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PDF - White Rose Etheses Online

PDF - White Rose Etheses Online

PDF - White Rose Etheses

ST COPY AVAILA L TEXT IN ORIGINAL IS CLOSE TO THE EDGE OF THE PAGE

  • Page 2 and 3: THE COLONIAL FACTOR AND SOCIAL TRAN
  • Page 4 and 5: I 11 of a colonial capitalist polit
  • Page 6 and 7: V Page No_. (b) The Demand for Gold
  • Page 8 and 9: vii (a) The Companies and Inadequat
  • Page 10 and 11: ix MAPS Page No. 1 The Gold Coast -
  • Page 12 and 13: xi ABBREVIATIONS ARPS Aborigines' R
  • Page 14 and 15: xi ii Val Grant for typing the thes
  • Page 16 and 17: xv MAP TWO: The Akan Group on the G
  • Page 18 and 19: INTRODUCTION Why yet another thesis
  • Page 20 and 21: internal dynamic, actions, and reac
  • Page 22 and 23: of 'raw data' on the Akan, which ha
  • Page 24 and 25: are embodied in the Marxist concept
  • Page 26 and 27: comes to the fore in the opening ch
  • Page 28 and 29: viewed by Europeans has been called
  • Page 30 and 31: of Asante Iife (1 ). We say i deol
  • Page 32 and 33: The nature of Rattray's investigati
  • Page 34 and 35: of debates within the tradition of
  • Page 36 and 37: CHAPTER0NEI EARLY CONTACT AKAN-ASAN
  • Page 38 and 39: 111.01, ' [ION-CAPITALIST SOCIAL FO
  • Page 40 and 41: circa 1600-1750. (a) Mode of Produc
  • Page 42 and 43: past has been made by a number of F
  • Page 44 and 45: social formation; in a second from
  • Page 46 and 47: Although his account might be ahist
  • Page 48 and 49: a discussion of the Akan modes of p
  • Page 50 and 51: constituted exploitation and theref
  • Page 52 and 53:

    of class consciousness had manifest

  • Page 54 and 55:

    0 Some of the issues which Arhin ra

  • Page 56 and 57:

    categoryfor analysing non-capitalis

  • Page 58 and 59:

    (ii) Kinship clearance and cultivat

  • Page 60 and 61:

    that kinship was the organizing pri

  • Page 62 and 63:

    capital and the employment of unfre

  • Page 64 and 65:

    Agriculture became increasingly pro

  • Page 66 and 67:

    Akan society seems to have become i

  • Page 68 and 69:

    in contrast to the anthropological

  • Page 70 and 71:

    The ownership of all lands througho

  • Page 72 and 73:

    twentieth century to have constitut

  • Page 74 and 75:

    We trace what might be called a 'cu

  • Page 76 and 77:

    and oral data alerts the reader to

  • Page 78 and 79:

    The second period which Kea discuss

  • Page 80 and 81:

    opportunity for peasant accumulatio

  • Page 82 and 83:

    Go I If I "Ids fil es 0 50 160 240

  • Page 84 and 85:

    shared among the miners as long as

  • Page 86 and 87:

    oys when ascending a chimney. Of co

  • Page 88 and 89:

    the distribution and marketing of g

  • Page 90 and 91:

    however, they worked in the home in

  • Page 92 and 93:

    colonial Akan societies has been co

  • Page 94 and 95:

    (C) Sl avery Whatever the 'real' na

  • Page 96 and 97:

    ealise that an analysis of the rela

  • Page 98 and 99:

    In contrast to this nineteenth cent

  • Page 100 and 101:

    transition from feudalism to capita

  • Page 102 and 103:

    century Europe as already reflectin

  • Page 104 and 105:

    the Akan areas at this time. We clo

  • Page 106 and 107:

    The World System Debates over the o

  • Page 108 and 109:

    enterprise than the means of assuri

  • Page 110 and 111:

    social relations themselves (1). Th

  • Page 112 and 113:

    existence of class struggle on the

  • Page 114 and 115:

    towards the establishment of a worl

  • Page 116 and 117:

    not trade with foreign ships, and i

  • Page 118 and 119:

    different coins for uncoined pure s

  • Page 120 and 121:

    I demand and use of gold in Europe

  • Page 122 and 123:

    the result of a long evolution in d

  • Page 124 and 125:

    longer bringing gold into Europe (1

  • Page 126 and 127:

    faced mounting competition from nei

  • Page 128 and 129:

