K0kFcG

first24hrs

K0kFcG

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS IN

4 SIMPLE STEPS


Do you Know?

� Where your family will be when disaster strikes?

� How you will find each other?

� If your family are safe?

“Disaster risk reduction is too important to be left to the experts.

Risk reduction begins at home, in schools, places of work and worship and

throughout our local communities.”

Margaret Wahlstrom, Assistant Secretary‐General for Humanitarian Affairs and Disaster Emergency

Relief Coordinator at the United Nations

Four Steps to Preparedness

1. Get Informed

Contact your local emergency services or local councils to gather the information you will need to

keep your family safe and create a safety plan.

Community Hazards

Ask about the specific hazards that threaten your community (e.g. Fires, Floods, tsunamis, etc) and

about your risk from those hazards.

Community Disaster Plans

Learn about community response plans, evacuation plans and designated emergency shelters. Ask

about the emergency plans and procedures that exist in places you and your family spend time,

such as places of employment, schools and childcare centre’s. If you do not own a vehicle or drive,

find out in advance what your community’s plans are for evacuating those without private

transport.

Community Warning Systems

Find out how local authorities will warn you of a pending disaster and how they will provide

information to you during and after a disaster.

2. Make a Plan

Meet With Your Family Members

Review the information you gathered about community hazards and plans. Explain the dangers to

children and work with them as a team to prepare your family. Be sure to include caregivers in your

meeting and planning efforts.

Copyright © 2012 First 24 Hrs Foundation


Choose an ‘Out‐oof‐Town’

Coontact

Ask an out‐of‐tow o wn friend or

relative tto

be your contact. Following

a disaster, family f memmbers

should call c this peerson

and tell t them wwhere

theyy

are. Every yone mustt

know the contact’s phone

number rs. After a disaster, d itt

is often easier

to make

a long distance ccall

than a local one ffrom

a

disasterr

area.

Decide Where to Meet

In the event

of an emergenc cy, you maay

become separatedd

from fammily

membeers.

Choosee

a place

right ou utside yourr

home in case c of a su udden emeergency,

like

a fire. CChoose

a loocation

outtside

your

neighboorhood

in case c you caan’t

returnn

home.

Comple ete a Familly

Communnication

Plan

Your pla an should iinclude

contact

inforrmation

for

family members,

wwork

and scchool.

Your

plan

should also a includ de informattion

for yo our out‐of‐ttown

contact,

meeting

location ns, emergeency

servicess,

etc. Teacch

your chi ildren howw

to call thee

emergenncy

phone numbers and a when iit

is

appropr riate to do so. Be surre

each fammily

membber

has a coopy

of youur

commun nication plaan

and posst

it near your y teleph hone for use

in an emmergency.

Take Pr recautions

Find out t and showw

each fammily

membeer

how andd

where too

turn off wwater,

gas and power

supplies.

Learn how

to use the fire ex xtinguisherr

(ABC typee)

and instaall

smoke ddetectors

iin

your home.

Store

importaant

documents

(i.e. wwills,

passpports,

phottos,

birth certificates)

in a fire/wwater

prooof

containeer

or safe deposit d boox.

Keep a list of emeergency

telephone

nuumbers

neear

the pho one e.g. Poolice,

Fire,

SES, Am mbulance, Local L Coun ncil, Service e Providerss

and relat tives.

Involve the Familyy

Discuss with the family

why you need to preparee

for disastter

and explain

the ddangers

to your

children n. Househo old membeers

need too

agree on and sharee

essential tasks and responsibiilities

(i.e.

contacting

each other

of not

being home,

collecting

schoool

children, etc.). Worrk

together

as a

team.

Escape e Routes

and Saafe

Placees


In a fire or other emergency, you may need to evacuate on a moment’s notice. Be ready to

get out fast. Be sure everyone in your family knows the best escape routes out of your home

as well as where the safe places are in your home for each type of disaster (i.e. If a tornado

approaches, go to the basement or the lowest floor of your home or an interior room or

closet with no windows).

Use a blank sheet of paper to draw a floor plan of your home. Show the location of doors,

windows, stairways, large furniture, your disaster supplies kit, fire extinguisher, smoke

alarms, collapsible ladders, first‐aid kits and utility shutoff points. Show important points

outside such as garages, patios, stairways, elevators, driveways and porches. Indicate at

least two escape routes from each room and mark a place outside of the home where

household members should meet in case of fire. If you or someone in your household uses a

wheelchair, make all exits from your home wheelchair accessible. Practice emergency

evacuation drills at least two times a year, but as often as you update your escape plan.

