • Page 272 and 273:

    present leisure for getting out, an

  • Page 274 and 275:

    met no more while Anne belonged to

  • Page 276 and 277:

    Chapter 23 One day only had passed

  • Page 278 and 279:

    too much self-occupied to hear. ‘

  • Page 280 and 281:

    tone,) ‘it was not done for her.

  • Page 282 and 283:

    ville was beginning to say, when a

  • Page 284 and 285:

    that I should undervalue the warm a

  • Page 286 and 287:

    angements of her own at her own tab

  • Page 288 and 289:

    assured herself with some anxiety,

  • Page 290 and 291:

    There could not be an objection. Th

  • Page 292 and 293:

    In his preceding attempts to attach

  • Page 294 and 295:

    till at once released from Louisa b

  • Page 296 and 297:

    lief; and yet, I was determined to

  • Page 298 and 299:

    again at her, replied, as if in coo

  • Page 300 and 301:

    and no vanity flattered, to make hi

  • Page 302 and 303:

    le there. She had soon the mortific

  • Page 304:

    through all the petty difficulties

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