2007 ANNUAL REPORT Part 1.cdr - Kootenai County Sheriff Office

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2007 ANNUAL REPORT Part 1.cdr - Kootenai County Sheriff Office

KOOTENAI COUNTY

SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT

2007

Presented by

Sheriff Rocky Watson

ANNUAL REPORT


The 2007 Annual Report is Dedicated

to Retired Undersheriff Gary Cuff

Gary holds a Bachelor's Degree in Management from

Lewis-Clark State College and is a graduate of the FBI

National Academy. He has served as a member of the

Idaho Drug Policy Advisory Board, is a past president of

the Inland Empire Police Officers Association, past

director of the Kootenai County Joint Agency D.A.R.E.

Program and has served on several other local and

regional boards and committees.

During his 31 ½ years with the Sheriff's Department, Gary

was responsible for writing the first grant that started the

D.A.R.E. programs in Kootenai County, was directly

involved in the start up of the Citizens On Patrol program,

the Sheriff's Office K-9 program, and the jail and work

release center construction and expansion.

Gary and his wife, Susan, were married in 1987. They now

live in Missoula, Montana. He has one son, Troy, and two

granddaughters.

10-42 Thanks for your service!

Gary Cuff was born in Coeur d'Alene and attended

elementary school in Hayden. He graduated from Coeur

d'Alene High School in 1969, after which he served four

years in the U.S. Army.

He joined the Kootenai County Sheriff's Department on

Jan. 1, 1976. He worked his way up through the ranks,

serving in the Jail, Investigations, and Patrol Divisions as a

Deputy, Sergeant and Lieutenant before being promoted to

Captain in July 1992. He was appointed Undersheriff on

Nov. 3, 1993, by Sheriff Pierce Clegg. Gary was

responsible for the management of all personnel issues for

the 275 member department and the budget of nearly $16

million dollars annually.

Gary was retained in the appointed position of Undersheriff

by Sheriff Rocky Watson and eventually served more than

13 years as Undersheriff. He retired on June 8, 2007, as the

longest-serving Undersheriff in the history of the

department.

Gary is shown here displaying the badge and

firearm presented to him by Sheriff Rocky Watson

upon his retirement.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


MISSION STATEMENT

THE MISSION of the Kootenai County Sheriffs' Department is to consistently contribute to our

community and their desire to live in a safe environment where people can peacefully live,

work, learn and play. To this end:

WE MUST be seen to serve our community in a manner which is fair, professional, and

upholds the public trust. By every deed, we will be seen to honor the Oath we have

taken to the Law Enforcement Code of Ethics and to the Kootenai County Sheriffs'

Departments' Values.

WE WILL do this with compassion, courtesy and patience, acting without fear or favor

or prejudice to the rights of others. We will be professional, calm, and restrained in

the face of adversity and apply only that force which is necessary to accomplish our

lawful duty.

WE WILL consistently strive to be responsive and adaptive to changes in the

community. We will be accountable in our utilization and care of the resources

entrusted to us through the use of our communitys' tax dollars.

The Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department

Campus at the base of beautiful Canfield

Mountain.

COVER: The Kootenai County Sheriff’s

Mounted Posse is shown in full parade gear.

INTRODUCTION

Letter from Sheriff 1

Letter from Undersheriff 2

Organizational Chart 3-4

Personnel Chart 5-6

Administrative Support 7

OPERATIONS BUREAU

Captain Wolfinger 8

Patrol Division 9

Recreational Safety 10

Special Teams 11-14

Detective Division 15-16

Volunteers 17

SUPPORT SERVICES BUREAU

Captain Shirley - Civil 18

Civil & Records 19

Drivers’ License &

Vehicle Maintenance 20

CONTENTS

JAIL BUREAU

Captain Chaney 21

Custody Division 22

Special Teams 23

Services Division 24

Work Release Center

& Programs 25

Kitchen & Medical 26

Maintenance Section 27

COMMUNICATIONS BUREAU

Director Coughenour 28

9-1-1 29

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

Organizational

Achievements 30

Personnel Achievements 31-32

KCDSA 33

Contact Information 34

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


A letter fr0m Sheriff Rocky Watson

Citizens of Kootenai County:

Idaho Statute provides; "The policy of the State of Idaho is that the primary duty of

enforcing all penal provisions and statutes of the State is vested with the sheriff of each

county... " Among the designated duties of the sheriff are: preserve the peace; arrest

and take before a magistrate persons who attempt to commit or who have committed a

public offense; keep the county jail and the prisoners therein, and; serve all process and

notices in the manner prescribed by law.

With a county of 1,310 square miles, 56 square miles of navigable water, nearly A

million acres of national forest land and a residential population in excess of 140,000,

these law enforcement duties are a daunting task. As a destination location for regional,

national, and international travelers, the law enforcement responsibilities increase

significantly. The Kootenai County Sheriff's Department works diligently to meet the

needs of residents and visitors alike, and is divided into four bureaus: Operations;

Support Services; Jail; and Communications. This Annual Report will address the

composition, responsibilities, and performance of each of these Bureaus. The emphasis

will be on the services we provide and the personnel who provide them.

I hope the information provided gives you a better understanding and perspective of the

Kootenai County Sheriff's Department and the essential law enforcement services we

provide. As the Sheriff of Kootenai County, it is a pleasure to present this Annual Report

and provide the citizens of the County with information about this fine, professional law

enforcement agency.

Respectfully,

Rocky Watson

Sheriff

Page 1


A letter fr0m Undersheriff Tad Leach

Residents and Guests of Kootenai County:

During 2007 the Kootenai County Sheriff's Department reached a number of milestones. In the

first half of the year, attrition to our area law enforcement competitors was significant. All four

Bureaus were below their authorized strength, especially the Operations Bureau (Patrol and

Detective Divisions) and the Jail Bureau. The lack of sufficient personnel caused operational

difficulties, such as increased response times and mandatory overtime to achieve minimum

staffing levels. Needless to say, morale also suffered.

The Board of County Commissioners started the process of making us more competitive with

area law enforcement agencies by approving a substantial pay increase and a more

comparable salary plan for Fiscal Year 2007-2008. I am pleased to report that by the end of

the year we were in the process of filling the last of our vacant positions. Our ability to provide

an enhanced level of law enforcement service has increased accordingly and our response

time to calls for service has improved for the first time in four years.

Overcrowding in the Jail and other sheriff's department facilities continues to be a problem. We

are currently transporting inmates to Geiger Correctional Facility in Spokane and Ferry County

Jail in Republic, Washington, to alleviate overcrowding- an expensive proposition. We are in

the process of contracting with Sanders County, Montana, as the closer detention facilities are

reaching capacity and may not be able to accommodate our needs in the near future. At one

point we had 400 inmates (excluding Work Release); 376 of in our jail, which has a capacity of

325, and 24 inmates housed in other contract facilities. This overcrowding has resulted in

numerous tort claims, a lawsuit, and liability exposure, again mandating significant taxpayer

expense. In addition, The Kootenai County Sheriff's Department is the last major law

enforcement agency in the area that is in an overcrowded public safety facility, and which is

not modern or state of the art. Personnel, records, evidence and equipment are spread out in

numerous buildings. This lack of efficient and effective quarters hampers our Patrol, Detective,

Civil and Records operations and ability to provide essential services to the community. We

are currently in the preliminary phase of reviewing all Sheriff's Department facilities to

determine our needs, and plan for the future.

We look forward to 2008 with the anticipation of continuing to improve our personnel situation,

and implementing some new and/or expanded units to better serve residents and visitors alike.

I am proud to be affiliated with such an outstanding law enforcement agency, and participate in

the preparation of this Annual Report.

