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Bi.,5 - (PDF, 101 mb) - USAID



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AGRI CUL ruRAL HUf1AN RESOURCES DEVELOP,.,EfIT

(UPPER VOLTA)

PROJECT PAPER

Project No . 686-0221

USA I D

COil tractor

SOUTH EAST ,COtISORTt Uf1 FOR INTERflATIOfiAL DEVELOPMENT

(SECID)

CIO Research Triangle Institute

P.O. Box 12194

Research Triangle Park. N.C. 27709


G. Mission Director's Certification. 180

H. Borrower/Grantee's Application for Assistance. 181

I. Interviews with Encadreurs and ATA's Serving 185

in the Eastern ORO.

J. Role of Women and Minorities. 187

K. Waivers. 189

L. Statutory Checklist. 191

M. Draft of Project Descri ption to be used in Project 204

Agreement.

Page


Agricultural Human Resources Development

Project Paper

Part 1. SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS.

A. Face Sheet Data.

- As provided on cover sheet

B. Recommendations.

'I. The following funding is recol1ll1ended by the PP Team:

Grant

FY 1978 $2,000,000

FY 1979 2,000,000

FY 1980 3,000,000

FY 1981 2,093,000

$9 2 093z 000

2. Code 935 Waiver (see Annex K)

3. U.S. Technical Assistance to be provided by South East Consortium

for International Development (SECID)


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Certain points were raised in the PRP and will be discussed

first before examining other questions brought up during the review

process.

1. Can the University of Ouagadougou staff an improved program?

This question is examined in Part 3.A. Technical Analysis. The

additional training of faculty and addition of interim long and

short-term technical assistance should allow UO to staff their

program at the levels they require by the end of the project.

2. Will graduates be more capable of addressing the needs of Upper

Volta?

The emphasis in the project on increasing practical training at

both the ISP and CAP levels in different climatic conditions

should ensure production of better-trained graduates more aware

of the; r country' s needs in the agri cu1 tura 1 sector and more

attuned to the problems of rural life.

3. Can functional analysis of needs at the top ORO level be met by

ISP curriculum?

The creation of the three regional research centers comb)ned with

the time spent by final year ISP students in an ORO should enable

the :SP to better match its training to the rural development

skills needed at the ORO levels.

4. Can GOUV avoid idle capacity within a phased expansion?

This question is answered more completely in Part 3.A. Technical

Analysis, in the examination of manpower needs. The need for

graduates at the Ingenieur de Oeve10ppement Rura1e and Conducteurs

and Agent Technique levels is so great throughout the rural development

network that all trained personnel are assured of a

position immediately. Many positions are currently unfilled for

lack of qualified personnel.

5. Will the Ministry of Rural Development be able to attract qualified

staff for the CAP's?

This basic question of incentives has been responded to by the GOUV

in the form of a "Statut du Personnel Enseignant ll which will give

CAP instructors comparable civil service rank to their equivalents


(C) Outputs.

Project outputs are basically in the two areas of trained

agricultural extension personnel and training infrastructure. The

outputs are in easily quantifiable measures such as numbers of graduates

and buildings. Practical training can be measured by using questionnaires

and interviews (see Part 4.C. Evaluation Arrangements for Projects).

Basic assumptions are similar to those for the purpose level with the

addition of appropriate training selection for ISP and CAP staff.

(D) Inputs.

USAID project inputs are in the form of funds for technical

assistance and buildings, equipment, livestock and operating costs.

Some training of Voltaic staff at the educational institutions is also

included.

The GOUV will contribute personnel, land, buildings, equipment,

livestock, and operating costs.

Assumptions for inputs are basically concerned with providing

qualified personnel from both USAID contractors and Upper Volta staff

to fill technical assistance and training positions.

Other Donors.

This project is coordinated with inputs from other donors for

its operation. Small amounts of foreign technical assistance are

present at CAP Matourkou in the form of one U.N. volunteer mathematics

instructor who may be renewed for the next school year. In addition,

two Dutch volunteer engineers are working in the community development

component of the CAP, but do not fill any teaching positions.

At ISP there are 12 professors whose salaries are paid by the

French Government, and one U.S. Peace Corps volunteer English instructor.

Future assistance of this nature is likely but difficult to determine

for long-term. Canada, France and the U.S.S.R. also fund

scholarships for ISP students; and the French Government is constructing

some ISP main campus buildings.

While other complementary projects in agricultural education

would undoubtedly be welcomed by the GOUV. there is no other similar

project which should be directly coordinated with this one at this time.


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The World Bank is considering funding a $12 million agricultural

education project for young farmers at the ORD level.

(Centre de Formation des Jeunes Agriculteurs - CFJA).


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PART 3. PROJECT ANALYSIS.

A. TECHNICAL ANALYSIS, INCLUDING ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT.

OUTLINE OF PART 3.A.

INTRODUCTION.

PERSONNEL NEEDS OF AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SECTOR

INSTITUT SUPERIEUR POLYTECHNIQUE (ISP).

Curri culurn.

Analysis.

Recommendations.

Research and Demonstration Activities.

Analysis.

Recommendations.

Staff Needs.

Analysis.

Recommendations.

Facilities and Equipment.

Analysis.

Recommendations.

CENTRE AGRICOLE POLYVALENT (CAP) AT MATOURKOU.

Curriculum (ATA's and CTA's).

Anal ysis.

Recommendations.

Training of Encadreurs.

Research and Demonstration Activities.

Analysis.

Recommendati ons.

Staff Needs.

Analysis.

Recommendations.

Facilities and Equipment.

Analysis.

Recommendations.

NEW CAP AT BOGANDE.

ITEMIZED COST SUMARY.

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT.

CONSTRUCTION SUMMARY.

INTRODUCTION.

The Agricultural Human Resources project is a logical addition

to the present system of agricultural education in Upper Volta. One

phase of the project will be aimed at improving the ISP capacity to


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provide university-trained specialists in various agricultural specialties

required throughout Upper Volta as teachers in the educational

systems as well as personnel in the ORD's. Some graduates also may be

available for other branches of the Government as well as for private

enterprise. It is the intention of this project to focus training on

practical problems of rural development in Upper Volta. Heretofore,

most Voltaics have been trained outside Upper Volta and often outside

Africa (usually in France, Canada, Russia, Mali, and the Ivory Coast)

where training is often not particul3rly relevant to Upper Volta's

needs.

Another phase of the project will be the development of the

present CAP at Matourkou and aid in construction of a new CAP at Bogande

in an ecological region different from that at Matourkou. No development

can take place unless known applicable technology is disseminated

to the people directly involved in production. This project is aimed

at expanding Upper Volta's capacity, as well as its competence, in

getting relevant technology to the rural people. Again, as with the

ISP, emphasis at the CAP's will be focused on practical training for

rural develdpment. While a strong theoretical base is desirable, it

is not a sufficient base for work in disseminating practical advice

*to rural people.

Results of a survey of students and staff of ISP and the CAP,

Matourkou (see Annex B.4-10), along with talks with ORD directors and

various levels of extension personnel in the field, have indicated that

the present curriculum in the CAP is generally adequate in theory, but

short on practical training. It will be the aim of this project to

recommend methods of, and to provide facilities for, remedying this

situation.

An important phase of the project, infrastructure, will be

provided in the form of some construction and equipment at the CAP,

Matourkou. In addition, money will be provided for development of a

new CAP at Bogande and development of a central and three field stations

for ISP training, research, and demonstration.

PERSONNEL NEEDS OF AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SECTOR.

The demand for skilled agricultural technicians within Upper

Volta is great and will continue for some tire to come as efforts by

GOUV to bring agricultural technology to the rural sector expand. This

project will fulfill a portion of this need during its five-year span.


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It cannot and should not attempt to meet all the needs too quickly

as the absorptive capacity of the GOUV to utilize the newly-trained

technicians would be strained.

The project emphasis on practical training should ensurenot

only increased staff levels, but more suitably the trained personnel to

work with rural farmers. This approach necessitates some training of

Voltaic staff outside the country until local institutions are able

to meet all needs.

The Ministry of Rural Development (1nDR) is the main user of

agricultural technicians in Upper Volta. The agricultural services

are structured to absorb personnel, trained at the four different

levels, which are found within the GOUV (see Table 1). At the top

echelon are the university graduates (Ingenieurs de Developpement

Rural). These are called Category A technicians. To date all A

technicians have been trained in foreign countries. Next year, ISP

will produce its first 12 graduates in this category. Graduates of

technical secondary schools are called Category B (Conducteurs des

Travaux Agricoles, CTA's) and Category C (Agents Techniques Agricoles,

ATA's). The last cateqory consists of the Encadreurs, Category D,

who are primary school graduates with short-term technical training.

Agricultural personnel needs have been estimated for 1976­

1985 by a sub-committee of the Agricultural Development Commission

(CDA) within the MDR. The provisional estimates of this sub-committee

were based on the needs expressed by eleven regional rural development

organizations (Organismes Regionaux de Developpement, ORD), the "Directions

Techniques" of MDR, various development projects, research institutes,

other GOUV agencies such as Autorite des Amenagements des Vallees

des Voltas (AVV) and private agencies (see Table 2).

TABLE 1.

POSITIONS WITHIN AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SYSTEM.

Trai nialg

Level Title Institutions

Category A Ingenieur de Developpement Rurale TSP & outside

Upper Volta

Category B Conducteur de Travaux Agricoles (CTA) CAP

Category C Agent Techniques Agricoles (ATA) CAP

Category D Encadreur ORD's


TABLE 2.

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ESTIMATED ADDITIONAL AGRICULTURAL PERSONNEL NEEDS IN UPPER VOLTA

FOR THE PERIOD 1976 - 1985.

Additional

Personnel Needs in the MDR Additional Needs Additional

Category & Other Agencies In the ORD's Total Needs

A 160 69 229

B 276 381 657

C 1124 759 1883

Total: 1560 1209 2769

Source: GOUV Ministere du Developpement Rural, Travaux de la

Sous-Commission-Formation, Juillet 1976.

This table reflects only the categories of agricultural

personnel which are currently being trained at ISP or the

CAP. That is,such categories as civil engineers, hydrologists,

sociologists, agricultural economists, nurses,

linguists, etc., are not included.

In order to have a comparison as to how fast these needs are

being met now and the increased capacity at the end of this project,

Table 3 is presented.

Although encadreurs (D)are not formally trained at the CAP,

Matourkoi!, the CAP does provide special training for encadreurs on a

selective basis depending on the availability of CAP space and staff.

The major reason for the dropping of the encadreur program was the

difficulty incurred in coming up with a program which was practically

oriented to the differing ecological areas found in Upper Volta's

11 ORD's and in the scheduling of training for all 11 ORD's. Contrary

to Categories A, B and C personnel, Category D personnel (Encadreurs)

are not GOUV civil servants. Rather, they are contractual employees,


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hired directly by the ORD's. The number of encadreurs hired by each

ORD is constrained by the budget of each ORD ­ hence it is impossible

to schedule a regular encadreur training program with any assurance

of a particular level of candidates for the program. Nonet'eless,

the GOUV recognizes the important role of the encadreur as the final

link between the extension service and the farmer. Although the bulk

of encadreur training Will remain the responsibility of the ORD's,

the GOUV has stated that short-term trainina of encadreurs will be a

part of the new, expanded, and improved programs at Matourkou and

Bogande. This training is most likely to occur during the period of

February to April, when CAP facilities are freed due to the annual

vacation period for ATA's and CTA's.

As the number of encadreurs depends on the budgets of the

different ORD's, no GOUV estimates of the personnel needs for this

category are available. This explains the absence of Category D in

Tables 2-4.

Although this project will only partially increase the levels

of agricultural personnel for the first few years of the project, the

optimum level of 235 additional technicians being produced yearly at

the end of the five-year period will add substantially to the agricultural

extension work force in Upper Volta. In addition, the emphasis

on practical training should produce technicians who are better

trained for this work than those produced heretofore.


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TABLE 3. ESTIMATED SUPPLY OF AGRICULTURAL PERSONNEL TRAINED

BY CATEGORIES AND INSTITUTIONS 1978-1983.

Category of Personnel

Year Source A B C Total

1978 ISP 12 - ­ 12

CAP, Matourkou - - 40

40

CAP, Bogande - - -

Totals 12 ­ 40 52

1979 ISP 20 - - 20

CAP, Matourkou - 30 45

75

CAP, Bogande - - ­ -

Totals 20 30 45

95

1980 ISP 22 - - 22

CAP, Matourkou - 30 45 75

CAP, Bogande - - ­ -

Totals 22 30 45

97

1981 ISP 21 - ­ 21

CAP, Matourkou - 30 50 80

CAP, Bogande - - - -

Totals 21 30 50 101

1982 ISP 25 - - 25

CAP, Matourkou - 50 60 110

CAP, Bogande - 30 - 30

Totals 25 80 60 165

1983 ISP 25 - - 25

CAP, Matourkou - 50 100 150

CAP, Bogande - 30 30 60

Totals 25 80 130

235

GRAND TOTAL: 105 250 370

745


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During the life of the projec: a total of 745 agricultural

technicians will be trained. If training at the CAP's and ISP is

projected to 1985, a total of 1215 agricultural technicians will have

been trained. Table 4 combines Tables 2 and 3 and includes this

training projection. As Table 4 indicates, training at ISP and the

CAP's will supply a significant portion of the stated GOUV agricultural

personnel needs. Although these needs will not be completely

filled by the training to be provided by this project, it is felt that

the numbers of trained personnel reflect an optimal mix which takes

into consideration the absorptive capacity of the GOUV.

TABLE 4.

UPPER VOLTA SUPPLY AND DEMAND FOR AGRICULTURAL PERSONNEL 1976 - 1985.

Supply Demand

Category (from ISP & CAP's) (IDR, ORD's et al) Deicit

A 175 229 54

B 410 657 247

C 630 1883 1253

Total: 1215 2769 1554

INSTITUT SUPERIEUR POLYTECH14IQUE (ISP).

Curri cul um.

Analysis. The curriculum of ISP extends over a 4-year period

with a fifth year devoted to specialized, practical field training, at

the end of which the student has to present an elaborate report, called

a memoire, of the experience gained during this period. Upon the

presentation of the memoire, successful students receive the diploma

of Rural Development Engineer, which is roughly equivalent to the

B.S. degree conferred by the U.S. colleges and universities. Agronomy,

livestock, and forestry* constitute the three areas of specialization

in the curriculum.

* The French term "Eaux et Forets" includes more than the English

"Forestry". Specifically, as used here, forestry also includes

water resources management.


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Presently, there are 12 students who have begun the 5th year

training, and they are expected to graduate in June 1978. Six have

chosen to major in agronomy, and six in livestock. These students will

constitute the first graduated from ISP, which was founded in 1973. In

1979, the number of graduates will rise to 21. Of this number, at least

two will major in forestry, nine in livestock, and seven in agronomy.

The student enrollment in the first, second, and third years is 52, 22,

and 23 respectively.

The first two years of the four-year course program are devoted

to core subjects (tronc commun), namely mathematics, physics,

chemistry, biology, geology and pedology, animal and plant physiology,

genetics, rural economy, and languages. The specialized courses in

agronomy, livestock, and forestry are taught during the third and

fourth years. Besides the specialized courses, there are also core

courses (trunc commun) during the third and fourth years. (see

Annex B.l for outline of the total curriculum).

Analysis of the curriculum consisted of reviewing the printed

curriculum given, interviewing the Director of ISP, interviewing the

faculty of ISP, and interviewing a sample of twelve students. The

following points were noted:

The teaching is, in part, too theoretical. Not enough, or no,

emphasis is put on field practice and laboratories in many subjects,

mostly because of the lack of facilities and qualified teaching personnel,

especially in the specialized applied areas of agronomy, livestock,

and hydrology/forestry.

Regular weekly field trips and mandatory training at selected

ORD's and other centers is part of the ISP program for the first four

years. This training is aimed at compensating, to a certain degree,

for the inadequacy or non-existence of laboratories during the academic

year. At the end of each training period, the students are expected

to present a report on the field experience gained. However, ISP does

not have any control over the activity of the ORD's or ttie centers

where the students work. Nor is the training program designed to

corroborate any theoretical knowledge acquired in the classroom. Therefore,

althoug, periodic training is a good institution, per se, it is

not a substitute for practical training directed by the ISP. The

Director, the staff, and the students as well, do not pretend that it

is. It is simply the best that can be done at the moment.


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Taking into account the country's realities and the prevailing

educational system, the ISP printed curriculum is,in general,

well conceived. Itis designed to give the students, in addition to

the knowledge received in the specialized concentration chosen, a

general background in the other concentrations. This approach, explained

the Director, is to facilitate communication, exchange of information,

and cooperation among the specialists in the three areas.

In terms of academic courses listed, we find the curriculum

to be re'atively complete, if teachers are available to teach it.

The main problem is a lack of teachers to teach practical courses. For

an Institution such as ISP, which, quite often, must depend on shortterm

visiting professors to teach certain specialized courses, adjustments

in the curriculum are at times necessary .

Recommendations. Even though the present curriculum is relatively

complete on paper, with the main problems as lack of staff to

teach practical subjects and lack of physical facilities, the Team

does, however, wish to make certain recommrendations. Most of these

have already been identified and agreed to by the Director of ISP and

the staff.

1. Forestry and Water Management. Forestry has been the most recent

area of specialization added to the ISP curriculum. According to the

Director, this concentration was added because of intensive demand

for foresters throughcut the country at the ORD level. This concentration

includes already 7 students in the third and 2 in the fourth

years. If the present trend in student enrollment continues, and

conversations with the Director, the faculty and the students indicated

that it will, this concentration will attract many students in

the years to come. Yet it is the one which presently does not have

any full-time faculty. In addition tu courses regarding organization

of Forest Production, this concentration also puts emphasis on fisheries

and water management. To ensure its arrival and its effectiveness in

turning out competent graduates, it is imperative that ISP be provided

technical assistance in this area as soon as possible.

2. Agronomy. Peanuts and cotton are the two main agronomic crops

grown for exportation in Upper Volta. They play a key role in the

econJmy of this country. Recently, another agronomic crop, soybeans,

has been introduced. Its accceptance by the farmers, and as a result,

its potential expansion in several regions of the country, has been

spectacular. If the present trend continues, thi, crop will also play

an important role in the economy of UV in the near future.


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Considering the above, agronomy may be the most important concentration

in the ISP curriculum. In terms of student enrollment, it

is also one of the most important. It includes 9 students in the fourth

year and 6 in the fifth. In addition to the agronomic crops, the

concentration also includes courses in general horticulture, vegetable

and fruit production. Conversations with the Director, the students,

as well as a glance at the Faculty Roster (see Annex B.15) indicate a

dire need for qualified personnel to teach the courses included in this

concentration. Technical assistance on a short and long-term basis is

urgently needed in this area for the years to come.

3. Animal Husbandry. Animal husbandry is one of the three majors at

ISO. The courses taught in the 3rd and 4th years cover "general"

and "special" animal husbandry. Pastures management is not formally

taught. A small course of agrostology is offered by a botanist within

the Forestry curriculum. Daily cattle management is not included in

the Animal Husbandry curriculum. Due to the importance of this major

et ISP and the role of livestock producticn in Upper Volta's economy,

it is strongly recommended that the following steps be taken: (1)The

establishment of a farm close to the ISP campus (at Gampela) where the

Animal Husbandry students will. be almost constantly exposed to cattle

management practices, pasture management, cattle judging, animal care,

rations balancing and preparation, handling of herdbook and other

routines of farming. Without this constant exposure, education in

animal husbandry at ISP will be almost entirely theoretical and totally

unfit to the country needs; (2)The introduction of special

courses in goat and sheep management and production. Introduction of

dairy goats at the ISP field station is recommended. Production of

sheep and goat meats is well known in Upper Volta, but not the production

of goat milk. In spite of susceptibility of the dairy breed

to trypanosomiasis, production and consumer acceptability of goat milk

could be investigated; (3)To train the student in simple and applied

animal husbandry experiments such as the use of industrial by-products

such as sugar cane molasses in animal feeding and production. This

research practice is highly recommended for the fourth and fifth-year

students.

4. Extension Methods and Teaching Methods. The emphasis in this

subject should be in getting technology to the people. Students need

training in the techniques of dealing with people at the farm level

and approaches to dissemination of information. Included here or elsewhere

should be general principles of teaching or teaching methods.

Along with these methods should also be practice teaching under supervision.

The same should be true for extension work. Perhaps the student

could spend a short period of time in the field with an ATA or other

extension person working directly with farmers.


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5. Sociology. At present, the ISP program includes no sociology

course as a result of a lack of staff to teach it. The ISP recognizes,

however, the importance of sociological training for its

students. Here, as with other courses, the emphasis should be on

practical, applied sociology. The course should include: Information

on each of the major ethnic groups of UV with specific attention

to agricultural practices and their importance in every day life;

the specifics of the interaction between ethnic groups in agriculture,

e.g. the role of the Fulani as cowherds for other groups; practical

experience in gathering sociological information through the use of

participant observation, key informants, etc. (as none of these

students will become sociologists per se, it is suggested that methods

should be informal and designed to answer specific technical questions

rather than test theory); brief introduction to the general principles

of sociology as they relate to agriculture, e.g., farm roles, the farm

family, rural institutions, village development, etc.

6. Agricultural Economics. While there are agricultural economics

subjects now listed in the curriculum, there is no full-time, trained

agricultural economist available to teach them. When such a person is

available, the Team wishes to recommend that the following specifics

be covered to ensure practical knowledge in this field: General principles

of economics, including especially the theory of the firm; cost

analysis, including tudgeting of costs and returns for different

enterprises; supply and demand analysis; principles of marketing

agricultural products; farm management, including farm records and

accounting and general accounting; prices and National agricultural

policy; agribusiness, including cooperatives; agricultural credit;

principles of development of an under-developed economy; economic

geography of Upper Volta; planning, including cost-benefit analysis;

and, foreign trade and international commodity agreements.

7. Research Methods. This is an area typically missing in B.S. level

degrees. It should include the scientific method, how to set up and

design research, how to carry it out, sources of data, methods of analysis,

and technical writing. 'sUV will not have great numbers of PhD

level trained personnel soon, research, in many cases, will have to be

carried out in the MDR and elsewhere by Voltaics trained at this level.

It is,therefore, necessary that some training methods of reserach be

included in their training.

8. Rural Family Living. Recognizing that the well-being of the family,

including the farmer and actual field workers, as well as children and

other members of the family, is the ultimate goal of rural development,


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it is felt that more stress in the curriculum should be put on what is

generally known as Rural Family Living. This subject matter is definitely

not just for women, but should be required of all students.

It should include: Family health, including prevention and treatment

of common diseases and afflictions found in rural areas of Upper

Volta; sanitation, including the water supply and waste disposal;

food preparation and preservation; human nutrition, including information

on balanced diets; diet in disease and health; infant and

child care; and sex education, among other subjects. It is the understanding

of the Team that the GOUV has trained home economists who

might be used to teach these subjects. Perhaps no new full-time position

would be required.

Research and Demonstration Activities.

Analysis. Presently, ISP does not have any research centers

or programs see Annex B. 17). The project calls for the establishment

of a central station at Gampela, near Ouagadougou, and three branch

stations at Markoye, Fada N'Gourma and Banfora. Research at these

stations will have two main purposes:

-1. To support teaching so that the students can receive an

adequate academic and technical training allowing them, upon graduation,

to perform their tasks more satisfactorily, either at the ORD level,

as teachers at ISP, Matourkou or Bogande; or, as researchers at the

various stations which exist or will be established under the direction

of MDR.

2. To investigate and develop new technology conducive to

increased production and which can be easily transmitted to the farmers

through the extension agents, namely conducteurs des travaux, agents

techni,,ues and encadreurs.

The research programs at these stations should be practical,

and aimed at solving existing and future agricultural problems. As

far as possible, the ORD Directors, the conducteurs des travaux, the

agents techniques agricoles, the encadreurs who are in the field and

in daily contact with the farmers, jointly with the Director of ISP

should provide the feedback for initiating research programs in the

areas of agronomy, livestock and water resource management and forestry.

This joint effort will result in pertinent and relevant research directed

toward solving real existing and future agricultural problems.

In fact, individual interviews with ORD Directors, CTA's, ATA's and

encadreurs reveal their willingness, desire and expectations to have


- 26 ­

some input in the elaboration of the research programs which should

be implemented throughout the country. New applicable findings from

these research programs will be conveyed to the farmers through onsite

visits, establishment of small and local demonstration plots,

or verbally through extension activity.

From several conversations with the ISP Director, it became

apparent that he is well-versed on the organization of research programs.

According to him, research should strengthen resident instruction

and benefit the farmers. Therefore, the professors in the

specialized areas should also conduct research at the central and

outlying stations. He voiced concern about the fact that, presently,

the teaching personnel in these areas are not trained to do research.

In fact, a glance at the list of professors clearly reveals that only

one, a Voltaic, holds a doctorate (see Annex B). A second Voltaic,

who also holds a doctorate, but who is still abroad, is about to join

the faculty at ISP. Possibly, they will be the pioneers among GOUV

agricultural researchers. The Director also states that ISP tries

to influence the research subject of students studying abroad who

have manifested interest in working at ISP. He also indicated that,

since the outlying stations will be situated in areas of different

ecological conditions, the research in each of these stations should

be quite specialized. He envisions the staffing of each station as

consisting of an Ingenieur Agronome Specialise, three Techniciens

Superieurs, and two or three specialized persons.

Recommendations. The Team feels the Director's attitude and

approach concerning the staffing of the experiment stations is commendable.

It has certain recommendations which generally support the

ideas of the Director, ISP, as follow:

1. That during the implementation st'ige of this project,

trained advisors in the areas of livestock, agronomy and forestry be

sent to Upper Volta, even for relatively short periods of time, to

help in the elaboration and initiation of the research program.

2. That the Director of the Central Station participate in

teaching at the main campus of ISP on such practical subjects as farm

management.

3. That, in as far as is possible, all staff of ISP in Ouagadougou,

be encouraged, or actually required, to initiate and have ongoing

research and demonstration projects at the central and outlying

stations in addition to their teaching duties. In the early years,

these need not be highly sophisticated projects. They should

be highly practical types of demonstration and research which have


- 27 ­

direct application to Upper Volta's farms, rather than highly theoretical

or basic research one or more steps removed from actual application.

Such projects would be planned by each professor according

to feedback from ORD personnel, farmers in the area, and the center

staff. In this way it would reflect real problems of the area and

would be carried out by the center staff under the direction of the

professor responsible. This would, of course, require that the ISP

professors make several trips to these stations at critical times in

order to direct their research and to consult with center staff.

These trips would ideally be made with students so that the students

also would gain a feel for the approaches and methods of carrying on

field research.

Staff Needs.

Analysis. At present the faculty of ISP consists of 21 professors;

including the Director who also teaches. Of these 21 professors,

15 are full-time, and 6 are part-time. According to the

Director, qualitatively and quantitatively, there exists no scarcity

of professors for the more theoretical core curriculum of the first

two years. In fact, ISP counts one professor of physics, four of

chemistry, one of math, three of biology, and one in geology. A very

good job could be done in these areas if adequate physical facilities

and teaching materials for practical work were available. Among the

professors responsible for teaching the core courses during the first

year, eight are Voltaic and two are foreigners.

However, conversations with the Director, and selected students,

results of a questionnaire answered by the faculty (see Annex B),

as well as a glance at the faculty roster revealed a scarcity of professors

in the specialized areas at ISP, specifically: agricultural

economics, agronomy, livestock, forestry, and fisheries. There are a

total of eight professors within these areas, but two have not yet

arrived in UV. They are expected in January. In the interim, their

assigned courses are not being taught. Itis worth noting that, excluding

the veterinarian, only one faculty member holds a doctorate

in the applied subjects. The others hold an Ingenieur Agronome diploma

which is roughly equivalent to a B.S. degree (see Appendix B).

According to the Director, the i-ed for an agronomist, a horticulturalist,

two livestock specialists, a forester (with water resources

training) and a fishery specialist is urgent. The agronomist

is needed to teach courses on the productivity and management of staple

crops as well as Upper Volta's commercial crops, namely cotton, peanuts,

snybeans. The horticult'iralist will be primarily responsible for teaching


- 28 ­

courses on General Horticulture, fruit and vegetable productivity

and handling. The two livestock specialists will teach the general

and specialized zootechnology courses, while the forester and the

fishery specialist will take care of courses on organization of

forest production and fisheries, respectively.

On the basis of the curriculum analysis, the Team feels that

these needs are obvious and will be met during the implementation

stage of the project. In this regard, ISP and CAP (Matourkou) have

the same need. Arrangements might be made in the class schedule of

both Institutions to allow the movement of the same teachers from

one place to the other without too much inconvenience for the teacher

and the students. For instance, these courses could be taught on

a quarterly basis.

Recommendations. The Team reconmmends the following technical

assistance to ISP over the five-year life of the project:

1. Long-term advisory assistance

6 person years at $100,000/yr................ $600,000.

2. Short-term advisory assistance

36 months @ S7,500/month .....................$270,000.

While the specific training of the short-term personnel may

vary according to the need and availability, it is recommended that

long-term advisory assistance should include three technicians for

two years each in agronomy, forestry, and livestock (animal husbandry)

(see Annex B.16). The thirty-six person months of short-term advisory

assistance are recommended for ISP in order to supplement the longterm

assistance with specialists in agricultural economics, rural

sociology, fisheries, horticulture, agricultural engineering, soil

science, plant breeding, plant pathology, entomology, and home economics.

The Team, therefore, recommends the following training and

tours forVoltaics over the life of the project:

1. 20 students @ $14,000/year x 3 years ......... $840,000.

2. University tours @ $6,000/year x 5 years ..... $ 30,000.

Itis expected that the 20 students will be sent for M.S.

degrees or the equivalent to schools most appropriate for the needed

specialties. This should start in 1978 with the first group of stu­


- 29 ­

dents and continue with the 1979 and 1980 classes in order to get

all 20 in within the five-year project. Initially the Team recomments

the following subjects for study, although these can vary as

new information becomes available:

Number of Students Subject Matter

3 Animal Husbandry

3 Agronomy

3 Horticulture

3 Forestry

2 Agricultural Economics

1 Fisheries & Applied Aquiculture

1 Home Economics

1 Agricultural Engineering

2 Extension Methods & Education

1 Rural Sociology

20

The funds for university tours should provide an opportunity

for travel and study for the Director and present staff.

Facilities and Equipment.

Analysis. The PRP outlined certain deficiencies in the

facilities and equipment needed by the ISP. These were checked by

the Project Design Team through visits to ISP and the various sites

proposed for training and research centers, through visits with the

Director of ISP, and through questionnaires administered to staff and

students.

The Team did find that the ISP was critically short of classrrim

and lab space at its present facility on the main campus. Only

fourth-year students are able to take all their work on the present

campus, and the lower classes must be held at other sites. Also, all

students must live off campus, as dorm facilities are not available.

However, a new campus is now under construction by the GOUV, and main

campus facilities will not be a part of this project.

Probably the most important lack ini facilities and equipment

at ISP is the lack of places for practical training of these higher-level

students in representative agricultural environments around the country.

In addition, ISP currently lacks a library*. This project will be directed

* ICRISAT is currently planning an agriculture library at Kamboinse.

