Arlington - The Connection Newspapers

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Arlington - The Connection Newspapers

Photo By Louise Krafft/The Connection Real Estate, page 11 ❖ Calendar, page 8 ❖ Classified, page 13 ❖ Sports, page 12

The

Arlington

Budget Cuts,

Tax Increases

News page 3

February www.ConnectionNewspapers.com

25-March 3, 2009 ❖ Volume XXIII, Number 8

Connection

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50 Years of

Integration

The Youth Liturgical

Dance Ministry of

Mt. Zion Church

performs during

the 50 th anniversary

celebration of the

integration of the

public school system.

News, page 3

Crystal Couture

Festival Arrives

News, page 6

ESPN Comes

To O’Connell

Sports, page 12

More online at connectionnewspapers.com

Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 ❖ 1


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News

Tragedy Leads

To Benefit Show

All proceeds

to go toward

SIDS research.

By Rob Wile

The Connection

The death of one’s child is

an unthinkable tragedy,

and for the parents of victims

of Sudden Infant Death

Sydrome (SIDS), it comes without

warning.

Brandon Heiner, lead singer for

Heather’s Headache, knows this.

In 2005, Heiner lost his twomonth-old

son Brady to SIDS in

the infant’s first week at daycare.

“It was an extremely difficult

day,” he said. “It’s always a shock

for SIDS parents — it was completely

unexpected. You don’t have

any reason to believe that anything

is amiss.”

Politics

Mt. Vernon native Brandon

Heiner has been playing in

Heather’s Headache for

seven years.

In the best way he knows,

Heiner hopes to ensure that D.C.area

parents will not have to face

See Benefit Show, Page 5

For Ebbin, A Jump to the Left

A theme for Del. Adam Ebbin (D-49) in this year’s General Assembly

session has been bans. He proposed a ban on the sale of

energy-wasting appliances and a ban on incandescent light bulbs.

He also proposed a five-cent tax on plastic and paper bags used

by grocery stores, as well as a measure that would prohibit discrimination

based on sexual orientation in public hiring.

All of these bills failed, with none even making it to the floor of

the House. According to Ebbin, this wasn’t surprising.

“I try to introduce a balance of bills between ones that have a

reasonable chance at passing and bills that start a public discussion

that’s needed on important issues,” he said. “I wanted to

stimulate discussion and move the issue forward.”

Ebbin represents an overwhelmingly Democratic district that

encompasses most of South Arlington along with parts of Alexandria

and Fairfax. He acknowledges that his agenda this year,

especially the bills that had little chance of passing, plays well

among his “more progressive constituencies.”

“But that’s not how I plan my agenda,” he said. “These issues

really matter to me. Every year that we don’t address important

environmental issues is a year that we fall further behind. … And

I don’t think that the environmental issues should be considered

‘left.’ To me, they’re really common sense.”

Ebbin also proposed a bill that would keep polls open for an

extra hour on Election Day, which died in committee, and another

bill that would broaden the definition of human trafficking,

which is still being considered. But with Virginia’s multi-billion

dollar gap in spending, Ebbin said that his biggest concern

right now is the budget. “We’ve had such a huge shortfall in revenue,”

he said. “It threatens so many things.”

— David Schultz

Hynes Backs Wagner

Arlington County Board Member Mary Hynes (D) endorsed Jody

Wagner, the former Virginia Secretary of Finance, for Lieutenant

Governor. Wagner was also endorsed by Fairfax County Supervisor

Cathy Hudgins (D), Alexandria Mayor Bill Euille (D) and Alexandria

City Council Members Del Pepper (D), Tim Lovain (D)

and Paul Smedberg (D).

2 ❖ Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 www.ConnectionNewspapers.com

Photo courtesy Brandon Heiner


www.ConnectionNewspapers.com

News

“She couldn’t interact with her friends.”

The cancer quickly went into remission

and Becky was able to start first grade at

Jamestown Elementary School this fall.

But a few weeks ago, she was taken out

of school again when a broken arm

caused her white blood cell count to drop

precipitously.

However, this time she wouldn’t have

to be cut off from her friends at

Jamestown. Georgetown University Hospital,

where Becky is receiving treatment,

set up a laptop computer in its Pediatric

Oncology department that allows chil

See Webcam, Page 4

That first day of school

for the four students

marked the end of a fiveyear

legal battle in Virginia

to implement the ruling of

the United States Supreme

Court’s ruling in Brown vs.

Board of Education of Topeka

— that the nation’s

policy of maintaining separate

schools for black and

white students was unconstitutional.

It also marked

the beginning of a new day

for an entire generation of

children, and for those that

would follow.

LONG BEFORE he became

the first black chairman

of the Arlington

County Board of Supervisors since the Reconstruction

era following the Civil War and

before he became Chief Judge of the Ar-

Arlington Connection Editor Steven Mauren

703-917-6431 or arlington@connectionnewspapers.com

‘Four Unassuming Foot Soldiers of History’

Arlington celebrates

50 th anniversary of

the integration of the

public school system.

By Aaron Stern

The Connection

Looking back now, 50 years hence,

things are a bit of a blur. Ronnie

Deskins remembers a reporter

taking notes that morning as he

ate the breakfast his mother prepared for

him, then brushed his teeth. Family and

friends all gathered to watch he and his

friends head off to Stratford Junior High,

and Gloria Thompson remembers walking

past rows of armed police officers on her

way past crowds present to witness her take

that walk.

Photo by Herman Farrer Photography

By David Schultz

The Connection

Becky Wilson’s extroverted personality

borders on irrepressible. The

six-year-old Arlington resident is

talkative, outgoing and loves to be the

center of attention.

So when she underwent treatment for

acute lymphoblastic leukemia 18 months

ago, it was especially difficult for her to

spend weeks in the hospital, away from

school and away from friends.

There were times she felt isolated and

frustrated,” Becky’s mother, Lisa, said.

Other than that, it was a

pretty normal first day of

school.

On Feb. 2, 1959 four 12year-olds

became the first

black students to attend a

previously all-white school

in Arlington County, and

the Arlington County Public

Schools were integrated.

Those four students — Ron

Deskins, Michael Jones,

Gloria Thompson, and

Lance Newman — were

honored at a ceremony at

the H-B Woodlawn Secondary

Program on Monday,

Feb. 23 in a ceremony that

featured three of those four

original students, Gov. Tim

Kaine, Del. Bob Brink and

other local political officials, as well as several

of the Stratford teachers who were

onhand for that historic day.

Becky Wilson, with her mother Lisa (right) and hospital staffer

Linda Kim (left), connects with her classmates via the Internet.

Staying Connected

Six-year-old cancer patient uses Internet

to keep up with her classmates.

William T. Newman,

Chief Judge of the

Arlington Circuit Court.

Photo by Louise Krafft/Connection

By David Schultz

The Connection

Arlington County Manager Ron

Carlee is proposing $23 million in

service cuts and a three-percent

increase in the real estate tax rate to make

up for a multi-million dollar gap in

Arlington’s annual budget.

Gulf Branch Nature Center, the Ellipse

Arts Center and the Arlington Mill Community

Center are among the casualties in

Carlee’s proposed $929.5 million spending

plan for the upcoming fiscal year, which is

1.3 percent lower than last year’s spending

plan.

Carlee described his budget as a “serious

belt-tightening” but one that still maintains

the County’s values. “In a city, you’re either

going forward or sliding backwards,” he

said. “This is a budget that keeps us from

sliding backwards. … [It is] unnecessarily

disruptive to start restructuring who and

what we are.”

THE COUNTY derives the lion’s share of

its revenues from taxes on real estate assessments.

This year, real estate values in

Arlington increased less than one percent

over the previous year, after several years

of double digit increases. This rapid stagnation

in real estate values has forced the

county to downsize.

Carlee is proposing the elimination of 100

positions in county government, 40 of

lington Circuit Court, William Newman was

a third-grader at Drew Elementary School

when Deskins, Jones, Thompson and Lance

Newman broke the color barrier in Arlington

County Public Schools. Before them,

“doors I didn’t know existed were already

being closed to me,” he said as he delivered

the keynote address at Monday’s ceremony.

Unbeknownst to him, his life

changed that day.

“My life and the possibilities it held expanded

exponentially,” he said.

“What a scary thing it must have been for

four seventh graders… to come into a place

where they knew they weren’t welcome,”

said Kaine.

The battle against the U.S. Supreme

Court’s decision in Virginia was called “massive

resistance,” a term coined by U.S. Sen.

Harry Byrd of Virginia, and was a fight that

grew so fierce that Prince Edward County

Public Schools closed down for five years

See Integration, Page 4

How To Cut $23 Million

Carlee’s budget

proposal hits Parks &

Rec, libraries hardest.

Budget Cuts

The following is a partial list of the services that

would be eliminated or reduced under County

Manager Ron Carlee’s proposed budget:

❖ Cancellation of Planet Arlington Music Festival

❖ Closure of Gulf Branch Nature Center

❖ Closure of Ellipse Arts Center

❖ Reduction in park and street tree maintenance

❖ Glencarlyn, Cherrydale and Aurora Highlands

Libraries to operate only three days per week

❖ Charging for after-hours parking at Human

Services Building in Clarendon

❖ Closure of Madison Adult Day Center

❖ Reduction of service on two ART bus routes

❖ Elimination of extra police detail in Clarendon

❖ Reduction of concrete maintenance and repair

❖ Increasing of solid waste collection fee

❖ Elimination of five deputy sheriff positions

❖ Postponement of Arlington Mill Community

Center project

which, he said, are currently filled. Carlee

said he would work with the departments

to see that these 40 employees are either

reassigned or voluntarily severed, but he

could not rule out the possibility of layoffs.