Professionally,

Tad Leach - Undersheriff

Page 2


Pages 3 and 4

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


ADMINISTRATION

TOTALS 2 0 7 1 1

SHERIFF

UNDERSHERIFF

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPERVISOR

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT

VOLUNTEER COORDINATO R

INFORMATION SERVICES LIAISON

INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGER

PC/NETWORK SPECIALIST

SUB-TOTALS:

SUB-TOTALS:

1

1

0

0

0

0

4

1

3

3

1

2

1

1

0

1

1

0

OPERATIONS BUREAU

TOTALS 72 1 7 14 139

CAPTAIN

PATROL DIVISION

LIEUTENANT

ADMINISTRATIVE SERGEANT

SERGEANTS

DEPUTIES

D.A.R.E. DEPUTY

RESERVE DEPUTIES

CITIZENS ON PATROL PROGRAMS (COPPS)

INTERNS (NORTH IDAHO COLLEGE LAW ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM)

CLERK

SUB-TOTALS:

1

58

1

1

8

45

1

0 6 12 137

15

30

3

1

RECREATION SAFETY SECTION 2 0 0 12 88

SERGEANT

DEPUTY

SEASONAL DEPUTIES

SEARCH & RESCUE

POSSE

AUXILIARY

1

1

12

41

26

21

ANIMAL CONTROL SECTION 0 0 3 0 0

ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICERS 3

COMMUNITY SERVICES SECTION 0 0 3 0 0

DETECTIVE DIVISION

LIEUTENANT

CLERKS

SUPPORT SERVICES BUREAU

CAPTAIN

FRONT DESK OFFICER

CIVIL DIVISION

SERGEANT

CIVIL DEPUTIES

RECORDS DIVISION

SUPERVISOR

RECORDS CLERKS

CIVILIAN REPORT TAKERS 3

DETECTIVE SERGEANTS

DETECTIVES

VIOLENT CRIMES TASK FORCE

BACKGROUND SERGEANT/BACKGROUND INVESTIGATORS

PROPERTY/EVIDENCE OFFICER

CIVIL DEPUTY TECHNICIANS 1 & 2

FRONT DESK CLERK

DRIVER'S LICENSE DIVISION

SUPERVISOR

DRIVER'S LICENSE CLERKS

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE SHOP

MECHANICS

SHOP CLERK

P E R S O N N E L C H A R T

Page 1

Page 5

LAW ENFORCEMENT

SWORN

DETENTION

CIVILIAN

PART-TIME

VOLUNTEERS

SUB-TOTALS: 13 1 1 2 2

1

4

6

2

1 2

1

2

TOTALS 6 0 24 1 1

1

1

SUB-TOTALS: 5 0 5 0 0

1

4

5

SUB-TOTALS: 0 0 7 1 1

1

5 1 1

1

SUB-TOTALS: 0 0 7 0 0

1

6

SUB-TOTALS: 0 0 4 0 0

3

1


JAIL BUREAU

TOTALS 3 69 54 4 406

CAPTAIN

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTAN T

1

0

CUSTODY DIVISION

LAW ENFORCEMENT

DETENTION

SUB-TOTALS: 1 60 9 3 0

LIEUTENANT 1

ADMINISTRATIVE SERGEANT

SR. ADMINISTRATIVE CLERK

BOOKING CLERKS

SERGEANTS

DETENTION DEPUTIES

1

6

46

1

6

TRANSPORT, WARRANTS & COURT HOLD SECTION 0 4 2 3 0

TRANSPORT DEPUTIES

WARRANTS DEPUTY

WARRANTS CLERKS

3

1

2

3

CLASSIFICATION SECTION 0 3 0 0 0

CLASSIFICATION DEPUTIES 3

JAIL SERVICES DIVISION

P E R S O N N E L C H A R T

SUB-TOTALS: 1 9 45 1 406

LIEUTENANT

ADMINISTRATIVE SERGEANT

CLERKS

1

1

2

CENTRAL CONTROL ROOM SECTION 0 0 20 0 0

CENTRAL CONTROL SUPERVISOR

CENTRAL CONTROL ROOM ASSISTANT SUPERVISOR

JAIL TECHNICIANS

1

1

18

WORK RELEASE/COMMUNITY LABOR PROGRAM SECTION 0 8 2 0 0

SERGEANT

DETENTION DEPUTIES

SR. ADMINISTRATIVE CLERK

CLERK

1

7

1

1

KITCHEN SERVICES SECTION 0 0 8 0 0

KITCHEN SUPERVISOR

LEAD COOK

COOKS

COMMISSARY CLERK

1

1

5

1

MEDICAL SERVICES SECTION 0 0 5 0 0

RN

LPN

HEALTH CARE ASSISTAN T

1

3

1

CHAPLAIN / INMATE PROGRAMS SECTION 0 0 1 0 406

CHAPLAIN

PROGRAMS VOLUNTEERS

1 3

403

MAINTENANCE SECTION: 0 0 7 1 0

BUILDING & GROUNDS SUPERVISOR

MAINTENANCE OPERATORS

SEASONAL/TEMPORARY LAWN CARE

JANITORIAL/MAINTENANCE ASSIST.

1

4

2

1

COMMUNICATIONS BUREAU

TOTALS 0 0 35 3 0

DIRECTOR 1

G.I.S. COORDINATOR 1

COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER 1

SR. SECRETARY 1

OPERATIONS MANAGER 1

9-1-1 TRAINING SUPERVISOR 1

9-1-1 DISPATCH SHIFT SUPERVISORS 5

9-1-1 SENIOR DISPATCHERS 6

CALL TAKERS/DISPATCHERS 18 3

DEPARTMENT TOTALS:

83 70 127 23 547

FULL TIME PERSONNEL TOTAL:

SWORN

NOTE: Actual Positions as of 12-31-07, including 3 personnel assigned to the Sheriff's Department by Information Services

Page 2

Page 6

280

CIVILIAN

PART-TIME

VOLUNTEERS


Administrative Support

The Administrative Support Staff from left to right: Carol Grubbs, Marcia

Heglie, Trudy Whittenburg and Esther McClaren.

The Administrative Support Staff consists of Administrative Supervisor Esther McClaren, Budget

Assistant Carol Grubbs, Personnel Technician Marcia Heglie and Senior Accounts Clerk Trudy

Whittenburg.

The Administrative Supervisor is responsible for the coordination of the sheriff’s office activities, serving

as liaison between Elected Officials, Department Heads, County Commissioners and the Sheriff’s

Department, performs responsible administrative and supervisory work for the Administrative Support

Staff, and maintains and submits payroll records and workman’s compensation claims.

The Budget Assistant is responsible for managing the department’s financial functions associated with

budgets and grants, and developing equipment specifications, preparing formal bids and selecting

vendors.

The Personnel Technician is responsible for the coordination of recruitment, advertising, testing,

screening of applications, and conditional job offers to all Sheriff’s Department perspective employees

and volunteers, and ensures all pre-emloyment requirements, as stated by Sheriff’s office protocol and

procedures, are scheduled and the results are relayed to administrative staff, through the new hire

paperwork and orientation of all employees. She also coordinates separation and leave procedures as

directed.

The Senior Accounts Clerk is responsible for

processing accounts payable invoices,

reimbursement requests, per diem requests and

petty cash requests, verifies receipt of goods with

purchasing agents, reconciles monthly

statements, and researches problem invoices.

She also balances month-end reports, verifies

and maintains Sheriff’s Department inventory

and processes forms.

Page 7

In 2007, Administrative Support Staff

handled the hiring of 60 employees, to

include 911 and Seasonal Marine Deputies.

In the same time frame, Administrative

Support Staff addressed administrative

needs for 36 terminations, resignations and

retirements.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


OPERATIONS BUREAU

In 2007, the Operations Bureau was commanded by Capt. Ben

Wolfinger. Capt. Wolfinger began his career with the Kootenai

st

County Sheriff's Office on April 1 , 1983. Captain Wolfinger worked

through the ranks in the Jail, Patrol and Detectives before being

promoted to Captain on April 30, 1995. This was his second

rotation in the Operations Bureau. He has also served as the Jail

Bureau Commander and the Support Service Bureau Commander.

Capt. Wolfinger is also the Department's Media Spokesman and is

a registered lobbyist with the Idaho Legislature.

The Operations Bureau is made up of the Patrol and Detective

Divisions, with a total complement of 79 personnel. Each Division is

managed by a Lieutenant. Some of the Specialty assignments to

the Operations Bureau include:

Dive Rescue Team

Special Response Unit (S.R.U.)

Hostage Negotiation Team (H.N.T.)

Range/Firearms Training Team

Kootenai County covers 1,310 square miles.