Care should be taken in planning facilities at ISP to avoid unnecessary

overlap.


- 30 ­

at improving these facilities. At present, students either get very

little practical experience in an agricultural environment or must be

transported long distances to sites simply to observe, with little

opportunity to actually participate in practical activities. This

frequently results in students with theoretical knowledge but with

little idea of how to put their knowledge into practice. The problem

is compounded by the fact that many of the higher-level students have

come from a city environment and/or have been in school most of their

lives and have not directly participated in agricultural activities.

A problem potentially as important as the lack of practical

experience by students is a lack of opportunity by ISP staff to do

practical research and demonstration. A staff well-rounded in theory,

but lacking in practical application ability, and without a strong

connection to research, is ill-prepared to train students to practically

apply the theory learned.

Recommendations. To help alleviate the above problems, the

following recommendations are made: (1) construct infrastructure for

a new central field station at Gampela near Ouagadcugou where 450

hectares of land are already available; (2) develop the earlier AIDfunded

ranch at Markoye in cooperation with the MRD where considerable

infrastructure is already available; (3) construct infrastructure for

two new field stations at Banfora and Fada N'Gourma to account for

other types of farming areas in Upper Volta. (see Financial Analysis

for Detailed Budget). These four sites, the central station at Gampela

near Ouagadougou, and the three outlying sites at Banfora, Markoye,

and Fada N'Gourma reasonably represent the varied types of farming

areas of Upper Volta and should provide the practical experience necessary

to strengthen and balance the agricultural education of the ISP

graduate. It is proposed that USAID provide funding for certain

buildings, materials equipment, wells, generators, farm pond construction,

and livestock for these centers. The GOUV will provide the land,

all other facilities, and personnel for managing and operating these

stations, as well as operating costs.

CENTRE AGRICOLE POLYVALENT (CAP) AT MATOURKOU.

In addition to strengthening the ISP in its task of supplying

upper-level personnel, the Agricultural Human Resources project

will be concerned with the training of those ORD personnel who are

more directly linked with the farmers of Upper Volta. These are the

Encadreurs, Agents Techniques Agricole (ATA's), and the Conducteurs

des Travaux Agricole (CTA's).


- 31 -

The current pattern of education of agricultural extension

personnel centers around the facility at Matourkou, 12 kilometers

south of Bobo Dioulasso in the Southwest of Upper Volta.

Funded in 1963, through the United Nations Special Funds and

the active and sustained cooperation of the GOUV, the CAP at Matourkou

is the result of a series of projects financed by the United Nations.

The objective of these projects was not only the creation of

a training center for middle-level agricultural technicians, but also

the improvement of local farming conditions through a series of relevant

community activities and pilot projects.

The present CAP at Matourkou evolved in these stages:

1. 1963-1968. A project financed by the U.N. Special Funds resulted

in the creation of an agricultural training center whose functions

consisted of training middle-level technicians, Agents Techniques

Agricoles (ATA) and Encadreurs and provided subsequent periodic

workshops to update their training. The training received during

this period was strictly confined to agronomy.

2. 1968-1973. A second project was financed by the U.N. through the

FAO. Besides the continuation, improvement and intensification of

rural development activities in the area, this project was aimed

at strengthening and improving the training activities at the CAP.

New constructions for classrooms, laboratories, a corral, administration

and lodging were added to the existing facilities. During

this project, in 1971, the GOUV encouraged by the first results

reformed the CAP curriculum, enlarging it to include areas of

specialization namely, agronomy, livestock and forestry.

3. 1973-1976. A third project financed by FAO in Integrated Rural

Development initiated at Matourkou the training of a higher

category of Agricultural Technicians, Conducteurs des Travaux

Agricoles (CTA). New facilities were added to accommodate this

additional group of students. The areas of specialization for

the CTA's are the same as for ATA's.

The most basic level for extension personnel is the Encadreur.

This is the extension person directly in contact with the farmer at

the village or farm level. He typically haz six years of formal primary

school training with a CEPE certificate. In the past he has had nine


- 32 ­

months training at Matourkou before going out on the job. However,

this program has largely been terminated recently, and encadreurs

are now being trained almost entirely in the ORD's. The Team is

concerned with this change. While it is conceded that training in

the ORD in which they will work is desirable and necessary, there is

also a need for this level of personnel- to receive certain specialized

subjects at a central point so that there is some uniformity in training

throughout the country. The recommendation is, therefore, that

some training of encadreurs at the CAP, Matourkou, and at the new

proposed CAP, Bogande, be reinstated. Encadreurs themselves, talked to

by the Team in the field, asked for this type of training when asked

for suggestions. As discussed earlier in this section, the GOUV has

agreed to short term trcinino of encadreurs at the CAP's.

The second level of extension personnel above the encadreur

is the Agent Technique Agricole (ATA). This person is typically an

ORD sub-sector chief. Although his responsibilities vary according to

the section of the country, type of agriculture, and density of agricultural

operations, he typically supervises four to five encadreurs

in an 'rea roughly 30-40 km in diameter. The ATA typically travels

around on a mobylette (a small motor bike). The ATA is also in direct

contact with farmers and is a key person in the extension scheme of

Upper Volta. The ATA's education typically consists of six years of

primary school with the CEPE certificate, two years of lycee, and four

years at Matourkou - three years of which are general training and one

year specialized in either crops, livestock, or forestry. Training of

this level of personnel is the heart of the training at Matourkou, and

this training is critical to the development of Upper Volta. The

Agricultural Human Resources project will, therefore, give considerable

support to this type of training which has the potential to have the

most immediate effect on Upper Volta's agriculture at the level of

the peasant farmer.

The third and highest level of extension personnel now being

trained at Matourkou is the Conducteur des Travaux Agricole (CTA).

This person is typically an ORD sector chief in charge of the ATA's

in his sector but also may be assigned to the ORD central office.

In the past, all CTA's have been trained outside the country. Now

the CTA program is part of the program at Matourkou. The CTA's education

typically consists of six years of primary s hool with the CEPE,

four years of Lycee with the BEPC and three years at Matourkou, two

of which are in general subjects and one year of specialization in

agronomy, livestock, or forestry.


Curriculum (ATA's and CTA's).

- 33 -

Analysis. The same methods used to analyze the curriculum

of ISP were used for the curriculum at the CAP, Matourkou (see Appendix

B for the curriculum). It consisted of an analysis of the printed

curriculum, interviews with the CAP Director, the staff, and a sample

of 15 students. The students were interviewed in three separate

groups by the Team. Questionnaires also were distributed to staff and

students as at ISP (see Annex B). The following points were concluded

from these various sources:

The instruction at the CAP, Matourkou is, in part, too theoretical

with not enough emphasis put on laboratory and relevant field

training. This is mostly because of the lack of facilities and the

lack of qualified teaching personnel.

Field training at selected ORD's or at other agricultural and

industrial centers is mandatory fcr all students and is part of the

CAP education program. This training has the purpose of enriching the

students' practical experience, which is actually very limited at the

CAP campus. In addition, the students participate in extension work

in the surrounding villages. This is a routine, year-round participation

under the supervision of their professors. The Team endorses

this activity.

Both the ATA and CTA programs allow for specialization in plant

science, livestock production, and forestry. Home economics is to be

added soon. Classes are conducted separately for the ATA and CTA students

as the CTA's are more advanced academically, although many of

the topics are the same. The coverage of the CTA curriculum is more

thorough. Also, because of differences in the duration and timing

of their field training on the one hand, and the difference in the

length of their overall training program on the other, their presence

on campus does not always coincide.

Taking into account the level of agricultural development in

UV, its prevailing education system and the mission of the future CTA's

and ATA's, who will be the liaison between the ORD Directors and the

farmers, the CAP academic curricula are well conceived. The core courses

offered in both programs are designed to give the students, in addition

to the knowledge received in the specialized disciplines chosen, a

general background on several subjects. This approach will facilitate

communication, exchange of information and cooperation among the specialists

in different fields. The curriculum for both programs is well

planned. No additional courses are needed. What is needed is more

qualified teachers and the establishment of a framework allowing for


- 34 ­

effective laboratory and field training in support of the academic

teaching. The CAP farm, close to 2500 acres, is used more for commercial

production than for field training. According to the students,

they do participate in these commercial farm activities, but there

exists no connection between classroom teaching and the field work they

are called upon to perform. The Team feels the practice of assigning

field projects to a student or a group of students, in support of the

classroom teaching, is desirable. It should be noted in passing that,

in contradistinction to ISP, all courses are not taught throughout the

year. Many of them are taught during one or two quarters. At the

end of each quarter an exam is given. If a course covers two or three

quarters, the final exam is comprehensive.

Recommendations. The printed curriculum at the CAP, Matourkou

was felt to be adequate, with minor exceptions, and the Team felt the'

no major recommendations were necessary. The problem at Matourkou,

rather, is the lack of certain facilities, although this is not a

majov- problem; and more importantly, the lack of quantity and quality

of staff to teach the curriculum. This will be discussed in detail

below. The exceptions noted in course content would include some

upgrading of training in agricultural economics and making students'

work on the CAP farm more applicable to their classroom work.

Trainina of Encadreurs.

In the past, the CAP, Matourkou, has had the mission of training

encadreurs, the closest technical link to the farmers. Presently, most

encadreurs receive their training either at the ORD's or in the field.

The Team feels that an administrative and technical framework should be

established to facilitate the training of future encadreurs either at

the CAP, Matourkou, at the new CAP at Bogande, or at one of the future

research stations, depending upon the vocation of the future encadreur

and the ecological conditions of the place where he expects to work.

Research and Demonstration Activities.

No provision is included in the project to make the CAP at

Matourkou a research station. An institutional framework, however, will

be established so that the facility there can be used for effective

practical training and demonstration. In addition, the program at

CAP calls for field training in the ORD's and other agencies for all

students. Therefore, once the research stations are established, cooperation

between ISP and Matourkou will enable the students to further

their training at the research stations. This arrangement between the

directors of both institutions will be beneficial for the students in

that there should be more connection between the classroom teaching and

field training.


Staff Needs.

- 35 -

Analysis. The staff of the CAP, Matourkou consists of 17

professors of which 8 are full-time and 9 are part-time. Among the

full-time ones are three who are currently absent and one provided

by the United Nations. The 9 part-time teachers come from neighboring

research centers or GOUV agencies. They are appointed charges de cours

(see Annex B. 15 for faculty roster). All full-time instructors are

Voltaics but one, the U.N. employee. Voltaic instructors are for the

most part CTA's, previously educated at Matourkou and/or trained in

foreign countries. In general, the full-time and the part-time

instructors (charges de cours ) teach both at the ATA and CTA levels.

Excluding four professors assigned to the teaching of biology, math,

French and physical education, all others teach specialized courses.

The faculty situation at Matourkou is very serious from the qualitative

and quantitative standpoint according to the Director and the students.

There is scarcity of personnel to teach the basic courses. Also, the

specialized courses are taught by instructors who do not have solid

academic, practical and pedagogic training. Part-time teachers who are

both Voltaics dnd foreigners, help, but they too often have no pedagogic

training.

Few additional courses are needed in the CAP curriculum. What

is needed is qualified teachers and the establishment of a framework

allowing for effective relevant laboratory and field training in

support of the classroom teaching. The Director, the students, as well

as a glance at the faculty roster and the teaching program (see Annex B.15)

support the foregoing statements. Ir summary, the Team feels that the

lack of qualified personnel in almosc all the course areas at Matourkou

may be the most serious handicap to the objective of this institution,

which is that of training the technical liaison personnel between the

ORD Directors and the farmers.

Recommendations. It is recommended that advisory assistance

for the CAP Matourkou includes one person for four (4) years of longterm

assistance to lend continuity to the program. Perhaps the type of

person who might be the most effective as a long-term advisor to the

CAP at Matourkou and the new CAP at Bogande would be a typical U.S.

Vocational Agriculture teacher rather than the highly,and sometimes

rather narrowly-trained, PhD in some subject matter. Such persons have

been used very effectively at different agricultural colleges in Africa

in similar types of colleges. The typical U.S. Vocational Agriculture

teacher has a wide training in every subject matter field in agriculture

as well as in teaching and extension methods. More importantly,

if he/she has been a practicing teacher ina high school with an FFA


- 36 ­

program, he/she has supervised a shop, students' home projects in

crops, livestock, gardening, tractor maintenance, and other subjects.

He/she also has probably supervised demonstration fertilizer plots

and other projects. In most schools in the U.S. he/she has also

probably held adult farmer classes for farmers in the community.

Such a person tends to be very practically oriented and able to carry

out practices taught in the classroom. Such a person was used very

effectively as the farm manager and supervisor of student practicals

and in running the farm shop in one case in East Africa. Categories

for short-term advisory assistance for the CAP at Matourkou should

include the following: forestry, agronomy (peanuts, cotton, sorghum),

horticulture (fruits and vegetables), agricultural economics, animal

husbandry, rural sociology, home economics, and agricultural extension

(small farm specialists). There already exists in Ouagadougou an

organization capable of providing teacher training. The Institut

Panafricain Pour le Developpement(PAID) maintains in'Ouagadougou a

staff of ten professionals in the fields of teacher training, administration,

and management. They have the capability of providing either

long or short-term training at their headquarters or at other institutions.

For example, they could provide teacher training for the staff

at Matourkou during the vacation period, thereby avoiding the disruption

of classes.

In addition, they have on their staff several sociologists and

economists who might be able to give short courses in their subject

fields at the university level. By utilizing this resource, it may be

possible to substantially reduce the cost of technical assistance.

A summary of technical assistance to assist in relieving the

staff needs at Matourkou is as follows:

Long-term advisory assistance

4 person years @ $100,000/year................. $400,000.

Short-term advisory assistance

24 person months @ $7,500/month ............... $180,000.

Facilities and Equipment.

Analysis and Recommendations. Expansion of the existing infrastructure

of the CAP at Matourkou is a major part of the U.S. contribution

to the budget (see Annex C.l ). Additional dormitories for a

total of 150 students will be constructed, including one dorm for 25

women. Two classrooms for 60 students each will be added. A dining

hall is included since adequate facilities do not now exist. Furthermore,

a library with books and audiovisual materials will be provided

to support classroom and practical field instruction.


- 37 -

Six houses for professors are included as an incentive factor

for professors to teach at the school and to be close to the

practical crop and livestock demonstration projects being conducted

with the students.

One-half of the vehicles will be purchased in the first year

of the project so that not all of the transportation vehicles will be

depreciated at the end of the fifth year. One pick-up truck, two cars,

one bus and 20 mobylettes will be sold after three years while they

still have salvage value. The salvage value of these vehicles is

expected to cover part of the price of the new replacements.

Laboratory equipment is included to supplement the existing

facilities and to make crop and livestock instruction both practical

and meaningful. In addition, an ixtension of the water system from

Bobo-Dioulasso to Matourkou is added since the existing water dam contains

silt and requires expensive filtering equipment; and it would

not be adequate for the new buildings and additional use, especially

during the dry season.

The CAP has requested three village training centers for its

students so that future ATA's and CTA's could participate in the diffusion

of crop and livestock technology in the rural environment. Each

village center will be located near a populated rural area where students

can work with farmers to perfect the use of new agricultural technology

and learn how to communicate it to the farmers. For one example, students

will gain practical field training in animal traction equipment

at the farm level.

NEW CAP AT BOGANDE.

Analysis. The creation of a new CAP at Bogande, about 200 km

northeast of Ouagadougou, will offer to the country the opportunity of

training CTA's, ATA's, and possibly, Encadreurs under agricultural,

climatic and social conditions different from those of the CAP at Matourkou.

Matourkou, in the southwest of the country, is more humid,

with an annual rainfall of 1100 mm whereas Bogande, in the northeast

is drier with 750 mm of rain annually. The ecological condition of

Bogande is closer to the Sahel than Matourkou and makes it useful in

representing this and other areas of eastern UV. Bogande is an area

of extensive livestock production, and its arable land is suitable for

farming with or without irrigation. An existing artificial lake has

water all-year-round and makes possible irrigated crop production such

as rice. In addition, millet, sorghum, corn and peanuts are produced

every year. Water supply for human and animal consumption presents no


- 38 ­

problem. Besides the lake, there exist six wells and a public fountain.

More wells will be built under this project. Extensive

land around Bogande, which is not suitable for farming,

could be improved for livestock grazing and production.

On the other hand, there are certain disadvantages of the

new CAP at Bogande. This village is isolated from urban centers

because of a lack of roads which are serviceable during the rainy

season. There is no sewage system, no electricity, and no hotel.

The solution of these problems could, in part, help in recruiting

teaching staff for the new CAP at Gogande.

The GOUV assured the Team that it will guarantee the recruiting

of staff for Bogande. The GOUV considered three aspects

as far as new CAP is concerned: infrastructure, qualified teaching

staff, the recurring cost. The GOUV will be responsible for

the last two, but requested that AID take care of the infrastructure

such as buildings, equipment, and related facilities.

Recommendations. It is recommended that a new CAP be

created at Bogande to train ATA's and CTA's. This new school should

be able to receive 120 students (30 per class) for ATA, and 90 students

(30 per class) for CTA. The new CAP will also be used for

short term training of Encadreurs in the Northeastern Region.

Advisory assistance at Bogande will have to be more than

that proposed for the CAP, Matourkou, which is already an ongoing

operation. It should include one long-term advisor in agricultural

education as with Matourkou. In addition, the Team recommends two

long-term advisors for two years each in range management (livestock),

and agronomy (crops, peanuts, sorghum). The short-term

advisory assistance should include the same categories as the other

CAP such as forestry, agronomy, horticulture, agricultural economics,

livestock management, rural sociology, home economics, and agricultural

extension. A summary of technical assistance proposed is as

follows:

Long-term advisory assistance

9 person years @ $100,000/year .............. $OO,000.

Short-term advisory assistance

48 person months @ $7,500/month ............. $360,000.

For facilities and equipment, see Annex C 1.


ITEMIZED COST SUMMARY:

- 39 -

For a detailed description of various items of cost, see

Annex C 1.

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT SUMMARY

The economy of UV is predominantly agricultural. Aid to

develop the agricultural infrastructure should result in the more

rapid transfer of improved and applicable technology to farmers.

This should result in less pressure to bring into cultivation, marginal

lands that should not be cultivated due to problems of erosion,

slope, fertility, etc., as with improved technology, more

could be produced with the same amount of land, or the same amount

could be produced with less land. Also, with livestock, improved

training of extension personnel in range management, conservation

methods, etc. should result in less over-grazing and less destruction

of grasslands of UV.

Construction envisioned in this project should have little

or no effect on the environment as it consists mostly of buildinas

and will consist of very little construction requiring alteration

of large areas of land and the environment. See Annex D for greater

detail on the environmental impact of this project.

CONSTRUCTION SUMMARY.

A considerable amount of construction will be financed by

this project. Construction will expand existing facilities and

create new ones to enable an increase in the capacity of Upper

Volta's Ministries of Rural Development and Education to train university

and secondary school level agricultural technicians.

Construction cost estimates are as follows for the three

major components of the project:

ISP (3 regional field stations plus Central Station Farm

Pond/Reservoir and wells) ........................ $721,000

CAP-Matourkou (central facilities: dorms, classrooms,

library, dining hall, housing; plus 3 village training

centers) ............................... 794,000

CAP-Bogande (central facilities: dorms, classrooms,

library, dining hall, labs, housing, sheds, wells,

sewers, etc.) ................................... 11,976,000

TOTAL: $3,491,000


- 40 -

Cost estimates in the case of ISP were drawn up (and updated

late November 1977) by the GOUV Office de Promotion des

Entreprises Voltaiques (OPEV). OPEV includes architects among its

staff. Cost estimates for the CAP-Matourkou were drawn up by two

Dutch architects working in the community development extension

service component of the CAP. These estimates reflect recent construction

efforts at Matourkou. Construction estimates for the

CAP-Bogande were based on costs for similar structures at Matourkou

and adjusted upwards to account for the remoteness of Bogande.

These estimates were reviewed by the MDR Secretaire Permanent who

in the past was the Director of the GOUV Service of Hydrology and

Rural Equipment (HER - this service provides engineering supervision

to most GOUV-financed construction). HER also provided

some of th ISP cost estimates (wells, farm ponds, etc.).

Actual construction plans will be drawn up by the architects

and organizations mentioned above (OPEV, HER). The construction

plans are very unlikely to cause any controversy, as the structures

to be built will conform to standard school buildings which

have already been constructed throughout Upper Volta. The construction

plans will be subject to the review/approval of HER and

an AID engineer (from REDSO/WA). In fact, one of the conditions

precedent specifically requires that, "prior to the disbursement

of any funds for each construction activity under this project,

construction plans for that-activity will be reviewed and approved

by an AID engineer." 'Therefore, the project meets FAA section 611(a).

B. FINANCIAL ANALYSIS AND PLAN.

DISCUSSION OF INCREMENTAL ANNUAL RECURRING COSTS.

Incremental annual recurring costs are expenses which will

be the responsibility of the GOUV after completion of the project.

These annual recurring costs include motor vehicle operating expenses,

building maintenance, generator operating expenses, farm

and laboratory equipment maintenance, and scholarships. They are

the result of an increase in the capacity of the CAP at Matourkou,

the new CAP at Bogande and ISP to train additional agricultural

agents for Upper Volta and will be paid by AID during the life of

the project. The GOUV will begin paying these incremental annual

recurring costs after the end of the project.


- 41 -

Scholarships and equipment and building maintenance are

the incremental annual recurrent costs for the CAP at Matourkou and

the new CAP at Bogande. Details of recurrent costs are presented

at the end of the individual budgets in Annex C 1. Scholarships

account for 82 percent of the recurrent costs which the GOUV will

have to assume at the end of the fifth fiscal year at Matourkou.

Building maintenance, equipment operating costs and care of the

village centers account for the remaining 18 percent of recurrent

costs. Vehicle operating costs will not be excessive due to vehicle

replacement during the third year of the project. Since the GOUV's

contribution to annual operating and maintenance costs, including

scholarships at Matourkou, has been expanding at the rate of about

10 percent per year, officials at the Ministry of Ru il Development

did not express any doubt that the government would be able to

finance the additional students at the end of the project.

Scholarships and equipment maintenance and operating costs

are the major items in the incremental annual recurrent costs for

the new CAP at Bogande. Scholarships account for about 66 percent

of the recurrent costs which the GOUV will have to assume at the

end of the fifth fiscal year. Operating costs make up 8 percent

of the remaining costs, building maintenance 15 percent, equipment

and motor vehicle maintenance about 8 percent, and laboratory

equipment about 2 percent. Economic growth in the national revenues

should make it possible for the government to support these costs

at Bogande.

The GOUV has already agreed to assume the responsibility

for operating costs of the Central Field Station (CFS) and the three

regional stations at ISP from the beginning of the project. Therefore,

incremental annual recurrent costs of the farm machinery,

vehicles, and other items are already included in the total GOUV

contribution to operating costs. ISP's budget will assume the

generator operating costs of $5,000 per year at the end of the project.

GOUV financial resources will be available to maintain the

farm equipment in good working order from the beginning of the

project. Participant training will be completed by the end of the

project and will not become an additional cost to the GOUV.

In sunmmary, incremental annual recurrent costs of the

Agricultural Human Resources Project to be assumed by GOUV at the

end of the project are CAP at Matourkou, $108,000, and CAP at

Bogande, $126,000, and at ISP, $5,000 for a total of $239,000.


Matourkou.

- 42 -

RECAPITULATION OF INCREMENTAL ANNUAL

RECURRENT COSTS AT THE END OF FY 5

Building maintenance $ 7,940

Vehicles 10,000

Training 88,000

Village Centers 2,100

Bogande.

ISP.

Sub-total 108,040

u~s. $u.s.

$

Rounded Total $108,000

Building maintenance 19,760

Vehicles 10,000

Farm & laboratory equipment 2,225

Generator 10,000

Training 84,000

Sub-total 125,985

Rounded Total 126,000

Annual generator costs 5,000

Recurrent Cost by Use.

I. U.S. Personnel

II. Commodities

III. Training

IV. Other Costs

Total $239,000

67,000

172,000

Total $239,000


- 43 -

BUDGET DESCRIPTION FOR CENTRE AGRICOLE POLYVALENT AT MATOURKOU.

Detailed budgets for each project component are included in

Annex C. 1. Cost estimates for construction and equipment were provided

(updated as of late November 1977 from earlier estimates) by

Dutch architects, OPEV, HER, and ISP (who contacted local equipment

suppliers) as discussed earlier in Part 3.A. A summary budget for

each component of the project is included at the end of this section.

Expansion of the existing infrastructure of the CAP at

Matourkou is a major part of the U.S. contribution to the budget.

Six dormitories will be constructed, including one dorm for women.

Two classrooms for 60 students each will be added. A dining hall

is included since no special facilities exist now. Furthermore, a

library with books, and audiovisual materials will support classroom

and practical field instruction.

Six houses for professors are included as an incentive

factor for them to teach at the school and to be close to the practical

crop and livestock demonstration projects being conducted

with the students.

One-half of the motor vehicles will be purchased in the

first year of the project so that not all of the transportation

vehicles will be depreciated at the end of the fifth year. One

pick-up truck, two cars, one bus and 20 mobylettes will be sold after

three years while they still have salvage value. The salvage value

of these vehicles will cover part of the price of the new replacements.

Laboratory equipment is included to supplement the existing

facilities and to make crop and livestock instruction both

practical and meaningful. In addition, an extension of the water

system from Bobo-Dioulasso to Matourkou is included since the existing

reservoir at the school contains silt, requires expensive filtering

equipment, and it will not be adequate for the new buildings

and additional use, especially during the dry season.

Scholarships for an additional enrollment of CTA's and

ATA's will increase the school's capacity to provide agricultural

agents for the country. These scholarships are only for new students

since the government is already providing support for 231

students currently enrolled. Details on the additional enrollment

of students is given in Annex C-5.


- 44 -

The CAP has requested three village training centers for

its students so that future ATA's and CTA's can participate in the

diffusion of crop and livestock technology in the rural environment.

*Each village center will be located near a populated rural area where

students can work with farmers to perfect the use of new agricultural

technology and communicate it to the farmers. For example,

students will gain practical field training in animal traction equipment

at the farm level. In addition, officials of the Ministry of

Rural Development indicated that the village centers will serve to

bring the entire farm family into contact with the extension system

and its training center at atourkou. Home economics, nutrition and

other family-oriented subjects would be organized among the teachers,

students and villagers.

Part of the miscellaneous fund will be allocated t. the farm

implement shop for spare parts. A substantial amount of equipment,

in addition to what is already working, can be repaired with the-e

funds.

The budget includes four person years of long-term U.S. personnel

who will teach courses, organize demonstration projects and

implement extension activities with .he students. The short-term

consultants will teach special courses and develop projects as needed.

BUDGET DESCRIPTION FOR CENTRE AGRICOLE POLYVALENT AT BOGANDE.

The student capacity of the CAP at Bogande, will determine

the structure of the final budget and the recurrent costs of the

project. In interviews with the officials in the Ministry of Rural

Development, the beginning enrollment was set at 30 CTA's and 30 ATA's

in the second fiscal year, and the final enrollment in the fifth fiscal

year at 210 students. The U.S. will provide the scholarships for these

students. Therefore, eight dormitories will establish the basic campus

facilities. Four classrooms, a dining hall, and library also will be

constructed during the project.

AdmInistrative buildings will be established similar to the

facilities at Matourkou. Vehicles such as cars, buses and mobylettes

for the Director, professors, and students are considered necessary

for adequate institutional transportation. A pick-up truck will be

used as needed by the farm shop and other departments. The first set

of vehicles will be sold in the third year, and their salvage value

applied to the cost of replacements 'inthe case of Matourkou. The

intention of this procedure is to leave the new CAP with usable vehicles

at the end of the project.


- 45 -

Two four-wheel drive vehicles will be required for the U.S.

technical assistance personnel, both long and short-term. Operating

costs of the vehicles will not be excessive since advisors will l.e

at the CAP.

According to recommendations of officials at the Ministry of

Rural Development, staffing for the new CAP at Bogande will consist

of 7 Ingenieurs de Developpement Rurale, 5 CTA's, 2 ATA's, 2 mechanics,

3 cooks, and 3 drivers. Therefore, houses were included for the Ingenieurs,

U.S. technicians, CTA's, and ATA's as an incentive for

working at the CAP and in order to be close to the demonstration plots.

Mechanics, drivers and cooks will come from nearby Bogande.

Village centers are not included in the budget for Bogande

for several reasons. Bogande is already located well into the rural

environment. There are villages located close to the school. Finally,

the students will have adequate demonstration plots and livestock at

the school for their practical training.

Eight person years of long-term U.S. technical assistance were

included so that the new CAP can develop a strong teaching and demonstration

program in its formative years. The long-term assistance

includes three technicians divided among one vocational agriculture

specialist for 4 years, one agronomist for 2 years, and a livestock

specialist for 2 years.

Forty-eight person months of short-term consultants will supplement

the long-term tebhnical assistance. For further details see

Part 3.A, Technical Analysis, and Annex B.16.

BUDGET DESCRIPTION FOR ISP'S CENTRAL FIELD STATION AND THREE

REGIONAL FIELD STATIONS.

At the Central Field Station, AID will provide funding for

farm and transportation equipment, materials for a workshop, a generator,

and installation of a small farm pond and wells. The farm equipment

selection will represent both modern and intermediate agricultural

technology. In order for the professors and students to benefit

from international agricultural research (to be applied and adapted to

the local environment), AID will provide funding fcr library materials,

textbooks, and journal subscriptions. Students at ISP do not have

textbooks for their own use and copy all lectures. Textbooks will be

kept by the library for future classes and lent to students. Supplements

to the existing laboratory facilities will also be required to

make agronomic and animal husbandry experiments functional such as

soil analysis, pest control, cross-breeding, parasitology and virology.


- 46 -

AID will provide funding for a farm equipment specialist on

a short-term basis. His/her arrival will coincide with the delivery

of the farm equipment, and he/she will train those Voltaics who will

become responsible for operating and servicing the equipment. AID

will also provide funds for observation and orientation tours for

selected University faculty members engaged in the project. They

may visit other African uni,,-,-sities which have had experience in

operating agricultural research and training facilities.

For the Regional Field Stations, AID will provide funding

for construction of buildings, materials, equipment, wells, and live..

stock necessary to carry out the practical training. The Regional

Centers will utilize intermediate technology.

AID will also provide long and short-term advisory assistance

for ISP. It is expected that advisory assistance will include teaching

and practical experimental capability. In addition, participant training

for Voltaics at U.S. universities and other locations will strengthen

ISP's capability for adaptive research, teaching and extension. Funds

are also included for research activities at the Central Field Station.

These funds will supplement the research activities of the station as

needed for specific projects. A project funding forecast is included

in Annex C.2 giving details of technical assistance, participant training

and construction plans by fiscal years.


USE

CAP Matourkou.

I. U.S. Personnel.

4 person years

24 person months

- 47 -

SUMMARY COST ESTIMATE AND FINANCIAL PLAN

U.S. Contribution in $

U.S. $

$ 400,000

180,000

II. Commodities.

Vehicles, equipment, parts, etc. 448,000

III. Training.

Teacher retrai ing and student scholarships 262,000

IV. Other Costs.

Buildings plus contingency 794,000

CAP Bogande.