    As early as 1481 merchants had prev

  • Page 130 and 131:

    the British. The Dutch West Indian

  • Page 132 and 133:

    The Bank of Amsterdam however, was

  • Page 134 and 135:

    The development of the Bank of Engl

  • Page 136 and 137:

    England emerged from the seventeent

  • Page 138 and 139:

    successful Mali kingdom established

  • Page 140 and 141:

    The changing role and importance of

  • Page 142 and 143:

    The pull of trade to the south resu

  • Page 144 and 145:

    TABLE FOUR (1) Akan Gold Exports to

  • Page 146 and 147:

    will discuss the structural changes

  • Page 148 and 149:

    The earliest account of the need fo

  • Page 150 and 151:

    in the process of colonial expansio

  • Page 152 and 153:

    The characterisation of the inland

  • Page 154 and 155:

    of the Gold Coast! s incorporation

  • Page 156 and 157:

    the demise of Denkyira. Indeed, inc

  • Page 158 and 159:

    asked for Dutch help against the Et

  • Page 160 and 161:

    as the basis of military organisati

  • Page 162 and 163:

    commerce. The method used to do thi

  • Page 164 and 165:

    a common trading language (which) t

  • Page 166 and 167:

    port thereby increasing the merchan

  • Page 168 and 169:

    from commander by Traders and they

  • Page 170 and 171:

    early contact relations of producti

  • Page 172 and 173:

    increasingly set up as traders in t

  • Page 174 and 175:

    of extensive study. Instead, we int

  • Page 176 and 177:

    development of proto Akan agricultu

  • Page 178 and 179:

    Both these views seek to stress the

  • Page 180 and 181:

    The second status in the simplified

  • Page 182 and 183:

    of the formation of theAsante state

  • Page 184 and 185:

    than merely to control the Begho tr

  • Page 186 and 187:

    European desire to create friendly

  • Page 188 and 189:

    (b) The Basis of Trade and the Dyna

  • Page 190 and 191:

    people. By linking the productive a

  • Page 192 and 193:

    nature of the most profitable form

  • Page 194 and 195:

    Slavery Re-examined The view that A

  • Page 196 and 197:

    Li ttl e mention is made about the

  • Page 198 and 199:

    over their progeny despite their so

  • Page 200 and 201:

    of its wealth or property holding.

  • Page 202 and 203:

    involved in the process of slavery

  • Page 204 and 205:

    thus been put forward as a reason f

  • Page 206 and 207:

    of loot was accompanied by war inde

  • Page 208 and 209:

    arrangements for obligatory hospita

  • Page 210 and 211:

    century has warranted a close look

  • Page 212 and 213:

    Africans from the Gold Coast (1). B

  • Page 214 and 215:

    traditional company monopolies. Wit

  • Page 216 and 217:

    The Dutch too were concerned that t

  • Page 218 and 219:

    to exchange slaves (1 ). Eventually

  • Page 220 and 221:

    0 So ;'A, the trade had for promoti

  • Page 222 and 223:

    Coast into the world economy increa

  • Page 224 and 225:

    Atlantic slave trade on the Akan pe

  • Page 226 and 227:

    of slaves in the eighteeenth centur

  • Page 228 and 229:

    v CONCLUSION The foregoing has offe

  • Page 230 and 231:

    the Akan social formation from whic

  • Page 232 and 233:

    CHAPTERF0UR 'LEGITIMATE' TRADE AND

  • Page 234 and 235:

    characterising European contact thr

  • Page 236 and 237:

    close at the end of the nineteenth

  • Page 238 and 239:

    Direct responsibility for British p

  • Page 240 and 241:

    British state viewed Britain's colo

  • Page 242 and 243:

    to be involved? For the Governor of

  • Page 244 and 245:

    Asante and the division of jurisdic

  • Page 246 and 247:

    forced the withdrawal of a direct B

  • Page 248 and 249:

    Evidence was gathered at two Parlia

  • Page 250 and 251:

    Commons' report of 1842 noted this.