Deputy Nelson works as quarry for K-9 training

(above left) and SRU members conduct

training.

Page 8

Captain Ben Wolfinger

396 square miles (30%) of Kootenai County is

Federal Land managed by either the U.S. Forest

Service or the Bureau of Land Management.

Kootenai County shares the Law Enforcement

responsibilities of these areas with other

agencies.

More than 140,000 people live in Kootenai County.

The Operations Bureau managed a $6,266,978

million dollar budget in 2007.

In 2007, Patrol incorporated the use of the

Automated License Plate Recognition system

(ALPR). The ALPR is a system of cameras

mounted to a patrol vehicle that reads license

plates on surrounding vehicles up to speeds of

80mph. It reads license plates using infared

technology, and then compares the numbers to a

database of stolen and other manually entered

license plates on vehicles that law enforcement is

currently searching for.

The system was obtained through a federal grant.

KCSD, PFPD, CDAPD, and Boise PD were the

only agencies in the state who had the system in

2007.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Patrol Division

The Patrol Division is the most visible section of

the Kootenai County Sheriff's Department. The

64 men and women who comprise the Patrol

Division provide first line police response to the

unincorporated areas of Kootenai County as

well as to several contract cities within the

County. The Patrol Division is responsible for

responding to calls for service in a geographical

region comprising over 1,300 square miles,

servicing a population of approximately 65,000

people.

In addition to basic police services, the Patrol Division also has several specialty units that provide

specialized services to the community. The Special Response Unit (SWAT Team), Dive Rescue

Team, Recreational Enforcement Section, Traffic Team, and Canine Unit are some of the most

visible units assigned to the Patrol Division. Animal

Control Services, as well as Civilian Report Takers

also are assigned to the Patrol Division, and provide

valuable support to the deputies in the field.

In 2007...

The Patrol Division handled 33,013 calls

for service.

Patrol Deputies spent 21,295 hour in

Contract Cities in Kootenai County. Contract

Cities include: Athol, Dalton Gardens, Fernan

Village, Harrison, Hauser, Hayden, Huetter and

Worley.

Page 9

It is the goal of the men and women who comprise the

Kootenai County Sheriff's Department's Patrol

Division to provide prompt, efficient, courteous service

to the public, and to enforce the laws of the State of

Idaho with fairness and impartiality.

In 2007, the Patrol Division was led by Lt. Dan Mattos. Lt.

Mattos has nearly 30 years of law enforcement experience

in California, Arizona and Idaho with the last 13 years with

the Kootenai County Sheriff's Office. Lt. Mattos also

carries the responsibility as the Commander of the Special

Response Unit. The individuals of the Patrol Division

perform patrol specific tasks that include:

General Patrol Duties

Recreation Safety Section

K-9's

Traffic Unit

District Deputies

D.A.R.E.

Crowd Control Team

Special response Unit

In addition, many of the volunteers that work for the

Sheriff's Department also come under the direct

supervision of the Patrol Division. These include:

Chaplains

Search & Rescue

Mounted Posse

Sheriff's Auxiliary

Reserve Deputies

College Interns

Citizens On Patrol (C.O.P.’s)

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Recreation Safety Section

The Kootenai County Sheriff's Department Recreation Safety Section is responsible for providing marine law

enforcement and rescue patrols to 18 lakes and 56 miles of navigable river within our county. The program

operates year round, but is at maximum deployment May 01 through September 15 of each year. At maximum

deployment, the section employs one full time Sergeant, one full time Deputy and twelve seasonal Deputies.

Throughout the year, the marine program provides certified boating education courses to the public and

conducts patrols on the various lakes and rivers in the county. Kootenai County is home to the largest number

of registered boaters in the State with over 20,000 registering in 2007.

The Marine program is a leader in the State when it comes to the service provided to the boater. We host an 80

hour POST certified marine academy, attend the ten day boat show held at the Spokane County Fairgrounds.

Additionally, the marine deputies conduct several hundred vessel safety inspections and arrest dozens of

intoxicated boaters on the water each year. The Marine program teaches the State Certified Boating

Education course to local students. In 2007, sixty-five students were certified through this course, with 3 of

those completing the “BEST” Boating Safety Instructor course.

Through out the year, the section processes

nearly 100 Marine Event Permits, one of which

is the USA National Ironman Triathlon. This

annual event brings in thousands of spectators

and over two thousand participants.

Page 10

The Kootenai County Sheriff's Department Recreation

Safety Section is also charged with maintaining an active

Dive Rescue Team. The team consists of twelve members.

The divers train year round in various environments. The

divers are trained in boat operations, swift water rescue, ice

rescue and can dive to 110 feet. On average, the dive team

responds to two dozen calls per year.

The Kootenai County Sheriff's Department Recreation

Safety Section is also charged with maintaining an active

back-country snowmobile patrol. During the winter months,

the Section employs two full time deputies and two seasonal

deputies that patrol over 350 miles of groomed snowmobile

trail. The purpose of these patrols is to provide a law

enforcement presence in the back-country and ensures

registration compliance on approximately 4000 registered

snowmobiles that use our trails. During a typical year, the

section investigates 2-5 serious injury and multiple minor

property damage accidents.

The Kootenai County Sheriff's Department maintains an active all volunteer Search

and Rescue Council that provides volunteer support on all Search & Rescue missions.

The SAR Council is comprised of three primary and independent units and consists of

nearly 90 members. The three units are Kootenai County Search and Rescue,

Mounted Posse and Kootenai County Emergency Auxiliary. See additional

photographs on page 34.

The SAR Council responds to all search and rescue incidents in the back-country of

Kootenai County and also works security details during special events such as the

Annual Kootenai County Fair and the Fourth of July.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Special Teams

The Kootenai County Special

Response Unit, also known as SRU, is a

SWAT team with select members from

both the Sheriff’s Department and the

Coeur d’Alene City Police Department.

The members of this team are trained in

the use of special weapons and tactics

to address incidents that exceed the

resources of patrol officers.

The mission of the SRU team is: To

quickly and safely gain control of critical

or high risk situations which have

exceeded the resources of patrol

responses or in situations that have the

potential to do so. Examples of these

types of situations are hostage incidents,

active shooters, armed/barricaded

suspects, and high risk warrant service.

The SRU team also incorporates the use of a Hostage Negotiation Team that includes members from both

departments. Members of the SRU team attend specialized training every month and are required to

maintain a high level of physical fitness.

K-9 Unit

Deputy Nelson and Ringo, Deputy Shaw

and Karo and Deputy Lyons and Brutus

Page 11

Special Response Unit

The Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department K-9 Unit is made up of three

deputies who are assigned canine partners. Our K-9 teams are

specially trained to track and locate or capture people, and to search

areas for evidence or drugs.

These teams are also involved in many community demonstrations

and regularly assist other agencies. Training time is a very important

part of maintaining an exceptional K-9 team. Our team regularly

participates in training events with other agencies.

In 2007...

Karo, after locating ten - 1

pound bags of marijuana.

The Kootenai County K-9 team logged a total of

9,585 hours of K-9 Team Training.

Karo, Ringo and Brutus were responsible for

locating narcotics 366 times.

These teams assisted other law enforcement

agencies a total of 189 times.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Special Teams

Field Training Evaluation Program

The Patrol Division's Field Training and Evaluation Program (FT&EP) is often referred to as the

backbone of the department. This is due to the importance of producing a highly trained deputy

that can work autonomously.

Every patrol deputy that is hired attends the ten week POST Academy. Upon their return, the

trainee(s) then attend a three week in-service academy, taught by the Field Training Officers

(FTO). Once they successfully complete the in-service academy, the trainee is assigned a FTO.

The training with the FTO's is a 15 week, intensive on the job training. The 15 weeks are broken

into three phases of training, where the trainee is assigned a different trainer for each of the

phases. Once they successfully complete the 15 week training, the trainee is then observed by a

trainer over a two-week period to ensure he/she is able to work effectively.

There are currently seven patrol deputies assigned as Field Training Officers. They are

supervised by three patrol sergeants. In 2007, thirteen deputies were hired and trained through

the FT&EP. Out of the thirteen deputies, only one left the program prior to completion. In addition

to training the newly hired deputies, the FTO's are also tasked with training Animal Control

Officers, Civilian Report Takers and Reserve Deputies.

Crowd Control Team

The Kootenai County Sheriff's Department Crowd Control Team is

comprised of three sergeants and ten deputies that can respond to

public disturbances throughout Kootenai County. The team has

received specialized training in crowd psychology, crowd control

tactics, K9 deployments, less lethal munitions, hostage/officer

rescue situations and gas deployment.

The team requires and wears special protective equipment, such as

chest protectors, shin protectors, helmets and arm pads. The team

is also equipped with both expandable batons and with three foot

long straight batons.

During the year of 2007, two of the sergeants and the ten members assisted the Coeur d'Alene

th

Police Department with the 4 of July deployment in downtown Coeur d'Alene, as they have done

in years past. This created a united police presence in the downtown area during the daylight

hours, enough so that when darkness fell, it kept the disturbances in the downtown area to a

minimum. This type of a deterrent is an excellent example of pro-active law enforcement.

th

In fact just prior to the 4 of July deployment, there was an equipment upgrade and the team

received new and updated helmets, which provide ballistic protection, compared to the older

motorcycle helmets that had been used in previous years.

Page 12

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Special Teams

Range Program

The Kootenai County Sheriff's Department Range Staff is composed of one Range Master and

seven staff members. The function of the Range Staff is to provide initial and on going firearms

training to all members of the Sheriff's Department. Included with the standard firearms training, the

Range Staff also instructs various members of the Sheriff's Department with the use of Less-Lethal

devices such as “Bean Bag” rounds. The list of personnel that are provided training include: The

Patrol, Detective, Detention, and Marine Divisions. The Range Staff also provides firearms training

to members of the Bailiff’s Office, Search & Rescue and The Sheriff's Posse.

In addition to training, the Range Staff is also responsible for records keeping, care, and annual

maintenance of (180) handguns, (92) shotguns, (80) rifles, and (14) pieces of specialized weapons

utilized by SWAT, Crowd Control, and Detention Response Teams.

Page 13

Members of the Kootenai County Sheriff's Department are required to

successfully complete two Idaho POST qualification courses per year.

In addition to these standardized qualifications, the Range Staff also

provides realistic force on force training and specialized tactical

training.

Our Animal Control Section responded to over 4,600

calls for service, took 250 reports and wrote 336

citations for violations relating to animal welfare and

responsible animal care.

Animal Control handled a variety of animals in 2007, to

include: dogs, cats, birds, horses, cattle, goats, and

pigs! Unfortunately, many of those calls concerned

abused and neglected animals. Twenty horses were

seized in four separate animal cruelty cases.

Civilian Report Takers

Animal Control

Animal Control Officer Karen

Williams kept very busy in 2007!

The Kootenai County Sheriff's Department has three

civilian members assigned as Civilian Report Takers

(CRT) in the Community Services Program. These

members are non-sworn individuals that are

responsible for taking calls that are not in progress,

such as burglary reports, vandalism reports, theft

reports, etc. They also complete VIN inspections,

conduct Neighborhood Watch programs and other

tasks that free up deputies so they can be proactive in

the community.

In 2007, the CRT's, Andy Schroeder, Diana Mihalek

and Gary Shultz (from left to right) responded to 3,384

calls for service and completed 943 reports.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Special Teams

The Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department

continued to participate in the national antidrug

program, Drug Awareness and

Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.), in 2007.

Our D.A.R.E. program was especially lucky

to have Deputy Alana Hunt at the wheel.

Dep. Hunt organized many fund-raisers

throughout the year, and was able to raise

over $6,200 in donations from various

organizations and members of the

community. An additional $5,000 was also

provided through the Drug Enforcement

Fund. The Drug Enforcement Fund

maintains monies seized directly from drug

offenders.

District Deputies

District Deputies Ward Crawford, Will

Klinkefus and Chris Fresh.

Page 14

D.A.R.E.

D.A.R.E. Deputy Hunt shows off the new D.A.R.E. car

in 2007!

In 2007...

D.A.R.E. was taught at 9 different Elementary

schools in Kootenai County.

Over 600 fifth graders graduated from the

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department D.A.R.E.

program.

D.A.R.E. students received additional education

in decision making, bullying and alcohol abuse,

as well as the lessons provided through the antidrug

program.

The District Deputy Program started in the late 1980's. The deputies assigned as District Deputies work in

the outlying areas of the county. In addition to providing law enforcement service to the areas they work,

the district deputies also attend local council meetings, organize special events in their districts and attend

both school and community functions. Each District Deputy oversees a Citizen's on Patrol program

(COPs), which is located in their assigned districts.

The Department has three deputies assigned to the District Deputy Program; one is assigned to the

Athol/Bayview areas, one is assigned to the Cataldo/Harrison areas and one is assigned to the Worley

area. These deputies are given more latitude to adjust their work schedule based on the district's needs

and activity. These deputies are also assigned a 4-wheel drive patrol vehicle due to the mountainous

terrain in each of their districts.

In 1995, the Kootenai County Sheriff's Department received a federal grant through the COPS FAST

program to fund two deputies that were assigned specifically to the City of Hayden. Since then, two

detectives have also been added to the program. Along with their normal duties, Hayden Deputies also

attend City Council meetings, organize food drives, assist with fund raising activities, host annual bicycle

rodeos, and attend numerous school and community functions.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Detective Division

The Detective Division is made up of 15 individuals that are led by Lt. Kim Edmondson.

Lt. Edmondson has 16 years of law enforcement experience, all with the Kootenai

County Sheriff's Department. Lt. Edmondson began working in the Kootenai County

Jail in 1992 and as a Sergeant, transferred to the Patrol Division before being promoted

to Lieutenant and taking over the Detective Division. The members of the Detective

Division are responsible for:

Crimes Against Property

Crimes Against People

Registered Sex Offender Monitoring

Special Investigations Unit / Multi-Agency Task Force

Property / Evidence

Background Investigations

Crime Analysis

Volunteer Coordinator

Crimes Against Children

Page 15

The Detective Division is responsible for followup

on all criminal cases that are not traffic law

violations. Detectives are skilled in a variety of

areas including interviewing, evidence

collection, report writing, photography and

courtroom testimony.

Additionally, the Detective Division monitors

Registered Sex Offenders (RSOs). In 2007,

Detectives teamed up with Patrol Deputies to

conduct an RSO emphasis, to verify that each

RSO could be located at their appropriate

registered address.

In 2007, the Detective Division fully outfitted our

new Crime Scene Unit trailer with state-of-the-art

evidence collection equipment with funds

provided by the FBI. The unit is now available to

be utilized by any agency participating in the

North Idaho Violent Crimes Task Force

(NIVCTF). Those agencies are: Kootenai

County Sheriff’s Department, Idaho State Police,

Post Falls Police Department, Shoshone County

Sheriff’s Department, Idaho Department of

Corrections, and Coeur d’Alene Police

Department. The NIVCTF investigates violent

crimes, drug cases and gang activity in the

participating areas. They also work closely with

felony and misdemeanor probation officers in the

area.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Detective Division

One of the most important functions of the Detective Division is the Property and Evidence Section.

This section receives and maintains items collected as evidence, safekeeping and found property.

Some of the evidence dates back to the 60’s. Some of the services provided by this section are:

l Receiving, processing, and storing of property and evidence.

l Identification and return of evidence and property to rightful owners.

l Provide access to evidence for any prosecuting or defense attorneys.

l Maintain and return personal property to inmates following release.

l Store vehicles that are impounded, maintained as evidence or held for forfeiture.

l Store bio-hazardous materials taken as evidence.

The evidence section processed over 30 vehicles and 85 firearms. Additionally, $12,082.53 in

currency was collected as evidence, seizure money or found property.

Detective Jerry Northrup, Deputy Chuck

Sciortino, Civil Deputy Tim Leeder and

Detective Todd Jackson discuss cases in the

Detective’s office.

The TOP 10

Crimes

Reported to the

Kootenai

County Sheriff’s

Department in

2007 were:

Page 16

In 2007...

2,713 Group “A” offenses were reported,

according to preliminary Uniform Crime

Reporting statistics. Those offenses include all

major crimes regarding people and property.

Detectives assigned to the NIVCTF followed up

on more than 600 drug cases and nearly 500

drug arrests.

Patrol and Detectives seized over 2,585 grams

of marijuana and over 875 grams of

methamphetamine.

2,766 evidence items were taken in by the

Evidence Custodian. Of those, 28 were vehicles

and 65 were firearms.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Volunteer Section

The Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department continued to improve

and increase the number of volunteers who provided countless

hours of assistance and relief to our staff. KCSD offered a variety of

volunteer opportunities in various areas, to include: Citizens On

Patrol (COPs), Reserve Deputy Program, Chaplain Corp, Kootenai

County Search and Rescue, Mounted Posse, Kootenai County

Emergency Auxiliary, and a variety of in-house volunteer support staff.

In 2007, KCSD recruited a volunteer to assist in coordinating and marketing our in-house

volunteer opportunities. Retired FBI Special Agent, Ed Burke, fit the bill (between tee times!) and

immediately began recruiting more help from the community. Ed Burke is shown above (left) with

Jeremiah Halbert (right), a long time KCSD volunteer who is greatly appreciated!

COPs

Our COPs program

continued to grow in

2007 by the addition of

a Worley group. COPs

are all over the county

now. You’ll find them in

Athol, Bayview, Harrison and Worley.

All of our COPs volunteers assist the Patrol

Division in a variety of ways including:

conducting vacation and security checks,

handling abandoned vehicles and completing

VIN checks. They also assist at crime scenes

with traffic control and security. Currently,

there are 29 COPs volunteers in the county.

Chaplain Corp

Our Chaplain Corp provided counseling

assistance to citizens and staff in 2007. They

were regularly called out at all hours to

provide comfort to members of our

community and to give death notifications to

families. D.V. Moyer and Patsy Bogan are

shown above. Greg Linnebach is not shown.

Page 17

Reserve Deputy

Program

Our Reserve Deputy Program was established to

aid and supplement the Sheriff's Department. The

program is used to provide support to the Sheriff's

Department in all aspects of service when the need

arises. Reserve Deputies must attend 292 hours

of training through a Regional Reserve Deputy

training course.

In 2007, the Kootenai County Sheriff's Department

had five Reserve Deputies. These deputies

volunteered their time a minimum of 24 hours per

month with the department. They are tasked with

various duties to include traffic control, security

details, special functions and routine patrols with

full-time deputies. They were involved with a

variety of functions to include the North Idaho Fair's

“Child ID Booth”, assisting the DARE Program with

numerous parades, and hospital guard duty.

These civic minded individuals provide an

invaluable service to the Kootenai County Sheriff's

Department through their volunteerism and

support to the community.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


SUPPORT SERVICES BUREAU

In 2007, the Support Services Bureau was commanded by Capt.

Nile Shirley. Capt. Shirley was born and raised in Idaho and began

his career with Kootenai County Sheriff's Department as a member

of Search and Rescue and the Reserve Program in 1977 through

1980 when he became a Seasonal Marine Deputy. He started his

full-time career in 1981 and served in the Patrol and Detective

Divisions. Capt. Shirley was promoted to the Rank of Sergeant

where he supervised the Patrol and Marine Divisions. Capt. Shirley

promoted to Lieutenant, and supervised the Patrol and Detective

Divisions in the Operations Bureau as well as the Services and

Custody Divisions in the Jail. Upon promoting to Captain, he

commanded the Operations and Support Services Bureaus.

rd

Capt. Shirley is a graduate of the 203 Session of the FBI National

Academy, attended the FBI Command College and is a Leadership

Coeur d’Alene graduate.

The Support Services Bureau is made up of the Records and Civil Divisions, Driver’s License

Office and the Vehicle Maintenance Division, with a total complement of 30 full-time personnel, 1

part-time person and 1 volunteer. Each Division is made up of mainly civilian personnel and are

supervised by civilian supervisors, with the exception of the Civil Division.

Civil Division

The Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department

Civil Division, by Idaho statue, serves the

entire county population of 142,863 citizens.

the Civil Division handles the paperwork and

processes for garnishments, writs,

subpeonas, summons’, a variety of court

orders, and warrants of distraint.

Current Civil personnel:

5 Civilian Civil Deputy Technician

support staff

4 Sworn field deputies

1 Sergeant supervisor

Members (shown at right) include: Brenda

Cooper, Karen Mahakam, Carey Holecek,

Christine Krivanek, Carol Eddy and Sgt. Lee

Richardson (seated).

Page 18

In 2007...

Captain Nile Shirley

The Civil Division received and processed

a total of 26,629 civil and criminal papers.

Civil received $2,304,395.81 and

disbursed $2,305,236.71.

Civil also processed 9,434 garnishment

checks and 7,189 court subpeonas

served.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Records Division

The purpose of the Records Division is to be the link between the Sheriff’s Office and the

public, as well as between the Sheriff’s Office and other criminal justice agencies including

the courts, prosecutors and other law enforcement agencies. All documentation that comes

from either the Operations or Jail Bureaus at the Sheriff’s Office is managed and stored by

records personnel.

In addition to handling records, the Records Division issues CCW Permits and Dog and

Kennel Licenses. They also process background and criminal history checks, process

abandoned vehicles and fingerprint Registered Sex Offenders.

The Records Division is maintained by 5 full time Records Technicians, 1 part-time

Technician and 1 Civilian Supervisor.

Records personnel (left to right) are Shelley Stephens, Rhonda

Wheelock, Cindy Cook, Linda Mattos, Dorinda Thurman, Dian

Demille, Clayton Smith and Paul Klawitter (kneeling).

Professional front desk assistance

is available in the main lobby.

Page 19

In 2007...

The Records Division processed a total of

7,617 citations.

Records handled 7,055 Incident Reports,

220 Protection Orders and 124 No

Contact Orders (all of which are handled

2-3 times)

They also processed 10,205 arrest

records and 8,393 inmate release files.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Driver’s License Division

The Driver's License Division of the Sheriff's Department is a mandated function of the

Sheriff. In Idaho, the Sheriffs of the forty-four counties are required to work as the vendors

for the Department of Transportation with regards to Drivers' Licenses and Identification

Cards. Additionally, the Drivers' License office is the

location where all Registered Sex Offenders must

complete their registration paperwork annually.

Supervisor Sandy Delbridge

Vehicle

The office is open 7:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. Monday

through Friday.

In 2007...

Maintenance Division

52,162 driver’s license transactions were

completed.

One transaction was completed every 2

minutes & 18 seconds.

296 Sex Offenders were Registered.

The seven licensing staff members have

not increased in over 10 years.

The County Vehicle Maintenance Shop is on the Sheriff's Department campus and is

responsible for over 200 vehicles and vessels from the Sheriff's Department, Assessor's Office,

Misdemeanor and Juvenile Probation and other County offices. The three mechanics in the

shop; Will, Eric and Larry, maintain this fleet of vehicles, do minor and major repairs, change all

tires twice a year and fabricate and outfit new vehicles with a wide variety of specialty and

emergency equipment.

On top of all of this work is the documentation that must be

kept on every vehicle.

The shop crew performed

over 800 minor vehicle

services and checks.

They also completed over

400 major vehicle services

and checks.

The crew changes over 1,600

tires annually.

Page 20

This is the job of Faye,

who keeps all the

paperwork straight,

makes sure that license

plates are up to date and

deals with the massive

amount of red-tape at the

D e p a r t m e n t o f

Transportation for all of

those special vehicles.

Mechanic Larry Rash works to keep

up on the tire change overs.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Page 21

JAIL BUREAU

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Jail Bureau is to hold safely and securely all prisoners

lawfully committed to the custody of the Kootenai County Sheriff, and

those delivered by competent authority to the jail.

While in custody, prisoners shall be afforded all rights and privileges

guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States and the State of Idaho

The Jail Bureau comprises the Custody and Services Divisions. It is staffed by 126

employees, 14 part-time staff and 431 program volunteers and is commanded by

Captain Travis Chaney. Captain Chaney began his career as a Reserve Deputy

Sheriff with Kootenai County in 1977 and has served the citizens of our community

for over 30 years.

During his career he has worked through the ranks in Patrol and Detectives. He has commanded the Patrol and

Detective Divisions and has served as the Bureau Commander for the Operations, Support and Jail Bureau's. He has

served as a member of the Dive Rescue Team and the Special Response Unit (SRU) completing his assignment as the

SRU Team's Commander. Captain Chaney was the founding member of the Department's Field Training Officer

Program and the Individual Patrol Vehicle Program.

Captain Chaney possesses a B.S. Degree and is a Graduate of the F.B.I. National Academy and holds Management

and Advanced Certificates. He is past President of the

Montana-Idaho Chapter of the F.B.I. National Academy

FACTS ABOUT YOUR JAIL

Associates and the Idaho Jail Administrators Association.

Captain Chaney has served as a member of the board of

directors for various community service organizations and is

currently the Chairman of the Region One F.B.I. N.A. Idaho

Advisory Board.

In 2007...

A total of 8,862 arrests were processed

at the Jail facility.

67% of the inmate population confined

to the Jail has been charged with one or

more felonies.

Average length of stay in the jail per

inmate was 18 days.

The total cost to house an inmate was

$63.24 per day (including personnel,

facilities, utilities and basic needs).

Total revenue from reimbursement and

fees collected from inmates and other

government and private entities was

$1,348,914.33. This amount is returned

to the Justice Fund for Jail operation.

Captain Travis Chaney

In 2002, the Kootenai County Jail completed an expansion

project with a rated capacity of 325 beds. In March of 2004,

the Jail began exceeding its rated capacity and has remained

in an overcrowded condition for the past four years. In May of

2006, the Jail began transporting sentenced county inmates

to other out of state jail facilities in an effort to reduce

dangerous conditions caused by the overcrowding of

prisoners. The cost of transporting and housing Kootenai

County prisoners in other states comes at a staggering cost

to the taxpayers. Despite continuing efforts to create

alternative programs to alleviate jail overcrowding the fact

remains that inmate bed space is dangerously inadequate.

A future projection in the population for the Coeur

d'Alene/Spokane Metropolitan area indicates a steady

growth trend. In addition, the Jail is holding offenders that are

more prone to violence. Most of those incarcerated have

been charged or convicted with crimes of a serious nature.

These factors mandate the jail must expand bed capacity in

order to effectively manage the inmate population through

appropriate lines of segregation and to reduce overall liability

caused by an overcrowded facility.

Adequate Jail capacity enhances law enforcement's ability to

arrest and jail offenders that choose to victimize the citizens

of our community. This in turn protects the unparalleled

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Custody Division

Lieutenant Dan Soumas commands the Custody Division which has a staff of 72 and is

responsible for the care and custody of all incarcerated prisoners. Lt. Soumas is a 24 - year

veteran of the Department starting as a volunteer member with Search and Rescue, Reserves

and Marine Deputy. He has served as the Patrol Division and Recreation Safety Section

Commander as well as the Special Response Unit, the Detention Response Team, the Explosive

Recognition Team and the Jail Services Division. He is a graduate of the F.B.I. National Academy

and holds Advanced and Management Certificates.

The Custody Divisions primary role is that of ensuring the safety and security of the jail, inmates,

staff and visitors. Custody Division is also responsible for the following operations sections:

l Classification Unit

l Warrants/ Prisoner Transport Section, Court/Inter-agency Cooperative Transports and

Extraditions.

l Explosive Recognition Team

l Detention Response Team

l Jail Training Officer Program

The Jail has been the recipient of

Jail Compliance Certificates from

the Idaho Sheriff's Jail Standards

Committee for the years 2002,

2003, 2004, 2005 and 2007.

The Certificate was not awarded in

2 0 0 6 d u e t o o v e r c r o w d e d

conditions which have been

alleviated in 2007 through an Outof-County

Prisoner Housing

Program, housing inmates in

agencies in Washington and

Montana.

Detention Deputy Conrad Anderson

works in Booking.

Page 22

During an average month, there are over 22

times the people in court mandated

alternative programs to incarceration than

those sitting behind bars. The following is a

breakdown: 4,750 Committed by the Court to

Unsupervised Probation, 1,132-Committed to

Adult Felony Probation, 797-Committed to

Adult Misdemeanor Probation, 399-

Committed to the Sheriff's Community Labor

Program, 353-Committed to the Community

Court Services Program, 144-Committed to

the Pretrial Services Program and 22

Committed to the Sheriff's Work Release

Program. Total in Kootenai County

Alternative to Incarceration Programs is 7,597

with on average 345 inmates incarcerated at

the main jail. These numbers do not include

those people involved in other various social

programs offered as part of sentencing.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Special Teams

Explosives Recognition

Team (ERT):

The ERT is a combination of patrol and

detention deputies who have been trained

in explosive recognition, safety zones &

explosive evidence recovery. They

function as an on call response resource

when explosive devices are detected or

suspected. ERT also liaisons with the

Regional Explosive Disposal Unit from the

Spokane area.

Jail Training Officer

Program:

Using 8 deputies and three sergeants this

program is responsible for training all new

custody staff members in their duties at the

jail.

This training includes preparation for the

POST Detention Academy plus up to 16

weeks training within the jail after

graduation from the state academy.

Detention Response Team

(DRT):

This team of specially trained and equipped

deputies is available to suppress major

inmate disturbances within the jail by

utilizing tactical planning

& less lethal munitions in

cases where physical

control of an inmate is

not possible using

s t a n d a r d o n - d u t y

equipment carried by

deputies.

This team receives

specialized training in

responding to custodial

situations such as cell

extractions of combative

inmates.

Page 23

Warrants & Transport Section:

The three deputies and

two civilians assigned to

t h e W a r r a n t s a n d

T r a n s p o r t S e c t i o n

oversee all inmate

transports to and from

court and coordinate and

conduct all in state and

out of state extraditions.

Tammy Barnes coordinates

warrants and transports.

Classification Unit:

The three deputies assigned to Classification

analyze an inmate's past behaviors, criminal

history, current

c h a r g e s , a n d

k n o w n i n m a t e

enemies within the

jail. They classify

them for housing

at the appropriate

security level.

Deputy Kevin Muzzy classifies an

inmate.

Classification deputies also serve as the

disciplinary review for inmate rule violations.

Deputy Dan Gregg trains

with the DRT.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Services Division

The Jail Services Division is staffed with 54 employees and is commanded by Lt. Neal Robertson

who is responsible for inmate support services. Lt. Robertson is a 20 year veteran of the

Department beginning his career in the Patrol Division. He has served as a Field Training Officer,

Special Response Unit (SRU) Team Leader and has commanded the Patrol and Custody

Divisions. He is also a 2007 Graduate of the F.B.I. National Academy. Lt. Robertson holds his

Advanced and Management Certificates and is a Medal of Valor recipient.

The Services Division is staffed by 10 sworn personnel and forty-two civilians and is responsible

for the following support functions within the Jail:

l Kitchen/Food Services Section

l Inmate Worker Program

l Inmate Commissary System

l Medical/Health Services

l Chaplain Services and inmate support programs

l Building & Grounds Facility Maintenance

The Chaplain/Inmate Program Section is

staffed by one full time Chaplain/Program

Coordinator and supported by over fourhundred

volunteers. Thousands of hours

were donated by these volunteers in

2007.

Our Chaplain, Bob Smalley (shown

above), coordinates the scheduling and

delivery of nearly a dozen rehabilitative

and religious programs to include:

C h a p l a i n S e r v i c e s , A l c o h o l i c s

Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous,

Commerce and Labor Life Skills Training,

Drug Awareness, Celebrate Recovery,

Anger Management, Purpose Driven Life,

Bible Study and Graduation Equivalency

Diploma (G.E.D.) Church Services.

Page 24

The Jail's control rooms are staffed and operated

by one civilian supervisor and eighteen Jail Techs.

The Jail Techs control staff and inmate movement

within the Jail. They operate the Jail's gates and

doors, observe inmate activities, enforce inmate

rules, watch over the deputies, maintain activity

logs, and play a vital role in the overall safety and

security of the Jail.

In 2007...

FACTS ABOUT YOUR JAIL

The Inmate Commissary Fund, supported by inmate

dollars, generates enough revenue annually to pay for

all hygiene, bedding, inmate uniforms, mattresses,

televisions and utensils for those incarcerated.

Community tax dollars do not pay for these items.

The jail kitchen, aided by inmate workers, prepared over

1,300 meals daily at a total cost of $1.67 a meal

Inmate workers sanitized over a million pounds of

laundry.

Total revenue collected by the Jail, excluding

commissary sales, was $1,215,273.70. This revenue is

generated through an inmate restitution program where

inmates pay up to $500 towards their incarceration at a

rate of $25.00 per day.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


The Pierce Clegg

Work Release Center

The Pierce Clegg Work Release Center houses inmates who are sentenced to a “short stay” and

inmates sentenced to work release. It is also a day reporting center for defendants who are

sentenced to the Sheriff's Community Labor Program. Work Release inmates are allowed by the

Courts to be out of confinement to work at their jobs, allowing them to maintain their income and

support themselves and their families. When not at work, they remained confined at this center.

The Sheriff's Community Labor

Program is a sentencing option for the

Courts. The Courts have the authority

to sentence defendants to the labor

program in lieu of confinement.

Defendants in this program report to

the Center in the mornings and are

assigned to provide labor to municipal

projects and non-profit organizations,

pick-up roadside trash, shovel snow

for the elderly and infirm, and work at

the County landfill and transfer station,

along with many other projects.

The Work Release Center is staffed by

one sergeant, six deputies and two clerks. This staff supervises the work release inmates,

manages the labor program, collects inmate housing, work release and labor program fees and

works with a collection agency for recovering inmate restitution moneys.

Klarissa Hendrix

( a b o v e ) a n d

Deputy Ryan

Hayes (right)

work at the Work

Release Center.

Page 25

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Kitchen Section

Deputy Lisa Whitcomb provides instructions to Inmate Workers

during meal service.

The Jail's Kitchen is staffed by a supervisor, six cooks and one clerk. Additional labor is

supplied by inmate workers. The Kitchen also operates the Jail's laundry service which

cleaned approximately 1,062,687 pounds inmate laundry in 2007. The Jail's commissary

store is run by the Kitchen supervisor and clerk. This commissary service allows inmates to

purchase hygiene, toiletries, mail supplies, snack food and other approved items. The

profits from commissary sales go into a self sustaining fund which allows the Jail to pay for

certain inmate items and services, thus saving tax payer dollars. The Kitchen also oversees

the Inmate Worker Program. The Jail tries to maintain a staff of twenty inmate workers.

These workers provide the majority of labor in the kitchen, laundry room and janitorial

services.

Medical Section

Our Medical staff, Wendy Bozley, Judy

Lobue and Krista Scoles (left to right),

keep things lively at the Jail.

Page 26

In 2007 the Kitchen prepared

451,332 meals at a minimal cost of

$1.67 per meal.

Commissary sales totaled $233,040

in 2007.

In 2007 at total of 64,353 hours of free

labor was provide by inmate

workers.

The Jail's Medical Section is staffed by one

Registered Nurse, three Licensed Practical

Nurses and one Health Care Assistant. These

members work under the authority of a contract

doctor. The Medical Unit provides nursing care

for the inmates, assesses inmate medical needs,

schedules medical appointments, dispenses

inmate medications, and maintains inmate

medical records in compliance with applicable

laws.

The inmates are charged the maximum allowed

by law for nurse visits and doctor visits.

Additionally, inmates are charged for the entire

cost of their prescription medication.

The medical unit also provides some basic

medical training for Custody staff.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


Maintenance Section

Steve Listman is shown

here working on a door

lock.

Page 27

The Maintenance Section is staffed by one civilian

supervisor, four Maintenance Operators and two

Maintenance Assistants. These skilled craftsmen are

responsible for repairs, maintenance and groundskeeping

of all KCSD facilities.

The scope of their work includes repairs to HVAC

systems, water systems, refrigeration units, electronic

security systems, carpentry work, metal fabrication,

and lawn care and snow removal. These craftsmen

work diligently to maintain the security systems of the

Jail and maintain mechanical systems which operate

twenty-four hours a day throughout all of the facilities.

This team has learned to become creative in many of

the areas they maintain. Due to the aging areas of the

facilities, many parts are obsolete and new parts must

be engineered.

The Maintenance building was built by the Maintenance Section in order to save money.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


COMMUNICATIONS BUREAU

In the first quarter of the year the Board of County Commissioners

approved the installation of the Positron Viper Telephone System, a

computer based 911 package. This system brought new technology

to Kootenai County dispatchers with the use of Internet Protocol (IP)

and Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) to provide real time location of

cell phone callers through electronic mapping.

The second quarter brought an end to mandatory 12 hour shifts and

overtime, caused by staff shortages. A significant salary increase

targeted towards all employees with more than five years experience

stabilized the personnel situation and allowed training to be

completed on the new telephone system. Simultaneously, the

department sent four dispatchers to Peace Officer Standards and

Training (POST) basic training in Meridian. This was the first group

of new dispatchers to attend POST in 18 months.

Page 28

Director Brad Coughenour

The State Interoperability Executive Council (SIEC) accepted our Communications Plan for

implementing the new 700 MHz radio equipment, mandated by Federal Communications

Commission requirements for replacement of our existing UHF/VHF radio system by the end of

2012. Preliminary testing of 700 MHz equipment was completed by all agencies with favorable

results.

The summer focused on two objectives: the significant increase in calls to 911 during the tourist

season and the cutover to the new Positron Viper Telephone System, which was completed

without disruption of service. Late in the quarter the Kootenai County 911 Center began

dispatching for the Coeur d'Alene Tribal Police. With excellent coordination with the Tribal Police,

the transition was seamless.

The final months of 2007 culminated with the granting of $2.2 million through the State of Idaho

State Interoperability Executive Council (SIEC). This grant will assist in the significant capital

requirements to transition to the 700 MHz radio system. In addition, the Bureau of Homeland

Security released $350 thousand from 2005 grants which the county was able to utilize for

infrastructure expenses.

Although staff shortages still exist, the Communications Bureau is moving forward and is

retaining qualified personnel. Training will continue to be a priority and remain the cornerstone of

the organization. The training team, led by Carol Brown, defined training standards for new

dispatchers through supervisory personnel.

In conclusion, the Kootenai County Sheriff's Department Communications Bureau was

successful in accomplishing the department's primary objectives for 2007. These objectives

supported the mission of the county and Sheriff's Department by increasing the level of

communications service to the 14 public safety agencies we serve, as well as the residents of and

visitors to Kootenai County.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


911 Section

Carol Brown and Kelly Tomblin take

emergency calls and dispatch them to the

appropriate agency.

In 2007... Total

Kootenai County Communications and 911 Section

dispatched for the following agencies:

1) Kootenai County Sheriff &

Recreation Safety Section

2) Kootenai County Fire and Rescue

3) CDA PD Bike Patrol

4) CDA Fire

5) Spirit Lake PD

6) Kootenai County EMS

7) TimberLake Fire Protection District

8) Northern Lake Fire Protection District

9) Spirit Lake Fire Protection District

10) Mica Kidd Island Fire

11) Eastside Fire District

12) Hauser Lake Fire Protection District

13) Worley Fire Protection District

14) Harrison Ambulance

15) CDA Tribal Police

16) Hayden Lake PD

17) Idaho Department of Lands

18) Rose Lake Quick Response Unit

19) USFS (No dispatch/ assist with

NCIC/ILETS)

20) Office of Emergency Management

21) Emergency Alert System (EAS) 10

Idaho/2

Montana County’s

22) Post Falls/Rathdrum back up PSAP

Page 29

120000

100000

80000

60000

40000

20000

0

250000

200000

150000

100000

50000

0

2007 9-1-1

Calls Received

Calls

2007 All calls

Calls with Response

2007 9-1-1 Calls

Responded

Calls By Type

2007 Calls by

Type

Law

Fire

EMS

911 was busy in 2007. Throughout the year,

they received 99,056 calls for Law

Enforcement, 30,168 for Fire and 34,798 for

Emergency Medical Services.

2007 CAD/Officer

Calls

Series1

911 calls received by the center totalled 52,916.

All calls handled by the center totalled 227,775.

Series1

911 Calls responded to totaled 40,137. Calls generated

by self initiated activity by Deputies and Officers totaled

101,060.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


ORGANIZATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2007, Robin Anderson from 911, celebrated 30 years of service with the Kootenai County Sheriff’s

Department!

The Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department launched a brand new website in 2007:

www.kcsheriff.com was developed to provide more current information to the community and to

assist in recruitment efforts. Lt. Kim Edmondson helped to design the site and maintains the

information on the site.

KCSD personnel teamed up with Idaho State Probation and Parole agents for Operation Lights Out.

These teams ensured that Registered Sex Offenders in Kootenai County kept their porch lights out

on Halloween night.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Deputies participated in a Moscow Officer’s Funeral who was killed in the

line of duty. KCSD also provided a full patrol staff

to Moscow City PD and a detention staff to the

Latah Cuonty Jail so their troops could attend

the services of their fallen brother.

Lt. Neal Robertson attended and graduated

from the FBI National Academy, Quantico, VA,

on December 14, 2007. Three-hundred other

law enforcement leaders from forty-nine

states and twenty-seven countries were

represented at the NA. During the eleven

week academy, he received 255 hours of

classroom instruction earning 17 semester

credits fro the University of Virginia.

Employees involved in organizing the

Kootenai County Employee Breakfast

helped the Sheriff’s Department put a

grand collection of school supplies

together as “loot” for the pirate-themed

event!

Page 30

In 2007, Deputy Diane Macfarlane received

the Employee of the year award for 2006.

Deputy Pat Meehan receives the Life

Saving award for his heroic actions

that saved a life during a fire.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


PERSONNEL ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2007...

Dennis Stinebaugh was promoted to Sergeant .

Captain Ben Wolfinger taught Traffic Law, New

Law Update and Media Relations to a variety of

students at POST, and Reserves and Law

Enforcement Block students at NIC.

Captain Travis Chaney presented a course about

Unified Command at the Western States Sheriff’s

Conference.

911 Supervisor Linda Lane and Undersheriff Tad

Leach were both nominated for 2007 Boss of the

Year by their staff.

Lt. Kim Edmondson was elected as a Board

Member to ICARE.

DARE Deputy Alana Hunt led multiple fund

raisers for DARE, Holidays & Heroes and many

others!

Captain Travis Chaney continued to serve as

Region 1 Chairman of the Idaho Advisory Board

for the FBI National Academy Montana-Idaho

Chapter.

Sgt. Andy Deak was a Crime Prevention and

Fingerprinting Merit Badge Counselor for the

Inland Northwest Council of the Boy Scouts of

America.

Deputies Dave Dunkin and Chuck Sciortino reflect

after a foot race in which Dave barely breezed by

Chuck.

Page 31

D.A.R.E. Deputy Alana Hunt gets to escort

royalty in the 4th of July parade.

Deputy Shardell Ellis was named Deputy of the Year

for 2006 from the Kootenai County Domestic

Violence Coalition. The award was presented in

2007 and was based on her excellent reporting and

compassion during Domestic Violence responses.

Four Patrol Deputies graduated from POST

Academy in 2007. Special Awards are noted:

Deputy Scott Maxwell Marksman

Deputy Dale Johnson...Sharpshooter and

Fit For Duty

Deputy Joel Gorham.... Fit For Duty

Deputy Nick Franssen..Marksman and

Fit For Duty

Two Detention Deputies graduated from POST

Academy:

Deputy Seth Pommering...Fit For Duty

Deputy Steven Malcom

Lt. Kim Edmondson gets ready to take her first

helicopter flight. Big Country Helicopters donates air

time for overhead photographs to be taken of large

crime scene areas for the Kootenai County Sheriff’s

Department.

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


PERSONNEL ACHIEVEMENTS

In 2007...

Captain Ben Wolfinger was a featured speaker at both the International Assocation of Chiefs of

Police and the Western States Sheriff’s Conference. He spoke about Media Relations.

CRT Gary Shults taught a variety of courses to the community including: Defensive Tactics

through Panhandle Health, Community Safety at various Community Clubs, and Crime

Prevention at Neighboorhood Watch meetings. Gary also represented the Department through

various Community Service Booths helping to fingerprint children and complete ID a KID kits and

gave Cub Scout tours at the Department.

Deputy Alana Hunt was awarded the honor of “Firefighter of the Year” for Northern Lakes Fire

Department in March of 2007.

Detectives Eric Hildebrandt and Jon Brandel provided Gang Awareness training at several venues

in the community including a Parent Project class facilitated by Kootenai County Juvenile Justice

Services.

Front Desk Clerk Paul Klawitter, fingerprinted children during "Community Service Day" at Real

Life Ministries and gave a presentation and demonstration on fingerprinting at the Athol Library as

a part of their Summer Reading Program. Additionally, Paul facilitated two Cub Scout groups so

they could earn their fingerprinting badges.

Deputy Alisa Gavin presented Gangs in Jails training to the Idaho Sheriff’s Conference.

Sgt. Stu Miller provided Ground Control Tactics training to the North Idaho Reserve Academy.

Several department

members were glad

to see the return of

D e p u t y L a m o n t

Peterson, who was

initially hidden from view by some of his biggest

fans!

Page 32

Several personnel taught various courses at

North Idaho College to Law Enforcement Block

students. Those employees include:

Deputy Lamont Petersen

Sergeant Tom Knight

Sergeant Ken Lallatin

Sergeant Stu Miller

Deputy Lisa Brumbaugh

Deputy Kirk Kelso

Deputy Shane Vrevich

Deputy Chris Kerzman

Sergeant Stu Miller

Deputy Will Klinkefus

Detective Jon Brandel

911 Supervisor Linda Lane

Detective Jerry Northrup

Captain Ben Wolfinger

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


KOOTENAI COUNTY DEPUTY

SHERIFF’S ASSOCIATION

This last year there were some big changes in the Association!

We decided to change from IPOA to Fraternal Order of Police (FOP). This was a significant

change. With FOP there are more personal benefits to both Civilian and Sworn personnel. With

IPOA, only sworn deputies were covered on the plan – but now with FOP everyone has insurance

and benefits and an opportunity to join the Legal Defense Plan. As long as they are members of

the Association, they have the opportunity to get these benefits. All of these benefits can be

looked through www.fop.net.

This year we tried something new – instead of the annual Christmas party we held a 3 day event

up at Farragut State Park.

The KCDSA Board is comprised of:

President – Daniel Gregg

VicePresident – Dave Vaughn

Secretary / Treasurer – Klarissa Hendrix

Jail Rep – Alisa Gavin

Patrol Rep – Jon Brandel

Civilian Rep – Tammy Barnes

Detective Rep – Steve Stewart

The Association also sponsors a local soccer team, softball team, and the annual golf tourney in

Post Falls. We also help significantly with the Holiday for Heros program in December.

Goals for 2008 remain the same as 2007 – continue to sponsor local teams, help with donations

when requested, and help all Association members when the need aries. We will be doing an

Association Annual Meeting – more details to follow.

Any member of the Board can answer any and all questions! It is going to be a great year!!!

KCDSA President

Dan Gregg

Page 33

Vice - President

Dave Vaughn

Sec. Treasurer

Klarissa Hendrix

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


CONTACT INFORMATION

Page 34

Emergency 911

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Information - Non Emergency...............

Kootenai County Jail........................................................................................

Driver’s License...............................................................................................

Civil Department..............................................................................................

District Deputy Hotline - Athol, Harrison and Worley.........................................

District Deputy Hotline - Hayden......................................................................

Recreation Safety............................................................................................

(208)446-1300

(208)446-1400

(208)446-1340

(208)446-1309

(208)446-2211

(208)772-9235

(208)446-2250

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

The Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department would like to thank all of the

employees who contributed to this report.

Created and Edited by Lieutenant Kim Edmondson.

This report can also be located on the Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department

website at: www.kcsheriff.com

Kootenai County Sheriff’s Department Annual Report 2007

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