Sub-total $ 2,084,000

I. U.S. Personnel.

8 person years 800,000

48 person months 360,000

II. Commodities.

Vehicles, equipment, livestock, parts,

laboratory material, etc. 509,000

III. Training.

teacher improvement and student scholarships 248,000

IV. Other Costs.

Buildings + town services + contingency 1,976,000

Sib-total $ 3,893,000

ISP - Central Field Station + 3 Regional Field Stations.

I. U.S. Personnel.

6 person years 600,000

36 person months 270,000


- 48 -

II. Commodities.

Farm equipment, office and laboratory

materials for central field station and

three regional stations

III. Training.

20 students

Faculty tours and professional improvement

IV. Other costs.

Farm and classroom buildings plus farm

reservoir and wells

Project Total by Institution.

CAP Matourkou

CAP Bogande

ISP

Evaluation

Project Total by Use.

I. U.S. Personnel including evaluation

II. Commodities.

III. Training.

IV. Other Costs.

pond/

U.S. $

$ 605,000

840,000

30,000

721,000

Sub-total $ 3,066,000

$ 2,084,000

3,893,000

3,066,000

50,000

Total $9,093,000

2,660,000

1,562,000

1,380,000

3,491,000

Percent

29

17

15

39

$ 9,093,000 100


- 49 -

CONTRIBUTION OF GOUV TO THE PROJECT.

The contribution of the GOUV to the project will include

salaries of faculty and staff at the respective institutions, operating

expenses and maintenance, land, buildings, and other materials.

The contribution of the GOUV to the project varies among the different

institutions and locations due to different amounts of existing facilities

and local infrastructure.

1. CAP Matourkou.

The Ministry of Rural Development has proposed a budget of

$332,000 for the operation of the existing facilities and $212,520

for salaries and benefits for faculty and staff at Matourkou during

1978. Requests for operating expenses have been increasing at about

10 percent per year. Operating costs will be a firm contribution of

the GOUV to the total value of the project.

Scholarships for the current students at Matourkou are also

a significant contribution to the GOUV-to the total project and are

included in the annual operating budget. Land for the three village

centers can also be considered significant support of the project.

2. New CAP Bogande.

The GOUV will make land available for the new CAP at Bogande

through appropriation of existing government territory. Ministry of

Rural Development officials estimate salaries at S109,000 for the

first year of operation at Bogande. S lary levels are itemized in

Annex C.

In addition to the housing incentive for teachers and staff to

locate at Bogande, the Ministry of Rural Develupment has agreed to

provide a monetary incentive of $52 per month for the teaching personnel.

Although scholarships for Bogande will be a U.S. contribution

during the life of the project, MIDR approved the level of student

enrollment for Bogande during the project. The cost of the scholarship

will be assumed by GOUV at the end of the project.

3. Central Field Station.

The GOUV will furnish a plot of land, 450 hectares, and the

personnel necessary to carry out the functions of the Center. ISP

will make all arrangements to build workshops, laboratories, sheds,

conference rooms, etc. The U.S. contribution will be equipment for

these facilities. ISP will hire the personnel and staff the Center.

Details of ISP's contributions are given in Annex C.


- 50 -

The GOUV will furnish a plot of 20 hectares for each regional

field station, making a total of 60 hectares. Also, ISP will furnish

the personnel necessary to staff each regional center to do the work,

including a foreman at each center and local laborers. ISP will con-

tribute a total of $647,320 in initial capital investment and $1,230,01(

in operating costs for the project life. The total contribution is

$1,878,000.

The total GOUV contribution to the project is estimated at

$6,079,000 over five years. The GOUV request for assistance basically

seeks financing for infrastructure (buildings and equipment), technical

assistance and training. Once the necessary educational infrastructure

and staff are in place at the CAP's and ISP, the GOUV will be

able to meet the incremental annual recurrent costs.

It is clear that the Fixed Amount Reimbursement (FAR) method

of financing construction is inappropriate for this project. It is

precisely due to the lack of GOUV funds that U.S. assistance is sought.

GOUV CONTRIBUTION TO THE PROJECT

U.S. S

Matourkou $3,695,000

Bogande 506,000

ISP 1,878,000

CONTRIBUTION TO THE PROJECT

(U.S. $)

TOTAL: $6,079,000

Institution U.S. GOUV* TOTAL

Evaluation 50,000 50,000

Matourkou 2,084,000 3,695,000 5,779,000

Bogande 3,893,000 506,000 4,399,000

ISP 3,066,000 1,878,000 4,944,000

TOTAL: $9,093,000 S6,079,000 $15,172,000

U.S. Contribution Percent 60 40 100

* GOUV contribution is entirely in local currency. The exchange rate

of 250 CFA = $1.00 was used.


C. SOCIAL ANALYSIS.

The creation of an effective agricultural system capable of

increasing agricultural productivity at the level of the Upper Volta

peasant will require the integration of formal agricultural education,

agricultural research, and a variety of extension programs. At present,

as in many third-world countries, the linkage between these three

functions is fragile and at times incomplete. Moreover, while these

functions must be integrated in order to create an effective, productive

agricultural system, there is nothing magic about the particular

way in which they are integrated in the United States. While the

Upper Voltaic system is somewhat different in organizational structure,

it is, in principle, capable of working as effectively as those

in developed countries. Let us briefly examine an idealized representation

of the structure of the Upper Voltaic agricultural system (Figure 1).

Agricultural education in UV is under two Ministries: the

Ministry of Rural Development, and the Ministry of Education. The ISP

is responsible directly to the Ministry of Education while the CAP is

responsible to the Ministry of Rural Development. A joint coordination

committee of the two ministries exists to avoid program overlap. Students

at both institutions appear to be recruited from all over the

country and from a variety of backgrounds, although children of city

dwellers appear to be somewhat over-represented, particularly at ISP

(see Annex B.4). Women are under-represented, but efforts are being

made to recruit more women at both schools. In general, however, the

bulk of the students are from peasant families and are thus personally

familiar with village life. This is particularly important if the

graduates of these institutions are to effectively deal with the peasant

population.

The graduates of both institutions will be placed within the

ORDS. As is true of organizations everywhere, some ORD's are more

effective than others. However, all suffer from a lack of trained

personnel. As a result, they often have little information to disseminate

and are unable to translate peasants' needs into research

questions for those in research institutions. On the other hand,

many ORD's have demonstrated considerable success in getting peasants

to adopt and purchase animal traction equipment, adopt new farming

practices, correctly use fertilizers, and plant new crops.

The infusion of new and better-trained graduates into the

ORD's should increase their effectiveness as extension organizations

in a number of ways. First, the new graduates will have more information

to disseminate. That is to say, simply by virtue of being welltrained,

extension staff will be in a position to increase the scope


Other

Research

Institutions

(e.g. IRAT,

ICRISAT, SAED,

etc.)

Research

Coordination

Committee

FIGURE 1

TIlE UPPER VOLTA AGRICULTURAL SYSTEM

ISP

Education

W.4..W,

Research

U to 'a , X

l

,,FarmersJ

E I

-

-- D -s Geerl

-

oplaio


General Population

IIIIIII I ..

2Ministry

Coordi nation

cl 33

!

4|

CAP'S


- 53 ­

of assistance provided to farmers. Moreover, as formal education is

valued highly in UV, these graduates should be able to rise quickly

to policy making positions within the ORD's where they can gradually

re-direct them away from ineffective and toward more effective extension

activities. It should be emphasized here that high-quality applied

agricultural education is essential. If the education is of

poor quality or overly theoretical, then UV will be saddled with a

cumbersome and ineffective bureaucratic structure, ultimately paid

for by the peasant population.

A third advantage of the infusion of well-trained personnel

into the ORD's is the bolstering of their applied research and devf.,lopment

activities. For example, ORD staff would be able to conduct

varietal trials and other relatively straightforward experiments,

thereby freeing the research institutions from this routine and turdensome

task and permitting them to focus on more fundamental actlvities

such as the development of new varieties and the development of

farming systems. This would also increase the effectiveness of the

ORD's by allowing agents to bring specific technical improvements

direct to the peasant rather than reporting the results of trials at

far-away (both physically and socially) research stations.

A fourth advantage of better-trained personnel is that they

will be better able to recognize peasant problems and needs and

translate them into research problems. At present, the problems of

farmers often go unrecognized as they are not seen by people capable

of translating them into researchable problems.

A fifth benefit of trained personnel lies in their ability

to recognize, test, and disseminate innovations that are peasantoriginated.

All too often it is assumed that peasants are backward

and that peasant agriculture is irrational. Recent evidence suggests,

however, that (a) peasant agriculture is highly effective in providing

low-risk production, and (b) substantial variations may exist from

one peasant (or family) to another in crop practices. Better trained

staff should be capable of identifying such improved practices,

testing them, and disseminating them over a wider area.

Still another element enters into the operation of a successful

extension organization: The staff must be motivated by a sincere

interest in improving the level of living of the peasantry rather

than merely the desire to find a more secure position in the civil

service. The students at ISP and, to a greater extent, at Matourkou

seem genuinely concerned about agriculture and appear to desire to

participate in the agricultural development of UV (see Annexes B.4 and

B.7).


- 54 -

Thus, particularly at the levels closer to the peasantry,

this requirement for a successful system appears fulfilled.

As qraduates of these institutions take up their duties

within the agricultural support system, the farmers of the country

are expected to benefit by gra.dual increases in their productivity

as a result of greater access to the support system. This includes,

among others, greater accessibility of physical inputs and technical

information, improved credit programs, and better marketing systems.

Many small, near-subsistence farmers are expected to achieve modest

increases in production sufficient to improve the nutrition of the

farm family and to increase the products available for sale by means

of evolutionary modifications in farming techniques. Farmers who

benefit from the improved agricultural support system as a result

of this project will be self-selected, in that each individual farmer

will have the choice to take advantage of new methods and materials

or to decline to make the changes involved (this element of choice,

of course, is a very desirable testing mechanism which could prevent

the widespread adoption of unproven and ultimately unsuitable or even

harmful technological innovations).

In addition, a few advanced farmers and conmercial enterprises

may be able to benefit from the improvements in the agricultural support

system or from direct employment of graduates of the institutions

supported by this project.

Increased farm production will benefit the consumers of UV,

particularly those in urban centers, but also those on farms insofar as

greater availability of food and fiber produzts facilitates purchases

to supplement on-farm products.

Ultimately, the whole people of UV will be beneficiaries by

a reduction or elimination of the need for importation of food staples

and an increase in farm products available for export. This will decrease

the trade deficit and reduce the dependence of the country on

foreign donors.

In the long run, however, the best trained and most highly

motivated extension staff will be of little help if research is not

institutionalized so that the new questions carn be both raised and answered.

At present, UV has a multitude of agricultural research organizations

working within its frontiers with little coordination.

These organizations represent a number of donor nations, international

organizations, and voluntary associations (see Annex G.13). This

project addresses this problem through the establishment of ISP as

an indigenous agricultural research organization capable, through its


- 55 ­

field stations, of conducting research (and of teaching basic research

methods) relevant to most major ecological areas of UV, in most agricultural

disciplines. Moreover, it is expected that ISP will participate

actively in the research coordination committee that brings together

representatives of the various research organizations operating

within the country.

In short, the successful dissemination of information leading

to increased productivity at the level of the peasantry involves not

merely the training of low-level extension personnel. To ensure a

continuous flow of information and resources, it is necessary that an

agricultural service delivery system be established. If this system

is to be effective, it must integrate extension, research and education.

While the UV system will be somewhat different in structure than others-as

should be the case, for it has been designed by Voltaics to meet

their needs-- it appears fully capable, if the recommendations followed

in the PP are followed, of fulfilling its purpose: The improvement of

the level of living of the UV peasantry.

0. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS.

GENERAL.

Economic development can take several forms such as improvement

in public infrastructure, improvement in physical and economic

efficiency, and the removal of legal and social barriers. This project

deals with the improvement in educational infrastructure and an improvement

in agricultural efficiency through the diffusion of technology.

The proposed buildings, equipment and facilities in this project

are expected to greatly improve the practical agricultural training

of the students and staff. The new regional research centers and

village training centers will tailor practical training in crop and

livestock production to the country's three main general types of

farming areas.

Provisions for participant training of staff at ISP and CAP

will improve the knowledge of agricultural innovations and ultimately,

increase adoption of productive practices by Voltaic farmers. Improvement

in the curriculum at ISP and CAP will lead to an improvement in

physical and economic efficiency of production as this information is

transferred through the extension process to farmers. Traditional

agricultural methods are predominant in food and livestock production.

If the production function of food crops can be shifted upward through

the introduction of appropriate intermediate technology, then overall


- 56 ­

agricultural output can be increased. However, Upper Volta needs more

and better trained extension agents with practical knowledge which

farmers will adopt. An example is animal traction technology. Manufacturing

facilities in Upper Volta are producing large quantities

of animal traction equipment, but the pace of training animals and

farmers has been slow due partly to the lack of knowledgeable extension

agents. This project will result in accelerated agricultural

development of Upper Volta as new and better-trained extension agents

contribute to the growth of farm output.

THE ECONOMIC SETTING IN UPPER VOLTA.

Upper Volta isa classic example of a developing country which

does not possess a salable natural resource in great abundance. As

such, it must develop its agriculture so that, at a minimum, no supplementary

food is imported except those kinds which cannot be produced

in the country. Marketing and food processing sectors of the

economy must be developed so that more of the value added in production

can accrue to Upper Volta. It is also rarely profitable to export

unprocessed food when jobs could have been created and value added in

the economy by processing within the country.

At present the rural sector of Upper Volta accounts for 92

percent of the population and 94 percent of the resident labor force.

At thesame time, agriculture accounted for only 38 percent of the

Gross Domestic Product of the country due to a large subsistence agricultural

sector. Agricultural products acccunted for 91 percent of

Upper Volta's exports in recent years, with livestock representing

41 percent of this. One factor which makes agricultural development

urgent is that food production is not expanding as fast as the annual

2.2 percent increase in the population.

PROJECT BENEFITS.

In general, it is expected that t, diffusion of agricultural

innovations will increase farm output during the life of the project.

Furthermore, long-run sustained growth will multiply the benefits

many times, as it is expected that the investment in the agricultural

education and extension will have a permanent effect on the economy.

In addition, as agricultural efficiency increases, it is expected that

imports of food and fiber can be reduced, thus improving the balance

of trade and saving valuable foreign exchange. Therefore, the project's

impact on agricultural output will contribute to the long-range goal of

food self-sufficiency in the Sahelian countries.


- 57 -

The impact of an improvement in extension agent training

will benefit the small farmer in Upper Volta as agents acquire skills

and appropriate technology for the present production system. As

extension agents of the ORD's receive more appropriate training, their

visits to the farmers will have specific objectives that will benefit

th farmers. The new ideas and suggestions are not designed to make

che small farmer a large commercial agribusinessman immediately, but

rather to introduce technology relevant to immediate existing problems.

For instance, if a farmer has a gross income of $100, then the extension

agent's goal might be to add another $50 to gross income next year.

This is a realistic goal; and when achieved, provides an incentive for

the farmer and extension agent to continue their relationship.

The extension agents and regional development organizations

have very weak applied research programsto support their efforts in the

rural environment. The expansion of ISP's central station and regional

research stations, by means of investments in training, facilitaties

and technical assistance, will help bridge the gap between new agricultural

knowledge and the farmer.

Countries without the capacity to do internationally significant

agricultural research also lack the capacity to benefit from

the research of others in similar geo-climatic zones. Upper Volta

will need to emphasize not only development of the capacity for adaptive

or applied research, but also eventually, the formation of highorder

conceptual scientific skills if it is to take full advantage of

potential contribution of agricultural science to national development.

The coordination of agricultural research activities at ISP's

Central Field Station and regional centers will provide the country

with the capacity to benefit from international agricultural research

such as that carried on by such organizations as IRRI, CIMMYT, CIAT,

SAFGRAD, ICRISAT, WARDA, IRAT, IRHO and other agencies. An increase

in the rate of adaptive diffusion of agricultural innovations alone

would justify the project investment.

In lieu of a measurable value of output as occurs in projects

of this type, AID guidelines suggest analysis of cost. The following

Table gives the cost per student over an assumed 40-year life of the

facilities created. Costs per student are given for both U.S. and

GOUV contributions and are based on an output of students per year of

150, 60, and 25 at CAP Matourkou, CAP Bogande, and ISP respectively.

Considering the importance of agriculture in the economy of Upper

Volta, these costs per student appear to be very reasonable.


- 58-

Site: U.S. Cont. GOUV Cont.

Cost per Student

U.S. GOUV

Total Cont.Cont. Cont. Total

Matourkou $2,095,550 $3,695,000 $5,790,500 $ 349 $ 616 $ 965

Bogande 3,915,000 506,000 4,421,000 1,631 211 1,842

ISP 3,082,500 1,878,000 4,960,500 3,082 1,878 4,960


- 59 -

PART 4. IMPLEMENTATION ARRANGEMENTS

A. ANALYSIS OF THE RECIPIENT'S AND AID'S ADMINISTRATIVE ARRANGEMENTS.

This project will be implemented within the Ministries of Education

(ME) and of Rural Development (tDR). It is indispensible that

some administrative relationships and arrangements exist between both

Ministries at the level of the educational centers directly involved.

The implementing agencies of this project will be the University of

Ouagadougou through the Rectorate and the Coordinating Committee for

Rural Development (CCDR) through the Permanent Secretariat's Unit of

Community Development. These Governmental agencies will delegate

their responsibility for operation and decision making to the Directorates

of ISP and of the CAP's respectively. The director of each CAP will be

responsible to the CCOR while the director of ISP will report to the

Rector's office of UO. The CCDR will be capable of coordinating various

multi-disciplinary inputs and evaluating the educational outputs, educational

performance within the rural development and agricultural

programs. In the same way, the UO will assume the responsibility of

implementing its higher education program in this country. The officials

of the Secretariat Permanent/IDR, of ISP/UO and of CAP/Matourkou

are fully aware of their urgent needs and existing potentials and are

quite confident that the GOUV will benefit from this project. The

implementing institutions are fitted within the total development program.

In collaboration with the AID project manager these governmental

institutions will manage the education system, the technical assistance

and local commodities procurement of this poject. United States

commodities procurement will be handled by a procurement agency such

as the Afro-American Purchasirg Center (AAPC). Organization charts

of the implementing agencies structure and operation follow.


a

th

IRural

Ru If

|Planning1

one

'

Homoe

Economics

-to

Director

' '" " - I ,

O Training

Director

*

I

-m q D464 Am < -1

'

OF!CE OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT

CooRM1- I,&MTTEO ....

MINISTRY

PERMANENT SECRETARIAT OF CCD R1

Community Development I

iD-rector I

% '.

II

Proec Pr7 roject M Manager gDirector I ..

-J

AID Technical

Assistance "Drector

1 Other Donor--

Technical Assistance

ural Institu- I

tons & Credits

CAP Bogande

,l

ra'ing I

mD I -n 1 ~ g l g ~ l -1 -

U

U

-utritton &1I R

Health

Center

Dionkele ,

0


MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

Minister's Office

I-

1

1 --­

UNIVERSITY OF OUAGADOUGOU

E Rector'.s IOffit ceI -.

POLYTECHNICAL SUPERIOR

INSTITUTE (ISPO) CDO/Ouagadougou

Other Donor ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTION A '6 Poe Man4d&r I

Technical Assistance

OF -DIRECTION

SUISncal Assisac

Animal

tlusbandry

Aimal

Hsbandry Agronomy Mathema tics

"-i SECTIONS Civl i nr

Water Management

Forestry DEATETS

Biology &

Geology 1-chemi stry "Physitcs

Other Disciplines

Water Management

Frsry


CAP AT ,IATOURKOU AND BOGANDE.

- 62 -

During implementation the Secretariat Permanent of the Coordinating

Committee of Rural Development will have the decisionmaking

power. Under the Secretariat Permanent, the Community Development

Unit Director will delegate responsibility to the CAP's directors

who will coordinate the activities of implementation such as construction,

staffing, recruiting, cur,-iculum development and execution and

budget control. The detailed day-by-day curriculum applications

will be the responsibility of the Training Directors who

report directly to the CAP Director. The AID technical assistance in

each CAP will relate to both directors in matters regarding technical

assistance, teaching aid applied research and will coordinate the

project activities.

ISP AT UNIVERSITY OF OUAGADOUGOU.

Within the Ministry of Education, the University of Ouagadougou

headed by the Rector, has the decision-making power and the academic

freedom to operate in matters regarding higher education in Upper

Volta. The Rector delegates responsibilities to the Administrative

Director of ISP who will coordinate the activities of his project

implementation. The Administrative Director of ISP will be the key

intermediary person between AID and ISP as far as budget administration

and control, infrastructure buildings, personnel training, scholarships

and staffing are concerned. In collaboration with the Director of

Studies, he will coordinate and implement the improved curriculum.

He controls the rural development and the civil engineering sections.

He is responsible for staffing the different departments and consults

with various department heads in matters concerning laboratory practices,

stud.nts'visits and research. He will have the overall control

of operation in tne different field stations, although the day-by-day

operation of these stations will fall upon their respective Directors.

He will make certain that these centers serve their teaching purposes

and the research conducted serves the need of rural farmers in their

respective locations.

The construction plans of the various units of this project,

will be the responsibilities of the implementing agencies. The ISP

structural needs and designs fit within the existing architectural

designs for the whole university. Outlying training centers will be

designed and constructed by use of appropriate materials and consistent

with the construction in those areas. Better stock inventories of

spare parts and supplies will be developed to ease the acquisitions

due to geographic constraints.


AID.

- 63 -

Implementation of the project will be under the guidance of

the AID Project Manager (see position description, Annex B.17). In

addition, CDO/Ouagadougou and the GOUV will collaborate in all matters

regarding the pre-implementation procedures. USAID's responsibility

and concern in managing this project will be carried out by the Project

Manager. The services of USAID engineer (REDSO/WA) will be used to

approve final construction plans (see Technical Analysis, Part 3.A -

Construction).

Once the project paper is approved and funds authorized, the

Project Manager and appropriate COO staff will make final negotiations

leading to the signing of the Project Agreement. Once the project is

signed, the AID Project Manager will have primary responsibility for

project implementation (overall management, procurement, monitoring,

etc.). He/she will not have a single GOUV counterpart, but rather,

three counterparts: the Directors of ISP, CAP-Matuurkou, and CAP-

Bogande. The Project Manager will be aided in the coordination of project

inputs by the U.S. contract technicians sprving at ISP and the

CAP's.

The Project Manager will also represent AID in advisory committees

set up to review and supervise ISP and the CAPs. The CAP's

are supervised by the Community Development Unit of the CCDR, so the

Project Manager will make an input at that level. Two committees

review ISP's program: (1)The Conseil de Perfectionnement which meets

twice each year, once at the start of the academic year to review the

annual education plan and again at the end of the year to assess progress

made during the year; (2)the Assemblee de l'Etablissement

which meets monthly to review any problems/issues ISP may be having

and/or proposals for new activities. The Conseil consists of approximately

twenty people - half from the University (including ISP) and

half from outside the University (including representatives from other

Ministries - notably Rural Development). The Assemblee consists of

the Director of ISP plus four people, two from the public sector and

two from the private sector. Whereas membership may change from year

to year, the Permanent Secretary of the CCDR is a permanent member. The

AID Project Manager will participate in both of these supervisory committees.

Throughout the design of the PP, the PP team has been impressed

with the cooperation and interest expressed-by the GOUV for

this project. Though both the CAP at Matourkou and ISP are working


- 64 ­

under the constraints of insufficient facilities and staff, they are

doing a commendable job. The project inputs of technical assistance,

infrastructure, and training are designed to facilitate and improve

the performance of ISP and the CAP's. The GOUV's ability to manage these

institutions during and after the period of U.S. assistance should be

proved through the injection of project inputs. For example, when suf- imficient

numbers of teachers have been trained and are on staff, the

Directors will no longer be faced with the problem of juggling teachers

and courses and deciding which courses must be dropped temporarily.

Although tke individual who will direct the CAP-Bogande has not yet

been named, both the ISP Director and the Training Director of CAP-

Matourkou have shown over a period of several years that they can

successfully administer their respective centers. In addition, they

each carry a full teaching load. It is expected that the Directors of

the respective institutions who will benefit from this project will continue

their present strong leadership.


B. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN.

- 65 -

(see Project Funding Forecast, Annex C,2)

Date Action

12/77 1. PP submitted AID/W

1/78 2. PP approved

3/78 3, ProAg signed

4/78 4. Contract signed with SECID

5-6/78 5. 5 participants selected for U.S.

teacher training

5:-6/78 6. Matourkou construction plans completed

and reviewed by AID engineer

6/78 7. Construction begins at Matourkou (construction

by Matourkou building crew with

assistance from local contractors)

6/78 8. Sites for first two ISP regional stasions

and Bogande CAP selected

5-7/78 9. Equipment ordered for ISP and CAP's

(PIO/C's for procurement - Assistance

from short-term consultants: procurement,

agricultural machinery,and lab specialists)

7/78 10. Construction plans completed and reviewed

for regional stations.

7/78 11. Request for construction proposals for

regional stations

7/78 12. Bogande cbnstructlon plans completed and

reviewed

7/78 13. Request for Construction Proposals for

Bogande

7/78 14. Participants go to U.S. for 3 years training

7/78 15. University tours for ISP staff

Responsible

Agencies

CDO

AID/W

CDO/GOUV

AID/W/SECID

GOUV

CDO/GOUV

CDO/GOUV

GOUV

CDO/GOUV/SECID

CDO/GOUV

CDO/GOUV

CDO/GOUV

CDO/GOUV

CDO/GOUV/SECID

GOUV/CDO/SECID


Date Action

- 66 -

Responsible

Agencies

9/78 16. Half of project vehicles acquired CDO/GOUV

9/78 17. Well and water system installed at

ISP Central Station CDO/GOUV

9/78 18. Plans completed and reviewed for farm

pond/reservoir and wells at ISP central

station (construction by H.E.R.) CDO/GOUV

9/78 19. Two units staff housing, one dorm com­

pleted at Matourkou GOUV

9/78 20. Contractor(s) selected for Bogande CDO/GOUV

9/78 21. Arrival of long-term technician for

Matourkou (4 years) SECID

9/78 22. Arrival first long-term technician for

ISP (2 years) SECID

9/78 23. Short-term consultants off and on throughout

year CDO/SECID

10/78 24. Construction begins Bogande CDO/GOUV

10/78 25. Contractor(s) selected for regional

stations - construction starts CDO/GOUV

10/78 - ProAg Amendment tFY 79 Funds) AID/CDO/GOUV

3/79 26. Additional staff recruited/assigned

to Matourkou CDO/GOUV

3/79 27. Staff recruited/assigned to Bogande CDO/GOUV

3/79 28. Arrival long-term technician (4 yrs)

for Bogande

4/79 29. Short-term training of CAP staff CDO/GOUV

5/79 30. Construction of 3 dorms, classroom,

administration building, dining hall,

lab, 7 housing units, shed and town

services completed at Bocande CDO/GOUV

5/79 31. Site for third ISP regional station

selected CDO/GOUV

5/79 32. Construction of farm p nd/reservoir

and wells completed at ISP central

station CDO/GOUV


- 67 -

Responsible

Date Action Agencies

5/79 33. Lab equipment installed at Matourkou CDO/GOUV/SECID

5/79 34. Water system complete at Matourkou GOUV

5-6/79 35. First group, students begins at Bogande GOUV

5-6/79 36. First group of larger classes starts

at Matourkou GOUV

5-6/79 37. 10 participants selected for U.S.

teacher training GOUV

6/79 38. Construction plans for third ISP

regional station completed and

reviewed CfDO/GOUV

6/79 39. Request for construction proposal for

third station CDO/GOUV

7/79 40. Participants go to U.S. for 3-year

training CDO/GOUV/SECI D

7/79 41. University tours for ISP staff CDO/GOUV/SECID

9/79 42. Arrival of second long-term technician

for ISP (2 years) SECID

9/79 43. Short-term consultants off ard on

throughout year CDO/SECID

9/79 44. Construction of classroom, 2 dorms,

dining hall, and first village enter

completed - Matourkou CDO/GOUV

9/79 45. Construction completed at two ISP

regional stations CDO/GOUV

9/79 46. Contractor(s) selected for third

regional station; construction starts CDO/GOUV

9/79 47. Field equipment for 1SP Central

Station in place CDO/GOUV/SECID

10/79 - ProAg Amendment (FY 80 Funds) signed AID/CDO/GOUV

10/79 48. Two ISP regional stations equipped CDO/GOUV/SECID

3/80 49. Special in-depth project evaluation CO0/CJUV/AID/W/

SECID

4/80 50. Arrival of two remaining long-term

technicians (2 years each)-arrive

for Bogande SECID


- 68 -

Date Acti on Responsible

Agencies

4/80 51. Short-term training CAP staff CDO/GOUV

5/80 52. Additional classroom, docms, housing,

lab, sheds, town services, constructed

at Bogande CDO/GOUV

5/80 53. Lab equipment installed at ISP CDO/GOUV/SECID

5/80 54. Third ISP regional station completed

and equipped CDO/GOUV/SECID

5-6/80 55. Final 5 participants selected for U.S.

teacher training GOUV

7/80 56. Iarticipants go to U.S. for 3-year

training CDO/GOUV/SEC ID

.7/80 57. University tours for ISP staff CDO/GOUV/SECID

9/80 58. Construction completed at Matourkou CDO/GOUV

9/80 59. Arrival of third long-term technician

for ISP (2 years) SECID

9/80 60. Short-term consultants off and on

throughout year CDO/GOUV/SECID

10/80 - ProAg Aendment (FY 81 Funds) signed AID/W/CDO/GOUV

4/81 61. Short-term training of CAP staff CDO/GOUV

5/81 62. Lab equipment installed at Bogande COO/GOUV/SECID

5/81 63. Additional classroom, dorms, lab,

housing, library, town services,

constructed at Bogande CDO/GOUV

7/81 64. First group of participants (5)return

to Upper Volta, ready to teach SECID

7/81 65. University tours for ISP staff CDO/GOUV/SECID

9/81 66. Short-term consultants off and on

throughout year CDO/GOUV/SECID

10/81 67. Returned participants start teaching

at ISP GOUV/CDO

3/82 68. Special in-depth project evaluation CDO/GOUV/AID/W/

SECID


- 69 -

Responsible

Date Action Agencies

4/82 69. First CTA graduates from Bogande assigned

to positions in ORD's and

Ministries GOUV

4/82 70. Short-term training CAP staff CDO/GOUV

5/82 71. Construction completed at Bogande CDO/GOUV

7/82 72. University tours for ISP staff CDO/GOUV/SECID

7/82 73. Second group of participants (10)

return to Upper Volta ready to teach SECID

9/82 74. Short-term consultants off and on

throughout year CDO/GOUV/SECID

10/82 75. Returned participants (10) start

teaching at ISP CDO!GOUV

3/83 76. Final AID contribution to-project CDO

4/83 77. .First ATA graduates from Bogande assigned

to positions in ORD's and

Ministries GOUV

7/83 78. Final group of participants (5) return

to Upper Volta to teach SECID


- 70 -

C. EVALUATION ARRANGEMENTS FOR PROJECT.

In addition to regular annual AID evaluations, in-depth

evaluations of this project will be scheduled at the end of two

years and at the end of four years (see Implementation Plan, Part

4.C). In addition to the Means of Verification listed in the Log

Frame (see Annex E), baseline data as well as the methodology developed

by the PP team could be used for evaluation purposes.

It is suggested that evaluation be held after two years in

order to verify that the new CAP Bogande is functioning as planned.

At that point, it will have been in operation one year. The expanded

facilities at Matourkou should be evaluated at the same time to compare

operations at the two institutions. The field stations for ISP

should also be functioning after two years.

A second evaluation when the project is four years old should

allow time for further adjustment in the last year.

All evaluations will be conducted jointly with GOUV since

it is administering the affected institutions.

The student questionnaires distrfbuted by the PP team at

ISP and CAP Matourkou (see Annexes G.4 and 7) can provide baseline

data for evaluating the quality of education at the two facilities.

While the same students will not be polled, the mean responses should

change if substantial improvement is made.

The following questions could serve as indicators:

Q.13. Percentage indicating satisfaction with courses taught.

Q.16. Percentage indicating sufficient staff at ISP and Matourkou.

Q.17. Perception of adequacy of preparation at ISP and Matourkou.

Q.21. Percentage wishing to work in villages.

In addition, several points frequently alluded to by students should

cease to be problems if changes are specifically implemented. Specifically:

1. Students frequently complained about the lack of a relationship

between course work and field work.


- 71 ­

2. Students complained that teachers had not received adequate

teacher training.

3. Students noted that teachers were frequently forced to teach

outside their areas of specialization due to lack of staff.

If these conditions are ameliorated, these problems should not show

up on the evaluation questionnaires.

Moreover, even though it was impossible to collect baseline

data on the as yet non-existent CAP at Bogande, similar questionnaires

could be administered there. This would permit, the comparison of

student survey responc es at Bogande with those administered at Matourkou.

In addition to the questionnaires, the means of verification

outlined in the Log Frame Matrix (see Annex E) in Sections B and C

would serve as valuablec additional indicators of project success.

These would include:

B.3. 1. Annual number of graduates from ISP and CAP's.

2. Reduction of number of unfilled positions within MDR.

3. Interviews with encadreurs in ORD's to determine practical

knowledge of middle and upper-level staff.

C.3. 2. Numbers of teachers and students meet projections.

3. Site inspections of physical facilities.

The quantifiable nature of this project should facilitate

evaluation to determine if its purpose is being fully met.

0. CONDITIONS CO'.ENANTS AND NEGOTIATING STATUS.

The elements and terms of this project have been elaborated,

discussed with, and agreed to by the GOUV. Nonetheless, certain conditions

will be required to ensure the likelihood of a successful

project implementation. Project funds are scheduled for obligation in

fiscal years 1978, 1979, 1980 and 1981. Every effort should be made

in the negotiation of Project Agreement amendments to ensure that the

GOUV is doing its best to implement the project. The negotiating of

the Project Agreement and conditions precedent will be the responsibility

of CDO/Ouagadougou. It is recommended that the following Conditions

Precedent be included in the Project Agreement:


Conditions Precedent.

- 72 -

I. Prior to the disbursement of any funds for each construction activity

under this project, construction plans for that activity

will be reviewed and approved by an AID engineer.

2. Prior to the sending of any participants to the U.S. for teacher

training, the GOUV will state in writing that returned participants

who have successfully completed their training will be assigned

as teachers at ISP.

Covenants.

1. Specific site selection for the Bogande CAP will be made no later

than September 1978.

2. The GOUV will institute Personnel Benefits programs for ISP and

both CAP's no later than March 1979.


- 73 -

ANNEX OUTLINE

ANNEX PAGE

A. AID/W PRP APPROVAL MESSAGE. 75

B. PROJECT TECHNICAL DETAILS. 78

1. ABBREVIATED CURRICULUM, ISP. 78

2. CAP, MATOURKOU, ATA CURRICULUM. 86

3. CAP, MATOURKOU, CTA CURRICULUM. 99

4. RESULTS OF STUDENT SURVEY, ISP. 102

5. STUDENT QUESTIONNAIRE, ISP. 108

6. STAFF ACTIVITY FORM, ISP. 111

7. RESULTS OF STUDENT SURVEY, CAP, iM-ATOURKOU. 113

8. STUDENT QUESTIONNAIRE, CAP, IATOURKOU. 121

9. STAFF QUESTIONNAIRE, CAP, iL.TOURKOU. 124

10. STAFF ACTIVITY FORM, CAP, MATOURKOU. 127

11. SELECTED INDIVIDUALS AND GROUPS CONTACTED. 129

12. IMVAP OF UV SHOWING ISP AND CAP FACILITY 131

LOCATIONS.

13. CURRENT AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH IN UPPER VOLTA. 132

14. STAFF, CAP, IATOURKOU. 135

15. STAFF, ISP. 137

16. QUALIFICATIONS OF ADVISORY PERSONNEL. 139

17. POSITION DESCRIPTION-DIRECT HIRE PROJECT MANAGER. 142

18. BIBLIOGRAPHY. 144

C. FINANCIAL TABLES. 147

1. ITEMIZED COST LIST. 147

2. PROJECT FUNDING FORECAST. 163

3. FOREIGN EXCHANGE AND LOCAL CURRENCY COSTS. 166

4. GOUV CONTRIBUTION. 167

5. INCREMENTAL CAP ENROLLIENT. 171

D. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT. 172

E. PROJECT DESIGN LOGICAL FRAMEWORK MATRIX. 175

F. PPT. 179

G. MISSION DIRECTOR's CERTIFICATION. 180

H. BORROWER/GRANTEE'S APPLICATION FOR ASSISTANCE. 181

I. INTERVIEWS WITH ENCADREURS AND ATA'S SERVING IN THE 185

EASTERN ORD.


- 74 -

ANNEX PAGE

J. THE ROLE OF WOMEN AND MINORITIES 187

K. WAIVERS. 189

L. STATUTORY CHECKLIST. 191

M. DRAFT OF PROJECT DESCRIPTION TO BE USED IN 204

PROJECT )GREEMEMT.


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Sexual Reproduction in~'th. AngiosperMu; Generalitieson repoduction.

Flowers P n)aflrQa iation, fruit, 3004 ____,

A' &uu Reproduction in the Angionerms : Natual vegetat4# mui flu,

plants. Reproduction. of flowering' plants I Moxphol and anatoyo

flor. . EQQ1Qg1o4 ,'dt.Luintion by m.eans of the fbi.a. Gane$

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amosprm. Sotionx 9f 8 stimitiosl grassau et=- qa t

Iabiou and identification.

PamOrganizational Gioa&. and'Eencduction of-Plant Groumv, The

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alp.s, usah~ioc

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bryophtes, pteidp-

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Plant cobo~t Planta in their naturial habitat. PFactois~affeotizg

plant dstribution. Notions on nutiition cycle and food" ohin.

COMICS AND ANIMA BIOLOGYT

.... . ...... ..

ProtozoaUst Stdy of thelpinipa3. paraitic spiles in 'this pu.'

Sponicew Cnid.z.es. tenaire.? bief studies. j , .i+ . .

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- 82 -

Genetic make-un of a population: Frequency of genes and genotypes.

Hardy Wernberg's law. A case of a locus with two alleles or several

alleles. Sex-linked genes. Case of several linked genes.

Modification of Gene Freoueny: Migration, mutation, selection,

efficiency of selection, selection favoring heterozygotes, mutation

and selection.

Small Pooulations and Modification of Gene Freouencies: a. Consequences

- differentiation, reduction of variability, fixation b.

Specialization.

Pedigree Poulations and Close Consanquinity: a. Coefficient of consanguinity

of an individual. b. Coefficient of relationship. c.

Systematic consanguinity: (1)Brother-sister linkage, (2) Parent-child

linkage, (3) Linkage between half-brothers and sisters, (4) Backcrossing,

(5) Autofecondation.

Quantitative Genetics: Qxantitative characteristics. Quantitative

geetis, variance, likenesses among relatives, Heretability Selection.

Animal Bioloy: Anatomy and compared biology of 5 principal groups

of vertebrates: fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals.

Plant Physiology: Nutrition and Metabolism: Plants and water. Mineral

nutritirn. Photosynthesis. Respiration. Gas assimilation.

Growth and Development: Effects of external factors. -7ny2iology of

germination. Sexual reproduction.

Animal Physiolory: Cell physiology. Digestion. Circulation and the

internal milieu. Respiration. Reproduction. Endocrinal, and hormoal

glands.

GEOLOGY - PEDOLOGY

Introduction: (Definitions, Fundamental axioms. Methods. Principal

branches.) The Earth. Notions of minerology and oristallography.

The Terrain of the World: Tectonic notions, Paleontology, Rock,

alternations, Introduction to Pedology.

Practical Work: Reading of geologic maps, rook identifications,

Photoaer'.al interpretations.


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- 86 -

ANNEX B. 2

CENTRE AGRICOLE POLYVALENT DE MATOURKOU

Subjects Required of all Students

FIRST YEAR

1. Initiation in farming business

Description.

AGENTS TECHNIQUES AGRICOLES

ATA CURRICULUM

Definition and characteristics of farming business, The factors which contri­

bute to production: land, capital and work. Farming works, Combining factors.

Productivity

2, Farming techniques and animal traction

Description.

Plowing techniques and instruments. Animal traction plow. Tools. Maintenance.

Harvest machinery.

3. Olericulture or vegetable crops,

Description.

Vegetable garden, Nursery, techniques. Harvest and conservation, leafy vege­

tables. Fruits. Roots and tubers.

4. Poultrv & Rabbits.

Description.

Installation and poultry equipment. techniques of poultry husbandry. Feeding

Hygiene. Poultry diseases: diagnosis and care. Rabbit husbandry: Feeding,

hygiene, diseases and care. Installation and equipment. Guinea fowl, turkey


and duck husbandry.

5. Soil Science

Description.

- 87 ­

Definition. Formation. Components. Physical characteristics: Texture and

structure. Physical properties: Water and air movements. Chemical properties:

Humus, pH and fertility.

6. Meteorology and climatology

Description.

Atmospheric phenomena. Equip

7. Mathematics

Description.

Review of fractions, proportions and percentages. Commercial calculus:

revenue, interest rate, discount, graph and diagram interpretations. Statistics:

basic notions and limits. Algebra, polynomial representations. First degree

equations, inequalities, equation systems.

8. Plant biology

Description.

Plant life: seed germination, growth and reproduction. Cell. Plant and animal

tissues. Classification of plants. Angiosperms: classification and morpho:ogy.

Plant physiology: nutrition, germination, reproduction.

9. Animal Biology

Description.

Animal classification. Mammals and birds, morphology and anatomy. Physiology


80 ­

of digestion, circulation and respiration. This course will concern bovine,

ovine, swine, rabbits and poultry.

10. Chemistry

Description.

Atoms. Molecule. Elements: simple and compound. Mixtures. Solutions.

Concentration percents. Composition of air. Acids and bases. Valence.

Sulphur, carbon and their important derivatives. Metals.

11..Physics3

Description.

Weight. Kilogram. Concurrent forces. Parallels. Vectors. Levers. Mano­

meters. Temperature and thermometers. Calorie and heat. Fusion and water

vaporisation.

12. French

Description.

Grammar. Readings.

SECOND YEAR

1. Plant and animal biology

Description.

Sexual reproduction and asexual reproduction. Reproduction cycles.

2. Plant and animal breeding.

Description.

Thoroughbred. Hybridi-zation. Mendel laws. Selection. Experimentation.

Improved and selected seed production.


3. Soil improvement

Description.

- 89 ­

Humus and organic fertilizers. Minerals. Fertilization. Mineral fertilizers

used in Upper Volta. Drainage and irrigation.

4. Topography

Description.

Mapping. Planimetry. Altimetry

5. Pomology

Description.

Nursery. Orchard. Current fruit trees.

6. Farm mechanization

Description.

Tractors.Garden Tillers. Pounders. Harvesters. Incubators. Motorpumps.

7. French

Description.

Review of grammar. Reading report techniques. African literature.

8. Chemistry

Description.

Salts used in agriculture. Sodium, potassium, calcium and phosphorus.

Proteins. Carbohydrates and lipids. Hydrocarbons.


9. Physics

Description.

- 90 ­

Energy. Work and power. Electricity and power. Electrolysis. Intensity and

Joule effect. Resistance power consumption. Magnetism. Principle of electrical

engine.

10. Mathematics

Description.

Trigonometry. Applied Geometry. Surfaces and volumes. Vectors. Functioni

Second degree equations. Probability.

11. Functional literacy.

Description.

Definition.Functional literacy in Upper Volta. Setting up of functional literacy

program. Pedagogical organization.

12. Rural Sociology

Description.

Definition and application. Rural society. Organization and structures.

Social relationships. Culture and civilization. Social change. Causes and

manifestations. Social inquiry. Polling methods.

SPECIALIZATION CYCLE

1. The specialization cycle includes two essential phases:

a) Theoretical formation and .-ractical application (12 months)

b) Practicum (6 months) or training.


- 91 ­

2. Organization of theoretical formation phase:

a) Common courses

b) Special courses

c) Practical application

A) Common Courses

1) General Zootechny (animal science).

Description.

Production of feeds. Forages. Exploration of pastures. Stages. Utilization

of industrial by-products. Animal feeding. Nutritive value of main feedstuffs.

Forage equivalent. Balance of rations. Ration for growth, maintenance and

production.

2. Soil conservation.

Description.

Erosion phenomena. Wind and water factors. Techniques of erosion prevention.

3. Reforestation.

Description.

Causes of desertification. Deforestation prevention. Importance of forests.

Techniques of reforestation. Main forest species. Develcpment of forests.

4. Rural construction.

Description.

Farm construction. Techniques. Barns. Poultry houses, etc.

5. Credit and cooperation.

Description.

4.) role of credit in agricultural development. Types of credit. System of


- 92 ­

credit. Problems particular to Upper Volta.

(b) history of Coop. Rules and organization. Statute and rules. Traditional

structures. Coops in Upper Volta. Legislation and organization.

6. Community development.

Description.

Objectives. Structures, Role and competence of community development

agent. Program of comm. development. Methods of .;omm. dev.

7. Economics.

Description.

(a) general economics, (b) rural economics (c) home economics.

8. Human Nutrition.

Description.

Nutrition principles and needs. Food groups. Dietetics. Malnutrition.

Feeding habits and nutrition. Hygiene and eating.

9. Statistics.

Description.

(a) Descriptive statistics sampling techniques, graphing, (b) applied to

agriculture. Data gathering, implementation of inquiry,

10. Animal science (specialized).

Description.

Bovine and ovine husbandry.


11. Public administration.

Description.

- 93 ­

Characteristics. Formul is. Letters and correspondence. Budget law.

Administration and institutions in Upper Volta. Hierarchy and career.

12. Agronomy

Description.

Millet. Sorghum. Corn. Soil preparation. Maintenance and care. Harvest

and storage.

13. Sanitary education.

Description.

Infectious diseases and o.pidemics. Meningitis, smallpox, yellow fever

tetanus, etc. Onchocerciasis, bilharzia, malaria, Trypanosomiasis, etc.

Social diseases: venereal diseases, tuberculosis, alcoholism, etc.

14. First aid.

Special courses.

A. Agricultural Section.

1. Special agriculture.

Description.

Cotton, rice, peanuts, sugar cane, etc.

2. Crop protection.

Description.

Economic entomology and pathology. nsects and plant diseases in

Upper Volta. Insecticide and fungicide. Prevention and treatments.


3. Food packaging.

Description.

- 94 ­

Techniques and normalization of products.

4. Technology.

Description.

Oil, soap, rice, cotton, sugar cane, tobacco and beer.

B. Animal Husbandry Section.

1. Special Zootechny.

Description.

Goat, bovine, donkey, horse husbandry.

2. Animal pathology.

Description.

Skin and organ diseases. Infectious diseases. Parasites. Prevention

and treatments.

3. Sanitation policing.

4. Inspection of products of animal origin.

5. Technology.

Description.

Yogurt pasteurization. Leather and skin.

C. Water resources management and Forestry Section.

1. Forestry and reforestation.


Description.

- 95 -

Ecology. Botany. Knowing the forest species.

2. Fisheries

Description.

Species of fish. Pond establishment, management and care.

3. Forestry law.

Description.

Application to Upper Volta.

4. Cynegetics.

Description.

Knowing the fauna. Establishment. Legislation of hunting.

5. Topography.

6. Military education.

HOME ECONOMICS SECTION (Applied to rural communities)

1. Gaild growth and development

Description.

Physiology and hygiene of pregnancy. Delivery. Anatomy, physiology and

hygiene of the infant. Feeding and growth. Weaning. Common diseases of

children.

2. Hygiene.

Description.

Care and maintenance of body & home.


3. Cooking.

Description.

- 96 ­

Culinary techniques, traditional and modern. Preparations. Canning and

storage.

4. Sewing.

Description.

Clothing, fashion and design. Use and maintenance of sewing machines.

COURSE DISTRIBUTION (A. T. A.)

FIRST YEAR (COMMON TRUNK)

-----------------------------------------------------------------

SUBJECTS Ist Trim. 2nd Trim. 3rd Trim. Total

Hours Hours Hours Hours

Plant Biology - 60 60 120

Animal Biology - 60 48 108

Management 40 - - 40

Agriculture 40 - 36 76

Soil Science 36 20 - 56

Meteorology & Climate 30 10 - 40

Vegetable Crops - 24 50 74

Poultry 36 24 ­ 60

Mathematics 40 40 30 110

Physics & Chemistry 40 30 24 94

French 30 24 24 78

Practice 80 50 70 200

Training - 30 30 60


1. SECOND YEAR COMMON TRUNK

SUBJECTS

- 97 ­

1st Trim. 2nd Trim. 3rd Trim. Total

Hours Kours Hours Hours

Plant & Animal science 80 80

Plant and Animal Breeding 48 - 48

Soil Science - - 84 84

Topography 70 - 70

Pomology - 40 40 80

Rural Sociology 40 40 - 80

Farm Mechanization - 40 44 84

Functional literacy - 20 20 40

Mathematics 40 36 30 106

Physics and Chemistry 30 30 24 84

French. 24 30 30 84

Practice 80 60 70 210

Training 30 - 30 60

COMMON COURSES

Hours

Special Agriculture 60

General Zootechny 60

Special Zootechny 50

Rural Construction 40

Reforestration 40

Soil Conservation 40

Community Development 40

Credit - Cooperatives 40

Economics 40

Human Nutrition 40

Statistics 40

Public administration 30

Sanitary education 60

First aid 36

Physical education and studies 100

Training and visits 100

Note - there are 34 hours of courses per week - the common lectures last

6 months.


DISTRIBUTION OF S7,.CIAL COURSES

- 98 -

Agriculture Section Hours

Special Agriculture

140

Soil couditioning

70

Protection of crops 130

Technology

130

Practice

210

Training

680

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY SECTION

Special Zootechny

140

Animal pathology 200

Sanitation so

Technology

40

Inspection of animal products 60

Practice

200

Training

680

WATER RESOURCESMANAGEMENT AND FORESTRY SECTION

Forestry and reforestation 130

Topography

80

Fisheries and fishing 120

Forest law

60

Military education 80

Cynegetics

120

Practics

190

Training

680

HOME ECONOMICS SECTION

Puericulture

140

Hygiene

140

Cooking

100

Sewing & clothing 100

Practices

200

Training

680


Curriculum ,General

- 99 ­

.UPEX B.3

CENTRE AGRICOLE PULYVALLIT iATOULKOU

CONDUCTEURS DES TRAVAUX UU T.CZIMICLS SUPRUURS

Study will last 30 months. 15 months of general curriculum and 15 months

of specialization.

General Curriculum in 2 phases

Phase I - Theory and Practice (lu months) at eiatdurkou

Phase II - Practicum or training in different organizations, institutes

First Phase - Period 8 months

and specialized services of Upper Volta.

For students (from direct exam)

First Trimester

1. Plant biology

Description : Cytology. Histology. Plant Classification.

2. Agriculture

Description : Agricultural practices.. Ploughing. Harvest and storage.

Second Trimester

1. Farm business

For eaeh technique. study purpose, period and means.

'Description : Systems of production. Evaluation of results. Business

structure Agricultural production theory. Advantages

of rational use of variable factors.


2. Climatology

- 100 ­

Description : Atmospheric phenomena. Instruments. Weather forecasts.

3. T opography and Surveying

Climatic zones. Climate of Upper Volta.

Description : Planimetry. Distances. Instruments. Surveys. Altimetry.

4. Soil Sciences

Terraces. Trigonometry.

Description : Soil classification. Soil profile. Soil prospecting.

5. Biochemistry

6. Farm mechanisation

Soil texture and structure. Water and air movement

in soil. Chemical and biological properties of soil.

Soil fertilization. Soil improvement.

Description : Tools and machinery. i'-aintenance and use.

7. Vegetable crops

Description : Nursery. Vegetable garden management. Different types

Third Trimester

I. Sociology

of vegetable crops.

Description : Rural society. Urganization and structV --)undation

2. Aural construction

objectives. Organization. Source of authority in the

village. Property and land law. Inquiry in rural

environment. Extension methods.

Description : Rural buildings. Farm buildings.


3. &ural construction

- i01 ­

Description : Small dams. Irrigation systems. Roads and road improvement.

4. Poultry Science

Description : Breeds. ilaterial and equipment. Incubation. Chicks.

5. Pomology

Layer hens. Broilers. Feed and feedings. Guinea fowl.

Diseases of poultry.

Description : Nursery. Urchards. eianagement practices.

6. Farm machinery

Description : Tractors .Girden Tillers. Theshing machine. ieaper.

7. Zootechay

Crusher. Grinder. Incubators. Pumps, Plows.

Description : anatomy and physiology of digestion. Cattle, Horse,

Swine, poultry. Digestibility. Feeds and Feeding.

Composition of rations. Calculation of different types

of rations. Concentrat3s. 2'orages and pastures.

8. French - (review for some students)

description : African literature. African, Voltaic writers

9. Miathematics (review for some students)

Description : Algebra. Geometry. 1iathematics. Statistics.


- 102 -

ANNEX B. 4.

RESULTS OF A SURVEY OF THE STUDENT BODY AT THE IIMTITUT SUPERIEUR

POLYTECHNIQUE

In order to provfide (a) input from students, (b) baseline data for future evaluations,

and(c) decriptive information for inclusion in the PP, it was d.-cided to survey the

student body. A three-page questionnaire was prepared (attached)and distributed

at ISP. Shortness of time prevented pretesting. To compensate, many questions

were left open-ended and response categories were formed after the questionnaires

were filled out. Nevertheless, responses to several questions proved inadequate

for analysis and are not reported here. Of 130 students, 64 responded to the

questionnaire p,'v.viding a 49% sample of the population.

In general, students appear to have taken the questionnaire seriously and responded

freely. Indeed, students are quite critical of the ISP on a number of points.

A.DemograDhic Backgrou.id.

The ISP students have a median age of 22. They range in age from 19 to 33.

98 percent of the student body is male. All live away from school as no dornitories

are provided.

Only 19 percent of the students reported being raised in a large city. By contrast,

35 percent of the students were raised in villages remote from any city. Twenty-four

percent were raised in small towns while 21 percent were raised in villages near

towns.

Fully 72 percent of the students report that their fathers are peasants (cultivateurs).

By contrast, 6 percent of the students' fathers are nurses, 5 percent of

the students' fathers are functionaries and soldiers, 3 percent are merchants, and

teachers. Other reported occupations were notary, ATA and railway worker.

100 percent of the students reported that their mothers were housewives. Of course,

this category means something quite different for peasants than it does for those

in other circumstances.

There is substantial variation in the educational background of the students

although all appear to have had adequate preparation for the training they receive

at the ISP. Eighty-four percent of the students have completed the Baccalaureate.

Thirteen percent have completed the Maitrise des Techniques des Sdence Agronomiques.

Three percent of the students have received the DEUG (Diplome des Etudes

Universitaires Generales).


- 103 -

When a.sked why they had decided to come to the ISP, 42 percent replied that

they had come due to lack of other work or the lack of available scholarships

elsewhere. 31 percent cited the development needs of Upper Volta as their main

reason for coming to the ISP. A desire to work in agriculture wau the reason

given by 19 percant of the students, while 2 percent cited both development and an

interest in agriculture as their reason for choosing the ISP. Seven percent gave

a variety of other reasons in response to this question.

B. Studies at the ISP.

Students at the ISP have a choice of one of three specializations. When asked

which they preferred, 39 percent of the students said they preferred agriculture*,

17 percent preferred livestock (elevage) and 14 percent preferred hydrology/

forestry (eanx et forets). Significantly, an additional 30 percent identified areas

not presently offered as specialities at the ISP (e. g. Agr. Economics, Biology).

Students report they generally average 20 hours of classwork and 20 hours of

laboratory and field work (travaux pratiques) per week. However, it appears that

this is subject t very wide variation depending upon the availability of professors

and the seasonality of field work.

When students were asked if they were satisfied with the courses taught at ISP,

72 percent responded in the negative. Among the problems noted frequently were:

(1) lack of staff, (2) the lack of textbooks, and (3) the divorce of theory from

practice. Indeed, it is worth emphasizing that riany students desired additional

field work, but wished to have it more closely aigned with the work done in the

classroom.

45 percent of the students said there were courses not presently offered that

they would like to take. A list of the most common suggestions is found in Table

B- -1. The three that lead are economics, food technology, and agricultural

engineering. (All of these are in the curriculum but have not been offered due

to lack of staff).

56 percent of the students felt that there were unnecessary required subjects.

Physics and English lead t T e list of subjects disliked by students (Table B- -2).

A glance at the entire list suggests that it may be the most theoretical material

that is considered least essential by the students.

The French term "agriculture" as used in this context is approximately equivalent

to the English "plant sciences".


- 104 -

Students were also asked if there were enough teachers at the ISP. A substantial

83 percent answered "no". Among the subjects most frequently mentioned as lackin

teachers (Table B- -3) were plant physiology, geology, and hydrology/Forestry.

Nevertheless, only 16 percent of the students feel they will be poorly prepared

when they finish their studies at the ISP. 41 percent believe they will be moderately

prepared, 21 percent believe they will be well prepared and two percent believe

they will be very well prepared when they are graduated. 21 percent had no opinion

on the subject.

C. Students' Future Plans..

Eighty percent of the students report that they desire further education after

they leave the ISP. However, as Table B- -4 reveals, the subject most frequently

desired is agriculture (plant sciences). Indeed, desires for further education

appear for most students to be directed toward increasing their understanding of

the agricultural sector. When asked where they would like to go for further study,

frequently mentioned places were Canada and the United States.

When asked what they expected to do after graduating, 84 percent of the students

replied that they would work in the agricultural sector. Small numbers of students

expressed interest in research (7 percent), and further study (4 percent).

Students were also asked where they would prefer to work. Only 15 percent

said they wished to work in a large city. Among the reasons given were cultural

activities and the availability of educational facilities. 22 percent of the students

preferred to work in a small town, in contrast to those wishing to work in a large

city, these students argued that small towns provided some city services, particularly

health care, yet permitted one to be near the peasantry. Eighteen percent

of the students said they would prefer to work in a village near to a city. This

group gave three major reasons for their choice: (a) the benefits of both countryside

and city, (b) the availability of materials with which to work, and (c) easy

access to markets. No students desired to work in a village located far from a city.

A final group (45 percent) had no preference at all. They argued that one ought

to be ready to work anyThere and that the development needs were equally great

throughout the rural sector. As one student put it, "je dois servir la masse

paysane au progres du pays".

D. Additional Comments.

Students were encouraged to add any comments they had in a space provided

at the end of the questionnaire. While the comments are not entirely relevant to

the project, they are worthy of note. First, a number of students noted that ISP


- 105 ­

has to train people as well as they are trained elsewhere if it is to be a succesful

institution.

A second point is that a substantial number of students wished to learn how

to drive. Many felt this would be necessary in their later work.


- 106 -

TABLE B ­ -1 COURSES DESIRED BY STUDENTS BUT NOT OFFERED AT ISP

Rank Subject

1. Economics

2. Food Technology

1lo. Students

3. Agricultural Engineering 3

4. Architecture

5. Philosophy

6. Geology 2

7. Law

TABLEg ­ -2 COURSES REOUIRED BUT NOT DESIRED BY STUDENTS AT ISP

Rank Subject

1. Physics

2. English

3. Biology

4. Geology

5. Chemistry

4

3

2

2

2

'No. Students

6. Travaux Pratiques Non-Formateur 1

12

7

4

3

1


- 107 -

TABLE B - - 3 SUBJECTS FOR WHICH TEACHERS ARE LACKING AT ISP

Rank Subject No. Students

1. Plant Physiology 10

2. Geology 10

3. Hydrology/Forestry 7

4. Biology 3

5. Physics 2

6. Biochemistry 1

7. Irrigation 1

TABLE B- - 4 HIGIER EDUCATION DESIRED 3Y ISP STUDENITS

Rank Subject No. Students

1. Agriculture 14

2. Hydrology/Forestry 4

3. Livestock 4

4. Management 3

5. Biochemistry 2

6. Food Technology 2

7. [ledicine 2


- 108 -

Am= B.,5

Etudiants Universit4 1D

Comme

Haute-Volta

vous le savez

en

une

vue d'4laborer

4quipe de six

conjointement

membres est arriv~e

avec les

r~cemmect

Voltaiques

en

Nveloppement des Ressources

un projet

Humaines

de

et

financ4

Agricoles

par IUSAID.

qui sera

Le

en

but

partie

et

de

exhaustif

ces seances

des

sara

Programmes

d'obtenir

d'Enseignement.

un tableau objectif

Pour commencer

de remplir

vous

le questionnaire

8tes pri6

ci-dessous.

Nous voulons d'abord vous poser quelques questions sur votre passe.

Vous verrez que pour plusieurs, il suffit d'encercler la reponse qui vous

concerne.

1 - Age :s. 2 Sexe: $ F

3 - Certificat ou dipl8me le plus 4levi :

4 - Nombre d'annaes de'j passies 2 l'Universitg : ants.

5 - Aspirations professionnelles :

Ingdnieur des Techniques

Autre (lequel ?) :

6 - Sujets de sp 6 cialisation h l'Universit4 :

7 - Occupation de votre pere :

Occupation de votre m~re

(s'ils sont d4c~d4s donnez

:

l'occupation de leur vivant).

8 - Fcaerclez la r~ponse qui dcrit le mieux votre situation ' l'Age de 10 ans.

R4sidence dans une grande vifle

Rdsidence dans une petite ville

Rsidence dans un village h proximit4 d'une vyle

Rgsidence daas un village gloigne d'une ville.

9- Habitez-vous au dortoir fourzai par i'Universitd ?

OUI NON


- 109 -

Questions relatives h yes itudes 4 1'Uaiversite

10 - Nombre dheures de cours thdoriques par semaine : - heures.

11 . Nombre d'lheures do travaux pratiques par semaine : - heures.

12 - Raisons de votre choix dv l'stitut Superieur Polytecbnique :

13 -tes-vous satisfait des cours enseignds 'aI,ISPO ? i OUI NON

Si non, suggerez des moyens d'amdlioration :

14 - I a t-il des sujets que vous voud'iez prendre mais qui no sont pas

offerts k IISPO ? g OUI NON

Si out, lesquels ? _

15 - Y a t-il des sujets obligatoires qui ne vous interessent pas ?

Oul NON

Si ou±, lesquels ? :

16 X a t-il assez do professeurs easeignant h lISPO : OUI NON

Si non, quels sont les sujets d4laisses :

17- Considerant la fozmation theorique et pratique quo vaus recevez 'a 1,SPO

pensez-vous que au terme do vos 4tudes vous serez :

Tres bien prepare

Bien pr4pare

4 ode6rment pr~pare

Mal pr4pari

Pas d' opinion.


- 110 -

Questions relatives h vos projets d'avenir

18 - Au terms de vos dtudes h 1,3IPO aspirez-vous h plus d'iducation ? :

Oul NON

Si oui, daas quel domaine ? : ....

Si oui, oh ? .

19 - Au terme de vos 4tudes, que comptez-vous faire ?

20 - Au terms de vos gtudes, quel serait votre travail de pr4dilection ? :

21 - 0 voudriez-vous travailler ?

Dans une grande ville

Dans une petite ville

Dans un village 'aproximit4 d'Une grande vili.

Danas un village 4 loigtn d'une vifle

Pas de pr~fCrence.

22 Donnez les rdisons de votre pr'f6rence :

23 - Informations supplementaires :

Merci.


- 111 -

ANNX B. 6.

STAF ACTIVI FORK, ISP

Comme vous le savez une dquipe de six membres est arriv4e recemment

en Haute-Volta en vue d'4laborer conjointement avec les Voltaiques un

projet do D)veloppement des Ressources Humaines et Agricoles qui sara

en partie financ4 par IUSAID. L'4valuation des programmes d'Enseignement

IISPO at au CAP, un point tr's important de co Projet, permettra de

produire des recommandations concretes a 1,U3AID e 4gard . l'augmentation

et a la formation du corps enseignant, 'al'amelioration des biblioth~ques,

des laboratoires et des autres moyens de pratiques experimentales.

A cet effet, certains membres de l'4quipe auront a conduire

seances

des

de travail avec les profasseurs des Institutions sus-mentionnees.

Le but de ces seances sera d'obtenir un tableau objectif et exju tt

des Programmes d'Enseignement. Pour co zc!ar1 vous ftem pcr± de remplir

le questionnaire ci-joint.


- 112 -

Profession : Spcialit__:

Diplme ou Certificat (+) _

Nombre d'anne'es/mois dej& passes 1IISPC/CAP : --. s mos.

Etes-vous de nationalit4 voltalque ? : OUI NON

Matires enseignees

M'tires enseigndes

1 atieres enseignees

Premier Trimestre

Deuxime T rimestre

Total.dheures

Total d'heures

Troisi&me Trimestre

Nombre d'hedres par semaine

Nombre d'heures par semaine

Nombre d'heures par semaine

(+) Si vous Ates detenteur de plusieurs dipl~mes

celui

ou certificats,

qui est le plus

mentionnez

4lev4 et relatif au cours que vous enseignez.


- 113 -

ZI:: B.7.

xUSULTS U? A SJ-VWZ UF TIE_ STUDZ/iTS BODY

AT TE C.A.?. AT ,.ATTUUV:UU

lnarder to provide a) input from students, b) baseline data for

future evaluations, and c) descriptive information for inclusion in

the PP, it was decided to survey the student body. A three-page

questionnaire was prepared (atteched) and distributed at ..atourkou.

Shortness of tine prevented pre-testiag. To compensate, many questions

were left open-endc' and response categories were formed after the

questionnaires were filled out. Nevertheless, responses to several

questions proved inadequate for analysis and are not reported here.

Of 231 students, 194 responded to the questionnaire providing a more

than adequate 84,, sample of the population.

In general students appear to have taken the questionnaire seriously

and responded freely. Indeed, students are quite critical of the

CA? on a number of points.

A. Demographic Background

The CAP students have a median age of 20. They range in age from

16 to 30. Ninety-seven percent of the student body is male. iiinetysix

percent live in dormitories furnished by the government at the

CAP.

Only 15 percent of the students reported being raised L a large

city. By contrast, 37 percent of the students were raised in villages

remote from any city. 1wenty-four percent were raised in sall towns

while 22 percent were raised in villages near towns.

Fully 81 percent of the students report that their fathers are

peasants (cultivateur). By contrast, 4 percent of the students'

fathers are functionaries, 3 percent are merchants, 2 percent are

teachers and 2 percent are soldiers/policemen. Ut}'Mr reported occupations

were nurse, mason, tailor, laborer, veterinary nurse, and

agricultural agent. Jinety-n1ne percent of the students reported that

their mothers were housewives. Of course, this category means something

quite different for peasants than it does for those in other

circumstances •


- 114 -

There is substantial variation in the educational background of

the students although all appear to have had adequate preparation for

the training they receive at the CA. Twenty-six percent of the

students have completed the C01 (Certificat des Studes Primaires

-mentaires). rublly 6u percent have completed the 30C (Brevet des

Etudes du Premier Cycle). Four percent of them received the B.IA

(Brevet d'Enseignement Agricole) and 5 percent have the BAT.

When asked why they had decided to come to the CAP, only 13

percent replied that they had come due to lack of other work or the

lackvailable scholarships elsewhere. Twenty-eignt percent cited the

development needs of Upper Volta as their main reason for coming to

the CA?. A desire to work in agriculture was the reason given by 31

percent of the students, while 11 percent cited both development and

an interest in agriculture as their reason for choosing the CAP.

Fifteen percent gave a variety of personal reasons in response to

this question.

B. 6tudies at the CA?

Students at the CAP have a choice of one of three specializations.

When asked which they prefered, 53 percent of the students said they

preferred agriculture .d, 25 percent preferred livestock (41evage)

and 15 percent preferred water resources management/forestry (eaux

et forts). Two percent were undecided between two of the three specialities.

An additional two percent identified areas not presently

offered as specialities at the CA? e.g.

Home Zconomics.

Students report they generally average 2 hours of classwork

and 4 hours of field work (travaux pratiques) per week. However, it

appears that this is subject to very wide variation depending upon

the availability of professors and the seasonality of field work.

When students were asked if they were satisfied with the courses

taught at the CAP, 83 percent responded in the negative. Among the

problems noted frequently were 1) the lack of staff, 2) the lack

of textbooks, and 3) the divorce of theory from practice. n the

latter point, one student summed it up succinctly as follows :

"Notre formation est essentiellement bas6e sur la th~orie.

Alors que pour mieux comprendre les cours et bien exercer

notre metier k la sortie, nous devons faire la pratique

presqu'apr~s chaque cours theorique. Les travaux pratiques

que nous faisons constament ici Irecolter le mals, labourer

la cours avec des dabas...) sont non-formateurs".

_/ The French term "agriculture" as used in this context is approximately

equivalent to the Inglish "plant sciences".


- 115 -

Indeed, it is worth emphasizing that many students desired additional

field work, but wished to have it more closely aligned with the work

done in the classroom.

Eighty-five percent of the students said there were courses not

presently offered that they would like to take. A list of the most comr.on

suggestions',found in Table I. The three that lead are tractor-driving,

administration/management, and bookkeeping. (Lhile tractor-driving is

unlikely to be of benefit to these students as extension workers, many

of them desire to start their own farms. This is discussed below. loreover,

administrative and bookkeeping skills appear to be reasonable requests,

given their likely role as future extension workers).

Unly 38 percent of the students felt that there were unnecessary

required subjects. P.athematics and field work that is "non-formateur"

lead the list of subjects disliked by students (Table Ii). A glance at

the entire list suggests that it may be the most theoretical aaterial

that is considered least essential by the students.

Students were also asked if there were enough teachers at the CA?.

A resounding 99 percent answered "no". Among the subjects most frequently

mentioed as lacking teachers (Table ii) were physics, topograp.hy and

cnemistry.

Nevertheless, only ten percent of the students feel they will be

poorly prepared when they finish their studies at the CA.. Fifty-eight

percent believe they will be moderately prepared, 21 percent believe

they will be well prepared and one percent believe they will be very

well prepared when they are graduated. i"ight percent had no opinion

on the subject.

C. Students Future Plans

Ninety-two percent of the students report that they desire further

education after they leave the CAP. However, as Table IV reveals, the

subject most frequently desired is agriculture (plant sciences). indeed,

desires for further education appear for most students to be directed

toward increasing their understanding of the agricultural sector.

.Jhen asked what they expected to do after graduating, 89 percent of

the students replied that they would work in the agricultural sector.

Significantly, many students expressed the desire to start their own

farms using modern methods learned at the CAPz. -iany expressed frustration

over the difficulty they felt they would have in obtaining agricultural

credit. Uthers said they would attempt to save money for

equipment while working as an extension agent. Small


- 116 ­

numbers of students expressed an interest in administration, research,

further stud.' (3 percent each), and economics and commerce (1 percent

each).

It should be noted that these responses do not conflict with the

desire for additional education. lany students expressed a desire to

take evening or correspondence courses or to return to school at a

later dato.

Students were also asked where they would prefer to work. Unly ten

percent said they wished to work in a large city. Among the reasons

given were cul.tural activities and the availability f educational

facilities. Twenty-sLix percent of the students pretferred to work in

a small town. Un contrast to those wishing to work in a large city,

these students argued that small towms provided some city services,

particularly health care, yet permitted one to be near the peasantry.

Tully 39 percent of the studentLis said they would prefer to work in a

village near to a city. This group gave three major reasons for their

choice : a) the benefits of both countryside and city, b) the availability

of materials with which to work, and c) easy access to markets.

Unly 8 percent desired to work in a vi-'lage located far from a city.

This group cited cost and peasants' needs as the reasons for their

choice. A final group (16 percent) had no prefrence at all. They

argued that one ougpt to be ready to work anywhere and that

development needs were equally great throughout the rural sector. As

one student put it "je dois servir la masse paysanne au progres du

pays".

D. Additional Comments

Students were encouraged to add any comments they had in a space

provided at the end of the questionnaire. While the coments are not

entirely relevant to the project, they are worthy of note. Ffirst, a

number of students complained that they don't get even a small

allowance for personal expenses. As such, they must ask their parents

for money, and they feel fairly old to do this.

A second point is that the CAP bus is worn out after 12 years of

use. As a result both field trips and weekend trips to town (Bobo-

Dioulasso) are ruled out. Two other points concern the food aund medical

care available at the CA?. Students complain that food is of poor

quality and that dishes are often unsufficient to go around. i-oreover

they assert that the dispensary is frequently out of medecine.


TABLE I

- 117 -

Courses Desired by Students But Not Offered at Matourkov

NUMBER OF STUDENTS

IRANK COURSE DESIRING IT

1 Tractor-Driving 23

2 Administration/Management 22

3 Bookkeeping 21

4 English 16

5 Topography 14

6 Sex Education 14

7 Meteorology 13

8 Mechanics 13

9 Economics 11

10 Agricultural Engineering 10

11 Local Languages 9

12 Sociology 9

13 Civics 7


TABLE II

- 118 -

Courses Rcouired But Not Desired by Students at Matourkou

R.IK COMI SE NUMER OF STUDENTS

NOT DESIRlNG IT

I Mathematics

2 Field work t~hr is"non-formateur" 23

3 French 21

4 Physics

5 Chemistry 14

24

14


2

3

4

5

6

7

S

9

- 119 -

TABLE III

Subjects for which Teachers .re -Lackin-,at atcurkou

Physics

Topography

Chemistry

SUJECT NTrBER OF STUDENTS

A LCK CF TT.AC]IERS

'Meteorology

Technical Agriculture

Sociology

Econcmics

Mechanics

!{orticulture

63

62

53

13

39

37

21

15

15

NOTING


TABLE IV

- 120 -

-ifher Education Desired by CtP Students

StU.jECT

1 Agriculture (plant sciences) 63

2 Animal Science

3 Economics

4 Hydrology/Forestry

5 Sociology

6 Administration/Management

NC.:BQ CF STUDENTS

24

19

15

8

8


- 121 -

ANNE B. 8. Etudiants CA2

Comme vous le savez une 4quipe de six membres est arriv4e recem-ment en

Haute-Volta en vue d'glaborer conjointement avec les Voltaiques un projet de

D~veloppement des Ressources Humaines ct Agricoles qui sera ea partie

finance par lUSAID. Le but de ces s~ances sera d'obtenir un tableau objectif

at exhaustif des Programmes d'Enseignement. Four commencer vous ftes pri4

de remplir le questionnaire ci-dessous.

Nous voulons d'abord vous poser quelques questions sur votre pass'.

Vous verrez qua po,%c pL.usieurs, iI suffit d'encercler la reponse qui vous

concerne.

1 - Age : - ans. 2 -Sexe: M F

3 - Certificat ou dipl~me le alus 6lev4 •

4 - Nombre d'annees dgja pazses au CAP : ans.

5 - Aspirations professionnelles

Conducteur de travaux

Agent Technique Agricole

Encadreur

Autre (lequel ?)

6 - Sujets de sp4cialisation au CAP

Agriculture -levage Eaux et Fordts Autre(lequel?):

7 - Occupation de votre pere :

Occupation de votre mare :

(s'ils sont dgc4des donnez l'occupation de leur vivant)

8 - Zneerclez la r4ponse qui dgcrit le mieux votr. situation h !'Age de IZ anst

R4sidence dans une grande ville

R4sidence dans une petite villa

R4sidence dans un village ' proximit4 d'une ville

R4sidence dans un village 4loign4 d'une rille

9 - Habitez-vous au dortoir fourni par le CAP ? : OUI NON


- 122 -

Questions relatives h vos etudes au CAP

10 - Nombre d'heures de cours theoriques par semaine : - heures.

11 - Nombre d'heures de travaux pratiques par semaine : - heures.

12 - Raisons de votre choix de CAP :

13 - Etes-vous satisfait des cours enseign~s au CAP ? : OUI NON

Si non, suggerez des moyens d'am~lioration :

14 - Y a t-il des sujets que vous voudriez prendre mais qui ne sont pas offerts

au.CAP ? : OUI NON

Si oui, lesquels ? :

15 - Y a t-il des sujets obligatoires qui ne vous interessent pas ?

OUI NON

Si oui, lesquels ? :

16 - Y a t-il assez de professeurs easeignant au CAP ? : OUI NON

Si non, quels sont les sujets d~laisses :

17 - Considrant la formation th4orique et pratique que vous recevez au CAP,

pensez-vous que au terme de vos t-des vous serez

Tr~s bien pr~pare

Bien prepare

Moderement prepar4

Mal prepare

Pas d'opinion.


- 123 -

Questions relatives h vos projets d'avenar

18 - Au terme de vos 4tudes au CA aspirez-vous 'aplus d'4ducation ? :

OUI NON

Si oui, dans quel domaine ? :

19 - Au terme de vos 4tudes, que comptez-vous faire-? :

20 - Au, terme de vos 4tudes, quel serait votre travail de predilection ? :

21 - O voudriez-vous travailler ?

Dans une grande ville

Dans une petite ville

Dans un village a proxImit4 d'une grande ville

Daas un village dloign4 d'une vifle

Pas de preference

22 - Donnez les raisons de votre preference :

23 - Informations supplmentaires :

Merci.


- 124 ­

AM=E B. 9.

Professeurs CAP

Comme vous le savez une 4quipe de six membres est arriv4e r4cemment en

Haute-Volta en vue d'4laborer conjointement avec les Voltalques un projet de

D4veloppement des Ressources Humaines et Agricoles qui sera en partie

finance par 1,USAID. Le but de ces sdances sera d'obtenir un tableau objectif

et exhaustif des Programnes d'Enseignement. Pour commencer vous 8tes prig

de remplir le questionnaire ci-dessous.

Nous voulons d'abord vous poser quelques questions sur votre pass4.

Vous verrez que pour plusieurs, il suffit d'encercler la r4ponse qui vous

concerne.

1 - Age : -ans. 2 - Sexe : M F

3 - Certificat ou dipl~me le plus elev :

4 - Nombre d'annes d4ja passees au CAP : ans.

5 - Nationalit6 : Voltalque

6 - Occupation de votre pere :

Occupation de votre m&re :

(s'lils sont deced~s donnez l'occupation de leur vivant).

7 - Encerclez la r~ponse qui decrit le mieux votre situation h l'.ge

e'isidence

de 10

dans

ans.

une grande vi.le

R4sidence dans une petite

R4sidence

vile

dans un village h proximit4

Risidence

d'une

dams

ville

un village 4loign4 d'une ville.

8 - Habitez-vous dans un logement fourni par le CAP ? CUI NON

Questions relatives . l'enseiknmezt itu CAP

9 - Nombre d'heures de cours th4oriques enseign4s par semaine : = heures.

10 - Nombre d'heures de travaux pratiques enseigngs par semaine • - heures.

11 - Raison de votre choix de travailler au CAP :

_


- 125 ­

12 - Etes-vous satisfait des cours enseigngs au CAP : OUI NON

Si non, sugg-rez des moyens d'am~lioration :

13 - Y a t-il des sujets qui devraient 8tre enseign~s mais qui ne sont pas

offerts au CAP ? OUl NON

Si oui, lesquels ?

14 - Y a t-il des sujets obligatoires qui selon vous ne sont pas necessaires ?

OUT NON

Si oui, lesquels ?

15 - Y a t-il assez de professeurs enseignat au CAP ? OUI NON

Si non, quels sont les sujets deJ1aiss4s ?

16 - Enseignez-vous des cours autresque ceux pour lesquels vous avez gtg form6-!'?

OUI NON

17 - Considerant la formation thdorique et pratique que l'on regoit au CAP,

peasez-vous que au terme de ces 6tudes l'on est

Tr~s bien prepar4

Bien pr4parg

Moder4ment prepar4

iial prepare

fas d'opinion

Questions relatives h vos projets d'avenir

18 - Aspirez-vous h plus d'4ducation ? OUT NON

Si oui, dans quel domaine :

19 - Voulez-vous rester au CAP ? OUI NON


- 126 ­

20 . Si non, oL voudriez-vous travaller ?

Das une grande ville

Dans une petite ville

Dams un village h proximit4 d'une grande ville

Dans un village eloign6 d'une ville

Pas de preference

21 Donnez les raisons de votre preference _

22 Informations supplementaires

_...

Merci.


- 127 -

AM= B. 10.

STAFF ACTMT FORM, CAP, MATOURKOU

Comme vous le savez,une dquipe de six membres est arriv'e r4ce.ment

en Haute-Volta en vue d' laborer conjointement avec les Voltalques un

projet do Ddveloppement des *Ressources Huma.ines et Agricoles qui sera

en partie financ- par ITSAID. L'dvaluation des programmes d'Enseignement

.1,SPO et au CAP, ua point tres important de ce Projet, permettra de

produire des recommandations concretes k USAID eaiegard ' l'augmentation

et 'ala formation du corps enseignant, 'al'amlioration des biblioth~ques,

des laboratoires et des autres moyens de prat ques experlmentales.

A cet effet, certains membres de l'6quipe auront ' conduire des

s~ances de travail avec les profasseurs des Institutions sus-mentionaees.

Le but de ces seances sera d'obteaJ. un tableau objectif et exhauatif

des Programes d'Enseignement. P-ur oo/eaer vous tez pi de remplir

le questionnaire ci-joint.


- 128 -

Profession : Spcialit__:

Dipl6me ou Certificat (+) :

Nombre d'annees/mois d4j& passes h 1,ISPO/CP : ans mos.

Etes-vous de nationalit4 voltalque ? : OUI NON

Matieres enseignees

Matieres enseign~es

Meati~res enseign~es

Premier Trimestre

Deuxieme Trimestre

Total d'heures

Total d'heures

Troisieme Trimestre

Nombre d'hedrea par semaine

Nombre d'beures par semaine

Nombre d'heures par semaine

(+) Si vous Ates d~tenteur de plusieurs dipl mes ou certificats, mentionnez

celui qui est le plus 4lev4 et relatif au cours que vous enseignez.


- 129 -

ANNEX B 11

SELECTED INDIVIDUALS AND GROUPS CONTACTED

Toguyeni, Y. A., Recteur, Universite de Ouagadougou.

Tiao, C., Secretalre Permanent, Comite de Coordination pour le Developpement

Rural, Ministere du Developpement Rural.

Savadogo, A. Cellule de Planification Comite de Coordination

pour le Developpement Rural, Ministere du Developpement Rural.

Konate, Y., Directeur de Pedagogie, Centre Agricole Polyvalent, Matourkou.

Kabre, S., Directeur, Institut Superieur Polytechnique, Universite de Ouagadougou.

Yonli, J., Baore, K., Chefs de sous-secteurs, Eastern ORD, OR) personnel

includir g various encadreurs (see Annex).

Woba, A., AT k serving in Eastern ORD.

Tatieta, M., I irecteur, Bobo Dioulasso ORD and various personnel.

Isaac, IBRD extension specialist working in Bobo OR).

Coulibaly, Directeur, Banfora OR) and various personnel.

Ly, B., Dr. Directeur Sahel ORD and various personnel.

Lankouande, M. . ORD Personnel at Bogande, Village official (sous-prefet)Bogande.

Anadja, M., Markoye Ranch personnel

Groups of students at ISP and CAP, Matourkou.

Michigan State University personnel at Fada N'Gourma (Eastern ORD project)

Staff at ISP and CAP, Matourkou.

Baoua, F., Director of Planning MDR.

Kibora, A., Director of Community Development Unit, MDR.

Ouattara, K., Director, CAP, Matourkou.


Cole, IBRD, Division Chief for Education.

Brewin, D., BRD,Abidjan

- 130 -

Temanson, L., Societe Africaine d'Education et Developpement.

Zoreme, M., Director University of Ouagadougou library.

Staff at Centre Voltaique de Recherche Scientifique, PAID, INADES.


-

-4'

44

4

*j44.

u~ to

0 4>443

as*~~~4'~~

jo L

0o 4443

-4p4

4.434* 44

42:2 442444

4442-'Ica

'-44

S4a444>


'

'4 Qop~rtes twjo

--­

-. I U

CUrMT.IT AGfICUI .. LL I..~­ E.3 APLC} El7 rPM iUTA

bx4D o Mmain~tains liv~e~v4o4 rch Agoom

on aUnd, thi 3earo xettoi r s ollws

­ U&To is r~n T h ;U

aro

. large v=aIety f , hybiids ,: l addition,

ovii 1hybri'gr Fa~ i~t~it; g.7

,,

~ ed nd, Qperat;~eQ6Pea oh o~ an ai~o n

stationaa ~~Q 4a).

they havs ozeatod a: niimber of'their 27.'~.A

Unotntl IRTapas-obe~ffollwing a.=seaaoih poxa

101nte nhU; i4ta4 e., ~as -li t taijj~j,,t

reearch1 to cdsYo~ampee ieoknn *Qoxl

inf~st1ot1 ~dt~ied manpowr as ' p z~,t th ntroduction:..

ci' hybrid ,ead-poses overwheim±ng ;,oeistjOal'problems. Th 4'i ssay

all. laccirig. In addition, .ThT Mai taimsltl cnat wtvjoi

'despit7-,th9,fact thti-ita lta**,on is,literay

thle CAP,

acrouss the,

A

roadf

z eoent g~ve

M"'"+

;_,nt ~ep e:rts tha 'heir'z'lationshipas'

Se T6 PradsiP ijt d'Asstanoe-du ntj6A~oJ~

Polyvalant dK(Iatoukou. Rapport Te=i al * Dihpdou, ou: V,kl st~',

du~1977). -Poovz, memberss'of, other' 6ogai.zat ions

have remax'k3d onthe seoc'etivanessaf MW TA opeations andtheir. faile'e

to pr35sflt thA= F'poi'ts'in~such a way, as;to fot foieexteso

aotivities;, It ii-not cleax,'hbowwaz that 'this is d~iv to any d14.iberat6

policy 6n thn part- ofIRT, t isquit- >possible that MIT might r-spond

GIpouitivyt a Voltaic initiative.. (See also DP UV FT-*7

~'

PCIAT.' This international: resea~corgnzto sc~nl

wo~]cing at -a xeseez'ch etation 2oziginally. established by ths GO0W. The

rasaa2zch emphasis is th Imp' oement of-3L, ad 'u 1,121et. 17a.l

5000 'sorghum and 'millet, Varieties, 'mostly"impor'ted, from India a w9

bing t "tedth 'e. shevaxiatias' 6foing'i~differ'ent itraw lengths

havo raeqptly -be n made available to faxmeis,' The,'institiit4 is"lo0

working on the-dsvelopmeatofn~ew vaxieties, improved inteircropping -,systoms,

and soil1 managizment techniques. ,In'conjunction with 0ohr

r:?SeaxCh organizations, ICRIS3AT willi soon' establish a small agricultuz'al

librr at Ka6iboins~ - -t

' ~

'-. u-­


77-7-7,7---

21.is

?~133

A. - nIyti~r~zto lobcm novda h

asmbQsat. Cum work ooyea~~

io _pro .-i Zrm-om.-This _raai-~gn_.i1

SX74 gram,, 0OQQW±O

aom_

0T7.. The CTTT i.s conductig ressach o a numbar at tropical

trees. It h~asalso" =ged in extesive soi. erosion~studi±4 th~at

sug,.gst that an'Tual tracti.on ca r~dio3soi ~OifI erosio 1-.1 oQoG*at

to th~e constrction of sma3_. dyk.as inthe'fiel.ds,

JAM, This small.semi-p;ivate organiztion is conducting rssarg1h

on appropriati tahooy eog, SiMp13 methne' 'oQnvartar. In'add4itiont

it publish-as a journa3. aimed at ncadreurs,(Dav loppement Voltaiqu's) and

inthe process of developingan appi'opriate tcnlg documentation,,

± B UZZ?3. Thi Institut ,'tfricain de De'v~loppsment Joonomiqiuz et Social

isajot a search-organization per s s, bu itproises to. provide a*

mao4foti ,tesofFuddi Abidjan' n 1972,, and in i

Upper 7olta since1975, it provides oorrespondence cours.,s and publishes

a 'jo12~nal.

Tha extension courses axe aimed at pseasants and 3x:!nsion saff±'.

Theay vr usatal difficulty and sophistication.,Illitarata

peasants can take the course by constituting themsive s as a goup and

having a literate pterson read th simple I--ssons' to~thzm.12ach4.lesson

contains a questionna~ir- that is. fifll-d o.c turned in to lTD and

mailed back with coents. The cost of the 4several'couiscs varias With

th. income of the readers * Peasant groups pay 150 CPA for, the course

whil3 enoadriurs paY 750 CPA- They also utj pecial sessions of sel,1cted

proolims wh n =equisted by peaaant orgmnization*,

Their journal, .4iRIPROV, is a review for dB ylcpment ag nts

costing 8UU'Cr'A per year for ?our quarterly issues. Each issue has a

specific theme and also contains a "fiche, technique" for use in

exten~ion.

It appears that this organization cou.ld serve many; of the, etension,

needs of v-arious agents.

U3S.UD. A number of projects axe currently underaay. In the Eastern

ORDl work is being done o n so-a traction and cotton cultivation,

SAFGRA is conducting food grain~trials at iamboinse.K In addition, a

Iseed multiplication project is underay.


- 134 -

The problem of research coordination is quit,-, serious. In part,

3,ack of coordination is due to donor rivlry, unnecessary secretiveness,

and thz lack of a body of literature uponi which to build. 1Moreover, it

appears that research org-ni..ations may be making erroneous assumptions

regarding capital/labor ratio, energy usage, and market access. Tis is

encouraged by the nearly irtesistable pressure for immediate research

results. Yet, this must be resisted if the confidence of UV peasants

is to be obtained and maintained.

rTe GOUV has set up a special committee with the e:-press purpose

of cordinating agricultural research. It meets once a year in Narch

and prepares a report entitled ",ompte rendu du Comite Specialise de la

Recherche Agonomique". However, it appears that some research operations

have not sent representatives to this committee.

\1e recommend that I3P begin sending representatives to this

committee in order to keep abreast of current agricultural research.

Morvaver, it appears that all American-financed Agricultural research

should be reported at this annual meeting.

In addition, we recommend that ISP establish a research journal

so that research results may begin to be integrated into a coherent .;ody

of literature. This is entirely in line with Recommendation no 14 of

th2 Comite Specialise. (See Comptes Rendus 1977 pp. 56-57).

Zy participating in various agricultural research activities

through its field stations ISP rill increase its effectiveness as a

teaching institution. Teaching staff will be able to remain up-to-date

on relevant current research in their respective disciolines. As such,

their classroom teaching will reflect these new developments. !oreover,

as ISP staff members participate in the overall national agricultural

research program, their Laboratory and field classes will be far less

likely to become divorced from the needs of U.V.


- 135 -

ANNEX B,14

MINISTRY OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT

Secretariat Permanent of Coordination Committee of Rural Development.

Centre Agricole Polyvalent de Matourkou

TEACHING PERSONNEL 1

PROGRAMS FOR AGENTS TECHNIOUES AND

CONDUCTEURS DES TRAVAUX 2

Name Discipline Taught

Ouattara Karamokotie 1,2

(CAP Director)

Konate Yaya 1,2

(CAP Director of Formation)

Diallo Diadie 1,2

Hiema Felix

Traore Romain 1,2

Traore Katy 1

Nehe Ibrahim 2

Koutara Michel

Ouedraogo Rasmane

Siry Bomane

Cisse Fousseni

Bamba Seydou

Ziba Casimir

Sourabie Martin

Abou Francois

Sempore Georges

- Rural Economics and

Study of Farm Management

- Rural Sociology and Extension

Methods

- Animal Husbandry and Poultry

- Horticulture and Pomology

- Farm Mechanization

- General Agriculture

- Plant Breeding

- Soil Science

- Credit and Cooperative

- Human N'lutrition

- Public Administration

- Physical Education

- Water Management and Forestry

- Animal Husbandry

- Soil Science

- Human Nutrition


- 136 -

Ministry of Rural Development (Continued)

Name

Discipline Taught

Ouedraono Florent - Rural Development

Ouattara Soma - Crops Protection

Bonzi Marcel

- Entomology

Somida Lucas 1 - French

Guioemde Valentin 1 - Biology

Reguier arie-Claude 3 - Mathematics

1. Permanent instructor and full-time employee at CAP/Matourkou

2. Teaches in both cycles

3. Assistance Technique

Note: The permanent instructors at Matourkou, at least, have CTA's

diploma.


iNAME

Sylvie Muller

Kabre Tibo Simeon*

(ISPO Director)

Naoro ',Iouhoussine*

Ouedraoco Odile*

Kabore Issiaki*

Coeurdeuil Gilles

Broussal Gerard

(Director of Studies)

Ouadraogo Clement*

Guinko Sita*

Savadogo Alain*

De Sesmaisons

Grillon Michel

Basle Michel

Glemet flichele

Boulesteix Michel

Tersiguel 1

Mlonnet Marc 2

Sawadogo Laya*

- 137 -

APPENDIX B, 15.

INSTITJT SUPERIEUR POLYTECHNIOUE

TEACHING PERSONNEL*

DISCIPLINE

TAUGHT HIGHEST DEGREE

Physics Doctorate/etat

Chemistry Doctorate/etat

Chemistry Doctorate/etat

Chemistry Doctorate/3eCycle

Chemis.try Doctorate/etat

Mathematics Doctorate/etat

Biology Dictorate/etat

Animal Doctorate/3eCycle

Physiology

Botany Doctorate/3eCycle

Geology Doctorate/3eCycle

Agronomy Ingenieur-Agronome

Horticulture & Ingenieur-Agronome

Pomology

Animal Ingenieur-Agronome

Husbandry

Zootechny IA2

Veterinary D.V.M.

Science

Forestry Inqenieur-Aqronome

Fishery Ingenieur-Agronome

Zootechny Doctorate/3eCycle

ACADEN1IC TITLE

AT ISPO

Maitre-Assistant

Charge d'enseignement

'.!aitre-Assistant

IMaitre-Assistant

Assistant

Assistant A.

M'aitre de Conference

Maitre-Assistant

Maitre-Assistant

Assistant


- 138 -

NAME DISCIPLIrNE ACADEMIC TITLE

TAUGHT HIGHEST DEGREE AT ISPO

Cognet

Civil

Engineering

Ingenieur-Architecte

Kenlon Franz Technical

Conessa

* Voltaic

English

Assistant

French Doctorate/3eCycle Maitre-Assistant

** Has not come to UV yet. Is expected in January 1978.


-ld

- ~ ~ -

in.~

I 1v9

tt (2 Yers

bOQo*j

AI a. 16

thT

OF Qujmcnio

rmw~~ co.za a ,sat

mate' avth to 3Aal .. t,'&tpo*4

eme

or

tecj 'nd esa . "1 il

fttion A ,~nA mhrhn&~w s"ab2v~

u4q a~lo s--crqop.n p oction ul I T

paay ti,,scg jn avS. + .n *hd including pea 'AI control

tjxj~

IPj2j ;rp# a

for suh=Osnnt U4si,4 ia

~ ~ W~W 'A YYbi9I9*UU~~j'

­

df

-~

tUr SD94 'for~~" 5S

P*4O±0L/PV3l~ 1..spesn>t

d o =imr. rp

ii'rut mnnal

Ardmal usanry u(2yers) ~ ldnq e

and~-

-, , '3- , 1 .

shold pnudl otvlty,"t do ,uteahinjdiziidu=' Teaohirch toiay

sc. wh--........o~n7tide by'p~dta .&Is UvDst prtition,, ,sarso Utandi gy

-lwqS±7f!in± ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ---- ~ JjiL iia t t odn, matMp eod~zotoac coU~,

friiooc

pA­ and ii~o

- Paot.ol .prin si proaxtf r, BS&1 ioursoly' francapbofh -Uppra

ay~b mustittedtiafajilijteching szpeini6;~ov!S ida

oau,:,iiidtui ,o, forageb t J eze fnd i -atO iw@ and~~

of~mflndbODiafl O t iim tri ion us o -a

o u sbp pyp

PA4-~:p- ~ -.-~

~ ~ .rme

~ P fedig "i -~im

n

lcr_3\-iit f6 j

*Nte po an poiios Prnh:a UPRpIMwl~b''eu

-

.

>ottog

-btheg'a -i

-~

g-gg­

-


Forestry (2 year.)

- 140 -

This person should have a PhD in forestry and, is possible,

should have some coursework in fisheries and applied aqoulture.

The forester should be able to teach courses and do research in

forest production and management, development and ooinercialization

of wood products, pest control of forests and wood, photointerpretation

and forest inventory, and, perhaps, in applied aquiculture.

This person as with the Agronomist and Animal Husbandry

person will serve as an advised to the Director, ISP.

.MATOURKOU

Agricultural Education (4 ears)

This person or persons should have a very general and broad training

in different fields of agriculture. If possible, this person's

experience should have included high school teaching in Vocational

Agriculture or experienoe in agricultural extension or both, as

this institution is engaged in training persons approximately at

this level for Upper Volta. This person will be expected to teach

in applied subjects where the need is most critical. It is quite

likely, however, that this would include shop and other aspects of

a ricultural engineering and supervision of practical student

experience in such fields as crop production, livestock production,

and horticultural crops. This person would serve as an advisor

to the Director, CAP, Matourkou.

A Ticultural Education (4 years)

This person or persons should have a very general and broad training

in different fields of agriculture. If possible, this person's

experience should have included high school teaching in Vocational

Agriculture or experience in agicultural extension or both, as

this institution is engaged in training persons approximately at

this level for Upper Volta. This person will be expected to teach

in applied subjects where the need is most critical. It is quite

likely, however, that this would include shop and other aspects of

agricultural engineering and supervision of practical student

experience in such fields as crop production, livestock production,

and horticultural crops. This person would serve as an advisoxr to

the Director, CAP, Bogande.

This person should have a M.S. or B.S., preferably in Range Management,

or in Animal Production or Ruminant Nuttrition. The person

should have at least 2 years teaching and research experience. He/

She should have experience with rangeland management and forages.


- 141 ­

He/She should have knowledge of both large and small rminant. and

meat production. He/She should be prepared to teach a wide range

of subjects which may include Livestock Production, Arostology

and Eange Managrznt, Ruminant Nutrition, Goat and Sheep Production,

Meat Soience, RTminant Pbysiology, and Genetics and Animal

Breeding. Problems in Upper Volta to be addressed may relate to

forage adaptability to drought, forage production, use of industrial

by-products in ruminant nutrition, use of straw and low

quality forage in ruminant feeding, meat production, and crossbreeding.

AArnomy (2 years)

This person should have aM.S. orB.S. and at leant 2 years teaching

and research experience. He/She should be versatile enoug to

teach a wide variety of subjects within crop production and plant

breeding. In crop production, he/she will be expected to cover

such native crop. as peanuts, sorghum, millet, and soybeans,

including pest control for such crops. It also would be desirable

if this person had knowledge of horticultural orop8, including

both vegetables and fruit.


- 142 -

ANNEX B.17

Position Description - Direct Hire Project Manaaer

POSITION TITLE: Project Manager Agricultural Human Resources

Development - 0136.30

INTRODUCTION:

The purpose of this position is to serve as the Project Manager of

the Upper Volta Agricultural Human Resources Development Project.

The incumbent will be the principal Project Advisor for a major

project which encompasses agricultural institution building and

management; direction and guidance to agriculture college and high

school officials and faculty in administration, staffing, development

of curricula, and the design of courses; and methods for

applying the results of both scientific and practical research.

The projected total dollar value of the U.S. contribution to this

project is $9.1 million.

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

The Project Manager will perform the following functions:

a. Participate in negotiations with Government officials

leading to the project agreement.

b. Provide professional advice and guidance to Government

officials on the operation of one college-level agricultural program

and two high school-level programs. Specifically he/she will

be the principal project advisor to the Director of an Agricultural

College and the Directors of two Agricultural Secondary Schools on

plans and policy development, institutional development and expansion,

curricula development and modification.

c. Represent AID by participating on Government advisory

committees set up to review and supervise the Agricultural College

and Secondary schools.

d. Assist and supervise ti i U.S. Contractor selected to provide

technical assistance to as -re the timely supply of appropriate

agricultural technicians, both long and short term, neoessary

for successful project implementation.

e. Assist in the selection of participants for teacher and

technical training in the U.S. and or third countries. He/She will

also assist the U.S. Contractor in the placement of participants in

appropriate U.S. training programs.

f. Administer/supervise U.S. Contract personnel (7) involved

at each of the three project institutions.

g. Assist the GOUV in the local procurement of project commodities.

Establish and maintain contact with a U.S. procurement

agency (such as AAPC) for the procurement of project commodities

from the U.S.


- 143 ­

h. Report to the Mission on program progress and problems,

and make recomendations for modifications or changes in the program

as necessary.

CONTROLS OVER WORK:

The Project Manager works under the direct supervision of the Director

of national Projects. While the incumbent has discretion in

carrying out responsibilities he/she will look to his/her supervisor

for guidance in fulfilling his/her role within the framework of AID

and Mission policies and regulations. The Director of National

Projects will prepare the annual Performance Evaluation Report on

the incumbent. Information reporting from the incumbent to the

Director of National Projects will normally be by frequent ozal

conversations and periodic written reports as agreed to by the two.

OTHER SIGNIFICANT FACTORS:

The Project Manager will ideally be an exp 3rienced agricultural

educator, and at the same time will be a generalist familiar with

all of the facets required to develop an effective and progressive

national agricultural education program. A person possessing skills

in both agricultural education and project miagement should be

sought. Moreover, it is desired that the proje(A. manager have

relevant prior experience in Africa, preferably in francophone countries.

The Project Manager should have a minimum of a master's

degree in agricultural education, in an agriculture-related field,

or in a field related to project management/implementation.

The Project Manager must have demonstrated planning, coordinating,

negotiating, and problem solving skills as well as working knowledge

of the AID programming process and documentation, contracting procedures,

and financial management principles. He/She must also have

strong oral and written communication ability.

The Project Manager must also possess personality traits necessary

for effective interpersonal relationships, including empathy, understanding,

tact, and sensitivity to the interplay among various sectors

of a developing country and how such interactions influence

the human resources development process.

S-3, R-3 French language skills are the minimum level required.


- 144 -

ANNEX B 18

BIBLIOG aPHY

of

Selected Source i-.aterials*

I,.DR, Programne de Formation Cycle Agents Techniques

i;ai 1977 (Ilatourkou).

1!fl, Summary Statement of Apricultural Rural

Develovuent Plan, Hli-1, Sept. 197b

U de O,ISP, Horares et Programmes d'Enseignement

Ann6e Universitaire 197b-1977

i, DR, iiemorandu= on CAP, iliatourkou, undated

UNDP, FAO, Aricultural Trainin Demonstration Centre k.atourkou

FAU/SF : 63/UPV - 1, Rome, 1969

I.DR, Programme de Formation des Techniciens Sup~rieurs/ onducteurs

des Travaux, CAP i.-atourkou, 1977 (also earlier version UPV/72/020)

i.DR, Etude oour la Formation des Cadres Suoerieurs de l'Aariculture,

de l'Elevage et des For~ts dans la Communaut6 Economique de

l'Afrique de l'Ouest, Bureau communautaire de D6veloppement Agricole

CILSS/UO 746, 4-7-77


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- 147 -

ANNEX C

FINANCIAL TABLES

ANNEX C, 1 ITEMIZED COST LIST

CENTRE AGRICOLE POLYVALENT AT MATOURKOU

U.S. Contribution in $

I. U.S. Personnel. U.S. $

4 person years x $100,000/year $400,000

24 person months, short-term consultants

x $7,500/month 180,000

II. Commodities.

2 pick-up trucks (2 x 8,000)

4 cars, 8 seats each for director &

professors (4 x 11,000)

2 buses, 50 seats each for student transport

(2 x 35,000)

40 mobylettes (40 x 400)

Operating costs for cars, pick-up truck, buses

and mobylettes, 5 years

Laboratory equipment

Water system extension, Bobo to CAP,

Matourkou

1 vehicle for U.S. advisory assistance (long

and short term)

Operating costs for advisory vehicle

Equipment for Village Training Centers

1 plow animal traction

1 cultivator traction

1 cart traction

1 -ack sprayer

1 duster

1 set of hand hoes, rakes

1 seeds and plant protection

chemicals

Miscellaneous

Sub-total One Center

Total equipment

(3 x 1,500)

100

200

200

200

100

200

200

300

for 3 village training centers

Sub Total $580,000

$ 16,000

44,000

70,000

16,000

50,000

40,000

80,000

10,000

5,000

4,500


- 148 -

Operating costs and maintenance for one

village center (68,500 x 1% = 700)

One center for 5 years (700 x 5 = 3,500)

Total operating costs for 3 centers (3,500 x 3)

Miscellaneous (spare parts, etc.) and contingency

to repair existing farm implements

Sub-total for Equipment and Operatirg Costs

Allowance for inflation (10%)

III. Training.

Sub-total

Rounded

1. Teacher retraining and professional

improvement (60 months x $500)

2. Student scholarships for additional

enrollment of CTA and ATA

FY No. of Students

1979/80 60

1980/81 120

1981/82 180

1982/83 220

IV. Other Costs.

Sub-total for Scholarships

and Re-training

1. Buildings, Main Center CAP

I library equipped with textbooks and

materials

6 houses for pofessors (6 x 20,000 each)

2 classrooms for 60 students each

6 dormitories, 25 students each (1 for women)

(6 x 40,000 each)

1 dining hall, 80 students

U.S. $

10,500

61,000

$407,000

40,700

$447,700

448,000

30,000

24,000

48,000

72,000

88,000

$ 262,000

60,000

120,000

40,000

240,000

60,000


IV. Other Costs (Continued)

- 149 -

2. Buildings, village training centers

1 dormitory 35,000

1 meeting & classroom 15,000

1 cottage for instructor 10,000

1 warehouse 7,000

Sub-total 67,000

u.S. $

Total buildings for village centers 201,000

(3 centers x 67,000 each)

All buildings CAP Matourkou 721,000

Contingency of buildings (100) 72,100

Sub-Total $793,100

Rounded 794,000

Recapitulation for Centre Agricole Polyvalent at Matourkou.

I. U.S. Personnel $580,000

2. Commodities 448,000

3. Training 262,000

4. Other Costs 794,000

Total $2,084,000


- 150 -

RECURRENT COSTS FOR CENTRE AGRICOLE POLYVALENT DE MATOURKOU AT

THE END OF FY 5 1982/83.

Building Maintenance.

1 library

6 houses

2 classrooms

6 dormitories

1 dining hall

4 village centers

Total value new $794,000 x 1% of value

Vehicles.

1 Pick-up truck

2 cars

1 bus

20 mobylettes

Operating cost, 5 years 50,000 + 5

Training.

300 new CTA's and ATA's x $400

Operating Costs 3 Village Centers.

(3x 700 = 2,100)

Total

Rounded Total

=

U.S. $ Percent

7,940 7

10,000

88w000

2,100

$108,040

$10O000

9

82

2

100


I. U.S. Personnel.

- 151 -

CENTRE AGRICOLE POLYVALENT AT BOGANDE

U.S. Contribution in $

U.S. $

8 person years at $100,000/year $ 800,000

48 person months $7,500/month 360,000

II. Commodities.

a. Equipment.

Sub-total $1,160 000

I set of dining hall equipment (stove, pots,

plates, etc.)

1 set laboratory equipment for 3 labs (biology,

chemistry, rnysics)

3 plows for animal traction

3 cultivators

3 seeders

3 carts

3 back sprayers (plant protection)

3 dusters (plant protection)

I kerosene incubator

1 hand-driven corn sheller

1 grain cleaner

1 fertilizer spreader (hand model)

1 seed treatment drum (local materials)

I set of fencing for 2 hectare pasture

1 mower for animal traction

1 set of hand tools, hoes, shovels, rakes

2 sets of carpentry

2 sets of simple mechanics tools

1 forge with necessary tools and accessories

1 oxycetylene welder complete with nozzles, valves,

2 bottles of oxygen, 2 bottles of acetylene, and

assorted rods

1 set of dining hall furniture (30 persons)

4 sets of classroom furniture (60 students)

8 sets of dormitory furniture (beds, etc.)

4 sets of office plus conference room furniture

100 KvA generator + maintenance + operating

costs during 4 years

15,000

60,000

350

600

600

600

650

450

800

120

800

500

100

2,000

1,000

800

400

400

1,000

2,300

2,000

10,000

40,000

6,000

76,000

Sub-total $ 222,470


. Equipment - Vehicles.

- 152 ­

1 set of vehicles for the CAP, same as Matourkou:

U.s. $

2 4-wheel drive pick-up trucks - 20,000

4 cars, 8 places - 44,000

2 buses, 50 places - 70,000

40 mobylettes - 16,000 $ 150,000

Operating costs for vehicles for 5 years 50,000

2 4-wheel drive vehicles for U.S. Technical assistance,

both long and short term 20,000

Operating costs for 5 years (5 x 2,000) 10,000

c. Equipment - Livestock & Poultry.

Sub-total $ 230,000

1 seeds for crops 200

4 pair of oxen 2,000

10 heifers, milk type 2,500

2 bulls (improved selection) 800

20 feeder steers (250 lbs. each) 2,000

5 ewes 250

1 ram

50

5 milk goats

250

1 buck 50

1 flock of poultry: chickens, guinea hens 200

Feed for livestock & poultry (until production

on farm starts)

500

Medicine and veterinary supplies

800

Mi scel laneous 400

III. Training.

Sub-total for Livestock$ 10 000

Total Equipment $462,470

Allowance for Inflation

(100/0) -46,247

Total $508,717

Rounded $509,000

Based on the interview of 11/25/77 with officials of the MRD, the

requirements for student scholarships are:

ATA's CTA's

1979/80 =x $400 $ 24,000

1980/81 60 60 48,000

1981/82 90 90 72,000

1982/83 120 90 84,000

Sub-total $ 228,000

Short-term training of CAP staff (40 mo @$500/mo) 20,000

Total Training $ 248,000


IV. Other Costs.

a. Buildings, new CAP Bogande.

- 153 -

U.S. $

8 dormitories, at least one

dorm for woa.en (8 @40,000) $ 320,000

4 classrooms for 60 students each (4 @20,000) 80,000

1 administration building (4 offices

and conference room) 50,000

1 dining hall, 80 students 60,000

1 biology laboratory 40,000

1 chemistry laboratory 60,000

1 physics laboratory 40,000

10 houses for professors and director + U.S.

technical assistance people 200,000

7 houses for 2 ATA's andc 5 CTA's (7 @ 10,000) 70,000

1 equipment and repair shed 10,000

1 poultry and brooder house 10,000

1 livestock building and corral 10,000

1 grain storage building (silo, feed pit, etc.) 5,000

1 library equipped with books & materials 60,000

1 tool shed/garden tools 5,000

b. "Town" Services/Infrastructure.

Buildings $1,020,000

(wells, water system, electric lines, road

improvement, sewers, etc) $ 500,000

Sub-total Buildings &

Town Services $1,520,000

Contingency 30% * 456,000

Total $1,976,000

*Contingency for construction at Bogande is higher (30% vs. 10%)

than elsewhere, to reflect Bogande's remoteness and the expense

of transporting construction materials to the project site.

Recapitulation for Centre Agricole Polyvalent at Bogande.

I. U.S. Personnel $1,160,000

II. Commodities 509,000

III. Training 248,000

IV. Other Costs 1,976,000

Total $3,893,000


A. Building Mainentance.

- 154 -

RECURRENT COSTS FOR CENTRE AGRICOLE POLYVALENT

I library

8 dormitories

4 classrooms

1 dining hall

1 administration building

3 laboratories

10 houses for professors

7 houses for CTA's/ATA's

+ farm buildings

+ town services

AT BOGANDE AT THE END OF FY 5 1982/83

Total New Value $1,976,000 x 1% of value

B. Equipment and Vehicles.

I pick-up truck

2 cars

1 bus

20 mobylettes

Vehicle operating costs 5 years - 50,000 + 5=

Farm & Labnratory Equipment 222,470 x 1% =

C. Generator Operating Costs.

lO,O00/year

D. Trainin.

210 x 400

a

$19,760 15

10,000 8

2,225 2

10,000 8

84,000 67

Suh-Total $125,985 100

Rounded Total $126,000

Percent


- 155 -

INSTITUT SUPERIEUR POLYTECHNIQUE (ISP)

U.S. Contribution in $

CENTRAL FIELD STATION. U.S. $

I. U.S. Personnel.

6 person years x $100,000/year $ 600,000

36 person months short-term consultants

x $7,500/month 270,000

II. Conmodities.

a. Motorized Equipment.

Total U.S. Personnel $ 870,000

1 tractor 75 HP 15,800

1 plow 4 discs 2,380

1 subsoiler 3 shanks 1,900

1 disk harrow (width to match tractor power) 2,220

1 tractor mounted scraper blade 2,500

1 hydraulic dump wagon 4,200

1 front-end loader hydraulic for tractor 7,884

1 row crop planter, 2 rows 1,600

1 row crop cultivator, 2 rows 1,860

1 sicklebar mower, tractor mounted 3,600

1 dump or side-delivery rake 2,500

1 millet thresher, motor driven 11,860

1 corn sheller 420

1 small feed grinder and mixer 3,000

1 electric welder with assortment of welding rods 1,200

2 buses of 10/15 seats 24,000

1 mechanics tools, including grease gun,

oil can, wrenches, screwdrivers, punches, etc. 2,800

1 kit of gaskets, hoses, tires, oil and gas filters

for tractor, plus hydraulic oil (gaskets should

be complete set and enough filters for five years)

plus other spare parts 8,000

Sub-total $ 97,724

Inflation Allowance 9,772

Sub-total $ 107,496


II. Commodities (continued).

b. Non-Motorized Equipment.

- 156 -

u.s. $

1 plow $ 220

1 cultivator 80

1 harrow 72

1 seeder 160

1 cart 280

1 yoke and harness parts 24

$ 836 $ 836

1 oxyacetylene welder nozzles, valves, 2 bottles

oxygen, 2 bottles acetylene and rods 2,280

1 electric welder and rods 1,200

1 forge with necessary accessories and tools 3,200

1 set of carpentry tools 3,000

Steel bin for grain storage 2,400

Foot treadle rice thresher 120

2 kerosene incubators (200 egg capacity) 1,600

2 electric incubators 1,680

2 kerosene brooders 120

Miscellaneous feeders, waterers, nests, lamps 400

Office equipment 2,000

Lab equipment (soils, chemistry, hydrology) 44,000

Conference room equipment 4,000

Workshop equipment (tools, etc.) 10,000

Fencing and garden materials 20,000

Handling and branding equipment 400

Survey equipment 400

Initial stock of vitamins, mineral supplements,

feed, etc. 4,000

Textbooks and research documents for library 28,000

Miscellaneous supplies, materials, equipment 4,000

c. Electricity.

Sub-total $ 133,636

Inflation Allowance 13,364

$ 147,000

50 Kva generator plus operating cost during

4 years 32,000

Inflation Allowance (10%) 3,200

Sub-total $ 35,200


II. Commodities (continued).

d. Animals.

- 157 -

Poultry flock and rabbits $ 800

3 pair draft animals 1,560

10 heifers 2,400

2 bulls (improved selection) 640

10 ewes 400

2 rams (improved selection) 160

4 sows 320

2 boars (improved selection) 240

5 does 100

1 buck (improved selection) 40

e. Research.

Sub-total $ 6,660

Equipment, materials, documents, etc. for

ISP staff and U.S. technicals' research $100,000

III. Training.

Total Commodities $ 396,356

Rounded Total $ 397,000

20 students x $14,000/student x 3 yrs/student 840,000

University tours $6,000/year x 5 years 30,000

IV. Other Costs.

Total Training $ 870,000

Farm pond/reservoir 240,000

Wells for agriculture/l ivestock/forestry 40,000

1 well and water system for buildings 20,000

Sub-total $ 300,000

Inflation Allowance

(10%) 30,000

Total Other Costs 330,000

Total for Central

Field Station $2,467,000


EACH REGIONAL FIELD STATION.

I. U.S. Personnel.

Included in Central Field Station

II. Commodities.

. 158.-

a. Equipment for Animal Traction.

U.S. $

3 plow units

3 hoes (cultivators)

660

3 harrows

240

3 seeders

216

3 carts

480

6 yokes and

840

rope or chains for harness 144

b. Vehicle.

1 4-wheel drive, including spare parts,

tires, etc.

c. Furnishings.

Sub-total for Equipment $ 2p580

$ 10,000

1 set of dormitory equipment for 15 students,

1 dorn chief

1 set dining

3,480

hall furniture, dishes & silverware

for 18 persons

1 set

420

of kitchen equipment to cook for 18

persons including a kerosene refrigerator 1,600

1 set furniture for conference hall, study

room and office

1 set of office equipment,

800

reference materials

Miscel laneous

3,000

800

Sub-total for Furniture $ 10,100


[. Commodities (continued).

d. Additional Equipment.

- 159 ­

1 oxyacetylene welder complete with nozzles, valves,

2 bottles of oxygen, 2 bottles of acetylene, and

assorted rods

1 forge with necessary tools and accessories

1 set of carpentry tools

1 set of simple mechanics tools

1 hand-driven corn sheller

1 foot treadle rice thresher

5 kerosene incubators for 100 eggs

5 kerosene brooders

1 basic set of veterinary equipment

Fencing for 2 hectare pasture

1 platform scale for cattle weighing

1 pump with internal combustion engine

3 water wells

1 brick press

Water troughs, feeders, nests, cages, etc. for

livestock and poultry

Branding equipment

Survey equipment

e. Seeds, Animal Feed, Plant Protection,

and Veterinary Medicine.

Sub-total

Additional Equipment

Sub-total for all commodities other

than livestock

Inflation allowance (10%)

f. Livestock and Poultry.

Sub-total

3 pair work animals, oxen

4 heifers

2 bulls (improved selection)

6 ewes

2 rams (improved selection)

4 sows

2 boars (improved selection)

Rabbits and poultry (chickens, guinea hens,

ducks, and turkeys).

Sub-total

Total Commodities

Rounded Total

U.S. $

$ 2,280

3,200

200

200

420

120

2,000

300

800

8,000

2,700

520

8,000

320

400

400

400

$ 30,260

$ 4,000

56,940

5,694

$ 62,634

$ 1,560

960

640

240

160

320

240

200

4,320

66,954

S 67,000


III. Training.

None

IV. Other Costs.

- 160 -

1 workshop 70m 2 at $120/m2 1 animal shed with vet. room 50m2 at

$80/m 2

1 implement shed lOm2 at $120/m 2

1 fodder shed lOOm' at $120/m 2

1 produce shed (storage, FDR type)

1 poultry and brooder house 50mz at $80/m 2

1 combination building for classrooms, study

hall, office, and laboratory-reference center

80m 2 at $160/m 2 + 20m2 at $200/m 2

1 dormitory for 15 students and room

student supervisor 228m 2 at $160/m

2 for

1 kitchen 20m 2 at $120/m 2

1 dining hall 50m 2 at $120/m 2

1 living quarters for thl Regional Center

Director 60m 2 at $160/m

Sub-total for bldgs.

Contingency 10%

Sub-total

Rounded Total

U.S. $

$ 8,400

4,000

12,000

12,000

2,800

4,000

15,800

36,480

2,400

6,000

9,600

$ 114,480

11,448

$ 125,928

$ 126,000


II. Commodi ties.

- 161 -

RECAPITULATION FOR ONE REGIONAL FIELD STATION

Animal Traction Equipment $ 2,580

Vehicle 10,O00

Furnishings 10,100

Additional Equipment 30,260

Seed, animal feed, etc. 4,000

Inflation allowance (10%) 5,694

Livestock & Poultry 4,320

III. Training.

None

IV. Other Costs.

U.S. $ U.S. $

$ 66,954 $ 67,000

Buildings plus 10% contingency $ 125,928 = $ 126,000

Total $ 193,000

Sub-total for two stations $ 386,000

Sub-total for third station

(built during 2nd year at

10% inflation)

Sub-total

Rounded

RECAPITULATION FOR THREE FIELD STATIONS

$ 212,300

598,300

$ 599,000

II. Commodities. $ 207,700 $ 208,000

IV. Other Costs. 390,600 = 391,000

$ 509,000


- 162 -

RECAPITULATION FOR CENTRAL FIELD STATION +

Central Field Station

I. U.S. Personnel 870,000

II. Commodities

III. Training

IV. Other Costs

3 REGIONAL FIELD STATIONS

397,000

870,000

330,000

2,467,000

3 Regional Field

Stations U.S. $

- 870,000

208,000 605,000

- 870,000

391,000 721,000

599,000

Total ISP: $3,066,000

RECURRENT COSTS FOR ISP AT THE END OF FY 5 1982/83

Annual generator operating cost $- 5,000


Anne: C2

- 163 -

Projeot EMNw- Forecast

(3000)

__8 P'Y80 FY81 1rf82 TOTAL

9093

OBLIGOTI0NS 2000 2000 3000 2093 -

USES:

U.S. Peronel

matouzko iT

Boganda LT

Z. LT

Natourkou ST

Bogand.ST

IDPST

100

-

100

30

45

45

100

100

200

45

90

75

100

300

200

45

90

75

100

300

100

30

90

45

-

100

-

30

45

30

400

800

600

180

360

270

Evaluation - - 2515 - 5

TOTAL 320 610 835 665 231)

2660

Conodities

Matourkou:

Vehicles

Mobylettes

Op. Costs

Lab ?up.

Watez Syste

VillageCent.

Misc.

Miflation, 1%

75

8

11

10

20

-

10

11

-

-

11

30

60

3

31

ILL

-

-

11

-

-

6

20

65

8

11

-

-

3

-

9

-

-

11

-

-

3

-

1

140

16

55

140

80

15

61

411

SUMoM 147 149 41 96 15 448

Bogande:

Dining ab Hall p.

-5

20 20

5 5

20

- 15

60

Clahurow

DormitodeA

X.eOt?±o-ty

Othse Equip.

yehioles

--

-

42

2

15

46

21.5

-

2

10

10

-

-

3

15

10

-

3

10

-

35

10

40

76

21.5

154

45

- 32

Mobylettes

op.Costs

Livestock

10% inflation

-

12

-

6

8

12

5

12.5

12

5

11

12

­

10

8

12

-

7

16

60

10

46.

SUBTOL 60 147 120 107

75

509


(oontiined)

Motorized 1kip.

Non--'.-tor Equip.

mleei-.crcity

AftsI la

Research

Regional --

Stations

SUBTOTAL

TOTAL

Matou.kou-Students

Matou.kou-Teaohes

Bogmnd.-Students

Bogande Teaohers

ISP-Participanto

ISP-Staff

TOTAL

Other Costs

Matou.kou:

Library

staff Hosimg(6)

Claasom(2)

Do~m(6)

Diningl Ra

3vil. centers

Cmtingwno10%

SUBTOTAL

Boande.

DoXW(6)

classrooms(4)

A.d4iBldg.

D -. 0nng l

Labs(3)

Staff Houaing(17) ­

Sheds(4) -

Silo -

Library -

Town Serrioes -

Contingenay30% -

SUBTOTAL ­

- -

- 7

-

-

7

214

-

-

-

-

70

6

76

20

40

-

40

-

- 10

110

-

-

-

-

-

83.5

117

20.5

..

20

1-34

375

671

24

7

24

5

210

6

276

140

60

20

80

60

67

33

360

120

20

50

60

40

120

10

-

-

200

186

806

- 164 ­

24

30

5

40

74

173

334

48

7

48

5

280

6

394

- 20

20

120

- 134

30

324

80

20

-

-

60

90

25

5

-

200

iLbh

624

-

-

5

....

20

-

25

228

72

7

72

5

210

6

372

--

-

-

-

-

--

-

120

20

-

-

40

60

-

- 60

100

120

520

-

-

5

20

-

25

115

88

9

84

5

70

6

262

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

- 20

-

-

-

-

-

- 6

26

107.5

147

35.5

7

100

208

6o5

1562

232

30

228

20

840

30

1380

60

120

40

240

60

201

73

794

320

80

50

60

140

270

35

5

60

500

456

1976


(Oontim2.w1)

MSP:

Regional Cente=

Central Station

SUMOTL

TOTAL

-

22

22

132

252

278

530

1696

- 165 ­

139

30

169

1117

-

-

-

520

-

-

-

26

391

330

721

3491

GR. TOM 722 3253 2680 1785 633 9093


- 166 "

Annex 03

Fo-iean Echa e and Local Currency Costs

FY 78 Y79 Y80 rfY81 Fy 82 TOTAL

U.S. Personnel FZ LC FLC FXLO FX L~C FX LW FX WZ

L.T. 170 30 340 60 510 90 425 75 85 15 1530 270

S.T. 108 12 18q 211 211 2 148 17 17 13 773 87

TOTAL 278 529 81 721 11 573 92 202 28 2303 357

Comodities

Matourkou 11 136 33 116 - 41 - 96 - 15 44404

Bogende - 60 22 125 22 98 22 85 - 75 66 443

-SP 7 126 249 50 123 10, 15 10 15 196 409

SUBTOTAL 11 203 181 490 72 262 32 196 10 105 306 1256

Mat. Students - - - 24 - 48 - 72 - 88 - 232

Mat. Teacers - - - 7 - 7 - 7 - 9 - 30

Bog. Studan~ - - - 24 - 48 - 72 - 84 - 228

Bog. Teachers - - - 5 - 5 - 5 - 5 - 20

ISP Participants 70 - 210 - 280 - 210 - 70 - 840 -

ISP Staff 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 15 15

SUBTOTAL 73 3 213 63 283 111 213 159 73 189 855 525

Other Costs

Matourkom - 110 - 360 - 324 - - - - - 794

Bo6ade - - - 806 - 624 - 520 - 26 - 1976

P .- 22 - aOo - 169 - - - - 721

SO TOTAL - 132 - 196 - 1117 - - 6 - 97

TOTAL 362 380 923 2330 1076 1604 818 967 285 348 3464 5629


ANNEX C 4

GOUV CONTRIBUTION

GOUV CONTRIBUTION TO THE PROJECT, CAP MATOURKOU, ( IN U.S. $ )

Items

Salaries

Operating costs on budget

request of CFA 83 m Including

scholarship for 1977/78.

Requests go up 10% per year.

Infrastructure

Buildings

Land, 230 ha.

Equipment, farm

Poultry equipment &

animal equipment

Farm ponds/i rrigation

equipment

Repair shop

FY I FY e

212,520

332,000

191,360

98,137

20,000

21,000

20,050

20,000

233,772

365,000

Y E A I S

FY 3 FY 4 FY 5 Total

257,149

402,000

282,863

442,000

915,067 598,772 659,149 724,863

311,149

486,000

,,

797,149

1.297,453

2,027,000

191,360

98,137

20,GO0

21,000

20,050

20,000

3,695,000


NEW CAP AT BOGANDE.

A. Central Facilities

B. Equipment

C. Scholarships

FY I FY 2 FY 3 FY 4 FY 5 Total

D. Operating Costs, Salaries* 109,000 120,000 132,000 145,000 506,000

* See attachment for details of salaries at Bogande.


GOUV SALARY LEVEL FOR BOGANDE.

Annual sal

7 Ingenieur Technique

5 CTA -

2 ATA -

2 Mechanics -

3 Cooks-

3 Chauffeurs -

3 Secretaries -

1 Financial Agent-

1 Librarian -

4 Intendents -

- 169 -

+ Provislon for Promotion -

+ Charges Sociales - 18.5%

U.S. $

$ 34,000.

17,000.

4,500.

3,000.

3,000.

3,500.

5,000.

2,000.

2,000.

5,800.

79,800.

15% 11,970.

91,770.

16,977.

S108,747. or,

Total: $109,L000.


GOUV CONTRIBUTION TO THE PROJECT ISP IN U.S. $

Personnel

Personnel

Operating Costs*

Administration

Central

Field Stn

12,128

12,314

1 495

Each Reonal

Center FY 1 FY 2

6,072

21,669

528

(Misc) 25,937 28,269

x 2

56,538

Central Field Station

Two, Regional Stations

Third Regional Station

25,937

56,538

Y E A R S

FY 3 FY 4 FY 5 Total

28,530

62,191

31,095

31,383

68,410

34,205

34,521

75,251

37,625

120,371

262,390

102,925

ISP faculty salaries 72,960 91,200 109,440 136,800 182,400 592,800

Sub-total: 72,960 173,675 231,256 270,798 329,797 1,078,486 I

Sales of produce from Central Field Stn. 50,508 50,508 50,508 151,524.

Capital Investment

450 hectares of land for

Central Field Station**

60 hectares of land for all

3 regional stations

Miscellaneous equipment

377,400

50,280

219,640

377,400

50,280

219,640

Total: 720,280 173,675 281,764 321,306 380,305 1,877,330

* Includes food for students when they are at-the regional centers

** Land value estimated by GOUV Patrimoine Foncter

Rounded Total: 1,878,000


- 171 -

ANNEX C5

INCREMENTAL CAP ENROLLMENT*

CAP -MATOURKOU FY 78 FY 79 FY80 FY 81 FY 82**

CAP -BOGANDE

CTA - 20 40 60 60

ATA - 40 80 120 160

60 120 180 220

CTA 30 60 90 90

ATA 30 60 90 120

60 120 180 210

* This table indicates the increased numbers of CTA and ATA

students to be funded by the project

** FY 82 figures represent amount of incremental recurring

obligations which must be picked up by GOUV after the

withdrawal of project funding.


- 173 ­

,etter grazg managam-nt will ch-?ck the deterioration of the rZgIe

vegetation and even allow radual restoration of perennial grasses, sh-=ubs

-

and trees. 3oil treatments and reseedin will be needed in some areas.

Improved vegetative cover will minimize wind erosion, decrease runoff and

increase infiltration of water. _hese changes will also reduce the sediment

load of streams and improve ground water conditions. Ln addition, siltation

of laRkes, ponds and reservol:s, nd damage to roads and other structures

will be reduced. "1ater storage in the soil for plant rowth and spring,

well and stream flow will also be increased.

The use of animal traction, fertilizers ard pesticides has been adopted

by some farmers. Desire on the part of the professional agriculturalists

and the farers to increase productioa as well as the progessive economic

improvement of the country as a resul of this project will generate more use

of the above elements. Adverse effects could result from their intensive

and unwise application. 1owever, awareness and training provided by this

project will insure the expertise needed to minimize or ,v-n avoid damaginG

environmental effects.

M-e project provides for the construction of small buildings at

several widely scattered locations. The buildizgs are in support of training

activities at already existing or new training locations. They ar to be

one or at most, t,o-stor-y buildings made of materials custo-arily used in the

country for such purposes. Lamdscapes are favorable at the proposed

locations, however, some improvement will be needed. Except on easily

identified and readily avoided stream flood plains and wet lands, smallscale

construction of this sort A;ill pose only light or no environmental

problems.

At the new CA.?, Bogande, construction of water, s w'rag, and eloctrical

power facilities and road improvements will be requi-red, 2iose are all

urban services that would be eventually needed as the eeonomy improves.

Proper care in building those facilities should minimize any :Ldverse

environmental effects.

The agricultural land management demonstrations and trials will be

on small fields at six locations, totalling no more than a few thousand

hectares. Tnrm ponds are to be constructed for iriation at some

locations. These farm ponds will be used exclusively for research and

demonstrations covering small exeas. Considering all the environmental

factors affecting successful plant growth and development, water is the

most serious constraint in Upper Volta. These ponds, restricted to small

areas will provide water to irrigate the plots at critical plant growth

periods, thus insuring continuity and success in the implementation of the

research program for the benefits of teachers, students and farmers.

Any mLnimal advers3 effect caused by the construction of these small

ponds will be largely compensated for by the benefits gained research

and teaching. For most of the field areas, the managsement systems applied,

although technically improved, .. rill not depart significantly from those

prevailin, in the region. Any adverse effect will be confined to th

experimental areas and will be compensated man-fold by the information ;ained.


S174,

1wi11 Mlp im~rova land maae~ient over~ the e'nt.r are of th ­ QQo~r

cVze

shfsi

proec

Y~~1Q1~~S STrpPQc 9 se'4Qe ,o f ara ad I 4in ar cuQ 4~Z'

edln mas to tb=allw exmected. b:

-Aratcs-b tu-a

aduea4te 7iaoino

h req-ae-t

Onblne ayn0gtv niomna

wilb ml


Summary

A.1. Sector goals

To accelerate the development

of the agricultural

sector through the eff4 ­

oient combination of faotore

of production in order

to attain food crop selfsufficiency

at an improved

level of nutrition while

increasing

export

agricultural

Annex E. Project Design Logical Framework Matrix

Objectively Verifiable Means of Verification

Indicators

A.?. Measurement of Goal A.3.

Attainment 1. Per Capita agrioul-

1. Total agricultural tural production.

output Increased faB- 2. Per Capita production

tar than growth in of basic cereals.

population 3. Per Capita production

2. Nutritional intake and of liveatock,

availability improved 4. xports of foodcrops

Agricultural export of

grains, cash

livestock

crops and

increased

and livestock.

over previous years.

Important Assumptions

A.14. Assumptions ae related

to goal attainment

1. The GOLU will translate

its natioual

commitment to agrioultural

development into

action programis that

are relevant and responsive

to the change

potential of the existingagricultural­

ecological environment.

2. The GOUV and external

donors will continue

to provide financial

and technioal assistance

to programs

which support agricul- j

tural sector develop- ,

ment.

3. The GOUV will naintain

an agricultural pricing

policy that provides

incentives to producera.

4. An effective rural

development planning

and extension service

coupled with the provision

of factors of

production (e.g. agri.cultural

credit, improved

seed, fertilizer

farm practices,

etc.) can within the

cultural framework of

Upper Volta lead to increased

agricultural

production.


5. The laud resource of

the country will sustain

increased and

expanded agricultural

production on a longterm

basis.

B.1. Purpose: B.2. End of Projeot Status B.3. Means of Verification B.4. Assumptions Relative

To improve the COUV planning, 1. Provide the MDR with 25 1. Annual number of to Project Purpose

administration, and implemen- graduates per year from graduates from ISP 1. The existing institation

capabiltty for rural

development projects

Volta

in Upper

throuh the expansion/

creation of trahning centers

ISP.

2. Provide MDR with 130 ATA

level and 80 CTA level

graduates per year

and CAP's.

2. Reduction of number

of unfilled posttions

within MDR.

tutional agricultural

training infrastructure

can be expanded

without exerting un­

for middle and upper level trained at CAP's (Patour- 3. Interviews with due stresses on the

agricultural technicians and kou and Bogande). encadreurs to ascer- fiscal and human

extension

eMP's.

agents at ISP and 3. Graduates

CAP's have

of

increased

ISP and tain

ledge

practical

of middle

knowandaanagemeuof

GOUV.

elemei'ts

capability to provide upper level staff. 2. Needed managerial and

practical knowledge to 4. Project evaluation, professional techni-

Voltalo farmers through cal manpower to staff

MDR. the expanded training

system is either

available or obtain- ­

able through external

Pssistance programs.

3. GOUV employment opportunities

and incentives

will be sufficient

to attract and

retain output of

training institutions.

4. Th. commitment to

reach and improve the

produc tive capacity

of the individual producers

will be translated

into action programs

that reach all

of the Voltaic citizenry

irrespective of

ethnic affiliation or

BSOX


5. Existing research and

education coordinating

committees will

promote feedback from

different levels within

the agricultural

system.

C.1. Outputs C.2. Output Indicators C.3. Means of erification C.4. Assumptions jilative

1. Infrastructure provided 1. All buildings in place, 1. Qpestionnaire respon- to Output

and functioning, training and research sea indicate substan- 1. Exidting organiza­

2. Staff acquired, trained fields in use. tial increases over tional structures

and in place. 2. All institutions have baseline data. within GOUV for super­

3. Training programs em- necessary teaching 2. Numbers of teachers vision, administraphasizing

practical positions filled, and students meet tion and coordination

agriculture functioning 3. All institutions oper- projections. of the agricultural

at training centers.

4. Graduates placed and

integrated into ORD's

ating at desired student

capacity.

4.Students receiving

3. Site inspections of

physical facilities.

Ij. Project evaluation.

system will be maintained

and strengthened.

and other relevant ser- training in practical 2. Incentives and condivices

and/or enter- agriculture. tions of employment

prises, will be attractive

enough to recruit and T j

retain necessary GOUV

staff at ISP and CAP's.

3. Appropriate U.S. and

third country training

for ISP and CAP staff

can be located and arranged.

This training

will be applicale

to rural development

in Upper Volta.

4.Appropriate candidates

for training will be

identified and made

available.


D.1. Inputs D.2. Budget Schedule D.4. Assumption Related

USAID& See Budget Part III B. to Inputs

1. Technical advisor in

1. USAID/SECID can provocational

agriclnture

vide personnel with

placed at CAP Matoui-

necessary technical

kou.

and practical skill@

2. Technical advisors in

to implement projeot;

agricultural educeation,

range mangement and

aronomy/extention

2. GOUV Inputs, expecially

qualified personnel

(staff plus

placed at CAP Bogande.

3. Technical advisors in

forestry, agronomy and

livestock placed at

candidates for training)

will be forth­

coming.

4. Short-terw technical

consultants as needed.

5. Buildinga, equipment,

livestock and operating

fuads.

6. Training of Voltaic 4

staff and counterparts.

GOUV:

1. Personnel

2. Land

3. Buildings, equipment,

livestock, operating

Coate.


I

CII

.... . . r r

6/73~ ~ Se 'njptemefo Bog44and IS?' reilV sttins,

7 2. PP approved. ,

3/78 3. Pr_ ige

7/78 6. Fir :Lst particpants to USo,

,"...

~~~~~7/78 7, quipment orderea/ :,, .:, : ¢.,

.9/'78 8.Arv ehiin o n *aoro

13/79 11. taf urecited for both CAs

3/79

5/79

12. Arival

13. Compl.eted

techncian

ontrhuct:on'o

for Bogadaro.

essentl bui.digs at

6/78 k$ clases Bogan d6 ard Mato4sou to accomodate new and expanded

7/79 9/79 17, 1. Seco Gomgleted group construction of participants of two to U., regio toP ustations

9/79 17. Field equipment and water systems in place,, Fentrl Station

10/79 18. ProAg Amendment (- 8U Funds) 31gned

,7/$Q 2- Final goup of partcipans to, U'.S­

::::t}; ... 10/81

V7 Returned participants teaching at IS? ; ,Tird

1/7..1...regiona station operattginga tiio

3/2 2. 'Seial in jct r eoamd.


'Of . 1.. 61 . .. 2 .. . .....

" : : ;. + U " " + + + r + + P + : + " j + p 4 .( 12. )++

Un1~1ivesity of,"ugdoguttri OfctUprVla badevelopment

Qet.o t wa Pe.ane eo Beo (e) m Lha~ o+ P

'the !A exioteBoecaf a a eItitation )-at e

A. te ziatenoej' Ofa viable sodar o (zsP)atCAP­

.ao=S=) for thetraining of aulhtural extenaion

agents;

C. the performance of the curent directors of.ISP and

QAP-atorkou;

D, Pasnt p. te~t~pe and aurrent Ouag+Ougcuee GOUT support to of n ISP and a OhP-fttourkou

eve lopment;

interms of buge contributionu and personnel

assigants;

E. the oequirment for? additional trained agricultural

tehniciana and extension agents in order to spread"

appopiae intermediate technology to the rual

population of Upper Volta;

P. the impotance the GOUT place. on ? l development;

G. the teeaohe? training elemnt9Of the Proaect which will

develop neceumazy hummn resources;

H. the Iconat~otion/equipment elsents of the projecot

which will1 develop necessary educational infrastructure;

do hereby certify that in my judpinentg the GOUT will have by the

end of'the project the financial and Iman reOBOce capability

to maintain and effectively utilize the educational infratucture

and progL-am developed by the proj ect.

,

SJohn A. Hokins

Country Development Officer

.Ou.gadougou, Upper Volta

+"

+:+ +:J' + .+++. + + " + ' + :" +Yr + ' :++ .12/1 '++ : '+ ' . . ... .. + " +' +;7 + i J +++ .. . . + :

+

++... +++++++ ++J ... ++#... :' + +++++++++ ++>++..... ....' +> ..... . ;.. .......... .. ...... : .... ...... ++ .......... ..... + ++ .......... +" ... + ......+ + ...... "+, ++ ;++++ .. ... . .. + ..+ .... .. 1 .......+ . ... + +.....+... . ". ++ ... + I .........

+ + rm +, + ++ I '


- 181 -

AN=~ H

Bor±ower/Grantee's Application for Assistance

GOUV requests for U.S. assistance to finance the expansion of

ISP and CAP-atourkou plus the creation of a new CAP-Bogande

date back to June 1975 (See attacbmenta A and B). Since that

time, the terms and elements of the-proposed project have all

been discussed and elaborated with the close collaborativb

participation and the concurrence of GOUV officials.


- 182 -

ATTACHMENT A

UNIVERSITE DE OUAGADOUGOU Ouagadougou, Is ....1.6.jin... . * 975

B.P. 7021

OUAGADOUGOU (Haute-Volta)

Tel. 33-10 / 33-11

N" 1 3 8 6 /U.G./iAtn~s

Monsieur ie Directeur

de l'United States Aid for International

Development (U.S.A.I.D.)

Ambassade des Etats-Unis

- OUAGADOUGOU -

Objet : Projet de creation d'antennes destinges a la formation pratique des

6l6ves-ing~nieurs du d~veloppement rural.

Monsieur le Directeur,

Suite a la r~union de travail que nous avons eue le 30 aoat 1974 a

Washington, en presence du Directeur G~ngral de l'U.S.A.I.D. et de l'Ambassadeur

de Haute-Volta aux Etats-Unis et aux entretiens que nous avons eus, ici a

Ouagadougou, le 30 janvier, le 28 avril et le 10 juin 1975, j'ai l'honneur de

soumettre a l'agr~ment de votre organisme le projet ci-joint d'assistance

financi~re destind a permettre l'adaptation au milieu de la formation pratique

des ingenieurs du developpement rural ainsi que l'amorce de l'6ducation des

masses rurales orient~e vers l'utilisation des techniques culturales et agro­

pastorales am~lior~es.

Dans l'6laboration de ce projet, mes collaborateurs et moi-mame,

avons 6t guides par le souci d'6viter l'introduction pr~matur~e d'outils dont

la conception et le coGt seraient longtemps encore hors de la port6e des

masses rurales.

La Cellule de d~veloppement dans laquelle des outils de ce genre

sont envisages, est une sorte de laboratoire ayant pour but la recherche fondamentale

et appliqu~e dans les domaines de l'agronomie, de l'6levage et des

eaux et for~ts. C'est aussi un centre qui dolt permettre d'initier les 6lavesing~nieurs

sur ce que sont les techP s modernes dans ces secteurs, leur

formation pratique essentielle se fais sans les antennes r 6 gionales.

bn exemplaire du projet vous parviendra ult~rieurement revatu des

avis de Messieurs les Ministre de l'Education Nationale, du Plan, du D~veloppement

Rural, de l'Environnement et du Tourisme, par une voie plus officielle.

C'est donc pour permettre a votre organisme de programmer, en temps utile,

ce projet que je vous envoie directement l'exemplaire ci-joint.

Y


- 183 -

Je tiens personnellement a vous dire toute ma gratitude pour

la collaboration directe que vous n'avez cess-I d entretenir depuis votre

arriv~e a OUAGADOUGOU, mais aussi A vous remercie ° pour toutes les dgmarches

que vous serez ameng 1 entreprendre en vue de l'abouti4sement heureux de

ce projet.

Je vous pr 'e d'agrger, Monsieur le Directeur, l'assurance de

ma haute considerationI.

PJ. 3.

Th.Y.A. T0GUYENI

/2


'(4'': 4 44 "' Ji04'4C'

.TA. B" ' "" - "

MPUE RC V LI V VE AUT WL

*~~~~ul -

w... JPRn a..i.

1-Q936s~,1

QPJE~T., .

Afonsi'eur HASKINS

$PaDi-lru e' pUre \ e vn/AIP

.. e e du Gran

telle, a. iintesifiec tione l formation

e es re,. -t"intes

du eateu - ricole pour acc6.eer le d6ve -p-e.en

paoc

de e._ .a _ prod e erat tion enu avine:pim, ag coe. Cette intensifaton r.taufianennttu~.

obter !

drait soit en sul-mentaiit le no;,ibre d'agents fornes dans les

centr'es exialtai-,ts, soQit en cr~anIt de nouveaux dtbliSsemnats,

Vous uvea eu amabilit t de gin'ormer que votre Co vernerent

serait, enprzincpe, favorable au fncement dee . ,O

terlle activit6. n'ai dnc lhonneu , de vous trans tree, -.

joint, un vnte-,rojet pour l'ascroiesement de la capacit6

de reception du Cente Foyvasert de Mo1atourku et la creat..o

d.un nouveau Cebltre de Formation a Dogande pour l'region

Nord et Est,

Cet avarnt-projet ni'cessite un financement de.$ 3.500.000

pour la construction des b~timents, pour la fourniture de

I1'qcuipement des Jlocaux et pour assurer le fonctionemeit

des deuxc etablii-seme~nts -endant les cinq premie'res annees,

- Je vous serais reconnaissant si vous voudr'ez bien examiner

la Dossibilit'6 d'as-.*urer & la Haute-Volta le fizancement"'indiqu6

ci-dessus et me faire connattre la suite c;ue

vous voudrez bien ddnhior L cette requ~te.

Veuillez agr5er, Nonzieur le Directeur, l'assurance de'

ma con'ide ration distinguee. ..

/ :

... ...cc . ,onsi.;ur" le.

uPlan

is r ...

S S A Nr0

ccMonsieurle Secinire Permane]

d~u CCD)R. fi~i

4 4


Annex I

- 185 -

Interviews With Encadreuia and ATA's

Serving in the Ea tern ORD

Twelve enoadreurs and two ATA's were interviewed by members

of the PP team during the r'..urse of field study. The overwhelming

oonsensum of everyone interviewed was that training at the CAP-

Matourkou includes too much theory and not enough practical education.

The emphasis on theory actually starts before the CAP training

as Upper Volta's primary school education is purely based on

theory with no practical education. As a refalt, agricultural

extension agents - particularly if they do not come from rural

areas - often arzive at their first field post well grounded in

theory but very weak in practical applications. It was stated,

in fact, that many ag agents coming from urban backgrounds never

adapt to working and living conditions in the bush. where the need

for extension services is highest.

A second criticism of current training at Matourkou is that

even the practical training is too modern and not particularly

adapted or relevant to conditions in rural areas. One specific

example given (and noted firsthand by the PP team when visiting

Matourkon) involves avioulture - specifically the raising of

chickens. Chicken production at Matourkou includes electric and

kerosene-powered incubators, chicken feed consisting of a special

feed concentrate prepared (by machine) at Matourkou, vaccinations

using vaccines which must be kept in cold storage, modern chicken

houseJ, cages, feeding equipment, etc. One encadreur noted that

when he arrived in his village he didn't know how to build a chicken

house using local materials. It is all well and good to instruct

agricultural agents in modern chicken-raising practices, but at the

same time instruction could easily be given in chicken-raising at

an intermediate level of technology which is applicable to rural

conditions.

A major problem cited by the encadreurs and ATA's interviewed

involves the integration of the extension agent at the village

level. Many times - particularly with agents from urban backgrounds

- new agents do not fit into their villages. Traditionally,

older men instruct and counsel younger man and women concerning

what kinds of agricultural practices should be used. Most ag

agents are young. Secondly, if the ag agent is not from a rural

area, he/she is unlikely to appreciate the importance of establishing

contact and a rapport with village elders and chiefs.


- 186 -

Even if the ag agent wishes to make this contact, training at ?.fatourkou

does not prepare him/her to poll a village group to determine

who are the leaders, what are the expressed needs of the village,

etc. Finally, as current Matourkou training lacks both applicable

practical training and specialization, the new ag agent often finds

he/she has nothing to say to the farmers. If he/she had a partioular

skill to demonstrate to the villagers, integration into the

village scene and the respect and acceptance of the villagers would

be much more easily won.

The above is not intended to suggest that current training at

Matourkou is worthless. Rather, it is intended to reflect the

views of village-based extension agents concerning how the training

at Matourkou might be improved. In sum, the encadreurs ana ATA's

echoed the same criticism heard from ORD Directors and expatriates

working in rural development in Upper Volta: current agricultural

extension education is based too heavily on theory and not enough

on applicable practical training. The suggestions concerning

uecific subjects which should be taught reflect the practical concerns

of those who work most closely with the rural population.

Training was requested in - lowland management (water-spreading/

retention using small dikes), practical livestock procedures (how

to vaocinate, how to treat minor sicknesses and injuries), health

and nutrition, animal traction, youth groups, women's groups, and

functional literacy training. Matourkou has already added specializations

or majors to their curriculum. In sum, perhaps the major

contribution, this project can make in terms of presenting development

alternatives to the rural people of Upper Volta will stem

from efforts to do just what field agents are asking: make agricultural

education relevant and applicable to the practical realities

the extension agent will face in the rural areas.


- 187 -

AiaNX J

THE RULE Of dUci'.',IAD ,I0TLVI-.3

'he Agricultural Human Resources Development (Upper Volta) project

proposes a system-wide expansion of agricultural education facilities

and training opportunities. 6ince all Upper Volta will benefit from

increases in available agricultural extension personnel, the issue of

minority ethnic groups is not salient to this project. rain3d agricultural

technicians, engineers and extension agents work in all sections

of the country with all Voltaic farmers.

There are several definite benefits to women which are incorporated

in this project, howewer. According to the mandate of the Percy Amendment,

assistance programs should "...be acdinistered so as to give particular

attention to those programs, projects and activities which tend to

integrate women into the national economies of foreign countries, thus

improving their status and assisting the total developmm;nt effort".

(International Development and Food Assistance Act of 173). The OI;NV

has strongly supported women's icreasing participation in development

activities. In responding to the '13 survey used in the oreparation

of the 1V7b SUG Report, the U6AI Upper Volta mission noted that the

strong positive responses for women's activities already underway in

the country were due to GJUV initiatives rather than influence of

,DJ and/or other donors (SOG Report, P. 71).

The commitment on the part of GUUV to expanding agricultural

training personnel includes participation by women in a-! phases of

professional and technical training. f'our women are currently enrolled

in the first three years of the five-year cycle of Ingenieur de

Dveloppement Rural training at the Institut Superieur Polytechnique

(ISP) of University of Uuagadougou. Twelve women are also enrolled

at the Centre Agricole Polyvalent at ?Iatourkou in both the ATA and

CTA programs. A special effort to recruit young women to take the

qualifying exams for the CAP was made by announcing the competition

in all the girls' secondary schools in Upper Volta. In addition, the

Director of the ISP made a special effort to recruit women into the

Ing~nieur training program.

Project plans for the expansion of the CA2i at ,atourkou include

construction of an additional dormitory for women. The new to

be built at Bogand4 will also include dormitories for women in the

construction olans•


culI, traAt s once t adtonlcriul r de , i, b,4

.. .. e e l s •- q3 ..

: ~ ~.Ze:nrae ~ ... ~ , -p ceso c ores to;Idsue, and ute e ,c"agricutural

i 'tcrricul triwill 4'sPe Social e aad to CQU allresuentcpat~o the W, e i

- grzturto a!t plning 7ylexen asi-qonactvesad sic l rsaua tis

area to aloio the toll werktmoresi -tvl ., th"040 "ptmO

jobs within the pagiutura plan~ing aq t aia s 144em4,

n~hs proet lfalired o aes,,.woe

c,rtona! for :

woe'it the hghtu he, agricultu'rora n r4t dd@ png. ' levels cf ~ thterl

agiulua sv 's. e tensio

fo SlunItay Vo Agecie (AWA). soa! ep~e crteria h inue()ntation ,

• oe leaderei it l (2 rand atcpto leel non the ; 3utrol eten

"ince (4 Vlths socia prjc chng ;:inand (T)es .vsprcs grda upet pernne .o inClude z­

. . ..3 b 1 .. .. . " "i 4 +....Z'Q 9i. ,' L I, " 4'

~ ~~voe ._were no+t;rd;e,t nv glvgrduaintheintation of h rsoeclt~

levls I itto fals clearywihin h otx facniunDeeo

inln women , will beAof d~etyirlet imoncithal:.vapt'i otfal

loees, hefr oeneit stauscly tpowithin uP11othe Votis nlu44d nt x afacnilgavlpet Q1lt14 p'snm

Themphasi on recuinefit alotrain atd ~in o women. at.....el o


I.. .the

&V~ ~ ~ o -'c

Phu C409 (t OW U"44t ,W- *~ wV

* ~ ~ ~ ~ h Lu ofws00 mwWtl i V.5.1.4.40Y(J

e w~

.... , .

. . w

2~ 10/15 post 9q t# I 2400

, . ... Poet ... •.. vehices .. .......... fo ,.....o:....... 4i1 v 0n . .. VI : rj - o$t " " i; D .. ?''-_.

r •,.. ~~OM i!'N~! ..

.: > : :,,: '. .

.

: :.i ?i i- .> > > . -i .! : i

:; :i : P,? i ': ii, , '," ,: _: :- ' : ,: !: : K!,:.- , i -- ! : , -

'

hxys boon acquir*4 =n4 935

34?,

boosmmvxv *abeags

no suppart facilities in fter Volta for V#Iq,.t&s#Q:4 TIP4440.

Seotio~n 636(1) of thooe l AmmittP* At of 1941, as=ndd

Prohibits AID ft= she km 0ubs or Lmopq =z I*"* ofaco

vele =le~s such vehicles wae .in*acaod~ in the ftte4

States, section 636(1) doos hoversi, P~OT 0 that "***b#M

special oiromustmnces ezist, the President to Authorize to waive

proviin of this section in orde to @WA7 Qut the PUXVQ806

Of this Act."

3Ianufac ti~ of U.S. vehicles we not amp sente4 in Vypew Volta

and there wre no spare partap sapport or saintenstre facilities

for U.S. vehicles La the 00=hTs. Unti such ti=e U.3- MRaanuCo

turers are repiresented In Upper Volta with sufficient, spare parts

and adequate repair facilities$ there in no resonable alternative

to the putrehase of non-UsS. manufactiured vehicles.

:"/

Approuimately S14e50000 will be spent for the prourent

of Z4trized.4giIuituxal Umao±U7 and spare parts for the

-repair of ezisting agricutui U1Ohil*r7- -3oauxe of the

paiucity of mode=n agricultural naohluz7 in per Volta, a

0510 can be made that no maimfaotue in properly represented.

,

::-''4,

,

..........

i ?

.


- 190 -

Thus, a large percentage of the new machinery may suitably

be procured fre. the United States provided that a sufficient

stock of spare parts is incladed. However, the bulk of

existing agricultural machinery is of Code 935 (European)

source/origin. Consequently, the spare parts ($61,000) needed

to repair this machinery must come from Code 935 source/

origin.

C. Construction Materials

The project will spend $3,491,000 on the construction

of educational infrastructure. Construction materials locally

available are often of Code 935 origin.

D. Laborate-y EauiTment

Approximately $210,000 will be speut on laboratory

equipment. Whereas it is likely and desirable that a large

portion of this equipment be procured from thd United States,

it is important that new equipment be metric and compatible

with the equipment already in place at ISP and CAP-Matourkou.

Thisequipment is largely of European source/origin. Therefore,

it is likely that some of the new lab equipment should also

be of European, code 935 source/origin.

E. Books

At the two CAP's, the project will construct and stock

two libraries with books, documents, research materials, etc.

ISP will alao receive books, documents and research materials.

Approximately $70,000 will be spent for these materials and

books. As the language of instruction at all three institutions

is French, virtually all materials will be in French.

It is evident that such materials logically will be procured

from code 935 countries (notably French-speaking European

nations).

In sum, Upper Volta, ranking low on the list of the 25 least devaloped

countries, qualifies for Code 941 procurement. In view of the

above, it is clear tat several exceptions requiring Code 935 procurement

will be necessary if the project is to be implemented in

a tmely and successful manner. This is not to say that there will

not be a considerable level of procurement of project commodities

from thi United States. However, it is felt that the number and

level of exceptions to Code 941 procurement which will be necessary

warrants a general waiver for Code 935 procurement. It should be

noted that Code 935 procurement specifically includea U.S. procurement,

and the U.S. direct hire project manager will be expected to

maximize the amount of U.S. procurement wherever possible and

practicable.


4-.: 4-. " r :d . .. - .. . : ' '~" 4. 4"

Ajlab4t ini441 "u .V~ .4. ;

4

fa .. T''.' P'' ! *--u * ",V. +

,[ us, o 4, qlw ar d~ ,l! teril

' e'. .m

, :

4o

,+' ~

": -A

-.r

+

...

~

assistane wl directly

faile4~~ tp t totk rvn 04-t

st!v:ry gr Apable W+,ll

, FA 190)pI 41 se Prvetionu It A W an i that

,

PCt~p o f

ieDrug ~ A..

fil t he

eoy if A0,

v hs te

dictio' Pepr'.A ntte ¢ q of unde eshD $,tq .vaermietate o U.3, overanent ths

it flagl~.A from- c~r

carge~e t or (sfrom

$u~ Cuba?

to+ • AAfunds, an

F crl!orIp4

Cnto V

pttr of.gross il vel! ation :els noi enter,..

M a + ic

-1nve!ad1

of roe~mn h a

+

has~~the t $reayoSte

q;b or fa to"

' 4.. -

th3~~~~~ raiga Cmuitoveni U41

+utr

'4 . . . l narr t s4 £49+ *a

"

1

44a4. -1 J.A

v;¢h orfei ae Pat i nuc contryl+, r

" eP!!ts ing ilealywt * ,sol e i t jur"/

+'

govenmen, isthe oe FAA n esntalea

Se. . 620() . If assistance i t "

::+...e " . ' v+ : 4';twI ' r e ; ;;'+. 41 R. +'

dab~to a U.S. citizen for goods or,

N.

%

. '

serice 'furnishedor ordered wihera (a)

+: ; + " . 5+q - 4 te~a1 remedilq an ,b) * S R 91' debt "e . : I$not denied

Oronftested by such, government?

,+ ,

* 6. FAS. 620(a) Ifassistance isto

a g~erne~t da it(inclhding gover'nmentIT

acencies or subdivliin) taken any action

which has the effect Of f4tio~ali~ing, ..

exroraigo nte i eezing

ownrersip or control of 'proerty of U.S.

by 5term without taking

its*4*obiain

steps to

toads

disciiarge

c itizens or .

.

Cienities? lte eeical we ~ * , *

41

Tool.

.

.

44 J:"

.+

.,

+;

r'

"+


I' .

fei;,-Se"; 620 f. A2p ~

2

1.- V- gIUA- Notp

,. . £j!4+ - ,,- e. - n4! t -ss .4

i)o Ve-tn, o g V,e

M/ Sc 620 i s en-.. t in

;Ositn;o, or (b to Planing of suc

svr qr oggr $io lens t

"y1Y0 4- . vO 4dd irrk#.)Feriof sbve

s

ortsk

L, It 4ied aj., adequaetntake

A09

.oasures to prevenl., the damage or

FAA Se.%i 20,1 .i f the S c has ,n)tr

guaranty pr-gran,/fr the speinfic risks

of expropria;lion', inconvertibility or

confisation, fiathe AID Administrator

kvitth1n d.:: ,!. the Itrin, past eu year meshrby acinieof considered U.$ deny-ing

assian to sk 9chgovernment for) this

r, n.620(o) Fishermen's Protective

:aI.I h + t -yr i,;+i+-+f the inor;ise3.r pernalty or iet st e on +n grintt, r

<

criy IjS. fishing Activities in inter.

4* Eas any deduction required by Fisher.

" + ++ r - rtl~ C ex wn. ry haedin o e 4eao- NI

b.'has omoeete dnil.J eof sstance

ftejfl cposidered by ANr Adiniestrater?

21 A

•-n' i~

.


.19 3.... . .

3# 3,-O-I -pp ,! ovembr 10 -9l" - I)'W

14k, TAASe 20t, a the Conr severedNO

Uatei If5Q, have they bee~gn resumed

AN hove new bilaeral assistance agree,

mentl been negotiate d an entered into

00 sch g; resumnption? t K

15.fASC.60u what isthe paymetgw

IfCs the ti Copuntry the Cptntry's

Isinorrears,

V N. obligations?

wvere sueieh

a -arages taken into accou~nt by th, AIO

Administraor in determining the current

!ar

AIQ Operaional Year Bdget?

I& FAA tec 6A, Has the country grantedQ.

0ctwa r proseutio to iny indivio

"Oual o group which has coemitte l on act

.f e..trn4tje n1tg ,errors

a~~

_erasm

I,

179 FAA Sed, 665 Does the country object, NO

mnQ flof rae, 'religin, national

origin or sex, to the presence of any

fficer orerployee of the I).$. there

to carry out economic development program

under FWt

13. FAASec, 69, Hmas the country delivered

orraeeive nuc)ear 1 reprocesing

N

or

enricnent aquipment, materials or

te.nnolo.y without specifiled arrange.

ments on safev n4rds, etc.?

• , (' Has the country denied its

97tfTe$ the right or opportunity to No'*

eaigratie?

MlI~,'CITRA FO CTR

7. OevlopmntAssistance Country Criteria

a. EAkng. 102(ce,(ds. Have criteria Ye, See Country

beenestabised

Development

and taken into account, Assistance Program (DAP) of to

YTZ 75

assess ouritiiant

cuntry and

ini progress effectively involving of

the a c .... i4oxt i ida.zea.1:vl4

Mpnor in development, on such indexes as4 fo Py 76t PY 779 and~ IT 78.

()small-farm labor Intensive agri­

* culture, (2) reduced infant imrtality,

(3) population growth, (4) equality of

Income distributior , and (5) uneployment.

walcn coun~try is:

(1) Making appropriate efforts to increase See DA.P as. cited above,

food production and fiprove means for

food storage and distribution.

(2) Creat ng a favorable climate for The coutry actively attempts to promote

foreign and dmostic private enter- domestic and foreign inv.stment but

rie and nvesmet. with limited su0es due to mal doms-.­

tic .=mLrktand limited local capital.


(3) ,i Incoresn h lcs role inted~g . aevelopmp....at-

.... ' eia o. i n that

!::is :! d.-v ¢e ,.o'pment ,-!;,pexp .n ndtcess d e ; c t al_ -_-l ze. _, the: + . . ... p - a.k n :p rocess,,

(a):!: Allcatindng aial ugt0#tion

In rua deveAlopie O1$tB I ;

::. >+reforms~~ _ Such n retaure o s foi mr ov e bl, ) b.e ud,-,

&te=:~

Vrrniiees a mltar e pnditrs and !ec! P t peopes

itrv odveomn

entionespect f irs of ohefr rw, bleO.t

i-e of-pressatons ;:'h

-andA -rs-tou

e;Te~o of

n~TiTh'

Ontry the iialaon 0lIs£10,

hiss.-&ipg. *

..~ ~~ reo,.~~~~~~eore

~ the

()faigeoni

imotnei. . .Ioeee'~t

i nsoiltand

dvda are

politand

usconedn Mtary:J 1xpnd78, g

reom uh! a (5)cleto

s mrv, ic elPopfL-taCpoe S'L4tart(.w1cp. if~

Theres countryfn is reforming its c.rr ' .

arrangemen, adikia prorsso€a' !t the

:

Q

n

ofois

p'ooeusn

;: to~niafreptS ole

forle iludin

iho ruemof tr

th*fo~

latb o the otitutiona,

... . d. Fj e c. 115,to dev il ulpmntry

reut

be(

ed y

s l f e p xe ss o ouf thepsss ) ) p q

1-7 ~ssr* mi~lear

CCCU it

enithr ,

erven~tin,

n Jeq~.p~~~

4. Si...tn..cears (6)::FOth, otr,

Il e ro f e ~

.idintpecen;l iq t

A~t

ati? t,11( I on sevital - o n ot c p+mong Wihi the contrin ofUn~re itn resource

rsi.ne f r Dui ,Litaprleog ms, ve

ttnr , .a:-. F7A7 cla :e . d t seafhe3 .+siton to take:effetiv the efor~t A_ effcctse self-help

* nh l f iseac egt , dpi I fs roe i nthe ' 4 m ' t

c o =tifivIu reo, u ntaie n fr* , D+io- n

1-( - ,,un -ries

(othertan i whc ll~

for Y s

sopuQ2.eon projects) may

Lcan

"organ i.eat.i0s,

rian aid irough

viinal nr internat

programs? ronal

- t ­ t

teui f-rnOiedfog

.:.. t Sueo

frTienl

nt timStance

uuntry,n

o

hc

fUtr Q . U

= e i t a ai .--- [ .'

P.. FA Apvc. ent. R'si the c.unty

(6) NIA

ithwni a C t nont hnPatttrn ros,

tf

v.lo~fltions ce~:f of lntcr,,al,:oally i~t s, n p urunram furn~iie',Inethenr accordance

roCOo nizedj'+

ai' ~~'calyea,

1 a.l 1€y Of tht'u errirgtion?t t. Aj

f

b. FA Sc. 53 .( he

dlmanizaton,

As,s.a... thto

or body

rntce

elib

ive ltay assistance?./

be m'

w ­ th...i

c. FAA Sec ,L9 Ifcommodities are to N/A

to (ther. thd reciPiertinafsale t country, proceeds nave w .ce yil

1--,. coont(counterrarL) arrangements been

Irecal.

. .. .


5.

November 10, 1976 3: 1

6. FAA Sec. 219 61.g Isproject susceptble

sof xecu-F ? IF orn o v; A; si

lateral proj ,t? f so hy ipject rpt

whether *5astiae wil,,'OIour a\'

Assistance is for newl~y indep-endent

Couq'Vry, is it furnished throuqh multi,

1#1,ral organ,ations or plans to the

i:-axmum extent appropriate?

7 9Fe FAASec. e op 601Cal; nj o -an s), and,i Sec. nformatfi 201 on fand

deeopmenfLonj. nrmtaljT

Ilon?.wtl erprojec t

h will encourage

the (a)increse

flow of interndtiona1 trade; (b) fos-

ter private il(itiativeand

(c)enCouftge competition;

developner t -and use of

cooperatives, credit uninfk, and

and

savings

loan 4,ssciations; (d)Aiscurage

m)n ropolisic practices; (e) improve

technlcal efficiency of industry, agri.

culture and commerce; and (f) strengthen

free l bor unions. ,

8. FAA €l us Se.6001

on 60(2. an io

U.S. io prco Jpelct

Private formationencolrage

will

trade a--' and invetmen cona

broad

and encourage private U.S. participation

in foreign assist.,nce programs (Oncludinq

,use of private tr-rde channels and tne

Sserviceso U.S. privte enterprise).

9. FAASec. 6 1(b), Sec. 3§.j.. Describf

t eSo assure that, to the

maximur extent possible, th'.country is

contributing local currencies to sneet

'the cost of contractual and oth,,r

services, and foreiqn curencies owned

,"y the U.S. are util ized to meet the cost

of contractual and otnr [ ,r

1 rvices.

,J. FAA Sec. 612(d). -,ors thp U.S. own excess

foreign currency ardi,if sr, what arrangements

have been nmoe fr,r i's release?

CRITERIA FOR PQIJECT

;DevelOtnnt Asss ta.nce PnjfrctC iterfa

a. FAASec.l2(c).Soc. ill;sec

Extent to nwhicn 7 e f

tively nvolvc te poo- in

by c

extending

"velr,-ent '

access to

level,

econory

increasing .!abnor-intensive

at loal

prq,sprdin.

pduction, investrent out from

Cities to smeldltowns ind rural area%-,

an b) help develop

especially bytchni~al

cooperltlveS,.

assistance, eSri st rural'and to

irtan poor iCl to

t.emise.ves toward .ei .rf nd ther..

Awise encouraqL, derXC,'rtic private And

local Onvernmntal& ins5tituto.7­

A

A

""

196 -----

AIDHANo 3 A , ."

A '

_ e P Z ) o :. p o f' a., desi .gned

The Projecv ±5a pecificallydei d

to improve the technical efficiency

ac...ultre. trough improved

traning of ler numbers of a~icul­

t1al. ±Q.b8 and e1.,ee ,

U.S.

ment

epae

suppliers will supply la equipa

n& same machin± y as well a3

paxte. "

9," thlta Uppe ,i mat LeD'. ,Th e

a. 'ethel

has difficulty i

J1A

te

meetine is req1uTent

U

bdidet. An incdolatiQn-of the

1,tho

i porznoe

GOV places

GOUT

on this

oontribution

pro ect

in

Jc tho

hi.nd and mony valued

fth pOjec

at C69079t0C0 or

to.

4.0a of the project tota.

The U.S. has no ezcess local currency.

The project is designed to assist the

r 1 aton to help themselves

rur a p att n to

tou'a.aryt

then with beter and more aiculiuaal

nfor-ation in the for of dovelopmont

a ternatives applicable to rural con­

dition3 c;!that rZ1. fa~eu may

decide how thy willr participate in

'upporVoltaa development.

::/

4

"

L

A


. FA Sec. 103, 3A. 104. 15 106,

107._T asit ebig aeaalbe

Iode oInly apolicable paragraph - Prject is f'2dod =der Sahel

e~.,,,at. -which corresponds to Deeomn Psd.

source of funds isrd. It trore than one

furnd source 1 is use's for pr' :Ject, incl ude

relevant paragraph for each fund source.]

(1)[lo3l for aric,'turr 4 rural develop- N/A

ment or nutrition; if so, extent to

which activity issoecifically

''ad noe. of .r.iratl pnr+;- IA - IL

designed to increase productivitY

iffor agricultural research, is

) full account t;'kan of reds of snall

f atners;

(2) (104] for population planning or I

health; ifso, extent co wnich

activity extend low-.cost, integrated

delivery Systeits to prrvide health

and family planninig ervicei,

especially to rura areas and poor;

(3) [1053 for education, public Pdmin- h 13~ ~ e1~4t n

Sstration, or human re's-urces .p

ve the trinin of a iau(l t

development; if so, extent to which teo1"ciaes and e.7tensQ a-= .n whZo will

activity 5lrenithens nunfornia . w'0% it~h r ,afa far'±.eo ; OVO'.

education, rikkes forviAi Pducatioflrii_ lllC= r! 03 d1%IOtf

m rore relevanit, .SpL-ially forrural

Families and ,irimn prorl nr

t;rO4r toachao+ cnd wllJ .. -4 IC^

strengtnefis nmarroqwrjtr:. capibility a-In to zak a~iulla 3- 1-37-mt

of institutionis cenabl inij tiic ,uor to, e£ad applioabl3 to th3 condi4C.. C:L 'Upp.

SU- \articipate :n h-velruti, t; I VO:ta'D-rua3 pc alticzi­

(4) (106] for .technical as, istancp,,

""

pnergy, reiearr.h, reconstrLctinn, N/A

and solect(A Inveloi"ent prjhilens;.

if so, extent activity is:

(a) technicallr.oop(,ration and development,

eipeial!y &t./'I.$. private

and voluntary, :)r reqhina1 dod international

develocment, rrqanizatlons;.

N/A

(b)to help alleviate enerqy problei N/A

(c)research into, and nvaliation of, N/A

economic development r'rcpw Ies and

terhn iquo,;

-.. (d)reconstruction mffter natural or N/4

manmade disast,.

r(e) for special develot,r.ent problem, N/A

and to enable prnper ulili7ition (J

earlier !J.S, infrastruct,,re, etz.,

ass stance;

(f) espoc.ijll for nroir,,ns "ym of lahi-;nto ir:n n/A i nsive; v-lnmne )t,

enterprises, nrketinq - vOrn',i, an,

financial or i!er irs: itutions to

*help urban uuur oarticiiate in

economic and SOCid Oevelo nt, l ...


. .?


CCC + , ,

,', ,

I '

, - "* -- - C CIC. .II l . ... .. ... . . .. •:7

'


.... +.2 I , ....... iy

1!98_­

1)- 10 1_7 -ovti

3:1UHNw , App. 6C

() 17:I] by granr, for coordinated

private effort to develop and ,

:::i d* sseminate i!t@.er 4t'?__ i t::9Omolo | g i:es: e , N/', L

appropriate for' developing countries,~

c. FAA Sec. 110(a)i Sec. 208(e), Is the

i cbue

fun~ds to the project, and inwhat ma nner

has or will itprovide assurances that it

will provide at least 25%,jf the costs of

the program, project, or activity with

respect to which the assistance is to be

furnished,(or ha~s the latter costtsharina

requirement been waived for a "relatively

leas-developed" country)?: U

Sd. FAA Sec. 1i0 .+ Vill grant capital

assi tance be d'hcursed for project over

more than 3 years? If so, has justificftion

sdtisfaz;ory to Congress been made,

ano efforts fcr other financing?

.e. FAA Sec. 217; Sec. 113. Exten to

%i, ' 1icF. ass cF ', ppropriate .Ectse

em-phasis n; (1) en:ouraging development

of democratic, e:onmic political, and

social institutions; (2)zelf-halp in

- Sm improvins ting .thi aviaiity country's food )f trained needs; worker- (3)

pove,,r in the countrv; (4) programs

designed to meet the countrv's health

needs; (5) other important areas of

eccromic.. politicl,and social developmcnt,

inciuding industry; free labor

unions, cooperatives, and VoluntAry.

Ag.mrcies; tranrportuston and conimunication;

planning and ruhic administration;

urtan daveloF, ent, and mod,.rnization uf.

eisting laws, or(6) intevtj&tinq wcmen

into the recipient country's national

econcmy. r

f. FAA Sec .: 281(b.. f.e .cribe extent

wnc proram recogni

nceds, ,desires, and canacitie of tn .

ptople of the coumtry; utilizqs tht_

€Ointry's intellOC,dl resources to

encourage intitutiq al -lvlorment;

and supports. civic elucation anda training

in skills reouired for effective oarti.ipation

in governmental and oolitic l

preceses esst.ntiai to self-qovernment.

U ,

TGe T:. Qreent G V is contributing (in kind

and mRfoe) M0,7%,OOQ or 40% of'

the coat+of the prog,

,- '

B .'

.

:: : - /

Tho project will provide more and

botter trained agricultual etension

worke-.po.er fo Upper Volta.

~

+ Eiotin Upper Voltaio ititelleotual

r urceo (eachr, techniin,

a dont, and train . inattution )

iil b ezponded and dovoloped by thim

projeot. Puzthormore, the project

rao dovoloped in cooperation wi.th the

pooplo and Gvo = ent official. of'th,

boat country afterlthe GOUV cpecifio-,

ally reqreated U.S. csoiotanco for the

trornin " of agicx1ural technicians

an ;Pextcnoicn aGents.

Ba

//

/

'"

4' '

B+:... :: < : :" : •: ; "".-----,--- e,. cn--, . n• . e-. . . . . . ... .... . + . . . .

,,

f4

4

G

'

.

)


81

' !iiii~i :V. .. •i

.

1i99~

O 3'IPI 3, App 6C -! 3 o 10, 1 -7 J

.g, FAA Sec. 201( ') (4) and -Yes.

20j.j C Z_o, :-7 id -. Does

e activity the give reasonable pri~iise of

economic resources, or to tha increase of

produ-ctive cnpecities and self-sustaining

"economic butgroith; n trt or q of educational

19 oregae oor

Othr indcteity's e icted toward ."iciaY

progres? Is related to and nis-Ye

tent with other'_dev(.Jo-p~rent activitir-s,

and will itcontrib'ute to realiZablP

long-range objectives? Andi does project

paper provide informration and conclusion

on an cictivity's econiomic and technical

soundness?

V77a;nd-ril

h. FAA Sec. 201(b){6)- Sec. 211(a)(5), (6).

Infortion anqc thn on possible

effects of the assistance on U.S. economy,

with sFecial reference to arear of substantial

labor surplus, ind.extent to

which.U.S. r anudities and as,;istdnco

are furnished in i qwnner consistent with

improving or safeguardinij the IJ.S:'-balance.

of-payment positinn.

2. Oevelot)ment Asistance ProJect Criteria

a. FAA Sec. 201 (b)',l!).. InformationN/

and conclusiiw.*lability of financiag

from other free-worldt qourrces,

including p'ivati- within U.S.

b. FAA Sec. Olf,. 201(d), Infarmatlon

and cnnc!us n on ,) rapacity of

the country to rr!pay the loan, tncludinq

reasonitleness of rep.ymr'nt iirospects,.

., and (2) reasonablenoss ,,nd levality

(under ldvws of C;untry and 'i.',. of

lendlng and relenir nq terms of th. lnan.

c. FAA Sec. 201(c). If 1oan is not

rade rsuant to a mul,,Itila teral plan,

and the anunt of tlit l,n rxceed­

!100,000, has cnu,,tr,' _,fitredt o AID

an aozlicatior, frr tQh .unds toqrther

with assurncs to ,'diretl! thait funds

vill be , c d in an e=;ono'ircaI a,!d

technically sourd Tarnr?

d. FAA Sec. 20Zf. .oes oroject paper

describe how pro-ect .ill prumqte the

country's eronomic d-,elcorn tdking

into account tre count-y's ;lurn and

material r- sourcrs rcquirerments and

relation hiip lu tt.,en *d roto ctivn,

of Vie projo,:t and owr,i I orni.

i i!dL4t- 011 ?

9

Ya

Ya

'... re

No nega.tive effect on the .Se

eono ' aticip ,ted aa a =-ou't

.....

Of th4z pio O t.

/A"

N/A

NI/A

N/A

"

" , "t

W

.ources

"


-- i~. - ~riv~gai *~~AN. MEMO 1600.

'~)~. I v:~r10,..1976 7; 3:11 L PJcO 3, App. 6C

* e. FAA-Sec. 202(a). Total amount of NI

moe neFV- 11p -sgoi ng- di rectly ----.....

to private enterprise, is going to

inter~radiate credit institutions orL

otter torowers for use by private r

ent.rprise, is being used to finance

Thtonrts from private sources, or is

o.r:ise being used to finance procureniwcs

from private sources?

f. FAA !ec. 6?0(d). If assistance is

for &oy pi-Ructive enterprise which will IA

ccero in the U.S,. with U.S. enterprise,

1i there an a.grei-ment by the recipient;

country to prevent export tothe U.S. 6 fi

n:ore than 2C% of the enterprise's annualO'

p:c'uction during the life of the loan?

Prci rctCriteria Solely for Security

FU - $,: 531. How will this assistance /

:"Prom'ote

"

:

.conomlc or political

4. Lddition l Criteria for'Alliancefor

1:I-o-e: Alliance for Progress projects

:n.uld .dd tie following two items to a NIA

Ci*0J'-ct checkllst.J r

a. FA Sec. 25l(Pbb 8.) Does

crsIs'an,.e takeInto account principles N/A

Sbf 0hAct of logcta and the Charter of

* PLMtL. del E~te; and to what extent will

* the!aCtiVity conribute to tne economic

o;

Anericn?

political inteqration of Latin 1

1), FPA Sec. 251j~(8); 251( . For

loans, has there Letri taken into account

t"- c-fr-tnt .r3de by recipient nation to

'-trate :c:pital invested in other

pr.triehby tneir own citizens? Is

-,ncrnrntent witn thn findings and .

•eor,7-rieetlo-n, of tho Inter-American

.., . for te Alliance for Proress

;,. :'cZPc:S,' the Permanent Executive

' Coitt~ee of the OAS) in its annual

.....of nat conal development Jctivitie- .


o

\ i)TAIJDAPD 'TE1 rIHECLgT

Al! 0 1 IA'I

_ _ _ocouember D 3,......C' 10, 1976

GCon

Listcd bl('-'#are statutory items which nnrmally will be C'overcd r'utinely ir *hose provisions of in'

asstance aree'i;it de.)Iin9 with its implpmentation, or co-opred in tne aqreer,-- nt by,,eAqiuson (as

w~cre certain usia of funds are permi tted, hut other uses npiL.

These itemrs aretarranged under the q..... ral hedlirq... .... rocurement, j B) .Construction, and

(C) Other Restr'ictioni.

A. Procurement

1, FAA Sec. 602. /Arthlre cirran'Ierients ta Yeo.

pern.it U.0. s;r I u sii'essIo pi4rt ipat

equitably in tiefurnlsh1i,, o .1c.od, and

services financed?

2. FAA Sec. 604a) Will all cwIr';' diL1 procurement r lnanc.d nh" froii £1 U s.C

except as othervqise determinpa the

President or undell delegatiun hii

Procuzz~nt wrill ba in -_rjo-

A ... rag c'.

z~~tc~

wl";l

3. FM Sec. 604(d)., If the co.Jperat o(Jh

country discri;linats igainst, !J. ,

Crn za-oomnt vi±1,o

rmarlne insurance comanies, will I irpo-

C..

mient require that marine insuYi.:tw:e .r,

placed in the U.S, on cloiroditip, 0

financed?

4. FAA Ser r

604 (). 'If(Jfshorerocu,e . /A.

f,i ment of agricultural conrodiry :rt

Rroduct s t I t n is therrd

.'the d; omestih pr iL N+ 1:161 1,0410

less i'ian parity?

5. FA Sec. 60,()'. 1.ea...at

*exces esnal pront~wrty !)v ,~ 1

wherever practicanie in i i jIof' the

procurem,en, of niw i ois',

6 . 6 r'i !A Se c . g o b a ) Co mi;.',,,+ a i+ th

requiremenit tnat at leist 511 2gtowv 1-,

of the cross tonnaf:F:6 cr omrtv:J,j,. :­

(co.iputid separate ., for dty buK.,.

carriers, dry carrPniiirs, ain Lan• ....

* IS Tll~financed shall hie .;'lrn .rt :... .

(i extent th~at~such vessels are avodill le

* at fair and 'red oiablc' rite,; .:

7. FAA Sec. 621 . If t~~nc1i .~w

ishe ?T n,.ooo e wil . i:hi r. wir ;>ji7,r- Tcclmioril aoicu~ .~1~'.

tiwt b1 p:ovl.od dful~et bj'a U.S. coatzo',c.W

as goods ard 'rrFesqmiii, 'i,-.w

services from private ent,2rrwil j, ,

contract basisY ifthe fad ltie, o*

uother Federa I geLncies h( ut jeilIi

-d


I

4

. 2-" )/

..;. !! ~~~~3 { /­

L Ap 6CC

maeahI'l-wtot nu itr 4n

with mestic prgrse p rogrs

1 ---.----.­ '--- .- r- - Tr p-;- fa r---

I ir transportation of persons or

'property is financed on grant basis, will

provision be made that U. 4ag carriers

d ,fl1 . If a apli (en-"

coni tr n roiet, are ennerng such ..

gri professional services of U.S. firms

and their affillatei to he used to the

maximum extent consistent with the

national iiterest?

FA"A"-P ea . 611(c " . If.contracts for

mc l r

t)hey

3tructIon.d

be let on

-e

a

to

competitive

be financed,

basis

will

to

maxium ex tent practicable?

3 - .Sec. ,1(k). If for constructi'n

of pr ductiveeterprise, will agyregatp

value of assistance to be furni,,hed bX

the US. nCt exceed $100 million?

, Other Restrictions

1"

1. FAA Sec. 201(d'.' if develniment loan,

is interest raLe at least 2' per annum

4irng grace rperiod and at lLast 3%per

annum thereafter?

2, FPA Sec. 30U(d. If fund is established

fete by n contribtions anrd administered

by an international organization.

does Comptrcller'rieneral have audit

rlhts? ",

3.

FAA Sec. 620(h). Do arrangpments

preclude T'_FoTing or a sistinU the

foreign aid projects or activities of,

Conunist-Bloc countries, contrary to

the best interests of the U.S.?

4. FAA Ssc , 636(i). Is Finanring not pernmtred

.o Le used, without waiver, for

purchase, long-term ledse, or exchanye

of rlotor ven'cl, manufactured outside - 2

the U.S. nr qucirantYof such transaction?

0

"

"_ U-

A cofltvC* M i

lJ4mi

'04

aW (I):

in tM appo!al or QQutruot

la.. by a A o( q

plansb e, ; n) l r

Yea...'' ..

I/A

N/A

IT/A

NA

Yes.

Yea.

0.

.

.

"2

CM

,

< "

I.RI.

, .


.of 4Wt~"'~ r't moivt orctr4 o

f, App6 P (a-I Nse,-

F e, 6 . top €ensins e

aO qvine kL- f re onnpie for nana l. edlToo. ...

forlty pesnnl Too

f. FADD e,~M6 topa N.~ assiess

a. AA Se, 16 . topa P(c ins e c.,

To,

d. FAA Sec.'"662. Slwi''-e

o "r CI A activtes

for p tar _rionne.

? e ,*

g Ap.. . Se, 107. for oti v

d rins r VC otvfies?

h, AnP4 -Sc, be used for I

publicity or prUj-pand6 purposes Yes

witi1n U.S, i~ot aut~Itorized by Congrt'sW


i~him

II as

Uea 4Am~h-ul of "A~a*0 lfUne V" to~ ua "4Z

$0w VWX0494. p*44* , theUrnt1,

o

pwummk t #u awtluW g"a~tvmM

v"$ tb toeOtno~l pte4M4to$Fg*mma M

oftthe p4.wmU zAMuetmtomr vlt an 0-stut on Vpm s­

toash4 to ftu.I~. tua'"laLm 1.1. k.olys *a~t h oVU

W~xXVOS1OU*4 opp Uttmete

10m 4t touiv$se Vlta.4,a.m ~2 sWb

stou perimel bab'ee Uvs**4 vatsiA et Uppe Volta. Am

re~t tbo tr*jamg bee not #vqin been part~eu2wlv v4.vest w

Appus4~ , tbo AP14tea4.M oow4LfAs round Is Vvo ol

?u*Wu*S &Ut4ata UsT~ "presents aa $vrteat stop towArds

vwk~me #41ui uradateo roQ.MtY e .he asa of VM.w

ut.au~ t se" anda aWtstpftts4 ~uct ~we hsz7u

to w2* afeael it ra*4 famer .Owo, h ma~qr tbiptp

of this projet tovalv# not only 'inceasi the oasQ4tias of

tt providi them with&t~bha4 umsista~s tra1lA an


0.6/P _EW Y NOTE

9.. ,'

et.;r

*5 TYE4 DCMN

IPO S1 ,2,EC .R°.,,NU13 , oM.

.... 14. . N U M .

B E R

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