Plan for Those with Disabilities and Other Special Needs

Keep support items in a designated place, so they can be found quickly. For those who have

home‐health caregivers, particularly for those who are bed‐ridden, it is essential to have an

alternative plan if the home‐health caregiver cannot make it to you. In advance, provide the

power company with a list of all power‐dependent life support equipment required by family

members. Develop a contingency plan that includes an alternative power source for the

equipment or relocating the person.

Plan for Your Pets

Take your pets with you if you evacuate. However, be aware that pets (other than service

animals i.e. guide dogs) usually are not permitted in emergency public shelters for health

reasons. Prepare a list of family, friends, boarding facilities, veterinarians and “pet‐friendly”

hotels that could shelter your pets in an emergency.

Prepare For Different Hazards

Include in your plan how to prepare for each hazard that could impact your local community

and how to protect yourself. For instance, the actions you would take to protect yourself

from a wind storm are different from those you would take for a fire. Check with your local

emergency services or local councils.

3. Assemble a Disaster Supplies Kit

In the event you need to evacuate at a moment’s notice and take essentials with you, you

probably will not have the opportunity to shop or search for the supplies you and your

family will need. Every household should assemble a disaster supplies kit and keep it up to

date. A disaster supplies kit is a collection of basic items a family would probably need to

Copyright © 2012 First 24 Hrs Foundation


stay safe and be more comfortable during and after a disaster. Disaster supplies kit item

should be stored in a portable container(s) as close as possible to the exit door. Review the

contents of your kit at least once per year or as your family needs change. Also consider

having emergency supplies in each vehicle and at your place of employment.

Basic disaster supplies list (guide only):

� Three day supply of non‐perishable food and a manual can opener

� Three day supply of water (4 litres/1 gallon per person, per day)

� Portable battery powered radio or television and extra batteries

� Flashlight and extra batteries

� First aid kit and manual

� Sanitation and hygiene items (hand sanitizer, moist towelettes and toilet paper)

� Matches in waterproof container

� Whistle

� Extra clothing and blankets

� Kitchen accessories and cooking utensils

� Photocopies of identification and credit cards

� Cash and coins

� Special needs items such as prescription medications, eye glasses, contact lens

solution, and hearing aid batteries

� Items for infants such as formula, nappies (diapers), bottles and pacifiers

� Tools, pet supplies, a map of the local area and other items to meet your unique

family needs.

� If you live in a cold climate, you must think about warmth. It is possible that you will

not have heat during or after a disaster. Think about your clothing and bedding

needs. Be sure to include one set of the following for each person.

� Jacket or coat

� Long pants and long sleeve shirt

� Sturdy shoes

� Hat, mittens and scarf

� Sleeping bag or warm blanket

Supplies for your vehicle include:

� Flashlight, extra batteries and maps

� First aid kit and manual

� White distress flag

� Tire repair kit, booster/jumper cables, pump and flares

� Bottled water and non‐perishable foods such as granola bars

Copyright © 2012 First 24 Hrs Foundation


Seasonal supplies:

� Winter‐blanket, hat, gloves, shovel, sand, tire chains, windshield scraper, fluorescent

distress flag.

� Summer‐ sunscreen lotion (SPF‐30 or greater), shade‐item (umbrella, wide brimmed

hat, etc.).

4. Maintain Your Plan

Copyright © 2012 First 24 Hrs Foundation

**Not the WHOLE HOUSE**

Quiz Drill

Review your plan every three months and quiz Conduct fire and emergency evacuation drills every

your family about what to do.

three months with your family.

Restock Test

Check food supplies for expiration dates and Test alarms monthly and change the batteries at

discard or replace stored water and food every 6

months.

least once a year. Replace alarms every 10 years.

PLAN MAINTENANCE CHART

Check off task and enter date performed

Review Plan and quiz

DATE:

___________

___________

Hold Fire & Emergency Evacuation Drills

DATE:

___________

___________

Replace Stored Food & Water

DATE:

___________

___________

Check Fire Extinguishers & Recharge

DATE:

___________

___________

___________

___________

___________

___________

___________

___________

___________

___________


If Disaster Strikes

� If you are instructed to take shelter immediately, do so at once!

� If you are instructed to evacuate

� Listen to the radio or television for the location of emergency shelters and for other

instructions from local emergency officials.

� Wear protective clothing and sturdy shoes.

� Take your disaster supplies kit.

� Use travel routes specified by local authorities and don’t use shortcuts because certain areas

may be impassable or dangerous.

After a disaster

� Administer first aid and get help for seriously injured people.

� If the emergency occurs while you are at home, check for damage using a flashlight. Do not

light matches or candles or turn on electrical switches.

� Check for fires, electrical and other household hazards. Spilled bleaches, gasoline and other

liquids may produce deadly fumes when chemicals mix, or be a fire hazard. Contact your

local fire department for information on how to clean up spilled chemicals.

� Sniff for gas leaks, starting at the water heater. If you smell gas or suspect a leak, turn off

the main gas valve, open windows and get everyone outside quickly.