Carlee is also proposing the denial of

scheduled pay raises to county employees,

the “first time in modern history” that this

has been proposed, he said. “I do not like

this budget,” Carlee said. “[But] what makes

me very hopeful is we’ve had the worst real

estate market in known times and Arlington

weathered it better than anyone else.”

To make up for some of the lost revenue,

Carlee is proposing an increase in the real

estate tax rate by 2.7 cents per $100 of assessed

value. Since the average home in

Arlington declined in value over the last

year, this would amount to an increase of

$4.25 per month in the tax bill for an average-priced

home.

However, according to county figures, 35

percent of Arlington homes did not decrease

See Tax Increases, Page 4

Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 ❖ 3


Politics

Taking Sides in 47 th Race

It used to be an unspoken rule within the tight-knit Arlington

County Democratic community

that elected officials were not to make

public endorsements in a primary race.

In recent years, this rule has been tested,

as the County’s leaders waded into intra-party

contests. Last week, the rule

was obliterated.

County Board Members Barbara

Favola (D) and Mary Hynes (D) announced

their support for Patrick

Hope, a local activist and chair of

Arlington’s Community Services Board

who is running in Arlington’s 47 th district

for a seat in the House of Delegates.

Patrick Hope

Hope has four competitors in the race — Miles Grant,

Adam Parkhomenko, Andres Tobar and Alan Howze

— who are all vying to win the June 9 Democratic primary.

But thus far, Hope is the only one to have received the backing

of a local elected official. “I think it just builds momentum,”

Hope said about the endorsement. “It also gives me

credibility.”

The endorsements of Favola and Hynes are not unprecedented.

Last year’s School Board race saw several School

Board members pick sides in a six-way race for the Democratic

endorsement. In 2007, former School Board member

Frank Wilson was highly involved in the primary campaign

of Bob James, who unsuccessfully sought to oust

Treasurer Frank O’Leary (D).

But it is unusual for someone on the County Board to

take sides in a primary, especially this early in the race.

Favola said she came out for Hope because of her work with

him on human services issues, which is her area of expertise.

“I have known Patrick for many years now,” she said. “I

believe he is the best qualified to be an advocate for the

most vulnerable in the area.”

“I think he’s the real deal,” Hynes said. “This is someone

who has worked to make people’s lives better here in Arlington.

… I think he is a phenomenally well-qualified person

to send to Richmond.”

Favola said she has not received flak from any party insiders

who might see her as interfering with the race. “I

don’t mean to alienate anybody,” she said. “I’m coming at

this as a human services advocate. People who know me

are not surprised that I’m supporting Patrick.”

Potential Candidates Waver

Thus far, there are five candidates fighting to succeed Del.

Al Eisenberg (D-47).

Many local political watchers assumed there would be

more candidates vying for the Democratic nomination. But

several of those who were considering entering the race

have, in recent weeks, changed their minds.

Ted Bilich, the president of the Ashton Heights Civic

Association, was thinking about a candidacy. But last week,

he announced he would stay out of the race to support Hope,

his close friend in the neighborhood.

Many were certain that Alfonso Lopez would enter the

race. However, in an interview last week, Lopez said he is

seriously considering sitting this one out. To enter the race,

he would have to quit his job as Virginia’s top lobbyist on

Capitol Hill and, with the recent passage of the economic

stimulus bill, Lopez is not sure he wants to do that. “I’m

doing a lot of good right now,” he said. “I think I’d be an

asset to Arlington [in Richmond], but I think I’m an asset to

Arlington right now.”

Local attorney Mike McCarthy is all but out of the race

at this point. McCarthy, a 25-year-old who graduated from

George Mason University Law School last year, was scheduled

to formally announce his candidacy earlier this month

but postponed it at the last minute, saying he wanted to

“give it a few more weeks of thought and preparation.” Since

then, he has not responded to repeated phone and email

requests for comment.

— David Schultz

Photo courtesy

News

50 Years On

From Page 3

beginning in 1959 instead of integrating.

“Fifty years ago it was a more important value to

separate people and keep them apart because of the

color of their skin then it was to educate them,” Kaine

said. “That’s a strange thing to think about.”

The four students did more than just integrate Virginia

schools, said Kaine — followed later that day by

a group of black students in Norfolk — but they also

dragged Virginia into the modern age.

“It wasn’t just about equality and it wasn’t just about

education — we were a backwards state and we were

behind,” Kaine said.

Walking through the front doors of Stratford wasn’t

that difficult to do as relatively unaware 12-year-olds,

said Deskins. They knew what was going on, to be

certain, but it was their parents who had a more complete

grasp of the situation and who made the bold

decision to send their children forth.

They had the courage to stand on principle knowing

there was danger for their children,” he said.

ONCE THEY GOT INSIDE and settled down to class

that morning 50 years ago, things were about as normal

as they can be for any new student in a new school,

said Michael Jones. The surroundings and their fellow

students were new, but on the whole people were relatively

friendly to them, Jones said.

The school’s teachers and administrators, though,

were well aware of the enormity of the situation at

the time. Joe Macekura, a Stratford guidance counselor,

remembered walking into the school with the students

to ensure that all went well, walking them to

their classes, and monitoring them throughout that first

From Page 3

in value over the last year. The owners of these homes

would experience a tax bill increase of greater than

$4.25 per month under Carlee’s budget.

Carlee also proposed the postponement of the Arlington

Mill Community Center reconstruction project,

which would have included a new affordable housing

apartment complex. County Board Chair Barbara

Favola (D) has said that she does not want to decrease

funding for affordable housing in this year’s budget.

The County Board will consider Carlee’s budget over

From Page 3

dren to connect to their classrooms via the Internet.

The laptop is outfitted with a video camera, as well

as the Internet telephone software Skype. The hospitalized

students can log on and communicate with their

classmates, both verbally and visually.

“This is a turning point in the lives of children with

cancer,” Becky’s oncologist at the hospital, Dr. Aziza

Shad, said. “Typically, children with cancer are isolated

from friends and school. … It’s just not been possible

to get them to interact with their friends the way this

webcam will.”

GEORGETOWN University Hospital now has six

webcam-ready laptops in its Pediatric Oncology department.

The computers were purchased with

$23,000 in funds raised by the National Capital Area

chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

Donna McKelvey, the chapter’s executive director,

said that the webcams don’t just help the patients. “The

classmates get to see that they’re OK,” she said.

In a special presentation before the evening’s

program, Ubaldo Sanchez presented Gov.

Timothy Kaine with one of his original art

works. Kaine said that the piece would hang at

the DNC headquarters in Washington D.C.

day. The doors they walked through that morning were

more than just those to their junior high school, they were

doors to public facilities, institutions, and opportunities

that had until then been closed to them and to countless

others, Macekura said, doors that they helped to open.

Thompson said that they were prepared by their families,

friends, neighbors, churches for the challenge that

they were given, and that preparation helped them to

succeed.

The remembrance of that day was an opportunity to

reflect, but also to look at the challenges that still lay

ahead, said Elizabeth Weile, who was the president of

the Women League of Voters during Virginia’s battle to

integrate its schools, and she said that the battle to bridge

remaining socio-economic and racial achievement gaps

was not yet over.

“Since I am 94-years-old, I will leave the job to you and

you and you,” Weile said, pointing around the capacity

crowd in the H-B Woodlawn auditorium. “Will you accept

the challenge?” The hundreds gathered loudly

cheered an affirmative response.

Manager Proposes Tax Increases

the next several months and will adopt its own finalized

version in late April.

Board Member Walter Tejada (D) bristled at Carlee’s

proposal to eliminate the Neighborhood Day parade and

called on Arlingtonians to email the County Board with

their thoughts on whether the annual event should be

continued.

Board Member Chris Zimmerman (D) said that more

spending cuts may be coming. “We’re not done scrubbing

the budget yet,” he said.

David Schultz can also be heard on WAMU 88.5 FM.

Cancer-Stricken First Grader Uses Webcam

“This is a huge deal,” Dr. David Nelson, chairman of

the pediatrics department at Georgetown University Hospital,

said. “How a child feels about themselves affects

their treatment. … Losing contact is a big problem. This

enables them to stay connected.”

SPORTING pink shoes, apple-print stockings and a bushy

head of hair, Becky dialed into Helaine Ortiz’s first-grade

classroom — with some help from the hospital staff.

She took notes as her classmates informed her of what

they were learning: literary genres, ancient China, weather

disasters. She told them about the books she’s been reading

and the playground she’s building for her toy bear.

“Don’t be shy!” Becky told her friends as they began to

crowd the camera.

The first graders in Ortiz’s classroom seemed almost as

excited as Becky to be able to use this new technology.

“You sound better,” one of her classmates said. “Do you

know when you can come back?” another asked.

“Not yet,” Becky replied, the only point during the demonstration

when her voice betrayed a hint of sadness.

4 ❖ Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 www.ConnectionNewspapers.com

Photo by Louise Krafft/Connection


News

Show To Benefit SIDS Research

From Page -2

a similar ordeal. On Friday, Feb. 27 Heiner and his

band, will play a benefit concert to raise money for

SIDS research. The show will take place at Rhodeside

Grill, 1836 Wilson Blvd., in Arlington.

As the lead vocalist and songwriter — as well as

rhythm guitarist — Heiner says that his loss informs

all his music. He described the band’s latest album,

“Admonition,” which will officially be released at the

concert, as “a warning about what can happen in

life when you’re not paying attention.”

There’s a song called “Ominous Peace” about dealing

with emotion, and depression certainly, relating

to the loss of my son,” he said. “There’s also a song

written about a friend of ours who killed someone

in a crazy love triangle. We chose the name “Admonition”

to portray the seriousness [of life].”

Heiner said the band began planning the benefit

last September.

“It’s just taken us a little while to get comfortable

with doing something like [the benefit concert], it’s

just taken us to this point to feel like we could do

something,” he said. “We were all really close to it,

obviously — me in particular — but we’ve reached

the point where we feel like this is something we

can do to help other people, whether it’s preventing

further SIDS deaths from happening or just awareness

and research, it doesn’t matter to us, we just

want to help.”