  • Page 252 and 253:

    the Gold Coast. Merchant companies

  • Page 254 and 255:

    through the development of manufact

  • Page 256 and 257:

    General to inform local chiefs and

  • Page 258 and 259:

    This rush for land was to be monito

  • Page 260 and 261:

    Trade through the forts came to dom

  • Page 262 and 263:

    participation of Africans on the co

  • Page 264 and 265:

    status was achieved through the cre

  • Page 266 and 267:

    the Poll Tax was that sufficient fu

  • Page 268 and 269:

    British control of the coast. Oppos

  • Page 270 and 271:

    of extended British involvement how

  • Page 272 and 273:

    , demands for food and the ecologic

  • Page 274 and 275:

    had its apex in Kumase the seat of

  • Page 276 and 277:

    war or peaceful means have been lab

  • Page 278 and 279:

    A state monopoly of trade in Asante

  • Page 280 and 281:

    that date, and after, slavery and u

  • Page 282 and 283:

    were those linked directly with the

  • Page 284 and 285:

    Gyaasewahene (head of Exchequer per

  • Page 286 and 287:

    26& In brief, the turmoil which dev

  • Page 288 and 289:

    enefit from peaceful trading with t

  • Page 290 and 291:

    APPENDIX I TO CHAPTER FOUR Recorded

  • Page 292 and 293:

    1 O= 0 S- :: 3 LO 11 CD -t* C: 3 r

  • Page 294 and 295:

    CHAPTERFIVE COMODITISATION OF LAND

  • Page 296 and 297:

    27.8 incorporation into a developin

  • Page 298 and 299:

    and potential production of gold, s

  • Page 300 and 301:

    The colonial government was equivoc

  • Page 302 and 303:

    IIF B*i- Deb'so 111 I. 0 Ole e l(we

  • Page 304 and 305:

    (a) The Companies and Inadequate Ca

  • Page 306 and 307:

    Great store was placed upon the use

  • Page 308 and 309:

    suitability of African forms and re

  • Page 310 and 311:

    to the European mines (1). The cons

  • Page 312 and 313:

    In another communique the District

  • Page 314 and 315:

    will bring great losses to the gene

  • Page 316 and 317:

    over access to land and the ability

  • Page 318 and 319:

    the right to concede it and the res

  • Page 320 and 321:

    , sbest indigenous people cited by

  • Page 322 and 323:

    concern with developing the resourc

  • Page 324 and 325:

    the Crown rights of administration

  • Page 326 and 327:

    to try and stress the needs for bet

  • Page 328 and 329:

    Gol df iel ds Limi ted (1 ). The cu

  • Page 330 and 331:

    from Aburi was stationed at Tarkwa

  • Page 332 and 333:

    and brought by them within the rubr

  • Page 334 and 335:

    therefore left to do something else

  • Page 336 and 337:

    century, ý, Jtnessed the increased

  • Page 338 and 339:

    forms of control while at the same

  • Page 340 and 341:

    form of reproducing labour, hence t

  • Page 342 and 343:

    in a very limited way because chang

  • Page 344 and 345:

    (i) Sovereignty and the Formalisati

  • Page 346 and 347:

    essentially through property laws.

  • Page 348 and 349:

    state. In 1922 Governor Guggisberg

  • Page 350 and 351:

    too wished for a codified uniform t

  • Page 352 and 353:

    concession companies to erode the d

  • Page 354 and 355:

    337 Asante's two defeats by the Bri

  • Page 356 and 357:

    Kumase (1) especially following the

  • Page 358 and 359:

    colony. The British ensured that th

  • Page 360 and 361:

    Asantes increasing participation in

  • Page 362 and 363:

    of a British colonial presence towa

  • Page 364 and 365:

    APPENDIX I TO CHAPTER FIVE ILLUSTRA

  • Page 366 and 367:

    cz LLJ 2-1 C) CO LU LL. LLJ cz Ln L

  • Page 368 and 369:

    4-3 4- 0 cm 0a c) 0 C"i 4-) = :3 4-

  • Page 370 and 371:

    (D m Ici (A 0 (L) Z s- ., - ro (1)

  • Page 372 and 373:

    CHAPTERsIx COt, 140DITISATION OF LA

  • Page 374 and 375:

    standing this period more fully to

  • Page 376 and 377:

    fields Corporation at Obuasi, in Se

  • Page 378 and 379:

    that slave labour played an importa

  • Page 380 and 381:

    substitute paid servants and labour

  • Page 382 and 383:

    common experience was for the legal

  • Page 384 and 385:

    y the payment of a very small month

  • Page 386 and 387:

    process. The separation of the labo

  • Page 388 and 389:

