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View/Open - Texas Tech University

View/Open - Texas Tech University

View/Open - Texas Tech

Xfexas Ttech University 9-- Southwest Collection P. O.Br.. 41041 Libbk. ifexas SJBJBJBJBJPPJJBJBBjBBJBJBP inSHPIIafHSMSMSHSMlVH MlllHn Mm Marrk. Third Anniversary Nation of Islam leader, Minister Loins Farrakhnn, i .lie s ' -- duled speaker for the third anniversary of the Milltor Man March on Oct. 16. Speaking from liowa ' University, Min. Parrakhan will discuss e match' theme, "Atonement Will Save America Prom God'i Destruction." This year's anniversary theme focuses on America's perception of religion and the loss of morality and love for man. "We ifcust get prepared to meet with Min Parrakhan on Oct.. 16," said Brother Minister Abdul Khadir Muhammad, regional coordinator. "With what's going on with the world now there is a great need for everyone to atone." racy McKever Report Links Race To U.S. Human Rights ' loktions "Race is the thread that runs through cases of human rights violations in Ik U.S., said Amnesty Secretary General Pierre Sane last week at the release of the org'iization'i first major report on the United States. According to the findings, African Americans air adversely affected by violations such as police brutality. "Re- - Jits of discriminatory treatment by police toward racial and ethnic linoritics are common, and Black people arrested for minor offenses, for instance, appei. particularly liable to suffer police brutality," the report stated. Sane cited the number of African Americans in prison, SO percent of the 1.7 million people currently incarcerated And, while in prison, increasing numbeu of inmates are being subjected to high tech restraints such as the electronic stun belt und on a California Black man earlier this year, "ane said the human rights organisation will conduct al 2 month campaign to rugliHabrmoTations, which will include a lettefwriting campaign to federal and state officials. We "will be actively campaigning to obtain from the U.S. authorities a renewed commitment to placing human rights protection at the heart of U.S. domestic and foreign policy," Sane said. Race Panel Concludes That White Erivileae ISThe Problem WAJSmNQTON (IPS) President Bill 'Clinton's Advisory Board on Race ; recently concluded its th study, : calling on UJS. citizens to learn the history :of racial oonression and f'eht racial :swetypee jjl)juqtry. five board's :wnort slated that Tnf United States was Jlarsalj' built en,,"Mitury of white prftllejte that mi only been partially overcome in reeent decades. 'To understand fully the legacy of race and color with which wc are grappling, we as a nation need to understand that Whites tend to benefit, either unknowingly or consciously, from this country's history of White privilege." stated the 121-pareport Released with the report was a 74-pastudy by Clinton's Council of Economic Advisers, on recent economic and social trends affecting minority groups. It concludrd that "race and ethnicity continue to be salient predictors of well-bein- g in American soviety." lim Lobe US. Experienced Slight Reduction In Poverty In 1997 WASHINGTON (IPS) According to the ;Census Bureau, despite the United Stotes' ;booming economy in 1997, there was only a slight decline in the rate of poverty, which afflicted 35. 6 million Americans. Forty 40 percent of those were children. While the absolute number of poor remained unchanged during 1997, the poverty rate itself fell from 13.7 percent to 13.3 percent due to the increase in the country's total population. The new figures were released on Sept. 4, 24 hours after the Republican-le- d Senate rejected a one-doll- ar increase in the U.S. minimum wage, Jim lobe Zambian Government Says 'No' To Gay Group I LUSAKA (IPS) The ZambiaS Independent Monitoring Team (ZIMT), a human rights organisation, is receiving opposition from the government for trying to form the Lesbians, Gays, Bisexual and Transgender Persons Association of Zambia (LEGArRA). The government, feaefcee' by anti-sodo- laws, has vo ed that it will not condone the formation group or register LECATRA as a legitimate association. Homos uslity is a felony which carries a fine or a jail sentence of up to 14 years. "Regisuntioo of LEGATRA) is going as pUonod, and the public should ignore totally the government's view o Boaoaextiality ajd lesbianism," says Alfred Zulu, ZIMT president. According to Zulu, LEGATRA will fight for the removal of all laws ta' discriminate against local gays, offer A IDSHIV awareness, and counsel its members. Melinda Phiri South Afrkb HagMed fly Wife Heats JOHANNESBURG (IPS) As witchcraft killings in South Africa rise, mission schools have set up safe havens for women accused of being witches and a conference has been organized io discuss ways to !top the gruesome murders. One men place has since grown into a small town called "Nobody, named because a witch is not considered a human being The other place is Helena, SO kilometers northwest of il.i provincial capital of Petersburg. Helena, like Nobody, seems to be growi ng fasl due to refugees from surrounding village. Safety and Security Mutister Sufaey Mafiaurti says the rtt wiii discus wbjitjMF an dacjaca witchcraft killingt ffMUtty tei. ftps decision follows swat fan dsttaatM to ffirri h a neciai ponce to inefnaae Ac very low conviction rates. Police are cwrreatly iavestignUog 442 cases Twelve asoodu au-ra- ce ok stum, urn amoem align Wefi " 4ttBan fl fcss mSJ(rngJ((J ftar being MeJssed. SMSf want I by angry village snobs on eliefatione thai toy wr eiiti sr witches or wisant. In I9M. assns mm 1.112 witch lulling. Tag WiMinws 79409-10- 1 99 EH There has been a lot of oublicity about the new, redesigned $20 bill, but very little is known about ihe significant role African Americans play in the production of American currency. Several African Americans hold top positions at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, which, under the U.S. Department i.. The Treasury, is solely responsible for producing the nation's currency. That is about nine billion currency notes a year. Historically, African Americans have always been involved in the production of currency. For instance, it is a little known fact that five African Americans have had their signatutes on American currency. Fcur African American men whose signatures appeared on previous currency, as Registers of the Treasury, were: Bianche K Bruce, Judson W. Lyons, William T. Vernon and James C. Napier. The fifth African American whose signature appeared on currency was Ms. Azie Taylor Morton, as the 36th Treasurer, during the Administration of President Jimmy Carter. The first African American hired by the Treasury during the Civil War was Sophia Holmes, a free native of Washington, D.C. Ms. Holmes worked as a charwoman in the Division of Issue for $15 a month and saved the division $200,000 tffatliar imririfsmfcehly" thrown avsroy as trash- - As m aw4 General Francis Spinner, Treasurer of the U.S., promoted her to a messenger at a $600 a year salary. She served in that position for 38 years and died in 1900 at 79. Since then, there have been a number of African Americans promoted to senior level management positions at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEp). Following are some of the African Americans presently involved in various aspects of the production of American currency: William W. Willis, Plant Manager for the Washington, D.C. "In the Words of America's Noble Ancestors" In the 1930's, thousands of former American slaves dictated their full life stories. This column gives American history in their own. words, often providing little-know- n information. The following quotes from the full li: stories are taken, along wi'h their photographs, from the ueries of books entitled "I WAS A SLAVE." Please deal well with the usage of the word "nigger" and accept it in the era of time and the context in which it is used. The following segment is from the trt. life story dicta ;d by hannie Moore who ws 88 years old and m North Carolina at the time ot the interview. "My pappy he war Iwasj a b --ksmith He shad!) de horses on de plantation. He wo'k so hard that he ib no time to go to de fiel'. His mine war Stephen Moore. Mars Jim call him Stephen Andrew. He war sold to de Moores an' his mammy, too. She war brought ober from Africa. She nebber could spatk plai. All her life she been a slave. Whit fo'fcs affetar recognize 'en my more thaa ttfen dry war a dog U war stubbie lerribkj sight to see 4e speculators co:9 to de pUntatioa. l; would go Chroujb de fid's m' buy de slaves dey wauled. Marse Jim nebber sell pappy or maasaiy or any oh dey ifctllu.: alles Ufce pappy. Wbea de speculator come, ah de slaves start -shakin' No oae kaow who is EMM facility, manages more than 700 employees and oversees the areas of currency production, postage stamp production and engraving; Henry Toney, Chief. Office of Research and Technical Support, is MANAG! OF CUrNPOCESS!NG at the Bureau pf Engraving and Printing is rJarnes A . Brent, Jr. Employees and pveiieis 6ay to d&y eperctfldfr df ' l I the four phases of currency processing, including overprinting currency notes with serial numbers and seas, currency sheet examining, currency packaging and the Federal Reserve Vault. Under Department The Treasury, of Engraving Printing is solely responsible tor producing the nation s currency. responsible for managing 34 professionals, comprising chemists, physicists, physical scientists, and engineers; the office plays a critical role in ensuring that high quality materials are available for currency and postage stamps as well as other BEP securities; James A. Brent, Jr., Manager Den sometime dey take "em an' sell eni on de block. De breed breeding woman always bring mo' money den de res', ebben de men. When dey put her on de block, dey put all her chillun aroun' her to show fo'ks how fas' she can hab chillun. When si.e so'd, her family nebber see her agin. She nebber know how many chillun siic hab. Sometime she hab colored children an' sometime white. 'Tain't )o use to say anythin' 'case effen she do, sl.e jes' git whipped. Why, on Je Moore Aunt Cucuey, everybody call her Aunt Cheney, have two chillun by de overseeah. De overseeah name war Hill. He war as mean as de devil. When Aunt Cheney net do what he ask, he tell Granny Moore. Old Grt. .ny call Aunt Cheney to de kitchen an' make her lake her clothes off, den ihe .beat her 'til she jjs' black an' blue. Many boys an' girls marry dey own brothers an' sisters at.' qebbjr know de difference lest unless dey get to taUdn' 'bout dey parents an' where dey usuar Ub used to live. De niggers alius hab to get pass to go anywhere offen de plantation Pay git de pass from de maaaa or de missus. Deo whea de white patroJters come, day ha4 to show de pats to dem. If yes had eo pass, dey strip you aa' heat you. I remember ooa ttaw, day (then quartan All de aigfers was as' dey was dey feet m' a few dat dtda't. but De paddyroUers shove de do opes aa' sta't grebfata' us. Uade Joe's sen he decide of the Currency processing Division, manages 35Q employees and oversees day to day operation of the four phases pf currency processing: overprinting currency notes with serial numbers andeals, the U.S. of the Bureau and plantation currency sheet examining, cmency packaging and the Federal Reserve Vault; Brian Thompson, at 28, is the youngest and only African American banknotestamp designer at BEP, he has designed the new seal for the U.S. Postal Service's Office of the Inspector General, President dey vvdi one r" time to die an' he sta't to tight. He say he , tired standin' tired o f withstanding so many beatin's, he jes' can't stan' no mo'. D e paddyrollers Ex-Sla- ve stak beatin' Fannie Moore him an' he sta't fightin'. Oh, Lawdy, it war tubble terrible. Dey whip him wif a cowhide for a long time den one of dem take a stick an' hit him over de head, an' jes' bus' his head wide open. De pore boy fell on de flo' jes' moanin' an' De paddyrollers jes' whip 'bout half doien other niggers an' sea' 'em home an' leave us wif de dead boy. None ob de niggers hab any larnin' I learning education, warn't nebber lowed to as much as pick up a piece ob paper. My daddy slip an' get a Webster book an' den he take it outeo de fiel' an' he lam to read. De 'vhite fo'ks 'fraid to let de chillun lam anythin' Dey 'fraid dey get too sma't an' be harder to manage. Day aebber let 'em know anyrNa' 'bout aeythu'. Nebber hab any church EfEen you go, you sat in de hack ob de white fo'ks' church. But de a big wash put aa' prop it ap wif stick to drowfi out da soee' ob de shifts' so me slaveowners oausdn't baar." To 0lnmt fr tk Amrien Slaves National Mommmt project or for information mkout this series of emimkmg books fitU lift stories, emU 202-73- 7 7827. PUose call how while you 'm mmkimg abomt it. We need you. SOUTHWEST COLLtCTiON Texas Tch University LUBBOCK. TCXA8 70400 Clinton's official White House portrait in 1993, and assisted retired African American banknote designer, Clarence Holbert, with the design of the official currency for the African state of Eritrea; John Smith, Letter Engraver, is responsible for engraving the letters of currency notes into steel master dies; this place is used as a model for the final currency bill. Of the six photoenjravers at BEP, one is an African American female. Of the 35 cutrency plate printers, there are approximately rmmii mm. w' pjriSk J t: has. tet-- u eight African American females. Toncy, a chemist by training who has been with the Bureau for more than 30 years, explained tint the Treasury Department ordered icuesigncd $100. $50, and more recently $20 notes to make America's money much harder to counterfeit. "Criminals all over the world have access to sophisticated copmt'ter equipment," Toney said, "and we need to stay one step ahead." Though the new money has a lot of modern features to detect high tech" forgery, the actual artwork for the new bills is still done in the most old fashioned way possible. With the exception of the serial numbers, each number, letter and drawing on each bill is first engraved by hand. "We cut each design right into a block of soft steel by hand, using some tools that haven't change much in hundreds of years," said John Smith. Smith started out at the Bureau as a machinist but then entered un apprenticeship that eventually led tD him becoming an expert engraver. Even though some of the jobs at the Bureau are the same as in any other printing plant, "It is a unique place to work, " James Bent says proudly. "When you first como to work there, it's easy to be overwhelmed by seeing millions and msjUiOfys of dollars every day, hut ftfitern IjiilJMbgjiiDVit. as notlung rnpjo tfjan piK of gmh paper, "Brant saH. The person with the main overall responsibility for keeping those piles if green paper moving off the presses is William Wills, p'.ant manager for the entire Washington, D.C. facility, where about Af of all U. S. currency is manufactured. "It may just be green paper, but it means an awful lot to people," he said. "VTien people ask me what do I do, I say that 'I make money'. When people find out that I mean that literally, almost everyone thinks it is very amazing." ''"' H 'jBsakssBsl mmmmmii t?' imamHBmH HBBBnlBmEH gHspssesssjKKpjssai bphssjpIsPeph BmmmmflmmK a. mmmsmmmmB BmBlBBBBBBBBBBBBBY JmV3eBBBBBBBBBBBa NAACP LEADER RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS HUMAN RIGHTS AWARD Ernestine Barlow Peters, Executive Director of the NAACP Image Awards, has received one of Freedom Magazine's Humin Rights Awards for 1998. Ms. Peters received he. award for work Ml the area of cual rights and social justice at a special award ceremony at the National Press Club in Washington, D C. Freedom Magazine, which has been published by the Church of Scientology since 1968, has received wcltum for its expose 's of government abuses and discrimination against minorities. Also receiving awards were Reginald 'Reggie" Berry, former National Football League football player and director of Ste NFL Retired Players' Association's Goals for Life PnHPm Ipr ail dedication and work with "tt risk youth" and Dr. Theeslare Eafant, founder of the otgariizaiion lift Every Voice, Inc. for j as 30 fdiatioti and HfOHfT fights. The awardees praised Freedom Magazine for in 30 yttt of dedicated service iu investigative journalism eipiu 'liKTiifunatKffl and abuset worM wide, Washington, D.C. faedom cor tri luting editor, Itfttt Bratschi, said. The awards were based on L Ron riufefcasd's famous ouou): The price of freedom: Constant alefoess, Constant willingness to fight back. There is no other price." I