Doctors know relatively little about what causes

SIDS which is the leading cause of death in the

U.S. for infants aged one month to one year. Ex-

www.ConnectionNewspapers.com

Get Involved

Heather’s Headache will play a benefit concert Feb.

27 to raise money for SIDS research. The show will

take place at Rhodeside Grill, 1836 Wilson Blvd., in

Arlington.

Tickets start at $12 and can be purchased at the door

or by calling 202-262-9342.

perts have been able to determine a few common

characteristics amongst SIDS victims: stomachsleeping,

low birth-weight and inadequate prenatal

care among them. It is more common in

boys, and is more likely to happen during colder

months.

“It was a — I hate to use the word classic — but it

was a very typical SIDS case,” Heiner said. “It was a

boy, it happened in winter, all things that they say,

that the statistics show. It occurred in his first week

at daycare, during a nap. He was on his back, which

is a big thing with SIDS, but it happened anyway.

“It’s difficult to ever say what exactly caused it,

but it doesn’t change the fact that it happened and

that there are people who are going to experience

and are experiencing the same thing we went

through.”

When he’s not on stage or in the studio, Heiner

works in government affairs for an association in D.C.

A Mt. Vernon native, Heiner and his wife of 15 years,

Rachael, now have a set of two-year-old twins, one

boy and one girl; as well as an eight-year-old daughter.

Tickets, which start at $12, can be purchased at

the door, or by calling 202-262-9342.

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Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 ❖ 5


ARLINGTON

CONNECTION

www.ConnectionNewspapers.com

Newspaper of Arlington

A Connection Newspaper

An independent, locally owned weekly

newspaper delivered

to homes and businesses.

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McLean, VA 22102

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dschultz@connectionnewspapers.com

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News

Fashion World Comes to Crystal City

Diverse range of styles featured

in two-week long fashion festival.

By Emma Gonzalez

The Connection

Eighteen-year-old model

Lauren McAree, stood in

the midst of the crowd

last week with black

swirls and red flowers all over her

body. She appeared like a walking

doll, covered in white base paint.

McAree was one of the many

models who participated in the

Crystal Couture Festival, a twoweek

long event with a different

theme each night. One of the

themes last week was Tat Tuesday,

with a focus on tattoos and body

art. “It’s a lot of fun,” McAree said,

“A lot of art is involved.”

Along with boutiques, Crystal

Couture also partnered with Goodwill

whose clothing was shown on

the runway. Donations were accepted

from the public.

Angela Fox, CEO of Crystal City’s

Business Improvement District,

helped coordinate these events.

“Our purpose is two-fold,” Fox

said, “We have opened up the

venue which is open for lease. Retailers

can come in and see what’s

available to them. However, we

want the community to come out

and come together. We’re making

it a fun community.”

On TAT Tuesday, Feb. 17, pretzels

and temporary tattoo stickers

were placed on tables and organic

beer was available for free tasting.

Along with McAree, other models

were being painted with a variety

of colors such as neon green, yellow,

white, red, blue and brown.

Swirls, whiskers, wigs, feathers,

flowers and paw prints accompa-

Letters to the Editor

Support

Nonprofits

To the Editor:

David Schultz’s Feb. 18 article

“Freddie Mac To Resume Giving to

Local Charities” offered a glimmer

of hope to many charities in our

region — including ours, SCAN

(Stop Child Abuse Now) of Northern

Virginia — who have received

grants from the Freddie Mac Foundation

in the past.

But the article also served as an

important reminder for all of us

in times like these: prevention programs

are more important now

than ever before.

Recent reports note reports of

child abuse and neglect are up in

When & Where

The Crystal Couture Festival

is taking place every night from

now until Feb. 28 at 2450

Crystal Drive in Arlington.

❖ Feb. 26: Denim Night

Thursday (6 -10 p.m.)

❖ Feb. 27: Foxy Friday Animal

Prints (6 -10 p.m.)

❖ Feb. 28: Cocktail Dress

Saturday (11a.m. – 3 p.m.)

and Closing Night Gown

❖ Gala (6 -10 p.m.)

Admission is free. For more

information, see

www.crystalcity.org.

nied the body paint.

As music accompanied the event

and models walked around in their

painted costumes, belly dancing

was also a part of the entertainment

as was Synetic Theatre,

which had cast members play a

snippet of their current play,

“Dante.”

Vendors added to the night’s activities.

Imani Brown, owner of

Artistic Sole, had a smile on her

face and danced along to the music

with her co-workers. “I have

been working with this company

for three years. I have always

loved art, especially painting. Long

story short, I decided to paint on

sneakers because they are easier

to carry, and since then I have been

painting on sneakers,” Brown said.

The sneakers ranged from cheetah

print to President Obama’s face in

a hue of blue. “I want my customers

to feel like they have wearable

art,” Brown said.

The next evening, Crystal Cou

See Crystal, Page 15

our community. Domestic violence

is on the rise. Families across our

region are in critical need of support.

But not all hope is lost. We

can do something about it.

SCAN — like many other groups

across the region — offers regular

parent support groups, providing

a safe place where parents can

share their frustrations and triumphs

in a supportive environment

and learn new strategies to

deal with these challenges. The

groups also introduce parents to

a wide variety of community resources

available in the region,

including those related to financial

and housing issues. To learn

more about our parent support

groups or download our Parent

Connection Resource Guide,

Model Lauren McAree shows off her body paint at the

Crystal Couture Fashion Festival.

which lists other groups across the

region, visit our Web site at

www.scanva.org.

Freddie Mac is only one source

of funding. Our hope is that other

businesses — and individuals —

follow this lead and find a way to

continue to support critical programs

like these when we need

them the most.

Parenting is seldom an easy job,

and in today’s economic climate it

can seem impossible. Now is the

time to help parents reach out for

support. Now is our chance to prevent

more child abuse and neglect

before it has a chance to start.

Diane Charles, Executive

Director, SCAN (Stop Child

Abuse Now) of Northern Virginia

Remembering

Bozman

To the Editor:

Even after she had retired, I

could count on seeing Ellen

Bozman’s smiling face in the

crowd of dignitaries or just folks

out to enjoy themselves at many

Arlington County functions. And

she always made each person feel

special — she remembered the

names and faces of so many of her

admiring public!

She will be missed.

God bless and Godspeed you

Ellen Bozman!

Azar Attura

6 ❖ Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 www.ConnectionNewspapers.com

Photo by Emma Gonzalez/The Connection


Bulletin Board

Know of something missing from our

community calendar? E-mail it to

arlington@connectionnewspapers.com.

Deadline is 2 p.m. the Thursday before

publication. Call Rebecca Halik at 703-

917-6407 with any questions. Photos are

welcome. For more volunteer opportunities,

classes, announcements visit

www.arlingtonconnection.com and click

on Community.

ONGOING ITEMS

Beginning Thursday, March 5,

NAMI-Northern Virginia offers a

free, 12-week education course in Arlington

on mental illness for family

members of individuals with mental illness.

Contact Marie Fordham at

517-213-0668 for more information.

Lent Activities - Clarendon UMC

(606 N. Irving, Arlington) will hold a

variety of activities during the Lenten

Season. All activities will include

childcare for babies and toddlers, as

well as special activities for school age

children. Wednesday, Feb. 25 marks the

beginning of Lent with Ash Wednesday

services at 7 p.m. in the Sanctuary. A

special “Child’s View of Lent” will be

held in the Praise Room. Visit

www.morefaith.org for details on activities.

For more information, contact

Diane Smith at 703-527-8574.

The Army Officers’ Wives’ Club

of the Greater Washington Area

(AOWCGWA) and the AOWCGWA-Fort

Myer Thrift Shop have welfare grant

applications available. The official grant

application must be received no later

than April 15. Early submissions are

encouraged. For eligibility requirements,

information, instructions and to

download the official Grant Application

www.ConnectionNewspapers.com

Form 2008-2009, visit http://

aowcgwa.org/welfare.htm

Every Saturday through April 11, there

is Free Tax Preparation. 10 a.m. at

Columbia Pike Library, 816 S. Walter

Reed Drive. First-come first-served. Visit

www.aarp.org/taxaide for more.

SATURDAY/FEB. 28

Inside Greening Your

Congregation. Discuss saving

money, how to help in community

and more from 9 a.m.-noon at Mount

Olivet United Methodist Church,

1500 N. Glebe Road. RSVP at 202-

885-8684.

WEDNESDAY/MARCH 4

Money Talk. 7 p.m. at Central Library,

1015 N. Quincy St. Women can take

on their finances. $20 includes

textbook. 703-228-6417.

Workshop. 7 p.m. at Shirlington

Library, 4200 Campbell Ave.

Workshop on networking. Free. 703-

228-0322.

MONDAY/MARCH 9

Prayer Breakfast. 10 a.m. at

Woman’s Club of Arlington, 700 S.

Buchanan St. $5/person. Registration

required, 703-553-5800.

TUESDAY/MARCH 10

Meeting. 6:30 p.m. at NRECA, 4301

Wilson Blvd. The Arlingtonians for a

Clean Environment will discuss

“Think Local – Act Green. How

Businesses are Promoting

Environmental and Community

Values.” Free. Visit

www.arlingtonenvironment.org or

703-228-6427.

703-534-4477

Introduces…

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Arlington, VA 22207

Don’t Miss The Opportunity to Save

View the virtual tour at

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Remodeling

• Kitchens

• Bathrooms

• Additions

• Basements

• Porticos

• In-Law Suites

• Sundecks

• Media Rooms

• Garages

• Sun Rooms

• Built-Ins

• Porches

Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 ❖ 7


Theater

Photo illustration by J. Tom Hnatow; original photos by Scott Suchman

Ellen McLaughlin as Claire, Kathleen Chalfant as Agnes, Terry Beaver as Tobias, and Carla Harting as Julia in

“A Delicate Balance” at Arena Stage through March 15.

Arena’s Frighteningly Good Balance

Albee’s play about fear gets lovely revival. Where and When

by Brad Hathaway

The Connection

Most playwrights

working on a

drama use fear

somewhere in the

structure. It is almost always a fear

of something specific. Fear of

death. Fear of exposure for some

weakness or evildoing. A dread of

failure — financial or personal.

Not Edward Albee. At least not

when he was writing “A Delicate

Balance” which earned him his first

Pulitzer Prize (he has three). The

play, which is being performed now

by an exemplary cast at Arena

Stage’s temporary home in Crystal

City, is about fear itself — or, more

precisely, about dread. Albee never

diffuses the focus by specifying

what is feared. This isn’t a play

about danger or threat. No monster

with a machete in a goalie’s

mask or fanged vampire or slick-

Calendar

Know of something missing from our

community entertainment Calendar? Send

it to The Arlington Connection, e-mail it

to arlington@connectionnewspapers.com.

Deadline is 2 p.m. the Thursday before

publication. Call Rebecca Halik at 703-

917-6407 with any questions. Photos are

welcome.

ONGOING:

With the advent of spring, Arlington’s

David M. Brown Planetarium, 1426

No. Quincy Street, presents “The

suited mafia don is presented. Just

people in fear.

Those people are wealthy. They

exist in a world of refinement and

comfort. Their relationships may

not be as successful as they

dreamed they would be (the principal

couple no longer share a bedroom,

let alone a bed and their

daughter is reeling from the collapse

of her own fourth marriage.)

But their world seems about as secure

from external threat as possible.

Still, that world, beautifully envisioned

in Todd Rosenthal’s set of

a well decorated living room and

costume designer Ilona Somogyi’s

marvelously appropriate outfits for

each and every one of the characters,

is no protection from the fear

of some exterior danger.

Those characters are played by

an ensemble of superb performers

with Broadway veterans Kathleen

Chalfant and Terry Beaver in the

Mystery of the Missing

Seasons” beginning Friday,

March 6 through Sunday, April

5. Showtimes are Fridays & Saturdays

at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday matinees at

1:30 & 3 p.m. Admission is $3 for

adults and $2 for senior citizens and

children 12 & younger. 703-228-

6070.

FRIDAY/FEB. 27

Theater. 7:30 p.m. at Chalice Theatre

at Unitarian Universalist Church of

Arlington, 4444 Arlington Blvd. $15/

lead roles of the man and woman

of the house, the couple who

haven’t shared a bedroom since the

death of their son from an unspecified

cause an unspecified time ago.

Being unspecific is exactly the tool

Albee is using and it gives these

fine performers the latitude to go

at their parts and each other with

a vigor that is remarkable. Beaver’s

third-act tirade is particularly spectacular

while Chalfant is absorbing

all evening long.

Ellen McLaughlin is the wife’s

sharp tongued alcoholic sister with

a past and Carla Harting is their

oft-returning daughter who throws

something of a fit over the fact that

“her” room isn’t ready for her reoccupancy

without advance notice

even though she’s all of 37 years

old.

The room isn’t available because

a couple they think of as their best

friends have unexpectedly shown

up not just seeking but expecting

student; senior. $20/adult. Watch

“Big: The Musical.” 703-892-0202 ext.

6.

Music Performance. The IBIS

Chamber Music Society will perform

at 7:30 p.m. at Lyon Park Community

Center, 414 N. Fillmore St. Free,

donations accepted. Visit

www.ibischambermusic.org or 703-

527-3960.

Tiny Tot. 10 a.m. or 4 p.m. at Gulf

Branch Nature Center, 3608 N.

Military Road. Children ages 18-35

months can learn about nature

through walks, stories and more. $3/

“A Delicate Balance” plays Tuesday,

Wednesday and Sunday at 7:30 p.m.,

Thursday – Saturday at 8 p.m. with Saturday

and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m.

through March 15. There are also weekdays

matinees at noon March 3 and 11.

Arena Stage’s temporary location is at

1800 South Bell Street in Crystal City.

Tickets are $25 - $66. Call 202-488-

33000 or log on to www.arenastage.org.

asylum from some unexplained

danger that has caused them to flee

their home just a short drive away.

Albee doesn’t concentrate on plot

so much as on the inner workings

of the characters’ minds. Not much

actually happens between the

opening and final lines of the

nearly three hour play, but in the

hands of these performers under

the direction of Pam MacKinnon,

the by-play of language and the

flow of emotions makes the

evening a memorable one.

Brad Hathaway reviews theater in Virginia,

Washington and Maryland as well

as Broadway, and edits Potomac Stages,

(www.PotomacStages.com). He can be

reached at Brad@PotomacStages.com.

child. Registration required, 703-228-

3403.

Music Performance. 9:30 p.m. at El

Gitano’s Restaurant and Lounge, 3528

168 th St. Hear SikSadState and

Overkast perform. $5/person.

SATURDAY/FEB. 28

Theater. 7:30 p.m. at Chalice Theatre

at Unitarian Universalist Church of

Arlington, 4444 Arlington Blvd. $15/

student; senior. $20/adult. Watch

See Calendar, Page 10

PORTABELLOS

An American Cafe

Lunch, Dinner and Sunday Brunch

Back by Popular Demand Prime Rib on Sunday

Come early! When it’s gone, it’s gone!

Wednesday and Sunday nights1/2 price bottle of wine*

15% Discount Discount with with this Ad

www.portabellos.net • portabellos@comcast.net

703-528-1557

Open weekdays 11:30 am - 2pm • 5pm - 9pm

Saturday 5pm - 9pm

2109 Pollard Street • Arlington, VA 22207 Sunday Brunch 11am - 2pm • Dinner 5pm - 9pm

*not to be combined with any other offer. Expires 03/31/09

Mom’s

Restaurant

(703) 920-7789

Appetizers • Calzones

Salads • Pizza • Gyros

Daily Specials

Homemade Soup

3255 Columbia Pike,

Arlington, VA

8 ❖ Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 www.ConnectionNewspapers.com www.ConnectionNewspapers.com

Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 ❖ 9

*

M-Th: 11 AM - 1 AM

F & Sat: 11 AM - 2 AM

Sun: 11 PM - Midnight

Pizza

Serving Greek & Italian Cuisine

Lunch & Dinner

Delivery Available

M-Th: 11 AM - 12:30 AM

F & Sat: 11 AM - 1:30 AM

On/Off ABC

License

Sun: 11 PM - 11:30 PM (Lunch & Dinner only)

www.momspizzaarlington.com

$ 12 95

2 Greek Salads

w/2 Pita Bread

Dine-in Only. Expires 03/31/09

$ 3 OFF

Any Large Pizza w/

2 or More Toppings

Dine-in Only. Expires 03/31/09


Calendar

From Page 9

“Big: The Musical.” 703-892-0202 ext. 6.

DC Hokies Chili Cook-Off. 1-5 p.m. at Yorktown

Bistro, 5171 Lee Highway. Local chili fanatics

will be dishing out their homemade recipes.

Enjoy music, raffles and more. All proceeds

benefit scholarships. $15/adult; $5/child. Visit

www.ncrhokies.org for more.

Creatures and Cultures of Canada. 2 p.m. at

Long Branch Nature Center, 625 S. Carlin

Springs Road. Children ages 8-11 can bring

artifacts and stories about Canada. Free.

Registration required, 703-228-6535.

Polar Bears. 4 p.m. at Long Branch Nature Center,

625 S. Carlin Springs Road. Children ages 5-9

can learn about these animals through games,

crafts and more. $2/child. Registration required,

703-228-6535.

Flying Squirrel Lore and More. 5:45-7 p.m. at

Long Branch Nature Center, 625 S. Carlin

Springs Road. Families can watch these animals

come in for dinner. $4/person. Registration

required, 703-228-6535.

Owl Moon. 6:30-8 p.m. at Gulf Branch Nature

Center, 3608 N. Military Road. Families with

children ages 6 and up can learn about these

animals and go on a walk. $2/person.

Registration required, 703-228-3403.

Beach Party. 8 p.m. at Crystal City Sports Pub,

529 S. 23 rd St. Washington Area Parrot Head

Club hosts a benefit for Alice Ferguson

Foundations. Best dressed awards. $10/person.

SUNDAY/MARCH 1

Theater. 3 p.m. at Chalice Theatre at Unitarian

Universalist Church of Arlington, 4444 Arlington

Blvd. $15/student; senior. $20/adult. Watch

“Big: The Musical.” 703-892-0202 ext. 6.

A Sky Full of Stars. 7:30 p.m. at Fort C.F. Smith

Park, 2411 N. 24th ST. Families with children

ages 7 and up can study the sky. $3/person.

Registration required, 703-228-6535.

Music Performance. 3 p.m. at Kenmore Middle

School, 200 S. Carlin Springs Road. Capital Wind

Symphony performs. $15/person; $10/senior.

Visit www.capitalwinds.org for more.

MONDAY/MARCH 2

Stars Tonight for March. 7:30 p.m. at David M.

Brown Planetarium, 1426 N. Quincy St. Enjoy a

tour of the stars. $3/adults; $2/senior, child.

Visit www.apsva.us/planetarium or 703-228-

6070.

Author Event. 7 p.m. at Central Library, 1015 N.

Quincy St. Gwen Ifill will discuss “The

Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of

Obama.” Free.

WEDNESDAY/MARCH 4

Bird Walk. 9-11 a.m. at Long Branch Nature

Center, 625 S. Carlin Springs Road. Adults can

search for migratory birds. Experienced and

beginner birders welcome. Free. 703-228-6535.

Rocks On My Block. 1:30 p.m. at Long Branch

Nature Center, 625 S. Carlin Springs Road.

Children ages 3-5 can learn about rocks through

stories. $5/child. To register, 703-228-6535.

Gemstone Club: Aquamarine. 2:30 p.m. or 4

p.m. at Gulf Branch Nature Center, 3608 N.

Military Road. Children ages 7-11 can learn

about this gemstone and take one home. $8/

person. Registration required, 703-228-3403.

THURSDAY/MARCH 5

Book Signing and Reading. 7 p.m. Arlington

Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Office of the

City of Reims present “Crossing Glances: Regards

Croises Arlington & Reims: Sister Cities” from

Jan. 23 through March 28 at Ellipse Arts Center,

4350 N. Fairfax Drive. Photographs by John

Babineau of Arlington and Cecile Bethleem of

Reims, France. Free. Visit www.arlingtonarts.org.

Tiny Tot. 10 a.m. at Gulf Branch Nature Center,

3608 N. Military Road. Children ages 18-35

months can learn about nature through walks,

stories and more. $3/child. To register, 703-228-

3403.

Rocks On My Block. 1:30 p.m. at Long Branch

Nature Center, 625 S. Carlin Springs Road.

Children ages 3-5 can learn about rocks through

stories and more. $5/child. Registration required,

703-228-6535.

Would you like to be Energy Smart, increase

your profits and help your clients save money

at the same time??

Register for the upcoming course near you:

Washington, DC Metropolitan Area:

When: March 19, 2009

Where: The Lyceum, Alexandria’s History Museum

201 South Washington St.

Alexandria VA 22314

What Time: 9:30 PM until 2:30 PM

Early Registration Fee is $85.00 before March 5th

After March 5th, Registration fee is $99.00

Virginia, Maryland, and DC agents will earn 4 “CE” credits

plus the designation.

There are no yearly membership dues for this designation.

Register at http://www.energysmartrealestatespecialists.com

Homeowners Welcome!

You may become eligible for a

free energy audit!

10 ❖ Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 www.ConnectionNewspapers.com


Home Sales

www.ConnectionNewspapers.com

01/01/09 ~ 01/30/09

Address ................................ BR FB HB . Postal City .. Sold Price .. Type ... Lot AC .............................. Subdivision

4014 25TH ST N ........................... 5 ... 4 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON .. $1,441,000 ... Detached ....... 0.17 ............................ LEE HEIGHTS

3650 SOUTH GLEBE RD#1048 .... 3 ... 2 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON .. $1,250,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors .. THE ECLIPSE ON CENTER PARK

419 LINCOLN ST .......................... 4 ... 3 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON .. $1,132,000 ... Detached ....... 0.36 .................... ASHTON HEIGHTS

6054 22ND RD N .......................... 5 ... 4 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON .. $1,120,000 ... Detached ....... 0.20 .................... OVER LEE KNOLLS

3508 ABINGDON ST ..................... 6 ... 3 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON .. $1,025,000 ... Detached ....... 0.45 .............. COUNTRY CLUB HILLS

1708 KENILWORTH ST N ............. 4 ... 3 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $910,000 ... Detached ....... 0.18 ..................... LEEWAY HEIGHTS

1856 CLARENDON BLVD .............. 3 ... 2 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $865,845 ... Townhouse .... 0.04 ... BROMPTONS AT COURTHOUSE

2343 VERNON ST N ..................... 5 ... 4 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $840,000 ... Detached ....... 0.33 ............................ LEE HEIGHTS

128 PARK DR N ............................. 4 ... 2 ... 2 ... ARLINGTON ..... $815,000 ... Detached ....... 0.14 ................ ARLINGTON FOREST

1530 KEY BLVD #928 ................... 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $806,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors .......................... ATRIUM CONDO

1080 CLEVELAND ST.................... 8 ... 6 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $800,000 ... Detached ....... 0.11 ................................ LYON PARK

1323 20TH ST S ............................ 3 ... 3 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $800,000 ... Detached ....... 0.29 .......................... AURORA HILLS

2317 QUEEN ST S......................... 3 ... 3 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $785,000 ... Townhouse .... 0.09 ........................... FOREST HILLS

4412 16TH ST N ........................... 4 ... 3 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $763,000 ... Detached ....... 0.27 ......................... WAVERLY HILLS

1406 21ST ST S ............................ 4 ... 2 ... 2 ... ARLINGTON ..... $760,000 ... Detached ....... 0.14 .......................... AURORA HILLS

2333 VAN BUREN CT .................... 3 ... 3 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $757,000 ... Townhouse .... 0.05 ...................... FENWICK COURT

2024 WESTMORELAND ST .......... 3 ... 2 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $745,000 ... Townhouse .... 0.03 ......................................... WEST

5305 10TH ST N ........................... 4 ... 4 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $740,000 ... Detached ....... 0.13 .......................... LACEY FOREST

504 THOMAS ST N #L ................. 3 ... 3 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $699,000 ... Townhouse .... 0.03 .......... THOMAS STREET MEWS

1020 N. HIGHLAND ST#824 ........ 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $687,500 ... Mid-Rise 5-8 Floors ........................... THE PHOENIX

1404 20TH ST S ............................ 4 ... 2 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $687,500 ... Detached ....... 0.14 .......................... AURORA HILLS

734 ALBEMARLE ST N .................. 4 ... 2 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $683,000 ... Detached ....... 0.14 ...................BRANDON VILLAGE

1816 21ST ST N #1816 ................ 3 ... 3 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $665,000 ... Townhouse ............................................. BEL ALTON

2044 OAKLAND ST N ................... 6 ... 2 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $650,000 ... Townhouse .... 0.03 .. BROMPTONS AT CHERRYDALE

1160 VERNON ST N ..................... 3 ... 2 ... 2 ... ARLINGTON ..... $644,900 ... Townhouse .... 0.02 .............. BALLSTON CROSSING

633 ILLINOIS ST ........................... 3 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $641,000 ... Detached ....... 0.17 ...................................... BONAIR

1530 KEY BLVD #924 ................... 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $640,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors .......................... ATRIUM CONDO

301 EMERSON ST N ..................... 3 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $625,000 ... Detached ....... 0.30 ................ ARLINGTON FOREST

1116 28TH ST S ............................ 5 ... 3 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $600,000 ... Detached ....... 0.21 ................................. OAKCREST

2114 MILITARY RD ....................... 4 ... 2 ... 2 ... ARLINGTON ..... $600,000 ... Townhouse .... 0.06 ............................. LAUDERDALE

3301 JOHN MARSHALL DR .......... 3 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $595,000 ... Detached ....... 0.23 .............................. MINOR HILL

2722 ARLINGTON RIDGE RD ....... 4 ... 3 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $580,000 ... Detached ....... 0.16 ................................. OAKCREST

2221 SOMERSET ST N ................. 4 ... 3 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $580,000 ... Townhouse .... 0.04 ................ SYCAMORE HEIGHTS

6492 LITTLE FALLS RD ................. 4 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $560,000 ... Detached ....... 0.18 ............ BERKSHIRE OAKWOOD

2117 MONROE ST S ..................... 6 ... 3 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $550,000 ... Detached ....... 0.12 ............. NAUCK GREEN VALLEY

4413 7TH ST N ............................. 2 ... 2 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $550,000 ... Townhouse .... 0.03 ..................... BALLSTON PLACE

3830 9TH ST N #301W ................ 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $545,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors .................. LEXINGTON SQUARE

3369 DINWIDDIE ST N ................. 3 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $529,000 ... Detached ....... 0.16 ........ COUNTRY CLUB MANORS

408 EDISON ST N ......................... 4 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $527,000 ... Detached ....... 0.24 ...................................... BONAIR

712 WAKEFIELD ST ...................... 4 ... 3 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $510,000 ... Detached ....... 0.23 ................................. BARCROFT

1205 GARFIELD ST N #807 ......... 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $509,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ........................ STATION SQUARE

5866 14TH ST N ........................... 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $468,400 ... Detached ....... 0.13 ................................ WESTOVER

3800 FAIRFAX DR #1205 ............. 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $468,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ............................ TOWER VILLAS

836 VEITCH ST ............................. 4 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $445,000 ... Detached ....... 0.13 .............. ARLINGTON HEIGHTS

3311 5TH ST S #3311 .................. 2 ... 2 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $440,000 ... Townhouse ...............................DOMINION SQUARE

3711 14TH ST S ............................ 3 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $430,000 ... Detached ....... 0.25 ....... DOUGLAS PARK NEW ARL.

2560C ARLINGTON MILL DR S#3 ... 2 ... 2 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $430,000 ... Townhouse ................................ WINDGATE OF ARL

1200 NASH ST N #255 ................ 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $420,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ...................... PROSPECT HOUSE

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4141 HENDERSON RD #1011 ..... 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $415,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors .................................. HYDE PARK

3205 STAFFORD ST S ................... 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $411,000 ... Townhouse ................................ FAIRLINGTON GRN

3191 STAFFORD ST S #387 ......... 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $411,000 ... Townhouse ................................ FAIRLINGTON GRN

1001 VERMONT ST N #122 ......... 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $402,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors .......... WESTVIEW AT BALLSTON

4629 30TH RD S #1910 ............... 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $401,000 ... Townhouse ................................... FAIRLINGTON VIL

900 STAFFORD ST N #1907 ........ 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $399,900 ... Penthouse .............................................. ALTA VISTA

851 GLEBE RD N #1409 ............... 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $395,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ............................. CONTINENTAL

3452 WAKEFIELD ST .................... 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $391,000 ... Townhouse ............................. FAIRLINGTON MEWS

2180 GLEBE RD S ......................... 3 ... 2 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $370,000 ... Townhouse .... 0.02 ............................... MILESTONE

3800 FAIRFAX DR #208 ............... 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $365,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ............................ TOWER VILLAS

1505 QUINCY ST S ....................... 3 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $362,000 ... Detached ....... 0.26 ....... DOUGLAS PARK NEW ARL.

851 GLEBE RD N #802 ................. 1 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $353,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ............................. CONTINENTAL

820 POLLARD ST #616 ................ 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $342,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ................................ HAWTHORN

820 POLLARD ST N #216 ............ 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $342,000 ... Other .................................................... HAWTHORN

820 POLLARD ST #105 ................ 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $342,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ................................ HAWTHORN

3047 COLUMBUS ST S #C1 ......... 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $340,000 ... Garden 1-4 Floors ............... FAIRLINGTON VILLAGE

1024 UTAH ST N #915 ................. 1 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $340,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors .......... WESTVIEW AT BALLSTON

820 POLLARD ST #316 ................ 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $340,000 ... Other .................................................... HAWTHORN

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851 GLEBE RD N #414 ................. 1 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $329,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ............................. CONTINENTAL

3825 9TH RD S #3825 ................. 2 ... 2 ... 2 ... ARLINGTON ..... $325,000 ... Townhouse .... 0.00 ...................... DUNDREE KNOLL

1530 KEY BLVD #601 ................... 1 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $318,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors .......................... ATRIUM CONDO

4167 FOUR MILE RUN DR S#202 .... 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $315,000 ... Garden 1-4 Floors ..... WEST VGE AT SHIRLINGTON

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1320 FORT MYER DR N #824 ...... 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $299,500 ... Garden 1-4 Floors ................ WESTMORELAND TER

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801 GREENBRIER ST S #420 ....... 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $299,000 ... Garden 1-4 Floors ......................................... SIERRA

2826 MEADE ST S #9................... 2 ... 2 ... 1 ... ARLINGTON ..... $298,900 ... Townhouse .... 0.00 ......................... OLDE FACTORY

1029 STUART ST N #506 ............. 1 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $295,000 ... Mid-Rise 5-8 Floors .................. SUMMERWALK I&II

1045 UTAH ST N #2-305.............. 1 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $292,750 ... Mid-Rise 5-8 Floors ......................WINDSOR PLAZA

2602 27TH RD S ........................... 3 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $289,900 ... Duplex .......... 0.08 ................................... PARKWAY

1011 ARLINGTON BLVD #918 ..... 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $270,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ............................... RIVER PLACE

801 GREENBRIER ST S #406 ....... 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $270,000 ... Mid-Rise 5-8 Floors ...................................... SIERRA

4724 29TH ST S #C2.................... 1 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $268,500 ... Garden 1-4 Floors ........................ FAIRLINGTON VIL

3600 GLEBE RD S #633W ............ 1 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $265,000 ... Mid-Rise 5-8 Floors ...... ECLIPSE ON CENTER PARK

809 OAK ST S ............................... 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $253,000 ... Townhouse .... 0.04 ................................. FOXCROFT

4500 FOUR MILE RUN DR S#318 .... 2 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $232,750 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ........................ CENTURY SOUTH

1301 ARLINGTON RIDGE RD S#504 . 0 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $213,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ............................. RIDGE HOUSE

3711 FOUR MILE RUN DR ........... 3 ... 3 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $200,000 ... Duplex .......... 0.06 ........ FORT BARNARD HEIGHTS

3722 KEMPER RD ......................... 3 ... 2 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $199,900 ... Semi-Detached0.06 ....... FORT BARNARD HEIGHTS

1011 ARLINGTON BLVD #605 ..... 1 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $192,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ............................... RIVER PLACE

5030 7TH RD S #101 ................... 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $170,117 ... Garden 1-4 Floors ............................... PARK SPRING

816 ARLINGTON MILL DR S#5-104 .. 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $167,000 ... Garden 1-4 Floors .................................. PARK GLEN

4600 FOUR MILE RUN DR S#338 .... 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $165,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ............................. THE CARLTON

4600 FOUR MILE RUN DR #641 .. 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $165,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ............................. THE CARLTON

104 GLEBE RD S ........................... 3 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $163,500 ... Semi-Detached0.06 ......................... GLEBE MANOR

1510 GEORGE MASON DR S #1 .. 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $150,000 ... Garden 1-4 Floors ................... GEORGE MASON VIL

5106 COLUMBIA PIKE #6 ............ 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $146,000 ... Garden 1-4 Floors ................... FREDERICK COURTS

5101 8TH RD S #105 ................... 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $139,500 ... Mid-Rise 5-8 Floors ................. COLUMBIA KNOLLS

2802B 16TH RD S #2802B ........... 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $135,000 ... Townhouse ............................... ARLINGTON COURT

1021 ARLINGTON BLVD #538 ..... 0 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $130,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ............................... RIVER PLACE

5101 8TH RD S #210 ................... 2 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $123,000 ... Mid-Rise 5-8 Floors ................. COLUMBIA KNOLLS

4600 FOUR MILE RUN DR S#409 .... 0 ... 1 ... 0 ... ARLINGTON ..... $115,000 ... Hi-Rise 9+ Floors ............................. THE CARLTON

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22213

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debfunk@connectionnewspapers.com

All listings due by Monday at 3 p.m.

Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 ❖ 11


Sports

Yorktown Yanked from Postseason Play

Cold shooting costs Arlington

schools in regional tournament.

By Mark Giannotto

The Connection

It had already been a long night for

the Yorktown girl’s basketball team

when senior Carla Manger stole a pass

at midcourt, went streaking in for

what looked to be an easy layup, only to

watch it precariously roll off the rim into

teammate LaNia Charity’s hands.

Charity proceeded to brick the follow-up

attempt as Westfield took control of the ball

and the remainder of Monday night’s Northern

Region tournament first-round matchup

between the two schools.

The muffed lay-ups were a fitting conclusion

to a 63-48 Yorktown loss in which the

Patriots couldn’t seem to get the lid off the

hoop.

“We just could not make a shot,” said

coach Kim Cordell after her team went 16for-49

from the field. “We got a lot of offensive

rebounds, a lot of opportunities,

they just weren’t falling for us.”

Yorktown (14-10 overall, 9-5 National)

is now eliminated from the regional tournament

and can only wait until next year

to exact some form of revenge.

The Patriots had a huge size advantage

on the interior with six players listed at 5foot-9

or taller and took advantage of it on

the glass, led by junior Lindiwe Rennert

(eight rebounds). But Westfield (18-8) had

a gameplan of its own to offset the Patriots’

rebounding edge. The Bulldogs run a spread

out, Princeton-style offense heavy on pickand-rolls

that forced many of Yorktown’s in-

terior players to guard on

the perimeter.

It didn’t help that the

Patriots’ star player and

first-team all-National

District selection, Charity

(team-high 15 points),

was saddled with three

fouls in the first half,

forcing her to start the

second half on the bench.

“It definitely changed

things because she’s such

a strong player on both

ends,” said Cordell.

Still, the loss wasn’t all

for naught for Charity,

Manger (six points), and

the rest of the Yorktown

senior class. A year after

taking the Patriots all the

way to the regional semifinals,

this senior class

can say they helped bring

Yorktown back to the

upper echelon of the National

District.

Still, they harbored

dreams of getting to this

Friday’s semifinals yet again. For now, all

they can do is wonder what could have been

if it weren’t for an off shooting night.

“I think once everything starts sinking in,

I’ll finally look back, maybe cry a little bit,

seeing how well I’ve done and how well the

program has done,” said Charity.

Those pesky rims also caused havoc in the

Yorktown senior LaNia Charity had a

team-high 15 points Monday against

Westfield, while fighting through foul

trouble throughout.

ESPN Comes to O’Connell

Knights’ nationally televised game with DeMatha

last Tuesday was quite the spectacle.

Northern Region boy’s first-round matchup

between Wakefield and Westfield that

followed the girl’s game. Wakefield was

missing its own star, Johnathan Ford (19.4

ppg), after the senior picked up two technical

fouls in the team’s National District

Tournament semifinal loss to Stuart. VHSL

rules stipulate that an ejected player must

Arlington Connection Sports Editor Mark Giannotto

703-917-6409 or mgiannotto@connectionnewspapers.com

Wakefield senior Corey Levenberry goes up

for a shot during his team’s 53-43 loss to

Westfield.

miss his or her’s next game.

As a result the Warriors scored just one

basket in the first quarter and 10 points the

entire first half en route to a 53-43 loss to

Westfield. Wakefield made runs during the

second and fourth quarters, but they were

always answered by the Bulldog duo of

See Season Ends, Page 13

By Mark Giannotto the Knights and Stags did battle 9 p.m. tipoff.

The Connection in front of a raucous O’Connell “Atmosphere-wise, this was sec-

If the huge television production

truck idling outside the

Bishop O’Connell gym wasn’t

crowd and a national television

audience watching on ESPNU.

“Everyone has been going crazy,

I’ve never seen this many people

ond to none,” said ESPN analyst

and director of scouting for Scouts,

Inc. Paul Biancardi. “I think this

ranks up there with any game

enough of a clue that something at a game,” said O’Connell student we’ve had.” To set-up for the game,

out of the ordinary was going on and spectator, senior Billy ESPN officials did what they call

at the Arlington private school last McCarthy. According to McCarthy, a “sight-and-survey” in the weeks

Tuesday night, those in attendance tickets went on sale at 9 a.m. the leading up to the contest, where ESPN analyst Paul Biancardi was at Bishop O’Connell

only had to turn the corner to- previous Thursday and were sold they took pictures and notes of the High School last Tuesday night as part of the network’s

wards the gym doors to have their out within the hour. “This game, O’Connell gym to determine Old Spice High School Showcase. The Knights’ game

suspicions confirmed.

you just didn’t want to miss it,” he where all their equipment would against DeMatha was played in front of a packed house

On the entrance were two big said.

go.

and was broadcast to a national audience.

signs that read “Game Sold Out,”

The O’Connell athletic depart-

while extra tickets to the pivotal ALTHOUGH THE KNIGHTS ment built temporary scaffolding sor banners hanging throughout. ready made up. For last Tuesday,

WCAC regular season game about ended the night on a losing note that took up parts of one side of The hardest part, though, is get- producer Darren Chiappetta had

to begin inside between O’Connell after falling to DeMatha, 64-53, it the gym’s bleachers to hold ESPN’s ting relevant information about to literally send out questionnaires

and rival DeMatha were being did nothing to dampen the mood main cameras. The production everyone involved. When broad- to each player. There was also a

purchased for four and sometimes of the filled-to-the-brim gym. Stu- crew had the same amount of camcasting college games, ESPN has conference call with both

five times face value.

dents began tailgating soon after eras it would for a standard col- the benefit of sports information O’Connell coach Joe Wootton and

It was all part of ESPN’s Old school ended and filled their seclege game. There was also a make- departments that have all sorts of DeMatha’s Mike Jones before

Spice High School Showcase, as tion almost three hours before the shift announcing table with spon- stats, media guides, and bios al- See On ESPN, Page 13

12 ❖ Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 www.ConnectionNewspapers.com

Photos by Craig Sterbutzel/The Connection

Photo by Craig Sterbutzel/The Connection


Sports

Season Ends

From Page 12

guard Jacob Ryder (19 points) and 6-foot-

7 center Chris Kearney (13 points, six rebounds,

six blocks).

Seniors Robel Getu (15 points), Romeo

Goffney (eight points), and Corey

Levenberry (six points, nine rebounds) led

Wakefield. After a disappointing 8-14 record

a year ago, the Warriors started the season

winning nine of their first 10 games.

Wakefield (17-8 overall, 9-4 National) then

closed the regular season with wins in six

of its last seven games. “You can’t replace

20 points a night,” said coach Tony Bentley.

“When the ball is in (Ford’s) hands, all the

others look to him. Tonight when a guy had

the ball, (Westfield) didn’t have to concentrate

on one guy.”

THE YORKTOWN BOY’S team also came

out on the short end of its first-round regional

tournament game, losing to

Chantilly, 62-47. The Patriots were led by

seniors Simon Kilday (10 points) and Will

Carey (nine points).

Yorktown (13-12, 10-5) started the year

losing four of its first five, but improved as

the season went along. The team was once

again solid in district play.

On ESPN

From Page 12

hand.

The one thing that is great about these

venues is sometimes they’re tough for television,

but as you saw in there [last Tuesday],

it’s such an intimate atmosphere and

such a great environment that I think on

TV it looks as good or better than a professional

stadium,” said Chiappetta.

There were so many different storylines

heading into last Tuesday night’s pivotal

WCAC boy’s basketball game between

O’Connell and rival DeMatha, it’s no wonder

ESPN’s cameras decided to make their

presence known on the Arlington campus.

Wootton’s father, Morgan, is one of the

most legendary high school coaches ever,

having won 1,274 games as head coach at

DeMatha, which included four seasons

coaching his son. Meanwhile current

DeMatha coach Mike Jones was teammates

with Joe Wootton at DeMatha and the two

graduated together in 1991. Not to mention

both teams happen to be two of the

best in the area and the country.

DeMatha’s Quinn Cook had a game-high

25 points, 19 of which came in the second

half, to help secure the victory for the Stags

— their second win over the Knights this

season. O’Connell’s Kendall Marshall had 14

points, while sophomore Jordan Burgess

added in 13 points and seven rebounds.

“It’s great for the game of basketball when

you can get high school games on TV,” said

Marshall, a junior who is committed to play

at North Carolina. “It gets us some nice exposure

and it’s fun. We got a lot of people

to come out to support us and it was a great

feeling out there.” As a result of the loss,

O’Connell (21-7 overall, 14-4 WCAC) will

now have the No. 3 seed in this weekend’s

WCAC Tournament.

www.ConnectionNewspapers.com

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‘Total’

Confusion

By KENNETH B. LOURIE

Recently, my wife Dina, was in a car accident

on Rock Creek Park in Washington,

D.C., through no fault of her own, admitted

to on the scene by the other driver.

Fortunately, no one was hurt. However,

Dina’s car appears to have been “totaled.” At

present, two weeks after the accident, we’re

still waiting for both sides to adjust/agree on

the car’s assessment and therein lies the

confusion.

Both companies, brand name insurers of

unquestioned and unparalleled integrity,

have reacted quickly to their respective client’s

call-ins. So quickly, in fact, that neither

company has had the real-time information

in as timely a manner as we have since the

claims process has been tended to with the

utmost care and concern. What I mean is,

Dina (as the driver) and yours truly (as the

owner) are both receiving calls from both

insurers seeking information and status concerning

what action has been taken (car

seen/adjusted, car towed, where towed; and

hearing who else had to determine what in

order for all interested parties — insurers and

insureds — to agree) or still needs to be

taken, all in an extremely efficient and

responsive pursuit of the truth, justice and

settlement of the pending claim and ultimate

disbursement of funds.

The problem is that both insurers’ proactiveness

has caused Dina and I to act cautiously,

so cautiously in fact that, two weeks

after the accident, no decision has been

made; no repairs have been authorized, and

of course, no settlement has been offered.

Let me amend that. A settlement offer was

made to me by my insurance company.

However, when I told the other driver’s

insurance company’s claims person of my

company’s offer, she balked at its legitimacy,

so to speak, because she said that her company’s

adjuster hadn’t even seen the car yet.

As a result, rather than upset the other

driver’s insurance company, who I had

hoped would settle with my insurance company

— and its subrogation department, and

include my $1,000 collision deductible in

the “total” check, I called my insurance company

and withdrew my consent to their settlement

offer, paperwork concerning which I

had not yet “over-nighted” due to the crisscrossing

of customer service/claims phone

calls we were still both continuing to receive.

When I advised my car insurance company’s

claims representative of this decision/further

delay, she was a bit perturbed (I

realize it was costing them money; storage

fees, no sale at auction, etc.) and asked what

insurer I wanted to “ go through” to settle

this claim. I replied that I didn’t preferrably

want to “go through” anybody (my insurance

company versus the other driver’s), I simply

wanted to involve all the parties that, based

on the number and variety of insurance

company phone calls that Dina and I were

receiving, sounded like I was supposed to, to

facilitate the claim. At the very least, I

thought, both sides needed to have an equal

opportunity to gather all the information

deemed appropriate/necessary to assess the

damage/make a settlement offer (what do I

know?). Given her attitude, apparently, I

wasn’t supposed/expected to do that.

I guess I was supposed to do what my

insurance company advised me to do.

Whatever confusion I was experiencing,

whatever cross-communicating we were still

receiving, would all be sorted out at settlement,

if and when a final offer was made,

and I should let the professionals work it all

out on my behalf.

And though it all still sounded reasonable,

I couldn’t help wondering exactly who wants

to know what and why, and how all of it

effects Dina and me, and what’s all the rush

anyway?

Kenny Lourie is an Advertising Representative for

The Almanac & The Connection Newspapers.

Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 ❖ 13


Zone 6: • Arlington • Great Falls

• McLean • Vienna/Oakton

Classified

21 Announcements 21 Announcements 21 Announcements

21 Announcements

ABC LICENSE

Velocity Five, LLC trading as

Velocity Five Sports

Restaurant, 2300 Clarendon

Boulevard, Arlington, VA

22201. The above establishment

is applying to the

VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE

CONTROL for a wine & beer

on premises, mixed beverages

on premises license to sell or

manufacture alcoholic

beverages.

Jerry Burkot,

Chief Operating Officer

26 Antiques

We consign/pay top $ for

antique/semi antique furn.

including mid century &

danish modern Teak

furniture, sterling, mens

watches, painting/art glass,

clocks, jewelry, costume

jewelry, etc. Call Schefer

Antiques @ 703-241-0790.

29 Misc. for Sale

Antique Mahogany Buffet

completely refinished, perfect

condition $600, Antique Walnut

Ladies Rocker with inlay

detail and cane seat & back

completely refinished $125,

Antique Wicker Baby Buggy

late 1800's perfect condition,

completely refinished, has new

lining excellent shape $250,

Antique Maple Child's Bed

English late 1800's, all legs

and guard rails are turned,

very unique piece, completely

refinished and perfect condition

$1500. Please call or

email me for photos & info

703-868-1461 or

tamralea@gmail.com

703-917-6400

Zone 6 Ad Deadline:

Monday Noon

2 To Share

Bluemont Hm to Shr-Horses

& Pets OK $700/mo 540-554-

4540 owners.com/daj6284

Bluemont, home to shr, 12

acres horses & pets ok.

www.owners.com/daj6284

101 Computers

HDI

EASY COMPUTER SOLUTIONS

FOR INDIVIDUALS

& SMALL BUSINESSES

JENNIFER O. SMITH

COMPUTER CONSULTANT

➣ TRAINING

➣ INSTALLATION

➣ TROUBLE-

SHOOTING

➣ LET US TAME THAT

BEAST FOR YOU

Serving Area Since 1995

(703) 765-2222

JSMITHHDI@aol.com

PERSONAL

COMPUTER

SERVICES

for Individuals &

Small Businesses

✓ Advice on Equipment

✓ Set Up and Configuration

✓ Installation

✓ Troubleshooting

✓ Tutorials and Instruction

✓ General Help

ComputerMan

703-535-3254

bob@rstarcomputerman.com

21 Announcements 21 Announcements

Foster Care/Adoption:

Make a difference in the life of a child

who needs you.

Be a foster or adoptive parent and help a child and

provide a stable, loving home. Generous monthly

stipend; 24-hour support; ongoing training provided.

Call Phillips Teaching Homes, (703) 941-3471 ext.

217, for more information or visit our website.

www.phillipsprograms.org Training starts soon.

E-mail: classified@connectionnewspapers.com

Home & Garden

CLEANING CLEANING

Y & Y CLEANING

13 yrs Exp.

Excellent Refs,

Guaranteed Satisfaction,

Call Yamilet

703-967-7412

ELECTRICAL ELECTRICAL

George Ruben

Electrical & Handyman

Services

Serving No. Va. for 20 Years

703-408-0431

Licensed & Insured

GUTTER GUTTER

Metro Gutter

Clean/Install/Repair

• Wood Replace & Wrapping • Pressure Washing

• Chimney Sweeping & Repair

20 YEARS EXP.

703-354-4333

metrogutter.com

PINNACLE SERVICES, INC.

LAWN SERVICE

MOWING, TRIMMING,

EDGING, MULCHING

& TRIM HEDGES

Group Rates Avail.!

703-802-0483

HANDYMAN HANDYMAN

SMALL SCALE HOME REPAIR

•Need rebuilt porch steps?

•Threshold(s) replaced?

•Want wood shelves built?

connectionnewspapers.com

•Rotten or damaged siding?

•Sash cord replacement.

•Hand railing installed.

Other fixes offered

Please save this ad

CONTRACTORS.com

D. Gudenkauf

H 703-532-8175 • C 703-216-8320

IMPROVEMENTS IMPROVEMENTS

M. C. Lynch

Home Improvement

Family Owned & Opererated

Rotten Wood, Wind Damage, Trims,

Windows, Doors, Deck, Stairs, Vanity,

Basement Framing, Garbage Disposal,

Painting, Power Wash, Siding Repairs.

Licensed, Bonded, Insured

703-266-1233

R.N. CONTRACTORS, INC.

Remodeling Homes, Flooring,

Kitchen & Bath, Windows,

Siding, Roofing, Additions &

Patios, Custom Deck, Painting

We Accept All Major Credit Cards

Licensed, Insured, Bonded • Free Estimates

Phone: 703-887-3827 Fax: 703-803-3849

E-mail: rncontractorsinc@yahoo.com

703-917-6400

Zone 6 Ad Deadline:

Monday Noon

CLEANING

A CLEANING

SERVICE

Since 1985/Ins & Bonded

Quality Service

at a Fair Price

Satisfaction Guaranteed

Comm/Res. MD VA DC

acleaningserviceinc.com

703-892-8648

MaryClean On Call

Organizing Closets, Garages,

Laundry and Quick Clean Up,

Doing Groceries, Bookkeeping

with QuickBooks / Excel, Pick-up

Children after School or Activities

24/hrs

703-200-9194

ELECTRICAL

DISCOUNT ELECTRIC

Jan/Feb Discount

$48/HR.

✓Free Estimates ✓Licensed

✓Bonded ✓Insured

703-978-2813

Cell 703-851-8091

GUTTER

PINNACLE SERVICES,

•GUTTER CLEANING

•SMALL REPAIRS

•SCREENING

•POWER

WASHING

703-802-0483

GROUP RATES

AVAILABLE

FREE EST

HAULING

AL’S HAULING

Junk & Rubbish

Concrete, furn.,office,

yard, construction debris

Low Rates NOVA

703-360-4364

MASONRY

JDF Masonry CO, LLC

703-283-9479

703-455-0319

◆Bricks ◆Blocks,

◆Flagstone ◆Concrete

◆Retaining Walls

Free Est. Lic & Ins.

Affordable Prices

IMPROVEMENTS

The

HANDYMAN

A DIVISION OF NURSE CONSTRUCTION

HOME INSPECTION LIST

REPAIRS, CERAMIC TILE,

PAINTING, DRYWALL,

CARPENTRY, CUSTOM

WOOD REPAIR, LT. PLUMBING &

ELECTRICAL, POWER WASHING

Since 1964

We Accept VISA/MC

703-441-8811

If tomorrow

were never to

come, it would

not be worth

living today.

-Dagobert Runes

14 ❖ Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 www.ConnectionNewspapers.com


Zone 6: • Arlington • Great Falls

• McLean • Vienna/Oakton

IMPROVEMENTS PAINTING

KITCHEN &

BATH DESIGN

Refacing,

Facelifts,

Basements,

Decks, Porches

MichaelsRemodeling.com

703-764-9563

Since 1979 Free Est.

Bigsculpture.org

Class A Lic. Insured

LANDSCAPING

A&S

LANDSCAPING

Spring Clean-up•Planting

Mulching • Sodding • Patios

Decks • Retaining Walls

Drainage Solutions

703-863-7465

ANGEL’S

TREE & HEAVY

TRASH HAULING

•Mulch

•Clean-up Grounds

•Leaf Removal

703-863-1086

New#- 571-312-7227

PAINTING

PLOUTIS PAINTING

& CONTRACTING

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING

GENERAL CARPENTRY & MORE

OVER 48 YEARS EXPERIENCE

*FREE ESTIMATES

Mention Ad for 10% Discount

703-360-1215

WWW.PLOUTISPAINTING.COM

IMPROVEMENTS IMPROVEMENTS

STRONG PACE CONSTRUCTION

15 Yrs Class A VA Lic.

• Additions •Kitchens

• Basements •Comm Offices

•Decks •Painting •Drywall

•Windows & Wood Repairs

703-644-5206 • 703-750-0749

www.ConnectionNewspapers.com

Home & Garden

A&S Construction

• Basement Finishing

• Retaining Walls • Patios

• Decks • Porches (incl.

screened) • Erosion &

Grading Solutions

• French Drains • Sump Pumps

• Driveway Asphalt Sealing

www.Patriot Painting.net

Deep Winter

Discounts

Free Est. • Satisfaction Guar.!

Lic./Ins. Int./Ext.

703-502-7840

Cell

571-283-4883

ROOFING

Roofing & Siding

(All Types)

Soffit & Fascia Wrapping

New Gutters

Chimney Crowns

Leaks Repaired

No job too small

703-975-2375

TREE SERVICE

ANGEL’S

TREE & HEAVY

TRASH HAULING

•Mulch

•Clean-up Grounds

•Leaf Removal

703-863-1086

New#- 571-312-7227

I am easily

satisfied with

the very best.

-Winston Churchill

703-863-7465

LICENSED

connectionnewspapers.com

CONTRACTORS.com

•Patios •Walkways

•Retaining Walls

•Drainage Problems

•Landscape Makeovers

Call: 703-912-6886

Free Estimates

703-917-6400

Zone 6 Ad Deadline:

Monday Noon

LAWN SERVICE LAWN SERVICE

J.E.S Services

LANDSCAPE & CONSTRUCTION

MASONRY MASONRY

MOTTERN MASONRY DESIGN

Specializing in Custom

Stone and Brick Walkways, Patios,

& Small and Large Repairs

Licensed, Insured

• Free estimates • All work guaranteed •

www.motternmasonry.com

Phone 703-496-7491

PAINTING PAINTING

C&M PAINTING

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR

PAINTING

DRYWALL REPAIR

WALLPAPER REMOVAL

Licensed Insured Bonded FREE ESTIMATES

703-250-4241

FALL SPECIAL

10% to 20% OFF All Services

Nuance Painting Inc.

Family Owned and Operated

Serving Northern Virginia for Over a Decade

Winner of American Painting Contractors

Residential Top Job Award

Residential and Commercial Services

• Interior and Exterior Painting

• Faux Finishing

• Drywall Hanging, Finishing and Repairs

• Interior Moldings Crown-Chair Rail-Shadow Boxing

• Exterior Trim Repair/Replacement

• Decks cleaned and Sealed

• General Contractor Services

• For Evaluation and Consultation Call

703-437-3037

Licensed Insured

On the web at www.nuancepainting.com

We Accept

ROOFING ROOFING

St. Joseph’s Roofing, Inc.

“For the discerning homeowner

set on getting their roof right”

10% OFF tree removal service

Licensed, Bonded, Insured • Class A #020751A

FREE Estimates! 703-716-7663

1000’s of local references at WWW.SJROOF.COM

From Page 6

News

Crystal Couture Festival Arrives

ture did a 180-degree turn for

Wedding Wednesday. Wedding

gowns hung in the entrance

with lights below them, boutiques

stood next to each other,

bridesmaid dresses were worn

by participants, couture cupcakes

and champagne were partaken.

Women, mostly brides-tobe,

walked around quietly, keeping

to themselves and examining

the boutiques’ accessories

for sale. The music was subtle

but still made many sway their

shoulders and smile at one another.

Bridal fashion runways

were provided by designers,

bridal magazines were distributed

and hair and make-up was

done for free to those interested.

Beth Cullen, a resident of

Clarendon, had heard about the

event through her mom. “I was coming expecting

clothes and jewelry. I wanted a better

idea of boutiques in the area and I love

the cupcakes,” Cullen said.

The women outnumbered the men. In the

crowd, Lee Bacon and Arman Stewart

browsed boutiques together, laughing at

each other as they conversed with boutique

owners. Asked their reason for coming,

Bacon said, “I have a friend that is helping

It is

neither

wealth

nor

splendor,

but tranquility

and

occupation,

which

give happiness.

—Thomas

Jefferson

Brooke Keplinger, left, and Ann Nguyen,

both 26, attended the TAT-Tuesday fashion

event last week.

out with this event so Lee and I decided to

come and support him.”

Bacon said, “We had no idea it was a

bridal fashion show. However, this is really

interesting and we have gained a lot.”

Stewart nodded and said, “This was rather

astonishing. In fact, quite interesting with

a variety of people and a variety of booths

and I like how it all touches different facets

of wedding planning,”

Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 ❖ 15

Photo by Emma Gonzalez/The Connection


16 ❖ Arlington Connection ❖ February 25 - March 3, 2009 www.ConnectionNewspapers.com

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