    This feeling was not shared by all

  • Page 390 and 391:

    the British extended and modified t

  • Page 392 and 393:

    his fit villagers South. Attempts a

  • Page 394 and 395:

    in the North. Having said this howe

  • Page 396 and 397:

    effort shoul d be 1/3 to 1 /8 a day

  • Page 398 and 399:

    Despite these inducements the Mines

  • Page 400 and 401:

    who showed both increasing reluctan

  • Page 402 and 403:

    in the north. In November 1927 the

  • Page 404 and 405:

    and political subjugation of the in

  • Page 406 and 407:

    labour shortages in the south were

  • Page 408 and 409:

    391 was a failure. Insufficient enc

  • Page 410 and 411:

    on my way back from Boku, I told th

  • Page 412 and 413:

    which made the colonial desire for

  • Page 414 and 415:

    and contradictions inthe. colonial

  • Page 416 and 417:

    39.0, In addition to the clamour of

  • Page 418 and 419:

    impressed upon the chiefs of the di

  • Page 420 and 421:

    Hitherto the stool allocated land a

  • Page 422 and 423:

    eflected wealth, because of its inc

  • Page 424 and 425:

    European firms in the areas where p

  • Page 426 and 427:

    I ---- )I 5J .--I ) -- "; . k . C-

  • Page 428 and 429:

    lumber to Europe. Hence earlier, wh

  • Page 430 and 431:

    serves as a further illustration of

  • Page 432 and 433:

    did and this is born out by develop

  • Page 434 and 435:

    cash in payment for products grown

  • Page 436 and 437:

    ý. cr 001 z 4M / LLJ Ix ;i cr X, .

  • Page 438 and 439:

    the migration involving the residen

  • Page 440 and 441:

    authority. While land remained plen

  • Page 442 and 443:

    forest land compared with that of t

  • Page 444 and 445:

    and transport owners within the far

  • Page 446 and 447:

    land, (de facto ownership), and app

  • Page 448 and 449:

    This occurred when representatives

  • Page 450 and 451:

    We may now summarise some of the at

  • Page 452 and 453:

    of the chiefs. This was counter to

  • Page 454 and 455:

    monetisation and the colonial deman

  • Page 456 and 457:

    sanction or be involved in matters

  • Page 458 and 459:

    the point that the intention of the

  • Page 460 and 461:

    elected by a mercantile electorate

  • Page 462 and 463:

    not only a colonial form of judicia

  • Page 464 and 465:

    arm of the colonial state was alway

  • Page 466 and 467:

    CONCLUSION We have traced the inter

  • Page 468 and 469:

    and nineteenth centuries between Eu

  • Page 470 and 471:

    the very indigenous power structure

  • Page 472 and 473:

    GLOSSARY OF MAIN IFSAITT- T14I TERM

  • Page 474 and 475:

    K akoa literally, "a subject" of th

  • Page 476 and 477:

    BIBLIOGRAPHY PRIMARY AND ARCHIVAL S

  • Page 478 and 479:

    Cp :=W , , . A. 3- -2: - : i-_ '3>

  • Page 480 and 481:

    ARHIN, K. 'Asante Military Institut

  • Page 482 and 483:

    BLAKE, J. (editor) Europeans in Wes

  • Page 484 and 485:

    46 's CLARIDGE, W. W. A History of

  • Page 486 and 487:

    DANQUAH, J. B. Akan Laws and Custom

  • Page 488 and 489:

    EDHOLM, F., HARRIS, 0. and YOUNG, K

  • Page 490 and 491:

    FYNN, J. K. 'Ghana - Asante (Ashant

  • Page 492 and 493:

    7 .5 HAGAN, G. P. 'Ashanti Bureacra

  • Page 494 and 495:

    JENKINS, P. (editor) Abstracts from

  • Page 496 and 497:

    47-0 KRADER, L. Dialectics of_Civil

  • Page 498 and 499:

    481 MARX, K. Ca pital, Volume One,

  • Page 500 and 501:

    MILES, J. 'Rural protest in the Gol

  • Page 502 and 503:

    RATTRAY, R. S. 8 %a-# The Tribes of

  • Page 504 and 505:

    SNYDER, F. G. Caoitalism and Le al

  • Page 506 and 507:

    VON LAUE, T. H. 'Anthropology and P

  • Page 508:

    WILLIAMSON, J. A. A Short History o

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