� Shut off damaged utilities.

� Check on your neighbours, especially those who are elderly or disabled.

� Call your out‐of‐town contact – do not use the telephone again unless it is a life threatening

emergency.

� Stay away from downed power lines.

� Listen to local radio and TV for information about where you can get disaster relief

assistance.

� If electrical power is lost

� Call your local power company.

� Use a flashlight or battery‐operated lantern. Do not use candles for emergency lighting.

Candles and kerosene lanterns are fire hazards.

� Turn off all major appliances. They could overload electric lines when power is restored,

causing a second outage.

� Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. Food can be kept cold for a

day or two if the doors are kept closed.

� Use portable generators cautiously. Make sure they are operated only out‐of‐doors, in a

well‐ventilated area. Refuel a generator only after it has cooled. Do not connect a generator

to your home’s electrical system except through an approved transfer switch installed in

compliance with local electrical codes.

� In cold weather, drain pumps, supply lines, water heaters and boilers can freeze when the

power is lost. Traps in drains of tubs, sinks, commodes, washing machines and dishwashers

can also freeze. To avoid burst pipes, close the main water valve and open the spigots and

supply lines and drain them.

Copyright © 2012 First 24 Hrs Foundation

Above all use “COMMON SENSE “


Aboutt

First244Hrs

Foundationn

The First24Hrs

Foundation

had it inception in 1992 by Emergency Services and

Public Saffety

Personnnel

to providde

funding and a support t when responding

to thhe

ever incrreasing

numbers

of mann‐made

and natural disaasters

arounnd

the worl ld. The Firrst

24 Hrs Foundation is a registered

Charittable

Trust. A Not for Profit Nonn‐Governmennt

Organisation

(NGO)

Rational

ABN: 17343357837

1

The unique

and diverse

physical and geographical

naturre

of the Ausstralian

conttinent

and it ts proximity to immediatte

geograph hical surrounnds

means itt

is regularlyy

the subjectt

of a varietyy

of natural disasters, inncluding

flooods,

bushfirees,

cyclones, , tidal surges s, and earthqquakes.

The world

is increasingly

the sub bject of man‐ ‐made and nnatural

disassters.

The Foun ndation realiizes

that theese

threats require r the aability

to not t only respond

to disasteers

worldwidde

when theey

occur (disaster

and refugee r relie ef, emergenncy

/ crisis mmitigation),

bbut

to also eeducate

the world in booth

the publlic

and private

sector about the ssources

of risk, and too

prepare thhemselves,

their familiees,

and theeir

immediatte

environm ment, in the event of a thhreat

of or aactual

disasteer

or crisis.

The Objective O es of the e FIRST244Hrs

Fouundationn

are:

� Providing

fundinng,

in conjunnction

with governmenntal

and non‐governmeental

agenciies

associateed

with

Public

Safety in order to support

the at ttendance oof

suitable DDisaster

Response

Teamms

in circummstances

wherre

funding caannot

otherw wise be guaranteed

within

the critical

time framme

followingg

the occurrrence

of

a majjor

disaster, emergency or crisis.

� Providing

systemmatic

fundin ng for long term reseaarch

and developmentt,

in order to attain a better

understanding

off

new sourc ces of risk, Public Safetty

requireme ents and emmergency/crrisis

mitigation.

The

resea arch and deevelopment

will incorpoorate

the seearch

for more m effectivve

systems’ design to improve

equip pment and communica ation technoology.

It willl

also provide

for effeective

audits

of organisational

proce edures and capabilities c dduring

crisis response booth

domestically,

regionnally

and globally.

� Awar rding scholar rships to Public

Safety personnel p froom

both pubblic

and privvate

agencies

in developping

and

develloped

count tries, particuularly

wheree

training bbudgets

and facilities arre

limited oor

restrictedd.

These

traini ing and rese earch scholarships

aim tto

enhance professional

and academic

qualificaations

in thee

varied

discip plines involved

in Public Safety.

� Provision

of funding

for eqquipment

annd

training of essentiaal

Public Saffety

personnel

with paarticular

emphhasis

on assistance

to ddeveloping

ccountries

allowing

them m to respondd

more effectively

to diisasters,

emer rgencies andd

other crisess.

� Provide

support in order to

link emergency,

disaaster,

risk and a crisis mmanagementt

personnel with a

comm mon goal of a “Safer Woorld”,

under tthe

aegis of the First24HHrs

Foundatiion

For moree

information,

please contact

your loocal

Emergeency

Servicess

or your Emmergency

Maanagement

OOffice.

Remembeer:

Safety

Planss

Save Lives

www.Firrst24Hrs.

org

Coopyright

© 2012 FFirst

24 Hrs

Foundation

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines