The Archaeologist as Storyteller - Society for American Archaeology

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The Archaeologist as Storyteller - Society for American Archaeology

ARTICLE

Other issues we have had to consider in the course of developing our online publications include:

• copyright and citation issues

• costs of hardware and software upgrades, and of photographic digitizing equipment

• absence of revenue from our online publications

• conversion of text into HTML and the creation of Active Server Pages, which necessitated specialized

staff training

• slow loading time experienced by some users (as the technology improves and wider bandwidth

becomes more widely available, users should enjoy quicker response time)

• the complexity of the linking in our database system, so that even the simplest modification of the system

could result in malfunctions elsewhere in the system or could render data already entered inconsistent

or incomparable with data not yet entered.

Conclusions

The primary product of our online publishing venture is a large, complex database that we believe

works quite well for the purposes for which it was designed. It is important to note that our design has

by no means exhausted the possibilities of what an online publication could be. The design of our

reports has been (and probably always will be) partly restricted by our ability to fund and staff this

endeavor. There are clearly disadvantages as well as advantages to publishing site reports electronically,

but because the rising costs of publishing printed reports have put that option out of the reach of our

organization (and many others, I suspect), we believe that electronic publishing has become not only a

viable alternative, but a necessity in archaeology. Our profession can find thoughtful and workable solutions

to the problems associated with online publishing, and online databases could become valuable

resources for researchers in the coming decades.

References Cited

Churchill, Melissa J. (editor)

2002 The Archaeology of Woods Canyon Pueblo: A Canyon-Rim Village in Southwestern Colorado.

Electronic document, http://www.crowcanyon.org/woodscanyon. Date of use: 14 November

2002.

Connolly, Marjorie R., Samuel B. Fee, and Sara S. Kelly

1999 Castle Rock Pueblo: A Trip Through Time. Electronic document,

http://www.crowcanyon.org/castlerocktrip. Date of use: 14 November 2002.

2001 Woods Canyon Pueblo: Life on the Edge. Electronic document,

http://www.crowcanyon.org/woodslifeontheedge. Date of use: 14 November 2002.

Crow Canyon Archaeological Center

2000 The Castle Rock Pueblo Databae. Electronic document, http://www.crowcanyon.org/castlerockdatabase.

Date of use: 7 November 2002.

2001 The Crow Canyon Archaeological Center Field Manual. Electronic document,

http://www.crowcanyon.org/fieldmanual. Date of use 7 November 2002.

Kuckelman, Kristin A. (editor)

2000 The Archaeology of Castle Rock Pueblo: A Thirteenth-Century Village in Southwestern Colorado.

Electronic document, http://www.crowcanyon.org/castlerock. Date of use: 7 November

2002.

Lightfoot, Ricky R., and Mary C. Etzkorn (editors)

1993 The Duckfoot Site, Volume 1: Descriptive Archaeology. Occasional Papers, No. 3. Crow

Canyon Archaeological Center, Cortez, Colorado.

Varien, Mark D. (editor)

1999 Sand Canyon Archaeological Project: Site Testing. Electronic document, http://www.crowcanyon.org/sitetesting.

Date of use: 7 November 2002. Also available on CD-ROM, Vers. 1.0. from

University of Arizona Press.

16 The SAA Archaeological Record • January 2003

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